Limerick game designer scoops national award

first_imgFacebook Linkedin NewsEducationLimerick game designer scoops national awardBy Editor – May 17, 2017 1292 Print For more information on the 2017 eir Junior Spider Awards and further details on the winning entries log onto www.juniorspiders.ie Previous articleTrain services to be disrupted throughout month of JuneNext articleWin cinema tickets Editor TAGSJunior SpidersLIT Moylish center_img Advertisement WhatsApp Email Eir Junior Spider Awards, Croke Park, Monday 8th May 2017.Eir Junior Spider Awards, Croke Park, Monday May 8, 2017.A young Limerick game designer has had his creations recognised with a national award.James Corneille from LIT (Moylish campus) won in the Best Game/Mobile App category at this Eir Junior Spiders Awards which reward students and young adults, aged 4 to 19, for the innovative ways they use the internet, especially in the areas of website coding, development and design.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up James’ project, Skizzle Ninja, scooped top honours in the 16-19 years old category, “I’ve a passion in education,” said James, “so I wanted to boost that, for children, but in a fun and enjoyable way through animations.”As with previous years, the Awards provide an amazing springboard for students who wish to pursue a career in this sector by providing access to influential business executives from a range of sectors across Irish business.John Anslow, Head of Sponsorship, eir and Chair of the eir Junior Spider Awards Judging Panel said “This has been another great year for the awards. The level of talent in schools across Ireland is mindblowing and it’s such a pleasure to witness first-hand the creativity, passion, ingenuity and genius of our students. In addition to congratulating all of today’s winners I would also like to say well done to all those schools shortlisted. It’s a fantastic achievement to get that far. eir is very proud to sponsor these Awards, and to be at the forefront of recognising the talent that is clearly present in classrooms around the country.” Twitterlast_img read more

