Avoiding Family Farm Conflict

first_imgAs you know, managing a successful farm takes time, strategy and a little luck. Farmers need a remarkable capacity for planning years into the future despite an incalculable number of variables. Facebook Twitter By Hoosier Ag Today – Apr 27, 2012 Bequeath the farm to family members who have chosen to remain active in the operation.Purchase a life insurance policy on your life. Name off-farm family members as beneficiaries of the policy. (Or let inactive children purchase a policy while you gift the premiums using annual gift tax exclusions.)Use life insurance proceeds to provide an inheritance for family members who have decided to pursue other careers. Creating a “separate but equal” solution.Life insurance provides a straightforward solution to this difficult problem. Here’s how: Larry DykesBy Larry W. Dykes, CLU, ChFC, AAMS Beyond transferring assets to your loved ones in the manner you wish, transition planning allows you to:Avoid conflictProvide estate liquidityHelp cover debtHelp supplement retirementRealize philanthropic goals 70% of first-generation operations do not successfully transition to the next generation.90% of second-generation operations do not make it to the third generation.96% of third-generation operations do not survive to a fourth generation. Almost everyone owns assets that cannot be easily divided. This is particularly true of farmers who have spent a lifetime building a business largely made up of nonliquid assets. This legacy—the farm—is a particularly challenging estate asset when it comes time to transfer the operation to heirs. SHARE Home News Feed Avoiding Family Farm Conflict Unless you are not planning to die or retire, you will need to apply the same kind of careful planning to your financial future—to devise a strategy for the day when the farm is passed on to the next generation. Without planning, you increase your chances of becoming one of the following statistics: Passing along the operation . . . and everything else you own.The farm is almost certainly the biggest asset in the estate. So let’s imagine for a moment a farmer with three children—only one of whom is working the land. What’s the best way to divide the operation among children with very different wants and needs? Previous articleIFB President Don Villwock talked with Gary Truitt about the Farm Bill and Department of Labor rule withdrawal.Next articleIndiana Congressman Pleased with Farm Labor Announcement Hoosier Ag Today SHARE Of course, one of the keys to making this arrangement work is to discuss your plans with your children and explain the reasoning behind the choices you’ve made. A child who might otherwise feel slighted is more likely to accept the decision coming directly from you, especially when all of the children understand that you’ve taken enormous care to provide for each of them in an equitable way. Although inheritances may not be identical, they can be equitable—which keeps family members on the farm and peace within the family. Avoiding Family Farm Conflict Give each child an equal share of the operation. This may sound fair on the surface, but it can lead to unimaginable conflicts. The child working the land will need to keep the operation whole to continue farming efficiently, but he or she may not have the money to buy out off-farm siblings. The situation could quickly grow complicated both financially and emotionally.Give each child an equal share of the estate. This is easier said than done because the farm is likely worth much, much more than any of the estate’s other assets. Balancing the value of inheritances among family members by bequeathing the operation to one and the liquid assets to the others would likely not provide equality and would probably result in bitterness and resentment by the off-farm family members. Facebook Twitter Dividing the indivisible.Inevitably, death presents multiple opportunities for conflict. This can be especially disruptive when heirs’ expectations clash with estate realities. Disputes may also arise if directives in your will take loved ones by surprise, if your choices don’t make sense to your family, or if incomplete planning produces unintended consequences.last_img read more

University of Vermont Extension Names Associate Directors

first_imgUniversity of Vermont Extension Names Associate DirectorsUniversity of Vermont Extension recently announced that Gary Deziel has become the new associate director for statewide Staff Support and Operations and Rick LeVitre has become the new associate director for statewide Faculty Support and Evaluation. Deziel will concentrate on expanding the viability and impact of local University of Vermont offices, aligning Extension staff and programs to enhance efficiency of operations that will support programs focusing on emerging and critical issues facing Vermont. He will also be facilitating organizational and individual staff development. UVM Extension has local offices in 11 of 14 counties in Vermont, with the state office located at UVM. With a strong background in communications, research, and operations, Deziel has been chair of the Northwest Region, based in St. Albans, since 2001. He earned an MBA degree from the University of Vermont in 2005. He is looking forward to working with the approximately 60 staff members located across the state in local offices.LeVitre’s duties will include supporting 18 field faculty located in local UVM Extension offices across the state with programs that focus on helping individuals and groups cultivate healthy communities. This work includes supporting local government officials, agricultural enterprises, and supporting other local programs aimed at helping individuals. His work to link University of Vermont Extension faculty with other University faculty and staff on campus will expand UVM’s impact in serving local community needs, and facilitate program partnerships with other departments, agencies, and organizations. LeVitre will also work to establish and maintain linkages with local legislators on the important educational issues that can be impacted with UVM outreach programs.Presently chair of the Southern Region, LeVitre has served Extension for more than 25 years, working as a 4-H youth specialist, a farm manager, a regional faculty member, a sustainable agricultural specialist, and a legislative liaison and regional chair, working with faculty and program staff in the areas of natural resources, nutrition, agriculture, and youth programming.Both associate directors will work out of the new location for the University of Vermont State Extension Office in Colchester, just off I89, Exit 16. For more information, call (802) 656-2990. -30-last_img read more

