MORE OF YOUR INCREDIBLE PICTURES OF DONEGAL IN THE AUTUMN SUN

first_imgYOUR pictures have been coming in thick and fast.So here’s a few more of them.We are keeping the competition open for a few more hours so keep them coming to [email protected] Pic above: Muckish from Marble Hill by Pauline Edwards.Below: Crohy Tower, Maghery by Stephen Gallagher.Heavenly Sky by Louise Doherty Above: Below: Malin Beach by Pauline DohertyMichael Glynn took the next one below in Glenties:Damian Callaghan took this scene below at Glebe House.And Sunrise over Raphoe by Liam Porter Below:MORE OF YOUR INCREDIBLE PICTURES OF DONEGAL IN THE AUTUMN SUN was last modified: November 23rd, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegal in the autumn sundonegaldaily.com picture competitionlast_img read more

Hair Makes You Bigger and Warmer

first_imgScientists found that hair increases a beast’s surface area by a factor of 100.“The hairier it is, the larger the creature’s true surface area,” Science Daily says. “In fact, the team says it’s 100 times greater than its skin surface area.”Hair insulates the creature, keeping it warm. But you may be surprised to learn, according to Live Science, that mammals are not the hairiest of creatures. Researchers at Georgia Tech estimate that luna moths and butterflies have 10 billion hairs, compared to 3 million on a squirrel.Summing the combined surface area of skin and hair increases the total surface area dramatically. A house cat, for instance, has the surface area of a ping-pong table. A honeybee grows to the size of a piece of toast. The mammal surface-area champion mentioned in the article is the sea otter. Its dense hair gives it a total surface area the size of a hockey rink.The Georgia Tech team is particularly interested in how animals clean their hair. It’s giving them ideas for biomimetics. Different animals use active or passive methods:“Dogs shake water off their backs, just like a washing machine,” said Amador, who recently graduated. “Bees use bristled appendages to brush pollen off their eyes and bodies. Fruit flies use hairs on their head and thorax to catapult dust off of them at accelerations of up to 500 times Earth’s gravity.“Other animals and insects use more efficient, renewable cleaning tactics.“They don’t do anything extra to stay clean. It just happens,” said Amador.Eyelashes, for example, protect mammals by minimizing airflow and funneling particles away from eyes. Cicadas have sharp points on their wings that act as pincushions, essentially popping airborne bacteria like water balloons.These strategies may inspire self-cleaning technologies for drones, Mars rovers or machines that need to operate in dusty environments.Very interesting research, but the articles didn’t mention the various functions of hair. Many mammals seem comfortable in both summer and winter with full coats of hair, so there must be more going on than just warmth. Have you considered how your eyelashes protect your eyes, and eyebrows provide some protection from bright sun?  (Think of how extra black is smeared on to prevent snow blindness.)Watch this cat video to see how hair may provide cats a soft landing when frightened.Presumably individual humans’ surface areas can vary dramatically depending on how they cut their hair, and whether men are bald or bearded. (Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Sandeepa Dhar turns bold for a photoshoot

first_imgSandeepa Dhar, the new Bollywood hottie is finding her place in the list of bold and beautiful of Bollywood. Sandeepa, who made her debut with Rajshri Production’s Hindi film, Isi Life Mein recently got a hot photoshoot done.In the shoot, Sandeepa was mostly seen in hot pants and low neck short tops. She also sported flowy high-slit gowns.She was nominated for the Filmfare Award for Best Female Debut, Star Screen Award for Most Promising Newcomer and Stardust Award for Superstar of Tomorrow.last_img read more

Navi Mumbai cricket fan becomes October’s first ESPNStar Super Selector

first_imgWINNER WALINJKAR (RIGHT) WITH NASEERUDDIN SHAHIt took a Navi Mumbai cricket fan to beat Sunil Gavaskar, Geoffrey Boycott and 1,18,000 others and emerge as the first ESPNStar Super Selector for October. How did 28-year-old Amit Walinjkar, with experience of Mumbai school and college cricket behind him, get the better of,WINNER WALINJKAR (RIGHT) WITH NASEERUDDIN SHAHIt took a Navi Mumbai cricket fan to beat Sunil Gavaskar, Geoffrey Boycott and 1,18,000 others and emerge as the first ESPNStar Super Selector for October. How did 28-year-old Amit Walinjkar, with experience of Mumbai school and college cricket behind him, get the better of all the gurus?First, he made clever choices and secondly – thus proving the merits of reading the fine print and our selection tips – he was smart enough to substitute under performers without fear or favour. Take a look at his picks and his drops, read our tips and let your game begin.WALINJKAR’S WINNING XI Gary Kirsten Sachin Tendulkar Nick Knight Virender Sehwag Grant Flower Andrew FlowerJacques Kallis Shaun Pollock Makhaya Ntini Matthew Hoggard Martin Suji Meanwhile, Walinjkar will fly to Centurion near Johannesburg for the third Test between South Africa and India and share the commentary box with Gavaskar and Boycott.That should be incentive enough for you to become an ESPNStar Super Selector. To prove your cricketing knowledge and start on your own selectorial journey, log on to www.espnstar.com. Now!Smart TipsDon’t spend money picking late-middle-order batsmen from top-class sides like Australia or South Africa for one-dayers. With just 50 overs to go, you aren’t going to get too many overs on a consistent basis.In Test matches, a class bowler in an otherwise mediocre attack is always a better pick than a class bowler in a class side. Muttiah Muralitharan takes 38 per cent of the wickets for Sri Lanka in Tests. Neither Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath nor Jason Gillespie average more than 26 per cent.Dogged MythsadvertisementThe myth is that one Test match makes for two ODIs for a batsman. Our analysis shows that an average of 439 runs are scored by both teams in a normal ODI match. Compare that to 997 for a Test match and you have a ratio closer to 1:2.25 rather than 1:2. Go for that Test batsman.Watch current form. It often inflates a player’s value. You should be looking at the opposition and the conditions. Harbhajan Singh could have cleaned out Australia at home, but he was never likely to do the same in Zimbabwe.last_img read more