Rapid Response car axed from Monday next

first_imgWhatsApp Twitter Advertisement Linkedin Facebook THE cancellation of a vital rapid link in the care of critically ill people could cost lives, it has been claimed. It has been confirmed that the Rapid Response paramedic car, which operates as an emergency first response in advance of the ambulance service arriving, is to be axed from next week. Deputy Willie O’Dea, who claimed he was confidentially told by sources close to the service that it is being cut, told the Limerick Post, “this could cost lives.”Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He has tabled a Dail question for the minister.The Rapid Response car gives 24/7 cover and is deployed when an ambulance may take longer than the ideal response time of 7 minutes 59 seconds.It is reported that the service will be withdrawn from from March 19.Deputy O’Dea said: “The rapid response car provides advanced life support cover for critically ill people of the wider Limerick area“I have tabled a Parliamentary Question to the Minister for Health outlining the seriousness of the situation and the potential loss of life as a result of the withdrawal of this service”,The HSE said that the rapid response vehicle (RRV) was put in place on a trial basis for 25 weeks as part of a process to devise better arrangements for patients.“When this trial ends next week, advanced life support delivery will change from the solo response in the RRV to delivery through the ambulance network”.However, the secretary of the union representing paramedics and ambulance personnel, NASRA’s Tony Gregg, said that he was not aware of any plan to withdraw the service.“If the car is in situ withdrawing the service is penny pinching. It’s a disgrace if this happens. “The Rapid Response cars have their specific uses and depending on location and the circumstances, they can be the best chance of getting first response services in an emergency”.He said that if “this service is taken out of the the system you have to replace it with something. Taking it away is a blow to the community”..center_img NewsLocal NewsRapid Response car axed from Monday nextBy admin – March 15, 2012 449 Email Print Previous articleGood news on way for Kilmallock area roadsNext articleLimerick out on parade adminlast_img read more

Pitt Rivers launches LGBT+ History Month

first_imgBoyce said: “Each year we find prestigious venues such as the Pitt Rivers Museum want to host the launch event, and each year more and more members of the general public want to be involved and included. Society is changing for the better; let’s keep up the fight for liberation, for all!” The free event, ‘Museum Late Night: Diversity’ will include a series of talks, tours of the museum, poetry, stalls and activities, as well as a diversity-themed light and sound show projected onto the Pitt Rivers and Museum of Natural History buildings. “I know, if the graphics work, when I see the Pride branding projected onto the side of the building, I will have tears in my eyes.” She said this year’s launch is different because “we’re teamed up with the Pitt Rivers Museum, and we’re very pleased to be a part of an institution’s celebration of the LGBTQ+ community.” “I have had to silence myself at times to avoid being subject to multiple layers of discrimination from both inside and outside of the community and knowing that we all have a part in its future is why we do what we do. Ratty said she was “so proud to be included in such esteemed company” as the first person of colour to serve as chair of Oxford Pride, and added: “As we move forward through time, getting by pure effort similar rights to those who don’t identity [as LGBTQ+], we should remember those who came before us. In hosting this event the Pitt Rivers is publicly showing its commitment to diversity, learning and unlearning past narratives. The launch will be preceded by ‘Story Time with LGBT History Month: Stonewall,’ in which Stephen Boyce, the Chair of Trustees of the education charity Schools Out UK and LGBT+ History Month, will read an account of the 1969 Stonewall uprising for schoolchildren, narrated from the viewpoint of the building itself.center_img The Pitt Rivers Museum will stage a launch event for LGBT+ History Month on Friday (November 15), to kick off celebrations for the month itself which will be celebrated in February 2020. Other speakers will include Dean Atta, author of ‘The Black Flamingo,’ which describes the coming-of-age story of a mixed-race gay teen who takes up drag at university, Caroline Paige, who served as the first openly transgender officer in the UK armed forces, Zayna Ratty, the chair of Oxford Pride, and Sue Sanders, founder of LGBT+ History Month. Numerous organisations will also form part of the event, including Blackwell’s, who will run an LGBTQ+ bookstall, and Pink Times and OX & Fyne Times are expected to among stallholders. Musical performers will include indie rock group Junk Whale, and Aphra Taylor, a folk and grunge artist, as well as Drag Syndrome, a drag troupe made up of performers with Down’s Syndrome. Sanders, who initiated the first UK LGBT+ History Month as part of a Schools Out project in February 2005, told Cherwell: “We have been invisible for so long, and we came up with the idea for LGBT+ His- tory Month just after Section 28 died, and it was also at the time when the Labour government was talking about a single equality act, so we thought it was the per- fect time to launch a month that would celebrate LGBT.” Since 2005, museums have often been the sites of November launch events, with the British Library’s launch event in London taking place on November 14.last_img read more