On a Philippine island, indigenous groups take the fight to big palm oil

first_imgAgriculture, Environment, Featured, Forests, Green, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations Banner image: Larry Arcuyo, Chairman of the Aramaywan Farmer’s multi-purpose cooperative, holds up a handful of palm oil kernel. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay. Please contact the author if you’re interested in republishing any images in this story: [email protected]: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Many Palawan indigenous communities say they have suffered unfair land acquisition or lease arrangements for oil palm plantations. The situation hit a peak around 2007, when palm oil company Agumil Philippines promoted palm oil around the island as a miracle get-rich-quick crop.Many tribal landowners leased or sold parcels of land to Agumil. Those who leased said they were provided loans from the government-run Land Bank of the Philippines, negotiated by Agumil, to clear the land and plant oil palm saplings. Title deeds to the leased land were lodged with the bank as collateral against the loans, where they remain.Today the plantations are producing plentiful bunches of oil palm fruit. Still, landowners say they have yet to see any financial returns on their leased land. The problem all cite is that the loans came with crippling 14 percent annual interest rates, which left the original loan amounts inflating out of control. The terms of the lease contracts also stipulate that ongoing operational and managements costs be subtracted from the loan and harvest income.Now tribal groups are fighting back on multiple fronts. A tribal representative in the municipality of Rizal recently won a mayoral election. The re-elected mayor of neighboring Brooke’s Point has also pledged a halt to more oil palm plantations. Three of the seven municipalities in southern Palawan have now placed limitations on oil palm cultivation. The sandy path from the village of bamboo houses winds down through the coconut palms, which gives way to mangroves growing along the muddy shoreline. The seven elders inspect their fishing boats. Hand-built using timber from their communal forest, the small craft have bamboo outriggers to keep them stable in the open sea.The Sarong community on the island of Palawan in the Philippines has for generations been living a similar way of life from the forest, cultivated fields, stands of coconut and fishing. But a few years ago, in 2012, their lives were turned upside down when they noticed that their communal forest was being logged and cleared without any consultation, let alone their permission.“A contractor coming from another barangay [village] was clearing the land,” says Romeo L. Japson, who grew up in the community.Community members say the company responsible then went on to plant oil palm saplings on 200 hectares (500 acres) of their ancestral land. They add that now, every time they pass by the plantation, they’re reminded of how their community forest was razed. To this day they are bitter that the situation persists and they have no redress.Sarong community members chatting on the porch of a village house, in Southern Palawan. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.They are not alone, as many other Palawan indigenous communities have also suffered what they see as unfair land acquisition or lease arrangements for oil palm plantations. The situation hit a peak around 2007, when palm oil company Agumil Philippines promoted palm oil around the island as a miracle get-rich-quick crop. Twenty-five percent Filipino- and 75 percent Malaysian-owned, Agumil is a subsidiary of Agusan Plantations (API) and operates the only palm oil processing plant on Palawan.Now tribal groups are fighting back on multiple fronts. A tribal representative in the municipality of Rizal recently won a mayoral election. The re-elected mayor of neighboring Brooke’s Point has also pledged a halt to more oil palm plantations. Three of the seven municipalities in southern Palawan have now placed limitations on oil palm cultivation.Meanwhile, a growing number of communities are responding to threats to their ancestral domains by pursuing legal recognition of their community land and water resources. Two communities celebrated success in 2018, and at least 12 more claims are in process.Tribal land appropriationMany tribal landowners leased or sold parcels of land to Agumil. Those who leased said they were provided loans from the government-run Land Bank of the Philippines, negotiated by Agumil, to clear the land and plant oil palm saplings. Title deeds to the leased land were lodged with the bank as collateral against the loans, where they remain.“Until now I am riding only in my thongs,” said Mily Saya, landowner and member of the village cooperative in the barangay of Aramaywan. He explains how early company promises of a car and stone house failed to materialize. He says he “has no idea how to get back the land title” for his 4.7 hectares (11.6 acres) from the Land Bank.“I don’t know how big the loan is from the Land Bank,” he says, explaining how the company planted oil palm seedlings on 1 hectare (2.5 acres) of his land but abandoned the rest with no explanation.Mily Saya Landowner and member of the Aramaywan cooperative, leased most of his land to Agumil but has yet to realize any return. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.In time, the saplings matured and today the plantations are producing plentiful bunches of oil palm fruit. Still, members of the landowner cooperatives say they have yet to see any financial returns on their leased land. The problem all cite is that the loans came with crippling 14 percent annual interest rates, which left the original loan amounts inflating out of control. The terms of the lease contracts also stipulate that ongoing operational and managements costs be subtracted from the loan and harvest income.