48 Hours in Fayetteville, West Virginia

first_imgUsually, if you want to check an adrenaline-rushing, heart-pumping natural adventure off your bucket list, you have to travel to a place that doesn’t have much else to offer except that specific excursion. But what if I told you there is a town where you don’t have to sacrifice one thrill for another; a town with some of the best mountain biking trails, diverse miles of rock climbing, class V whitewater expeditions, hiking, zip lining, and even base jumping? Located toward the southern part of West Virginia, the small town of Fayetteville is making a big mark on the outdoor lover’s map. Use our guide to plan your perfect stay in one of the coolest towns in America.Day One:Experience the Beautiful New RiverFayette County is lucky in that two large rivers flowing through town with rapids of all different classes. The high volume, lower section of the New River provides a spectacular opportunity for whitewater adventure. It is anywhere from four to six hours (depending on the water level) of nonstop excitement as you raft through enormous waves, shelf drops, and class IV rapids.If that’s not your cup of tea then grab a crash pad and boulder in the New River Dries. The multitude of problems and unique formations make this section a favorite for beginners and expert climbers. For ideas of where to climb on the New River or for a wide range of quality climbing gear, stop in at Waterstone Outdoors and talk to their knowledgeable staff of experienced climbers and outdoor lovers.GrandviewRimTrailNRG2Photo by Jess DaddioSee Why The Gauley is World Class WhitewaterIf you’re in town in the fall and want to experience one of the top rivers in the world, try your luck rafting the Upper Gauley River. This is not for the inexperienced. Its constant class IV and V rapids are paired with technical maneuvering and tight squeezes. Drop over 335 feet in a little over 12 miles and see why the Upper Gauley is one of the top whitewater sections in the nation. Also in the fall when water is being released into the Gauley, the lower section provides a slightly less intimidating choice for eager rafters. The 17-mile stretch comes accompanied with astounding scenery, relaxing pools, and gut wrenching class III-IV rapids. Book your trip on one of these amazing sections with Adventures on the Gorge, ACE Adventure Resort, West Virginia Adventures, or many others!NewRiverGorgePhoto by Jess DaddioFor a More Tame Water Experience…In the beginning of the 20th century, a rock-fill dam on the Gauley River was flooded to create West Virginia’s largest lake, Summersville Lake. Encapsulating the clean and clear freshwater lake are miles of sandstone cliffs perfect for rock climbing, along with quiet coves that make it easy to see why this lake is so special. Popular activities on the lake include excellent fishing, swimming at the public beach, scuba diving, kayaking, and paddle boarding. Adventures on the Gorge even offers stand up paddleboard instruction right on the lake tailored to your needs and experience. They also offer paddleboard and kayak rentals as well as guided climbing.Photo by Jess DaddioPhoto By Jess DaddioDay Two:Bike the Arrowhead TrailsThe Arrowhead Trails offers mountain bikers 12.8 miles of singletrack, stacked loop riding. These four well-maintained, flowing trails range from the easier and beginner welcoming Clovis Trail and Adena Trail to the intermediate LeCroy Trail and Dalton Trail built for experienced mountain bikers. Enjoy rolling hills with tremendous flow, exciting turns, and obstacles such as rocky sections, tight switchbacks, and a rock bridge leading over a small drainage. Thanks to the hard work and many hours put into construction and maintenance, the trail provides great maps and excellent markings that will have you coming back for more. For bike repairs and parts, rentals, or guided tours, head to New River Bikes and let their friendly staff assist you.Hike the Kaymoor Miners Trail and See a Part of HistoryThe Kaymoor Miners Trail provides hikers with a short but strenuous one mile hike with unparalleled views and old structures of a historic mine site. The hike descends from the top of the New River Gorge and provides a magnificent view of the gorge just a short ways down from the trailhead. Once you reach the mine site, you will be greeted by the 821 stairs that carry you down to see what is left of one of the largest coal processing plants in the gorge. You’ll be fascinated at the mine openings, remnants of old coal cars and buildings, and signs to take you back in time over 100 years ago to when the plant was booming with coal.Get a Grip on Rock ClimbingHave you always had an itch to learn how to climb or to take the next step in becoming a better rock climber? New River Mountain Guides provide private instruction that is sure to enhance your abilities. They will take you to their favorite spots in the region and share their passion for climbing with you. See the New River and surrounding areas from a unique angle that unleashes even more beauty than you thought possible. Also offered are kids’ rock climbing summer camps, AMGA Single Pitch Instructor certification courses, and yoga retreats.ClimbingNewRiverGorgePhoto By Jess DaddioFood:Pies and Pints Pizzeria– Featured on the Cooking Channel and Food Network, Pies and Pints offers uniquely crafted pizzas and only the best handcrafted beers, a match made in heaven.Cathedral Café– This eccentric old church is where all the locals go for the best coffee, handmade pastries and desserts, and breakfasts.Secret Sandwich Society– The secret is out. Look no further than this small gourmet sandwich shop for a mouthwatering meal made from fresh ingredients.11392912_860963213939058_1335536886750861211_nPhoto Courtesy of the Secret Sandwich SocietyGumbo’s Cajun Restaurant– Head to downtown Fayetteville for a mix of Cajun, American, and Creole for dinner. With an effort to use only the freshest ingredients, they source as much local produce and meats as possible.Nightlife:Studio B Gallery & Gifts– If you’re looking to pick up a bottle of fine wine or six pack of craft beer to go along with your campfire under the stars, stop in Studio B for a diverse selection. Grab a souvenir of Bridge Brew, Fayetteville’s small craft brewery ran by only two hard workers making sure each beer is crafted to perfection.Smokey’s On The Gorge– Smokey’s is the best mix of superb, quality food, casual dining, and breath taking views of the New River Gorge. What better way to enjoy a glass of wine than sitting outside watching the sunset bask in all its glory over the tranquil river and echoing mountains?Charlie’s Pub– With over 75 craft beers and 160 liquor choices, unbelievable happy hour prices, and a welcoming, friendly atmosphere, it’s no surprise this is the bar of choice for all the locals.Lodging:American Alpine Club Campground– Located within walking distance of the New River Gorge, this newer, well-kept campground is only $5 per night for AAC members!Adventures on the Gorge– The perfect place to stay after a day spent on one of their many guided adventures. Adventures on the Gorge lodging rentals include something for every type of camper with simple and small cabins, deluxe four bedroom cabins, wooded camping, or field camping.Screen Shot 2015-09-16 at 2.02.02 PMPhoto Courtesy of Adventures on the GorgeACE Adventure Resort– Located on a lake in Minden, West Virginia not far from the New River, ACE offers fantastic dining, a plethora of outdoor activities, and plenty of lodging. Choose from spacey cabins with hot tubs, RV camping, or old fashioned tent camping.Upcoming Events:Gauley Fest– This four day whitewater festival gathers river rats from far and near to boast their boating abilities, swap gear, dance to some funky live music, and meet other passionate nature lovers. All proceeds from the event go to American Whitewater’s river conservation. September 17th-20th Summersville, West VirginiaUpperGauley_SweetsFalls_kayakPOVCraggin’ Classic is a weekend long celebration of the area’s premiere climbing destination. Climbing is only a dent in the list of activities and excursions: Live music, ping-pong tournament, trail work, film screening of “Metanoia”, clinics, gear demos, and much more.New River Gorge SUP Race– SUP athletes battle it out on the upstream attainment race or downriver whitewater race with up to class IV rapids. Watch the only paddleboard competition in the state and stay for free demos, instruction, and a raging celebration at the after party. September 20th Lansing, West Virginia.NewRiverGorgeSUP.jpg5Bridge Day gathers over 50,000 spectators whose jaws are sure to drop as the hundreds of base jumpers take a leap of faith on the 876’ New River Gorge Bridge. This event is one of the largest extreme sports events in the world on the second longest single arch bridge. October 17th Fayette County, West VirginiaNative Knowledge:“Fayetteville is located on the border of a national park. You can ride right from downtown and be in the woods in less than 5 minutes. There’s plenty of lodging, trails, food, and other activities. Picking a favorite biking trail is hard. I like to think of it more as a loop. In town to Arrowhead and back is super fun. Leave town via Fayetteville trail to Kaymoor Top and Arrowhead, ride the Arrowhead system, and return via Timber Ridge. So many folks drive to the Arrowhead trailhead and miss two amazing downhills!” – Andrew Forron, Owner of New River Bikeslast_img read more