Operation Martillo Uses a Stiletto to Stop Drug Traffickers

first_img WASHINGTON, D.C., U.S.A. – Traffickers beware: You’re likely to be pursued by a Stiletto. No, not the knife, a boat – a 90-foot long, 40-foot-wide vessel that reaches speeds of more than 50 mph and is filled with radars and computers and screens to track anything on water. And its unique, M-shaped hull and four 1,650-horsepower diesel engines allow the US$10 million boat to zip across the water while leaving just a small wake. The Stiletto is expected to become even more of a major factor in Operation Martillo, a regional counter-narcotics mission that brings together Western Hemisphere and European countries to cut the flow of illicit drugs through Central America. The Stiletto also has space to store an inflatable boat, which counter-narcotics personnel can use to get closer to vessels they want to board. About 80% of cocaine shipments are moved via maritime routes. Nearly 90% of the cocaine that reaches the United States comes through Mexico and Central America, according to the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board. Operation Martillo is led by Joint Interagency Task Force South, based in Key West, Fla., but it relies heavily on working with law enforcement and military agencies in other countries. “All the nations along the Central American isthmus, the United States, European partners, Canadians, etc., have been working more closely than ever in my 30 years or so working this particular problem set, as a direct result of Operation Martillo,” said JIATF-S Director Rear Adm. Charles D. Michel in January, at the conclusion of the operation’s first year. And what a year it was. Launched in January 2012, Operation Martillo directly seized or assisted in the capture of 127 metric tons (279,987 pounds) of cocaine in 2012, JIATF-S authorities reported. Security forces also have seized 56 go-fast boats, six pangas, two motor vessels, two semi-submersible vessels, two sailing vessels, six vehicles, seven fishing vessels and 12 aircraft and arrested all those individuals who were operating those crafts, according to Michel. A go-fast boat typically carries 1,000 kilograms of cocaine. “Operation Martillo is designed to deny or significantly hamper the ability of the traffickers to operate in the littoral routes along both sides of the Central American isthmus and force them into the deep-water routes. We have not achieved that on both sides of the isthmus,” Michel said. “On the Caribbean side we have been able to change some of the trafficking patterns.” Operation Martillo has carried its momentum into 2013, as the year already has been marked by major narcotics seizures. • Panama’s National Aeronaval Service (SENAN) agents seized 1.475 tons of cocaine and arrested four Colombians, SENAN Director Belsio González said on April 23. The seizure – the country’s largest of the year – occurred this past weekend when authorities spotted a suspicious vessel off the coast of the central province of Veraguas. Officers chased the boat for several minutes before boarding it. The cocaine was packed in 59 bundles. • In early April, U.S. law enforcement authorities arrested 103 suspects on April 3 in what was described as a “massive operation” against heroin and cocaine traffickers from the Caribbean into the U.S. state of Connecticut. • U.S. and Guatemalan counter-narcotics forces seized more than 998 kilograms of cocaine worth upward of US$90 million in the eastern Pacific in early March. • The Costa Rican Coast Guard seized 1.5 tons of cocaine after four crew members fled a boat to avoid arrest on March 13, Mauricio Boraschi, Costa Rica’s national anti-drug commissioner, said. Costa Rican officials have seized five tons of cocaine, eradicated 51,494 marijuana plants and broken up four narco-trafficking gangs so far this year, according to the Ministry of Security. • On Jan. 4, the USS Gary, a United States Navy frigate, intercepted a suspicious vessel carrying 600 pounds of cocaine. Coast Guard officers seized the shipment, which had a street value of about US$22 million. Michel, however, said there’s more work to be done. “We have seen strategic shifts in trafficking patterns in the Western Caribbean,” he added. “In the Eastern Pacific side, we are still working on that. We have seen some shifts but on the Pacific side we have a lot more challenges than we do on the Caribbean side in significantly changing those routes. One thing I will say about routes outside of Central America is that we have not yet been able to sense significant shifts into other routes, for example deeper into the Eastern Pacific or to Asia, or through the Central Caribbean or Eastern Caribbean. Those routes are essentially the same as they were before but we are constantly trying to sense those routes.” By Dialogo April 29, 2013last_img read more