“You will become a rich man,” Larry Arcuyo says he and other landowners were promised, “before entering into contracts” with Agumil. Arcuyo chairs the Aramaywan farmers’ cooperative, one of 14 such growers’ cooperatives on the island. He says Aramaywan has 26 members who have leased land to Agumil. “There are rich men in Palawan — rich of debt,” he says. “We are praying that someone helps us to resolve that problem.“From the start almost 11 years [ago], the landowners have never seen any money even through the harvesting started eight years ago … Some landowners already died in the meantime,” Arcuyo says. He adds that the price per kilo of palm fruit set by Agumil “is already very low.” Even then, he says, this payment never reaches the farmers who have leased their land to the company; instead, “it is given to the Land Bank for settling the debt,” including for preparation of the land and the initial seedlings. “All decisions regarding finances are controlled by the company,” Arcuyo says.Palm oil fruit harvested from a plantation in Aramaywan community awaits transport to the Agumil processing plant. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.According to the Coalition against Land Grabbing (CALG), a local indigenous organization campaigning for indigenous people’s rights, 9,000 hectares (22,200 acres) in Palawan have been cleared for oil palm plantations, and the government is inviting foreign investors to develop more. Agumil spokesman Eric Ang told Mongabay, “We intend to expand our business in the oil palm industry but for now we are consolidating in Palawan.”CALG says that if rules and regulations had been implemented properly, Agumil would never have been able to develop its plantations in the first place. It claims the Philippines’ Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Act (IPRA Law) has been ignored, and that the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development (PCSD) has failed to implement its Strategic Environmental Plan as required under a 1992 act. The group also says that environmental compliance certificates should never have been issued to palm oil companies by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The department did not respond to an email request to comment from Mongabay.Arbitration between tribes and companyThe Palawan Palm Oil Industry Development Council (PPOIDC), a multi-stakeholder industry body, is seeking a solution to the ongoing disagreements. However, four meetings “resulted in deadlock,” according to the minutes of the most recent meeting, held last November, and an agreement has still not been reached.According to lease agreements obtained by Mongabay, Agumil offered a land rental rate of 17,000 pesos ($333) per hectare for a 10-year period, amounting to 1,000 to 2,000 pesos ($20 to $40) per hectare per year to each landowner. In addition, it offered 200 pesos ($4) per ton for harvested palm fruit.The price of processed palm oil has been dropping in recent months, and on May 31 stood at $563 per metric ton, the sixth-lowest monthly valuation in the past five years.Palm oil from the Agumil processing plant at Maasin is trucked to the port at Brookes Point from where it is shipped to other parts of the Philippines and abroad. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.It was noted at the PPOIDC meeting that the estimated tonnage of palm oil per hectare was well below that promised to farmers by Agumil at the project initiation. In contrast, the palm oil cooperatives demanded a signing bonus of 20,000 pesos ($400), production sharing of 400 pesos ($8) per metric ton, and land lease rental of 10,000 pesos ($200) per hectare per year.The meeting recommended that Agumil reconsider its offer to the cooperatives and if still no agreement could be reached, the committee should “render a report to the committee on Cooperatives, House of Representatives, and recommend/request Congress to provide legal assistance to the Palm Oil Cooperatives for the filing of appropriate case, a class suit against Agumil.”It also recommended that the “Top management of the Landbank of the Philippines conduct a thorough investigation on the various accounts of the Oil Palm Cooperatives and possibly cooperate with the Oil Palm Cooperatives in filing appropriate legal charges against Agumil.”Back in 2015, only one co-op had already repaid its loan and four were up-to-date with payments and on course for full repayment by 2023. Seven, however, needed loan restructuring and two had defaulted on their repayments. Restructuring in previous meetings had involved interest rate reductions from 14 percent to 7 percent, and the management fee charged by Agumil reduced from 10 percent to between 2.5 and 5 percent.Summing up, board member B.M. Rama said that, “with what had happened to this industry, somebody must be [held] responsible and liable to this problem and that this case should be brought to the proper forum which is the court.”Workers load bunches of palm oil fruit onto a truck bound for the Agumil processing plant at Brookes Point, Palawan. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.Asked by Mongabay whether Agumil would be improving terms to co-ops in future, Ang said: “There is no change in the terms and conditions of the Lease Agreement entered between the Coops and the Company.” He maintained that the coops are still liable for a start-up 20 percent equity advance, a matter hotly disputed in the meeting. “We are agreeable to an independent audit of the 20 percent equity advance,” Ang said, adding that none of the co-ops had yet initiated the auditing process.The idea that the capital debt of the co-ops be assumed by another entity was recommended by a study commissioned by the government’s Cooperative Development Authority. Ang says this “was explored by the Land Bank of Philippines (LBP) and Agumil.” Such a restructuring scheme has yet to be implemented, and according to Ang, would entail a new company assuming the capital debt and a further loan from the Land Bank along with a “processing agreement with Agumil.”Moratoria stop palm oil plantationsThese days, the tribes are getting organized and pursuing ways to seek justice for their lost earnings. Mobilizing to stem the spread of oil palm plantations in Palawan, groups such as CALG have networked with Palawan’s tribal groups to explain the risks of leasing their land. According to CALG chairman Kemil Motalib, the lessons have been learned and nobody is leasing land to Agumil any longer, though some are selling plots in areas where cultivation is still permitted.There’s another cause for celebration among Palawan’s indigenous communities: the planting of oil palm has been banned in two other provinces in the Philippines, a trend others may follow in the coming months.“No to expansion of palm oil planting in Rizal for five years,” says Kemil, explaining the substance of the moratorium declared by the Rizal municipal government in October 2018. Kemil, who is from the Tagbanwa tribe, said that a year of painstaking lobbying that included frequent meetings with government officials by CALG members and local indigenous people had finally paid off: “After one year the moratorium was signed by the Municipal Mayor of Rizal,” he says. “Agumil cannot question it because that is ordinance. That is the law made by the municipal government.”This sense of victory was reinforced by the election of Rizal’s first indigenous mayor. Otol Odi, a member of the Palaw’an tribe, was won the May 13 election, polling nearly twice his nearest rival. Odi, now in his seventies, attracted widespread support among Rizal’s population of 50,000 with his platform of defending the area’s natural resources from big business.The municipality of Quezon was the first in the Philippines to declare a moratorium on oil palm cultivation, back in 2014. After recent victories, CALG is now pressing for similar moves in the municipalities of Española and Bataraza. When asked by Mongabay whether Agumil would respect the moratoria, Ang said, “We will abide by any rules and regulations imposed by the Government.”Youth and children from Brookes Point hang out on a shipping buoy at the edge of the harbor where palm oil is exported. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.A further challenge to palm oil companies came from the May 16 re-election of Mary Jean Feliciano as mayor of Brooke’s Point. Despite Agumil being headquartered at Maasin near Brooke’s Point, where its processing plant is located, and using the town’s port facilities for exporting palm oil, Mayor Feliciano has pledged no new oil palm plantations in her region. (She says the two existing plantations can stay for now.) When asked what impact this would have on Agumil’s business, Ang said the company was “not aware of Mayor Feliciano’s pledge.”Recognizing ancestral domain landIn an August 2018 ceremony, ancestral domain titles were awarded to the Tagbanwa tribes in the barangays of Berong and Aramaywan. In all, the titles awarded by the National Commission on Indigenous People (NCIP) covered 31,000 hectares (76,600 acres) of territory, comprising 23,000 hectares (56,800 acres) of land and 8,000 hectares (19,800 acres) of ancestral waters.“The forest land is inside the ancestral domain because the forest provides many things, such as honey, rattan, and almaciga [Agathis philippinensis] tree resin,” says Sarong resident Romeo Japson. “They are hunting grounds and provide clean water to drink. There are also natural medicines in the forest that can prevent and cure many illnesses.”A tribal elder from Sarong community in Southern Palawan. Photo by Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.After an application has been filed, it is assessed by the NCIP at the national office in Manila. Here the order is issued for a survey of the area to determine parcel size and boundaries.“Ancestral domain land is the common land of the indigenous peoples. So the indigenous people are claiming their land, no limits to the thousands of hectares that they claimed. They can own that but only communally, not in the name of one person,” Japson says. He adds that marine and mangrove areas can also be applied for under ancestral domain.However, there are hurdles. According to Kemil, it takes at least five years to process an application, with the domains granted to Berong and Aramaywan the result of “12 years hard work.” Part of this is due to the average cost per application of around 1 million pesos ($19,500), which can take a while to amass. Then there’s the issue of capacity.“The NCIP is very stretched as there is only one office in the whole of Palawan and only a few staff,” Kemil says.An indigenous community member from Aramaywan village, Palawan. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.Despite the obstacles, the number of ancestral domain applications has grown, with 12 currently in the pipeline. CALG has an ambitious program in the works that intends to support three barangays each in the municipalities of Batarazza and Matarazza and six in Quezon, according to Kemil.After years of struggling against the odds for the rights to their land, the indigenous peoples of Palawan appear to be making progress.“Ancestral domain is the only way the Katutubo [indigenous peoples] can protect their rights, their land,” Japson says. “It will decide whether they live freely and whether they maintain their own traditions and culture.“Indigenous people believe if there is a forest, there is food, there is medicine, there is everything else.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Indonesia fires cost nation $5 billion this year: World Bank