South/Central Essequibo T20 committee spearheading drive to assist the less forunate

first_imgAMID the COVID- 19 pandemic, the T20 Organising Committee of South and Central Essequibo have initiated a drive to provide assistance to the needy across the Essequibo Coast.The Committee has since invited the various clubs and supporters to pool their resources and to support a noble cause. In an invited comment, executive member Trevis Simon disclosed ,“it is imperative at this time that as a committee we show solidarity to those affected by this deadly virus and offer our assistance”.He added that there are 24 Clubs currently involved in the South/Central T20 League and he is hopeful that they will contribute individually and as a group.The Committee is also appealing to the corporate community and other stake holders to also join the drive in assisting the less fortunate. Simon, who is also Chairman of the Reliance Grounds Committee has pledged on behalf of the Committee to distribute food hampers, face masks, detergents and other accessories that are deemed necessary.Residents of Essequibo have been severely affected by the virus which has resulted in the loss of jobs, increase in transportation cost as well as the hike in prices of items in the store. The Committee will specifically target families with children and intends to distribute to over 100 homes across the Region. The Committee has since advised persons including the sporting community to take all the necessary precautions including social distancing and the regular washing of hands. Those desirous of making a contribution can contact Trevis Simon-619-2022, Rohan Budhram- 600-1069 or Andy Ramnarine- 663-1997.last_img read more