Gabonese timber linked to illegal logging seized in Antwerp

first_imgCorruption, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Law, Forest Loss, Forests, Governance, Government, Habitat Loss, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Logging, Rainforests, Timber, Timber Laws, timber trade, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Tropical hardwoods In 2016 and 2017, EIA investigators posed as timber merchants and met with WCTS’s deputy general manager, Chen Wixing. They secretly filmed a series of meetings with Chen and other WCTS employees.“His business model is essentially structural over-harvesting, tax evasion, money laundering and, covering all that, corruption,” Handy said.According to Handy, WCTS was extracting between two and three times its legal quota. When the EIA spoke to Chen in 2016, Handy says WCTS was already cutting down forest in areas it was not supposed to have reached until 2030.In the videos, published by the EIA in May this year, Chen also describes evading tax through transfer pricing and channeling his exports through smaller companies to avoid the attention of the authorities in Gabon.Following the EIA’s exposé, WCTS is now under investigation in Gabon.As part of its commitment to reduce illegal logging, the European Union introduced the EUTR in 2013, making it an offense to import illegally logged timber into the bloc. A key part of the regulation is a requirement that European companies importing timber must conduct thorough due diligence on their timber sources.Guidance documents produced by the European Commission in 2016 to assist timber traders in interpreting the EUTR state, “In cases where the risk of corruption is not negligible, even official documents issued by authorities cannot be considered reliable.” It is on this basis that Greenpeace believes Compagnie de Bois Anvers failed to conduct due diligence.In a statement responding to inquiries from Mongabay, Compagnie du Bois Anvers said, “We were of course shocked to see the set of movies that was released by EIA on 22/5/2019. We have immediately suspended our relationship with WCTS until the outcome of further investigations.”It declined to comment further until the Belgian investigation is complete.Allegations of illegal activities by WCTS have been aired publicly since 2017. WCTS was fined by the Gabonese authorities in 2017 following an investigation. It is also the subject of a civil complaint by Conservation and Justice, a Gabonese NGO. Verbelen said he believes the availability of this information means that Compaigne du Bois Anvers had clearly failed in its due diligence obligation.“There are more than enough indications if you are a timber trader in Belgium that there is a high risk of dealing with illegal timber when you’re buying from this company,” he said. “[Compagnie du Bois Anvers] needs to be investigated and, in our opinion, sanctioned.”Compagnie du Bois Anvers and Greenpeace are now awaiting the outcome of the Belgian government’s investigation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Banner image: Timber exported by Wan Chuan Timber SARL currently blocked at the port of Antwerp, Belgium. Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen/Greenpeace Belgian authorities have blocked a shipment of tropical timber from Gabon after a tip-off by Greenpeace.Under the EU Timber Regulation, European companies have an obligation to conduct proper due diligence on the source of the timber they import.Greenpeace says this due diligence requirement was not met in this case, as the wood was exported by a Chinese logging firm with previous allegations of illegal logging. On July 8, Greenpeace forest campaigner Philippe Verbelen was conducting routine monitoring at the Belgian port of Antwerp when he noticed a familiar name attached to a timber shipment: Wan Chuan Timber SARL (WCTS), a company that has been exposed and fined for a series of grave offenses in Gabon.Verbelen alerted customs officials at the port, who moved quickly moved to block the shipment of padoek, a tropical timber. The Belgian government is now investigating the company receiving the shipment, Antwerp-based Compagnie de Bois Anvers, for a possible breach of the European Union Timber Regulation (EUTR).The shipment in question came from Gabon, a country that currently still has 85 percent coverage of incredibly biodiverse rainforest. In May this year, Pierre Moussavou, Gabon’s then-vice president and minister of state for forests and the environment, was fired in connection with a timber scandal.“[Gabon] is a country with a high level of corruption linked to the forestry sector,” Verbelen said. “European timber companies clearly need to identify companies active in Gabon as a high risk for doing business.”WCTS, which exported the timber, is a Chinese logging company operating in Gabon. Verbelen recognized its name from an undercover probe by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), an NGO based in Washington, D.C. The EIA came across WCTS in 2016 while investigating illegal logging activity in Gabon.“We were asking who the really bad guys were, who were the people or the companies that were just breaking all the rules with no respect,” said Lisa Handy, the EIA’s director of forest campaigns, “and several times everybody was referring back to WCTS.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by terna gyuselast_img read more