first_imgBanner image: Peat fire in Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Haze, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Southeast Asia Haze, Southeast Asian Haze, Tropical Forests Land and forest fires in Indonesia cost the country $5.2 billion in damage and economic losses this year, equivalent to 0.5% of its economy, according to a new analysis from the World Bank.Half of the estimated economic loss came from the agriculture and environmental sectors, as fires damaged valuable estate crops and released significant greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, estimated at 708 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).The actual economic loss could be higher as the World Bank hasn’t taken into account the impacts of the fires on the public health and on the image of Indonesia’s palm oil industry. JAKARTA — Land and forest fires in Indonesia cost the country $5.2 billion in damage and economic losses this year, equivalent to 0.5% of its economy, according to a new analysis from the World Bank.The World Bank calculated the figure based on the fires’ impacts on the nation’s agriculture, transportation, trade, industry and environmental sectors.The fires burn annually across Indonesia’s vast peat swamp zones, which have been widely drained and dried for planting. They produce a toxic haze that blankets parts of Indonesia as well as neighboring countries. This year’s fires had burned nearly 10,000 km2 (3,861 mi2) of land as of October, according to the environment ministry.This year’s fires and haze, the report said, “led to significant negative economic impacts, estimated at $157 million in direct damage to assets and $5 billion in losses from affected economic activities.”Half of the estimated economic loss came from the agriculture and environmental sectors, as fires damaged valuable estate crops and released significant greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, estimated at 708 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).The World Bank predicts the economic impacts to be long lasting because production of affected commodities such as perennial crops and timber require at least two to five years to harvest.“Hence, the economic growth in 2019 and 2020 is predicted to be lower by 0.09 and 0.05 percentage points, respectively,” the report said.In 2015, the disastrous fires that razed 26,000 km2 (10,038 mi2) of lands and forests, were estimated to cost Indonesia at least $16.1 billion, equivalent to 1.9 percent of 2015 GDP.The World Bank estimates that the economic toll would be more severe at the provincial level, with a decline of up to 1.5 percentage points in affected provinces’ GDP growth in 2019.Central and West Kalimantan were the worst-affected provinces the most, with losses estimated at 7.9% and 6.1% of their respective GDPs.An analysis by the University of Riau estimates that Sumatra’s Riau province could suffer from 50 trillion rupiah’s ($3.5 billion) worth of economic loss due to this year’s fires.“The loss comes from disruption in trade, service, culinary, agriculture activities as well as delay in flights,” Suwondo, the university’s environmental study center coordinator, said as quoted by Tempo.Doni Monardo, the head of the national disaster mitigation agency, the BNPB, said the government was well aware of the economic impacts of the annual fires.“The president has said that if fires have broken out, they’re difficult to be extinguished,” he told Mongabay. “The losses are from various aspects, such as health, aviation and security, schools closing down and people not working. They are very harmful.”Doni added that the agency would use the World Bank’s 2019 report for future reference.“The BNPB doesn’t have experts [to calculate these figures],” he said. “The expert is the World Bank. So just use one data [from the World Bank] as a standard. The 2015 data [of economic loss] is also from the World Bank. We need to have a standard.”A group of locals in West Kalimantan participates in a flag-raising ceremony amid toxic haze from nearby peat fires. Image by Aseanty Pahlevi/Mongabay Indonesia.Health impactThe World Bank said it did not take into account the long-term effects of repeated exposure to haze on human capital, such as acute respiratory illnesses and reduced quality of education due to affected health of teachers and students.As of September 2019, over 900,000 people had reported respiratory health diseases and hundreds of schools in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore had to temporarily close.An analysis by Madani, an environmental NGO, found that this year’s fires choked at least 45 districts and cities around Indonesia with high levels of PM2.5, a fine particulate matter small enough to penetrate deep into the lungs and cross into the bloodstream.According to the World Health Organization, PM2.5 causes acute respiratory issues such as asthma and is increasingly linked to death from heart and lung disease.In Riau, Madani found that the haze emitted from fires in the province was linked to various diseases, with upper respiratory infection being the most common illness.In 2018, 31.4 percent of pneumonia cases on children under the age of five was in Riau.Madani executive director Teguh Surya said sometimes the health impacts from the fires and toxic haze weren’t detected until the fires were gone.“This year’s fires might be over now as rain starts to fall, but the disaster doesn’t end,” he said. “There are long-lasting impacts that could last for years. The impacts aren’t just today, but have to be calculated for the next 20 years.”According to a recent study published in GeoHealth, exposure to air pollution from Indonesian fires will cause some 36,000 premature deaths per year on average across Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia over the next few decades if current trends continue – that is, if no comprehensive land management strategies, such as peatland restoration, are undertaken.Therefore, Teguh called on the government to consider the long-term impacts of the recurring haze and fire episode when tackling fires.“This is a threat to our generation,” he said. “How can the young generation lead the country if they’re sick, or even dead?”A peat swamp in Sumatra smolders during the 2015 haze crisis. The drainage canals were dug in order to prepare the land for planting with oil palm, but the practice renders the land vulnerable to catching fire. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Unaccounted impactsThe World Bank figure also didn’t take into account how the recent fires might damage the image of Indonesia’s palm oil sector, thus affecting trade. Indonesia’s peat swamps are often drained by oil palm planters.The report said the annual fires had exacerbated the negative global perception of Indonesian palm oil, driving down demand from European countries, and factoring into the European Union’s (EU) plan to phase out palm-oil based biofuel by 2030.“This year’s spike in fire activities are unlikely to help Indonesia’s bilateral negotiations with the EU through the World Trade Organization,” the report said.The BNPB’s Doni said the bad image of the country’s palm oil had resulted in some products being labelled with “no palm oil” in some countries.“We are currently being punished by the international world,” he said during a recent government meeting on the preparation for 2020 fire season. “Biscuits in some countries are labelled with ‘no palm oil’. If this is copied in other major countries that have been utilizing Indonesia’s palm oil, [our market] will keep dwindling.”Isna Fatimah, a researcher at the Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL), said the government could start considering these unaccounted impacts when they’re trying to hold companies responsible for fires on their concessions.So far this year, the Environment and Forestry Ministry has prosecuted 17 companies linked to fires. Nine of them have received their verdicts and ordered to pay a total of 3.15 trillion rupiah ($225 million) in fines.Isna said the amount of money that the companies had to pay still fall short of what’s deemed to be fair because the damages calculated by the government were usually limited to environmental degradation.Meanwhile, the money spent by the government on tackling the fires, including outbreaks on company lands, isn’t taken into account when the government sues these companies, according to her.This year, the BNPB alone spent up to 3 trillion rupiah ($213 million) to extinguish fires, triple the amount it usually spends, while other state bodies like the environment ministry also have their own budget to fight fires.“The government should start thinking about this so that these costs can be reimbursed [when suing companies],” Isna told Mongabay. “It means that the money spent by the state to mitigate the loss from fires isn’t limited to health and environmental impacts. This might include declining investment in the palm oil industry because it has a bad image. These things should be considered.”center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