Emmanuel Sanders’ taunt comes back to haunt Broncos

first_imgEmmanuel Sanders wagged his right index finger in the face of Rams cornerback Troy Hill. (AP Photo/Joe Mahoney)DENVER (AP) _ First, Emmanuel Sanders wagged his right index finger in the face of Rams cornerback Troy Hill . Now, he’s pointing it right at himself after Denver’s fourth consecutive loss.After his taunt came back to haunt the Broncos, Sanders accepted the blame for Denver’s latest loss in a monthlong tailspin that has fans in the Rocky Mountains bracing for back-to-back losing seasons for the first time since 1971-72.“I guess this loss is on me,” Sanders said after the Rams escaped frigid Denver as the league’s lone unbeaten team following a 23-20 win Sunday over the Broncos (2-4), who became the first team in NFL history to allow a 200-yard rusher in back-to-back games.Sanders thought he had a 44-yard TD catch from Case Keenum as he tumbled into the end zone in the first quarter. He sprung to his feet and wagged a finger at Hill.Side judge Brad Freeman threw the flag, calling a personal foul on Sanders for taunting.Ordinarily, the flag wouldn’t have mattered much because the 15-yard penalty would have been enforced on the ensuing kickoff and Brandon McManus, after giving Denver a 7-6 lead with an extra point, undoubtedly would still have booted the ball out of the end zone for a touchback.Upon review, however, it turned out Hill had the last laugh, having touched Sanders before he crossed the goal line.That put the ball at the 1.The penalty pushed them back to the 16.After runs of 1 and 5 yards, Keenum’s throwaway on third-and-4 brought in McManus for a field goal instead of an extra point and his 28-yarder cut Denver’s deficit to 6-3.They never did get the lead and those four points would have made the difference in a three-point loss.“Me, honestly, I feel like the league is getting soft,” Sanders said. “I’m having fun. I didn’t do anything crazy to the guy besides say, `Hey, I got you on that play.’ I pointed my finger at him. And they threw the flag.”Sanders said he’s done that his whole career and has never been flagged for it.“It was a great throw by Case, I came down with it, big play, emotions are high. It’s not like I walked up to him and head-butted him or something,” Sanders said. “But it cost my team. We lost by three points. I feel like we could have easily punched that ball in and gotten four (more) points. I guess this loss is on me.”Vance Joseph, who fell to 7-15 as head coach, talked to Sanders on the sideline.“He can’t do that,” Joseph said. “He knows that.”Well, he does now.“I don’t think I did anything too crazy besides point a finger and tell the guy, `Hey I got you on that play.’ I don’t see the penalty in that,” Sanders said. “But I learned from it and like I said, it cost my team. I’ve just got to keep chugging along and don’t do it again.”The costly foul from a nine-year veteran came one week after Sanders’ fellow SMU alum, rookie receiver Courtland Sutton , chased down Marcus Maye at the 1 following a 104-yard interception return at game’s end, leaving the Jets safety with the longest such play without a score in NFL history.“We played two of the best teams in the league, the Chiefs and the Rams, and the games came down to crunch time. And that just shows you what kind of team that we are,” linebacker Shane Ray declared. “We’re a great football team.”Not at 2-4 they aren’t.Even Fox play-by-play man Dick Stockton dissed the Broncos by beginning the telecast saying, “the undefeated Rams take on the Denver Nuggets.”Other takeaways from Week 6 included:CUTTING OUT COLINThe 49ers posted dozens of photos on its website of past games against the Packers in advance of their Monday night game without at first including any of Colin Kaepernick, who set an NFL record for QBs by rushing for 181 yards in a playoff win against Green Bay on Jan. 12, 2013, threw for 413 yards in a season-opening win against the Packers in 2013, and led a winning drive in a playoff game in Green Bay on Jan. 5, 2014.“We have fond memories of those games and that should have been displayed on our website,” the team said in a statement after adding images of Kaepernick. “This oversight does not properly reflect the appreciation our ownership and this team have for Colin.”GRONK HONKTom Brady made light of yelling at Rob Gronkowski in an Instagram post following the Patriots’ 43-40 win over Patrick Mahomes and the Chiefs.In the second quarter, the sideline microphones picked up Brady yelling at Gronkowski to stand up out of his stance, and Brady ended up calling a timeout on the play.Gronk came up big in the fourth quarter with a stiff-arm that helped him gain 42 yards and set up a field goal that gave New England a 40-33 lead.“Gronk, you can line up however you want if you keep stiff-arming people like that,” Brady said.MISSED CALLSAl Riveron, the NFL’s senior vice president of officiating, acknowledged for a second straight week that officials goofed in not calling a running back for lowering his head and barreling into a defender.In his weekly video, Riveron said Patriots rookie Sony Michel should have been flagged for lowering his head to initiate contact with Colts safety Clayton Geathers in Week 5.A week earlier, Riveron noted that Chiefs running back Kareem Hunt should have been flagged for doing the same thing to Broncos safety Justin Simmons.Although Hunt got away without a penalty, his illegal hit did result in a $26,739 fine.NO EXCEPTIONSRiveron defended referee Clete Blakeman’s crew, which didn’t flag Steelers receiver Justin Hunter for blocking Bengals DB Tony McRae beyond 1 yard past the line of scrimmage on Antonio Brown’s 31-yard TD catch from Ben Roethlisberger with 10 seconds left that gave Pittsburgh a 28-21 win on Sunday.“The contact is initiated by the defender,” Riveron said on Twitter , “and therefore the receiver is not responsible for this contact.”NFL rule 8, Section 5, Article 4 states: “Blocking more than 1 yard beyond the line of scrimmage by an offensive player prior to a pass being thrown is offensive pass interference.”The rule book, however, doesn’t specify an exception for defenders initiating contact.___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/tag/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL___Follow Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapletonlast_img

Carmack, Batts, Givner lead City League Hall of Fame Class of 2018! (Oct. 17)