Alarm over mass vulture poisoning in South Africa

first_imgFifteen white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus) and a young lappet-faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos) have died after feeding on a poison-laced impala carcass in northern Zululand on 23 Dec — the fourth such incident in the province in 2019.The heads and feet had been removed from 13 of the dead birds, their bodies concealed in thick bush: experts warn that deliberate poisoning of vultures for belief-based use is on the increase in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal province.More than 1,200 vultures were deliberately poisoned across Southern and Eastern Africa this year, according to the Endangered Wildlife Trust. DURBAN, South Africa — Another mass vulture poisoning incident has ended the year on a sour note for Wildlife ACT rangers in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal.Soon after releasing two rehabilitated vultures, rescued from a different poisoning scene earlier this year, WildLife ACT was alerted to another incident on 23 Dec, on Rolling Valley Ranch, located between Pongola and Mkuze in the far north of the province.“Arriving at a scene like this with everything so fresh, but too late to assist in saving any poisoned birds is heartbreaking. Losing one vulture is always a tragedy. Losing at least 16 birds at one feeding is a crisis,” said PJ Roberts, manager of Wildlife ACT’s Emergency Response Team.Wildlife ACT works closely with Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, local farmers and communities, and other conservation groups to protect three endangered vulture species in KwaZulu-Natal.The first bird found, a white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), hinted at Roberts’s worst fears: “It had a full crop (still containing undigested food), contorted feet and many dead flies were scattered around its remains — all clear signs of fast-acting poison.”The team swept the area, but it took an aerial search to locate more victims. “We landed to find the devastating remains of multiple birds hidden at the base of the tree. Included in this discovery was the removed, yellow, wing tags of H065; a young lappet-faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos) tagged in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in October 2017 as a fledgling,” said Roberts.“No more than 30m away, the morbid discovery of 13 processed and harvested white-backed vultures, with their heads and feet removed, were found very purposefully hidden in a thick bush,” added Roberts.Wildlife ACT response team with the bodies of 13 white-backed vultures, poisoned for the traditional medicine trade. Image courtesy Wildlife ACT.Nearby was the body of an impala — snared, killed, and laced with poison. The rangers burned all the contaminated carcasses to ash to remove the poison from the ecosystem.It is the fourth vulture poisoning incident in northern Zululand this year, bringing the total recorded number of vultures harvested for body parts in this region alone to 53. The actual number of birds killed is believed to be much higher as many incidents are never detected.The Endangered WildLife Trust’s (EWT) Vultures for Africa Programme manager, Andre Botha, said it was difficult to quantify how many vultures are deliberately poisoned for body parts.According to records kept by EWT, more than 1,200 vultures have been deliberately poisoned in Southern and Eastern Africa this year. Culprits include poachers who poison the carcasses of elephant and other game in an apparent effort to conceal illegal activities from rangers. These poisonings are referred to as “sentinel poisonings”, as vultures circling over poached animals alert rangers to the killings.Africa’s vulture populations have already declined by an average 62 percent over the past three decades — with seven species crashing by 80 percent. Experts recently warned that the continent’s vulture populations face the prospect of collapsing, in much the same way as vulture species did in Asia thirty years ago.In the early 1990s, millions of Asian vultures died after eating the remains of cows in carcass dumps; India has 500 million cows raised for milk, but not eaten by the majority Hindu population. Scientists identified the culprit: diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory used by vets. Vultures feeding on carcasses containing the drug died swiftly of kidney failure.The reasons for the African vulture crisis are vastly different. They include habitat loss, ingestion of lead ammunition, collisions with power lines, accidental drownings in farm water reservoirs, and the use of poisoned bait by livestock owners to kill predators like jackals. Vultures feeding off the carcasses subsequently die, often in significant numbers.But many more are poisoned deliberately to harvest body parts for belief-based use.“The vultures are killed for their heads and feet and other parts,” said Chris Kelly, a species director at Wildlife ACT. “This is definitely the single biggest threat to diminishing vulture populations in this province,” said Kelly.In many parts of Africa, vultures are believed to have psychic powers, including an ability to see into the future.According to a fact sheet from EWT, the brains of the bird are dried, rolled and smoked as joints or simply burnt and the fumes inhaled. Users believe this improves their odds when they gamble on the lottery or place bets on sport. Students take it when preparing for exams. Other reported uses of vultures include consuming their eyes to improve eyesight, their beaks for protection, or their feet to heal fractured bones or make a person run faster.In 2014, EWT estimated that 130,000 traders, hunters and traditional healers were operating in South Africa. This figure is believed to have increased, sparking calls from conservationists, environmental scientists and wildlife experts at this year’s Conservation Symposium for an awareness-building campaign to reduce this consumption and demand for vulture parts.“Vultures provide critically important ecosystem services by cleaning up carcasses thus reducing the spread of dangerous diseases such as anthrax and rabies and resulting in highly significant economic and human health benefits,” said Brent Coverdale, an animal scientist for Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife at the symposium.  “We really can’t afford to lose them.”As vultures are protected by law, it is illegal to possess or kill any of the six vulture species found in South Africa. Nevertheless, deliberate killings continue.Roberts said the latest poisoning incident had been reported to local police.“We are hoping this leads to an arrest,” said Roberts.  “If the illegal harvest of these birds is not halted, then extinction may be just around the corner and the services that they provide within the ecosystem will be lost forever.”As part of a bid to save vulture populations, managers of conservation areas and private game reserves in South Africa are collaborating to create safe havens for existing vulture populations.— additional reporting, Mlu Mdletshe, Roving Reporters.Poisoned vulture: more than 1,200 vultures have been deliberately poisoned in Southern and Eastern Africa in 2019. Image courtesy Wildlife ACT.CitationOgada, D., Shaw, P., Beyers, R. L., Buij, R., Murn, C., Thiollay, J. M., … Sinclair, A. R. E. (2015). Another continental vulture crisis: Africa’s vultures collapsing toward extinction. Conservation Letters, 9(2), 89-97. doi:10.1111/conl.12182 Animals, Birds, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Poaching, Poisoning, Raptors, Scavengers, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Fred Kockott is the founding director of Roving Reporters, a journalism training agency that focuses on environmental, social and justice issues.Banner image: Burning a poisoned white-backed vulture carcass. Image courtesy Wildlife ACT.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by terna gyuse Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