DDTV: VIDEO OF A DONEGAL FAN’S DAY AT CROKE PARK

first_imgTHE GAA slogan says that you can’t beat being there. And you really can’t.For those of you who couldn’t make it to Croke Park on Sunday, the good people at jacksonsmediatv took along a video camera.And this view from the Hogan Stand (must be loaded!) is worth watching.There’s even a cameo role later on from Seamus Coleman! Click to play.  DDTV: VIDEO OF A DONEGAL FAN’S DAY AT CROKE PARK was last modified: August 27th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DDTV: VIDEO OF A DONEGAL FAN’S DAY AT CROKE PARKlast_img read more

Humboldt State men’s basketball loses fifth straight as Chico State sweeps season series

first_imgArcata >> A return home to Lumberjack Arena couldn’t cure all of the Humboldt State men’s basketball team’s ills of the past three weeks.That had a lot to do with what the opposition was doing from start to finish on Thursday night.Behind the red-hot shooting of junior guard Corey Silverstrom, Humboldt State’s No. 1 nemesis, No. 19-nationally ranked Chico State, rolled into Arcata and claimed a 100-83 win to extend the Jacks’ losing streak to a season-high five games and keep them winless in …last_img read more

Takeaways: the fuss over the Sharks power play was overblown

first_imgSAN JOSE — Pete DeBoer made a simple case for how the Sharks could turn things around after a 2-2-1 road trip: win the special teams battle, finish around the net and solidify the goal crease.They followed the formula to near perfection against the Buffalo Sabres at SAP Center Thursday.The power play finally broke through, going 3 for 7. The penalty kill went 5 for 5. The Sharks scored five times and Martin Jones put together his best game of the season, making 24 saves on 25 shots.Oh yeah, …last_img read more