first_imgLike us at https://www.facebook.com/pages/New-Pittsburgh-Courier/143866755628836?ref=hlFollow @NewPghCourier on Twitter  https://twitter.com/NewPghCourier BILL NEAL:10—As you read this you’re reminded once again that you still don’t have your tickets for the 5th anniversary of the historic Pittsburgh City League High School All Sports Hall of Fame. Following four consecutive sellout years it’s probably not a good idea; but, just to get you moving in the right direction here’s the class of 2018. (The other award categories will follow each week). Rodney Allen – Peabody, Claude Arrington – Carrick, Wilbur Bailey – Carrick, Wayne Copeland – Perry, Gilmore Cummings – Allegheny, David Dinkins – Schenley, Dominique Duck – Westinghouse, Jude Floyd – Peabody, Percy Fonville – West, Mike Ford – Schenley, Marvin Batts – Oliver, Casey Givner – Peabody, Chuck Griffey, Jr. – Perry, Harold Hamlin – Peabody, Margo Hinton –South Hills, Julius Hopson – West, Mike Howard – Schenley, Dana Knapp – Perry, Fred Marshall – West, Kim Martin – Schenley, Mike Ralston – Peabody, Chester Robinson – Carrick, Scott Schultz – Carrick, Charles Stock – Schenley, Stacy Williams – West, Shawn Yancy – West, Hudhaifa Ismaeli – West.:09—Now a good time to do a little ring kissing here. A Hall of Fame “Thank You” to the New Pittsburgh Courier. Mr. Rod Doss and Stephan Broadus for their 5th consecutive year as primary media sponsor for the City League Hall of Fame. Hey, we’re talking about one of the oldest Black newspapers in America, people! Hoo – Rah!!!:08—Oh yea, the game, no worries here people. Coach Tomlin and Big Ben have righted the ship. Your Pittsburgh Steelers still own the Cincinnati Bungles. 28-21. Black and Gold win a tough one.:07—No worries, and I repeat Le’Veon WHO??? Conner SCORES!:06—Rare as it might be, when I am wrong I’ll admit I am wrong. Pitt is tough enough, fast enough, good enough. Witnessed beating Syracuse last week and taking #5 Notre Dame to the wire this past Saturday under “The Damn Lucky” Golden Dome and without their best defensive player. HAIL TO PITT and Hail to my cousin, Denny Briggs. I’ll never doubt you again.:05—As you know, I can be a little global on occasion, so here goes…If you don’t vote, you’re part of the “Trump” problem, not the solution…Kanye West = Idiot…The absolute best to everyone affected by Hurricane Michael. Man, Michael was no joke!:04—Look, the only thing I can hope for is they gave Jim Brown a lot of money to show up with Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum. If not, it brings the greatest running back in the history of football off the Mount Rushmore of football. I mean, if it’s about the money at age 82, I can live with it. I am just sayin’!:03—Oh, please shutup about it. “A Star is Born” is good and you know it. Emotional, chick-flick, tear-jerker, yes, all the above. You went because she told you to or…and, you loved it. Yep, me too.:02—And now, boys and girls, you know why the Steelers have been waiting on Vance McDonald. At 6’4” and 270 pounds he’s a one-man wrecking machine. “He’ll chew you up Rock!” (Rocky III…Mick telling Rocky he can’t beat Clubber Lang. – C’mon people, try to keep up here.):01—Wait, say what…Conner scores again! Bell, don’t let the door hit ya where the good Lord split ya!:00—The wait is over, the time is now. You’ve been waiting and Achieving Greatness will deliver. AGI has teamed up with Chuck Sanders and the Savoy Restaurant to bring you “Champions Live” Sports Talk Show. Live at the Savoy every Thursday starting November 1. Exciting sports talk, celebrities, VIPs, prizes and surprises. Starring yours truly, Smokin Jim Frazier, Darnelle “Dap” Porter, Carmen Bruce, Keith Davis, and ‘”Major” Mark Whited. Free parking, free admission, cash bar, cash kitchen, weekly 50/50. Streamed live by Marcus Robinson and the Pittsburgh Bullets on YouTube and Facebook. Call 412-628-4856 if you want to get on!GAME OVER.last_img read more