How the Raiders can fill their most glaring need in 2019 NFL Draft

first_imgIt doesn’t take a rocket scientist or even a draft guru-turned-general manager to figure out where the Raiders need the most help after a dismal 2018. They finished last season with a mere 13 sacks, the fewest single-season total for any team since the 2008 Chiefs finished with only 10.The Raiders knew they wouldn’t wreak havoc in opposing backfields after trading All-Pro edge rusher Khalil Mack before the regular season, but nobody could’ve anticipated their pass rush being as anemic as it …last_img read more

Attorney: E15 Rule on Solid Ground

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Predicting how a legal case plays out can be dangerous territory, but an attorney representing ethanol interests in an expected petroleum industry challenge to EPA’s final E15 rule said the agency appears to be on solid ground with the rule.In a Renewable Fuels Association news call on Monday, Bryan Stockton, an attorney with Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP in Washington, D.C., said the rule will be challenged in court. The American Petroleum Institute said publicly, in the months leading up to the EPA finalizing the rule, the industry would file a lawsuit.As of Monday afternoon, a lawsuit had not been filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where a challenge would be filed. API did not respond to DTN’s request for comment.“EPA drafted the rule to withstand a challenge,” Stockton told reporters. “EPA has the authority to revise its interpretations. EPA has an advantage. It just needs to be a reasonable interpretation. Courts generally defer to the agency. The changed circumstances provides a basis for a change in regulations. Here EPA determined the regulation was out of date.”In previous court cases, he said, the opposition has had a difficult time in challenging or proving harm caused by EPA rules. There has been discussion about the possibility of someone asking a court for an injunction to prevent the agency from implementing year-round E15.“Seeking an injunction is a high bar,” Stockton said.Parties seeking injunctions have to prove they would experience “irreparable harm” if a regulation is implemented.If an injunction is sought, Stockton said, it usually comes with a rapid briefing schedule. Any legal action could create uncertainty for retailers wanting to expand E15 offerings.He said the change in the E15 rule was to account for regulatory and marketplace changes. The final rule determined that E15 is substantially similar to E10.“Under the Clean Air Act, if a fuel is similar to another fuel in the market, it may be introduced into commerce,” Stockton said.E15 MARKET EXPANSION SLOWRFA President and CEO Geoff Cooper said the industry is not under the illusion that allowing year-round E15 sales across the country will lead to instant market expansion.Cooper said the RFA has always said the immediate impact of the final E15 rule would be somewhat modest. “What this does is break down the door to longer-term growth,” he said.Without the new rule, Cooper said, it was expected that stations across the country would sell about 400 million gallons of E15 in 2019. Now, he said, the industry can expect to sell at least 700 million gallons to 800 million gallons of E15 in 2019 — still a small percentage of all transportation fuel sales.“It finally gives regulatory certainty to the supply chain that it has been looking for,” Cooper said, pointing to three to five years down the road when the rule will have a “big impact” on domestic demand for E15.Steve Walk, chief operations officer at Protec Fuel, said customers at his company’s 700-plus stations that offer ethanol blends in 18 states “will get what they want” as a result of the final rule.“We’ve been told repeatedly they want clean fuel that’s good for the car and a good value,” he said. “E15 is priced equal or less compared to gasoline. We’re not replacing fuel, we’re just giving consumers options.”Walk said allowing year-round sales means the E15 market will continue to grow many years down the road.“With existing stores with E15, it comes down to what consumers want and demand and make business decisions accordingly,” he said.Protec typically sees E15 account for 30% to 35% of overall regular gasoline sales. The company has some stores where E15 accounts for as much as 60% of overall regular gasoline sales.