Yield-X offers investors currency options

first_img16 September 2008Investors on the Yield-X will now be able to invest in currency options, a new investment avenue that complements the existing currency futures, which the JSE believes is sure to increase both trading volumes and liquidity in the local currency market.The first contract will initially be based on the rand-dollar, with other contracts to be requested from the relevant market markers. Like currency futures, currency options allow investors and speculators to benefit from the movement of the rand against other currencies, but differ in that they come with a “built-in insurance policy”.In other words, currency options are contracts that grant the investor the right but not the obligation to buy or sell currency at a set rate at a set time.“In layman’s terms what this means is that currency options allow the investor the choice not to exercise the contract if the exchange rate is not in his or her favour,” JSE trading GM Warren Geers said in a statement this week.According to the JSE, it is working together with Super Derivatives, a global derivatives solutions provider, to determine the currency options closing prices that will be used on a daily basis.Best means of hedgingDue to their flexibility, currency options are considered one of the best ways for companies, the agricultural community and individuals to hedge against adverse movements in the exchange rates.Currency futures are used by investors who are very confident that the currency will move in a certain direction while options are ideal for those who need to purchase foreign currency but are uncertain of the movements of the currency.“Of course, like an insurance policy, the investor will pay more of a premium for this peace of mind,” Geers said.Geers added that the JSE was confident that currency options would attract a different investor to that of currency futures, and is expecting a greater show of interest from institutional investors and the agricultural sector.“The currency futures market has done exceptionally well – it recently broke through the R18-billion mark,” Geers said. “The introduction of currency options as well as the new sliding scale fee system model we have recently introduced should further boost this market.”SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

New Ohio Forages website launched

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Our new Ohio Forages website has been launched, and can be found at https://forages.osu.edu/.  This is the same url as our old Ohio Forage Network site.We intend for this website to be the go-to place to find all things forage within the Ohio State University Extension system. We are still in the process of adding content but it already includes a fair amount of information and news on forage and pasture management. We will be adding to each section over time. Be sure to check out the Resources tab for some cool photos and links to some of our favorite forage-related websites. A brand new feature we plan to add over the next few months is a place to add and compile videos on key aspects of forage management.So browse around in it and let me ([email protected]) know if you have any suggestions.last_img read more

Major Spring Storm Coming

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Elaine SheinDTN Associate Managing EditorOMAHA (DTN) — DTN Senior Meteorologist Michael Palmerino was quite clear on what he thought of the projected path of a major spring storm for the middle of this week.The storm is aiming for some of the same areas that are still recovering from the mid-March blizzard and rains that triggered historic flooding in the Midwest.“It’s a terrible, terrible track in terms of its impact on the areas that have already seen terrible flooding back in March,” Palmerino said in an interview. “It couldn’t be any worse of a track to those having flooding in the area,” he said, pointing out that the main difference from a few weeks ago is this time it’s hitting where the snow has already melted.He added that this storm looks very similar to the March storm and appears to be setting up to drop at least 1 to 2 inches of rain through areas of the Midwest with very saturated soils and that are flooding or have been flooded. This could set up another round of flooding.The latest storm, which began with heavy rains in the Pacific Northwest, is expected to rapidly intensify Tuesday night into Thursday as it crosses into the Northern and Central Plains and Upper Mississippi Valley.Wyoming, northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, South Dakota, Nebraska, parts of Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin are expected to be affected by the storm on Wednesday and Thursday. Weather advisories already have been issued in parts of the Midwest, Central and Northern Plains for heavy snow, heavy rain, and high winds.The National Weather Service said there is a threat of strong winds and hail from strong to severe thunderstorms expected to hit south-central Nebraska, northern Kansas to southwest Iowa on Wednesday afternoon and evening, with isolated tornadoes along the Nebraska/Kansas border.RAIN AND SNOWPalmerino said the storm may initially start as rain and change to snow, and there is potential for heavy snow in South Dakota and parts of Nebraska.The weather models show there could be widespread up to 6 inches of snow, but some areas could get up to 18 inches or more. Other areas could get 2 to 3 inches of rain, or melted snow equivalent from a mix of rain and snow.While there weren’t any blizzard advisories out yet as of Monday evening, near-blizzard conditions are expected with the heavy snow and high winds gusting to 50 miles per hour in places. “This will have a big impact on travel,” Palmerino noted.The NWS has already said in some places travel may become impossible with whiteout conditions.IMPACT ON CATTLE“For cattle, the areas I’m most concerned about with the heavy wet snow and blowing snow is western Nebraska,” Palmerino said. The center of the snow and possible blizzard conditions could also affect livestock in southwest South Dakota, northeast Colorado and northwest Kansas. Southeast South Dakota, north-central Nebraska and southwest Minnesota will start as rain and end as snow, affecting livestock in those areas as well.He said this storm will be very stressful for cattle and calves, especially with heavy snow of 6 to 12 inches, and winds of 40 to 50 mph.DTN Senior Ag Meteorologist Joel Burgio said this storm should have a fairly significant impact on livestock, especially as it turns much colder behind the storm. While not as low of temperatures as in winter, it still will be below- to well-below-normal temperatures for this time of year in the western Midwest.“We’re talking about deep snow, cold and wind that will increase stress on livestock,” Burgio said.He said the heavy rain and heavy snow will be over a lot of the Corn Belt, extending from South Dakota and Nebraska to Wisconsin, but Burgio added that moderate to locally heavy precipitation could also reach Wyoming, northeast Colorado, southern Nebraska and maybe northwest Kansas.As the system moves east, it will have warmer air and scattered thunderstorms with moderate-to-heavy rain for eastern Illinois and into Indiana and Ohio.DELAYING FIELDWORK“Fields are going to be very wet, and ponding in fields as well,” Burgio said. “It’s also going to add some rain into river systems — the mid- and lower-Missouri (River) and Upper Mississippi River, and that should cause the rivers to rise.”Meanwhile, the Delta area will have a quieter week after heavy rainfall there this past weekend. However, an extreme rain event is expected this next weekend to include severe weather and heavy rains and thunderstorms — dropping 1 to 3 inches of rain, with locally higher amounts — reaching from the southeast Plains into the Ohio, Mississippi and Tennessee River Valleys. This will add to the already mostly surplus soil moisture in the Delta region, contribute to a significant risk of severe flooding, and delay seasonal fieldwork.“I’m not sure if that’s the end of it either,” said Burgio. “The jet stream that is in place is pretty potent.” He said there continues to be an active weather pattern that will continue to bring rain into the southern and eastern Midwest.“Even if it stopped raining, it will be a while to get into the fields,” Burgio said.NORTH DAKOTA LUCKED OUTPalmerino said wet conditions in fields are pretty much widespread, slowing down fieldwork, but places in North Dakota — outside of the area facing flooding concerns from the Red River — have lucked out with cooler weather helping with an orderly snowmelt. The storm track is farther south, and while the soil might be too cold to plant, farmers in the north may be able to hit the fields sooner.**Editor’s Note: To see what farmers in the Dakotas and Minnesota are saying about when they might be getting into the fields, see DTN Basis Analyst Mary Kennedy’s Cash Market Moves column at https://www.dtnpf.com/…DTN Managing Editor Anthony Greder notes that the latest USDA Weekly Crop Progress Reports show spring wheat planting is behind the five-year average pace at https://www.dtnpf.com/…Elaine Shein can be reached at [email protected](AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