Beehive fences can help mitigate human-elephant conflict

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Crop-raiding by elephants can devastate small farmers, leading to food insecurity, lost opportunity costs, and even death, as well as negative attitudes towards elephants, but finding effective and inexpensive solutions has proven extremely difficult.Beehive fences—surrounding crops fields with beehives attached to fence posts and strung together with wires—may serve as a humane and eco-friendly way to protect crops from elephants.Repeated farm-level trials have demonstrated benefits to farmers of using beehive fences, including fewer elephants approaching their fields and, for communities willing to manage the bees, production of “elephant-friendly” honey. However, the strategy doesn’t work everywhere: it requires management by farmers and willingness of bees to occupy at least some of the hives, and appropriate length and positioning to dissuade elephants from just walking around them.Beehive fences have benefited farmers in several East African countries, and projects elsewhere have begun to test them as well, but several uncertainties, including their success at a scale that doesn’t just displace the elephants to the first unfenced farm, suggest they should still be used with other techniques as part of a toolkit to reduce human-elephant conflict. Human-elephant conflict poses major threats to the well-being of both humans and animals. Crop-raiding by elephants across Asia and Africa can be devastating for small farmers, leading to food insecurity, lost opportunity costs, and even death. Crop-raiding and property damage can also result in negative attitudes towards elephant conservation and retaliatory killings of elephants.A camera trap photo captured after midnight of an elephant bull turning away from the beehive fence (one of the hives is on the left). Image courtesy of Southern Tanzania Elephant Program (STEP).Finding effective and inexpensive solutions has proven extremely difficult. Farmers guarding their fields at night lose sleep and put themselves in potentially close proximity to hungry elephants. Killing “problem” elephants is not only inhumane, but is also ineffective at reducing human-elephant conflict. Electric fences, while effective in theory, often fail in practice because they are costly and difficult to maintain.Bees to the rescueMore recently, conservationists have explored the use of beehive fences as a humane and eco-friendly way to protect crops from elephants. Zoologist Lucy King of the NGO Save the Elephants told Mongabay the idea came from Kenyan farmers, who noticed that elephants avoided foraging in trees that contained beehives.A beehive fence under Sagalla Mountain in Kenya. Hives are supported by posts and connected by wires, so that pressure on the wire disturbs the nearest occupied hives along the fence. Thatched roofs protect the hives from direct sunlight. The NGO Save The Elephants has experimented with various designs, including units that are not occupied hives but that contribute to the technique. A higher percentage of occupied hives gives a better chance of success in discouraging elephants from approaching further. Image by Lucy King.In the late 2000s, King and several Save the Elephants colleagues conducted a pilot study to determine if beehive fences could protect farms in Kenya. They placed locally constructed beehives on fence posts every 8 meters (about 26 feet) and connected them with wires. If an elephant tried to enter between the hives, it would knock into the wires, causing the hives to sway and disturbing the bees. In this study, the researchers found that elephant raids were reduced by almost half on a farm with a beehive fence compared to an unprotected farm.Since then, King and her colleagues have conducted two sets of field trials in Kenya. The first set of trials, published in 2011, found that beehive fences were better at protecting crops than traditional thorn bush barriers. The second set of trials, published in 2017, reported that 80 percent of elephants that approached the beehive fences were deterred from entering the farms. However, this second study did not report data from control farms – those not protected with beehive fences – so we cannot know if this represents a significant improvement.Currently, King and her colleagues at Save the Elephants are studying or implementing beehive fences for crop protection in 15 countries in Africa and four countries in Asia. The beehive fence concept has generated high levels of interest and acceptance among farmers in Africa and Asia. In Kenya, participating farms more than doubled over the course of field trials as farmers requested to join, and in Thailand, over 80 percent of cassava and sugar cane plantation owners reported that they were interested in trying beehive fences.However, comparatively few studies on beehive fences have been performed in Asia. One small study in India observed that elephants were less likely to enter agricultural areas through areas with beehive fences, although statistical evaluations were not performed.Kennedy holding jar of elephant-friendly honey produced by his community from management of the bees in the beehives. Image courtesy of Jane Wynyard / Save the Elephants.Beehive fences can provide many benefits to a community. In addition to humanely deterring elephants from entering farms, bees provide pollination services (which could increase crop yields) and honey (which farmers can sell to diversify their income). King and colleagues also found that even long-term use of beehive fences does not seem to negatively impact wild bee diversity.Problems and solutionsAlthough these trials seem to show great success overall, beehive fences have yet to be implemented at a broad scale. Wildlife veterinarian Richard Hoare, a member of the IUCN Human-Wildlife Conflict Task Force states that, “the sample sizes of farms in bee fence projects claiming success are too small to be extrapolated to general use.”Furthermore, beehive fences don’t work everywhere, and several factors can decrease their efficacy, including the design of the fences, the species of bee, and bee activity. A trial in Zimbabwe did not find any difference in crop damage between farms with beehives and those without. However, this may be because hives were hung on poles and not connected with wire. In other words, elephants could easily pass between the hives without disturbing the bees.The STEP team in southern Tanzania discussing the beehive fence including the costs and benefits of shielding hives from direct sun in the form of makuti thatch roofs. Image courtesy of STEP.Efficacy may also be affected by the species of bees that live in different regions. King says that the honey bees kept in many parts of Asia – called Apis cerana indica – are much less aggressive than African bee species and are less effective at deterring elephants.Even for beehives inhabited by the same species, not all hives deter elephants equally. A trial in Gabon found that while high-activity hives were very effective at protecting fruit trees from elephants, low-activity hives (and empty hives) were less effective. Unfortunately, this same study found that bees in very high-activity hives may produce less honey and be more aggressive than bees in low-activity hives.Challenges inherent to beekeeping have affected the effectiveness of some beehive fence projects. Conservationist and biological anthropologist Katarzyna Nowak told Mongabay that in many places in Africa, beekeepers simply provide hives and must wait for bees to come colonize them, sometimes resulting in low hive occupancy and consequently, less effective beehive fences. Furthermore, it can be hazardous to work with hundreds of stinging insects. African bees can be very aggressive – during one trial, two goats were stung to death, and people could not work in nearby