“Now, with all (E15 sales) year-round, we’ll see that go up,” Walk said. “Large retailers likely are not going to put E15 in all their stores on day one but will introduce the product then eventually roll out longer-term.”Cooper said EPA’s ability to complete the rule by June 1 came as a surprise.“It was absolutely down to the wire,” he said. “It was an incredibly heavy lift. I am happy to eat some crow. I didn’t think EPA would finish the rule on time. It is the one time I’m really happy to be wrong. This rule is really nine years in the making. It doesn’t mean the work on E15 is done.”CASE TO EXPAND E15Also on Monday, Growth Energy and Casey’s General Store announced the retailer will expand its E15 offering to more than 60 new sites this summer as a result of the agency’s actions.E15 is best known to consumers as unleaded 88, which is approved for all cars 2001 and newer.“The summertime E15 restrictions have been a major concern for us for a long time and would typically slow down our E15 expansion,” Casey’s Director of Fuels Nathaniel Doddridge said in a statement. “Now that we know we can provide our guests with a consistent experience at the fuel pump year-round, we are expanding E15 at a faster pace to stay ahead of our competition.”Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor said Casey’s action is just the beginning for E15 expansion.“We are thrilled that Casey’s will be rolling out E15 at dozens of new sites this summer and know from conversations with retailers all over the country that they will soon be joined by others who’ve been waiting for this day,” she said.E15 currently is sold at 1,807 stations in 31 states, still a small percentage of the more than 150,000 stations across the country.Todd Neeley can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(BAS/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. 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Redevelopment bylaws to ease friction, streamline process

first_imgThe Maharashtra government has issued bylaws to facilitate the smooth redevelopment of old housing societies. The new rules are likely to streamline disputes in societies and encourage redevelopment of thousands of old structures, officials said. The changes were made following complaints of non transparency, disputes on appointment of contractors, violation of the redevelopment rules, delays in tendering, among others. The rules, issued by the Maharashtra Co-operation, Textiles and Marketing Department this week, have reduced the consent clause to 51% from 70% of society members. The government has already relaxed the consent clause in other redevelopment schemes such as that of a slum, but it has been done for housing societies only now.The bylaws also list the procedures and modalities for the managing committee of a society, streamlining procedures for conducting meetings to granting sanction to redevelopment. The bylaws have fixed the minimum quorum required for a meeting of the managing committee at one-fifth of the membership strength. A special general body meeting must be called within two months of receipt of the application for redevelopment, and its minutes circulated among all the members within seven days.The redevelopment blueprint needs to be be uploaded by all societies and mailed to the members. Similarly, once the contractor and architect are appointed, they must be given an appointment letter in less than 30 days. Experts and citizens are happy with the new rules. “I welcome this progressive decision of the chief minister. It will help streamline disputes in societies and encourage redevelopment of old, dilapidated buildings for safe habitation,” said Manoj Kotak, Bharatiya Janata Party Member of Parliament from Mumbai North East, who has been receiving a lot of complaints on disputes between the managing committee of a society. However, some still feel the rebate in cess given to old structures under Rule 33 (7) of the Development Control Rules in the island city must be extended to structures in the suburbs. “The government has taken the onus of repair of cessed structures in the island city, but in suburban areas, the buildings do not pay cess and come under Rule 33 (7). The government must remove this injustice against old buildings in the suburbs,” said Parag Alavani, Member of the Legislative Assembly from Vile Parle.last_img read more