SEA Games: Kayla Richardson skips 100m dash, targets 200m gold

first_imgPH Volcanoes off to hot start in SEA Games View comments Kayla, according to her father Jeffrey, has a personal best of 23.60 seconds in 200m but ran 23.45 “with a little tailwind.”Her expected opponent in 200m is Singaporean champion Shanti Perreira, who won it with a time of 23.60 seconds two years ago in her backyard. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Man sworn in as lawyer by judge who sentenced him to prison as a teen 20 years ago LATEST STORIES MOST READcenter_img LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games “I don’t really want to say that I am giving it up, but this is not the event I have been training for,” said Richardson, who snared silver in 200m right after her century dash triumph two years ago.The team is looking at finally clinching the 200m gold this time and save the University of Southern California sophomore for possible golds in 4X100 and 4×400  relays.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutREAD: With a heart for old people, Richardson twins hope to run to golden finishShe will be running in the relays with twin sister Kyla, Katherine Santos and either Eloisa Luzon or another Fil-American Zion Nelson Corrales. UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students PLAY LIST 01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd Flags of SEA Games countries raised at Athletes Village Read Next Kayla Anise Richardson of the Philippines (center) finishes first for the gold medal at the 28th SEA Games Women’s 100m finals held at the National Stadium, Singapore Sports Hub. INQUIRER PHOTO/RAFFY LERMAKUALA LUMPUR — In an apparent strategic shift, reigning century dash queen Kayla Richardson won’t defend her Southeast Asian Games crown and instead will concentrate on 200-meter and the relays.The 17-year-old Richardson said she didn’t train for the 100m dash — easily the showcase event of centrepiece sport of athletics.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more