fields when a hive was knocked down.Beehive fence in Kenya protecting maize (corn) from elephants that approach looking for a high-calorie meal. Image by Lucy King.Due to hazards like these, Hoare notes that the beehive fence technique, “will most likely only work in rural communities with a previous culture of beekeeping.” Indeed, Nowak says that it’s very important to take community history and preferences into account on these projects. “It’s as much about how people receive the particular deterrent method – and therefore maintain it – as it is about the efficacy of it,” she says.Farmers extracting honey from hives in the beehive fence. Communities with beekeeping interest are good candidates for beehive fence programs. Image courtesy of STEP.Another problem is that hives and the honey within them are subject to theft – sometimes by other humans, but often by honey badgers. Colonies often abandon a hive after a honey badger attack. However, simple additions like cages or motion-activated lights have shown promise in reducing honey badger impact on beehives.King says one of the biggest threats to beehive fence projects in more arid areas is actually climate change. “With climate change, the rainfall has become so erratic that we’re getting erratic flowering seasons, so the bees are being affected,” she says. “We’re losing colonies because they’re not holding on through the dry seasons…I don’t know what it means for our project long-term.”A line of beehives designed to protect crops on in northern Kenya. As dry seasons lengthen, bees may not be able to support themselves inside hives throughout the year, a concern for beehive fence farmers. Image by Lucy King.Some of the challenges of keeping bees — like hive maintenance, attacks by honey badgers, bee stings, and problems with hive occupation during the dry season — could be solved by using a stimulus that mimics bees rather than actual bees.Some trials have shown that buzzing bee sounds seemed to disturb elephants – one study found that 94 percent of African elephant families quickly left the area when the sound of disturbed bees was played. In India, news reports have detailed minor reductions in elephant fatalities in train collisions by using bee noises near the train tracks (although it’s unclear if this small decrease merely represents random variation that occurs year-to-year). Another study found that chemicals contained in bee alarm pheromones seemed to cause elephants to hesitate or retreat.But these bee-mimickers aren’t universally applicable either. A study in South Africa noted that elephants appeared, at most, mildly disturbed or attentive in response to bee noises alone. Another study found that Asian elephants did not retreat from beehive noises significantly more than they moved away from control noises (although they did move farther away when movement occurred).The human-elephant conflict toolboxThe moral of the story is that no single technique is 100 percent effective. Researchers acknowledge that several strategies should be used to foster the peaceful coexistence of elephants and people. “I’m a huge fan of what we call the human-elephant conflict toolbox,” says King. “There’s a variety of options you can use to keep elephants out of your farm and to live better with elephants. Without question, beehive fences should be one of those tools, but it’s not necessarily a silver bullet for the entire problem, nor are any of the others.”A remote camera captures an elephant approaching a beehive fence and deciding its next move. Image courtesy of Lucy King.Several other strategies have been determined to be at least partially effective, including setting off small handheld fireworks  putting chili oil on fences surrounding crops. King says her team is experimenting with growing crops that are regionally appropriate but less palatable for elephants. These include tea, ginger, sunflowers, and chilis.Overall, King says that beehive fences have been quite successful and word of that success has spread. “We have people queuing up for beehive fences, literally coming to the research center and emailing me from all over the world, requesting these.”An example of combining techniques to reduct human-elephant conflict: fences made of chili-oil (left) and beehives (right) between the Udzungwa Mountains National Park boundary and adjacent farms in Tanzania. Image courtesy of STEP.CitationsGubbi, S., Swaminath, M. H., Poornesha, H. C., Bhat, R., & Raghunath, R. (2014). An elephantine challenge: human–elephant conflict distribution in the largest Asian elephant population, southern India. Biodiversity and conservation, 23(3), 633-647.Hoare, R. (2012). Lessons from 15 years of human–elephant conflict mitigation: management considerations involving biological, physical and governance issues in Africa. Pachyderm, 51, 60-74.Johnson, Abigail S., “The Effects of Tactile and Visual Deterrents on Honey Badger Predation of Beehives” (2019). CUNY Academic Works.https://academicworks.cuny.edu/hc_sas_etds/409Karidozo, M., & Osborn, F. V. (2005). Can bees deter elephants from raiding crops? An experiment in the communal lands of Zimbabwe. Pachyderm, (39), 26-32.King, L. E., Douglas-Hamilton, I., & Vollrath, F. (2007). African elephants run from the sound of disturbed bees. Current Biology, 17(19), R832-R833.King, L. E., Lawrence, A., Douglas‐Hamilton, I., & Vollrath, F. (2009). Beehive fence deters crop‐raiding elephants. African Journal of Ecology, 47(2), 131-137.King, L. E., Douglas‐Hamilton, I., & Vollrath, F. (2011). Beehive fences as effective deterrents for crop‐raiding elephants: field trials in northern Kenya. African Journal of Ecology, 49(4), 431-439.King, L. E., Lala, F., Nzumu, H., Mwambingu, E., & Douglas‐Hamilton, I. (2017). Beehive fences as a multidimensional conflict‐mitigation tool for farmers coexisting with elephants. Conservation Biology, 31(4), 743-752.King, L. E., Serem, E., & Russo, L. (2018). Minimal effect of honey beehive fences on native bee diversity and abundance at the farm scale during the dry season in southern Kenya. Apidologie, 49(6), 862-871.King, L., Pardo, M., Weerathunga, S., Kumara, T. V., Jayasena, N., Soltis, J., & de Silva, S. (2018). Wild Sri Lankan elephants retreat from the sound of disturbed Asian honey bees. Current Biology, 28(2), R64-R65.Mackenzie, C. A., & Ahabyona, P. (2012). Elephants in the garden: Financial and social costs of crop raiding. Ecological Economics, 75, 72-82.Nair, R. P., & Jayson, E. A. (2016). Effectiveness of beehive fences to deter crop raiding elephants in Kerala, India. Int. Res. J. Nat. Appl. Sci, 3, 14-19.Ndlovu, M., Devereux, E., Chieffe, M., Asklof, K., & Russo, A. (2016). Responses of African elephants towards a bee threat: Its application in mitigating human-elephant conflict. South African Journal of Science, 112(1-2), 01-05.Ngama, S., Korte, L., Bindelle, J., Vermeulen, C., & Poulsen, J. R. (2016). How bees deter elephants: beehive trials with forest elephants (Loxodonta africana cyclotis) in Gabon. PloS one, 11(5), e0155690.Sitati, N. W., & Walpole, M. J. (2006). Assessing farm-based measures for mitigating human-elephant conflict in Transmara District, Kenya. Oryx, 40(3), 279-286.van de Water, A., & Matteson, K. (2018). Human-elephant conflict in western Thailand: Socio-economic drivers and potential mitigation strategies. PloS one, 13(6), e0194736.Wright, M. G., Spencer, C., Cook, R. M., Henley, M. D., North, W., & Mafra-Neto, A. (2018). African bush elephants respond to a honeybee alarm pheromone blend. Current Biology, 28(14), R778-R780.Disney has supported the beehive fence research, including on this farm in Kenya. Image by Lucy King.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Agriculture, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Conservation Solutions, Elephants, human-elephant conflict, Human-wildlife Conflict, low-tech, Subsistence Agriculture last_img read more

One of four North Atlantic right whale calves spotted so far this breeding season struck by ship

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation One of just four North Atlantic right whale calves spotted off the southeast coast of the United States so far this winter was discovered last week to have suffered deep propeller wounds to both sides of its head.The injured calf was photographed by an aerial survey team about 8 miles (12.8 kilometers) off the coast of the state of Georgia while swimming with its mother on January 8. The two S-shaped gashes observed by the survey team were most likely caused by the propeller of a boat, but humans will probably not be able to intervene and help the calf.The North Atlantic right whale population has been on the decline since 2010, due almost entirely to the impacts of human activities, especially collisions with ships and entanglement in fishing gear. One of just four North Atlantic right whale calves spotted off the southeast coast of the United States so far this winter was discovered last week to have suffered deep propeller wounds to both sides of its head.Barb Zoodsma of the National Marine Fisheries Service told the Associated Press that the injured calf was photographed by an aerial survey team about 8 miles (12.8 kilometers) off the coast of the state of Georgia while swimming with its mother on January 8. The survey team didn’t notice the calf’s injuries until later, when the photograph was viewed at full size.The two S-shaped gashes observed by the survey team were most likely caused by the propeller of a boat, but humans will probably not be able to intervene and help the calf. “[I]t’s highly unlikely that we can fix this animal,” Zoodsma said.The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List. Centuries of commercial hunting nearly wiped the whales out, but their numbers grew at an annual rate of 2.8% between 1990 and 2010, when the population peaked at about 480 individuals. Since 2010, however, the population has been on the decline once again, due almost entirely to the impacts of human activities, especially collisions with ships and entanglement in fishing gear. The North Atlantic right whale birth rate is believed to be dropping, as well, which has meant that deaths have outpaced births in recent years. It is estimated that around 450 North Atlantic right whales still survive today.Every winter, North Atlantic right whales migrate from their feeding grounds in the Labrador Sea off the east coast of Canada to their calving grounds in the relatively warm waters off the coasts of Georgia and Florida, a journey through an area with heavy shipping traffic. 2017 was a particularly deadly year for the whales, with 17 documented deaths — or nearly 4% of the entire population. There were no newborns observed during the 2017-2018 calving season.Three right whale calves were spotted off the coast of Florida by mid-January during the 2018-2019 calving season. Ultimately, seven calves were recorded last winter, but at least 10 right whales were found dead in 2019.North Atlantic right whales are one of three right whale species, including the North Pacific right whale and the Southern right whale. Last year, recordings of North Pacific right whales singing were published — the first time any right whale species has ever been known to break into song. Jessica Crance, a marine biologist with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), appeared on the Mongabay Newscast in June 2019 to play the recordings she and her team had made of the whales’ songs. You can listen to them here:Atlantic Northern Right Whale mother and calf. Photo Credit: NOAA.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

New L.A. airports head gets orders

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The new director of Los Angeles airports met the press Thursday and talked about the “tremendous things” still to be accomplished at LAX and its satellite airports in the suburbs. And then Gina Marie Lindsey, a well-regarded and veteran airport executive, got a long list of goals from Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and some of his City Council colleagues. Renovate terminals. Build new gates. Get the Green Line’s tracks into LAX. Get more flights into Ontario and Palmdale. Keep the airports competitive. And, oh yes, keep the neighbors happy. Time and again during her brief introduction Thursday at LAX, Lindsey was reminded that the airports now under her watch are at a historic crossroads. LAX is struggling to maintain its title as a gateway to the world, while the smaller Southland airports are struggling just to get business. Alan Rothenberg, president of the airport commission, told Lindsey it was “a time of great opportunity, and great challenge.” Lindsey comes to the job with a record of transforming airports. She oversaw a $3 billion renovation and reconstruction project as the director of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Before that, she established Anchorage International Airport as an international cargo hub as its director of aviation. She has worked for a Washington, D.C., lobbying firm in recent years, focusing in part on airport-related issues. Villaraigosa chose Lindsey over 70 other candidates for the city’s top airport job, citing her record as an “innovative industry leader.” He called her the perfect candidate to carry out a “big, bold vision” for the city’s airports. Lindsey moves into the executive offices of Los Angeles World Airports next month. She succeeds Lydia Kennard, who stepped down as the city’s director of airports earlier this year but has stayed on as a paid consultant. Several candidates who interviewed for the job questioned how much freedom they would have to run the airport department with Kennard still in the background. Lindsey’s appointment still must pass a review by the City Council, but that’s not expected to present a problem. The airport area council members who turned out for her introduction praised her experience and leadership. [email protected] (310) 543-6649last_img read more

Multiple Ways of Importing Footage into Premiere Pro

first_imgI select the footage and the Rough Cut, right click and select “Send to Premiere Pro” (have Premiere Pro open before you do this).This will send what we did in Prelude to Premiere Pro. If we needed to move the Project and the Media to another system or location, we would select File > Export Project.Importing Footage from Adobe BridgeBridge is Adobe’s asset management software. Adobe Bridge let’s you organize, rate and filter media. Bridge has been around for years, where as Prelude was added in CS6. You can play your clips inside Bridge, then open it in Premiere Pro.Select the clips you want, then right-click and select “Open in Premiere Pro.” Go beyond the typical import settings. In this post we look at three additional options for getting your footage into Premiere Pro.The most common way to get footage into Premiere Pro is to import it. You do this by going to File > Import, or by double clicking in the Project.But what you may not know is there are 3 other ways to get footage into Premiere Pro.Premiere Pro Media BrowserThe Media Browser is part of Premiere Pro. If you are using the default workspace in Premiere Pro, it is beside the Project panel. The Media Browser allows you to view and play your footage on your hard drive before you import it into Premiere Pro.You can play your footage with the space bar, use the J/K/L shortcuts and Hover Scrub like you can in the Project.In my example I navigated to some footage from my Canon 5DM2.A nice feature is that the Media Browser hides files that aren’t the media, like the .THM files for my camera (if you were importing these files, you would see them).To import clips into the Project, select them and right click “Import”.If you double click on a clip in the Media Browser, it loads it into the Source Monitor, but not the Project. This allows you to play the clip before adding it to the Project.You can add clip(s) to the Project by dragging it to the Project or into a Sequence.Ingesting through Adobe PreludePrelude is Adobe’s ingest and logging software. For more in-depth info on Prelude check out the Premiumbeat articles here.Companies with multiple editors and large projects may prefer to use Adobe Prelude to ingest the media and organize it, and then hand that off to an editor. In Prelude you can create bins, organize your media, make subclips/add comments and even create a rough cut.In my example I have created a bin and a rough cut in Prelude that I now want to get into Premiere Pro.last_img read more