The Arctic and climate change (1979 – 2019): What the ice record tells us

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Science, Earth Science, Global Warming, Impact Of Climate Change, Monitoring, Oceans And Climate Change, Research, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Science, Sea Ice Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img This story has been updated: 2019’s Arctic ice melt season started out with record heat and rapid ice loss. Though cooler weather prevailed in August, stalling the fall, by mid-September ice extent was dropping dramatically once again. Then this week, 2019 raced from fourth to second place — now behind only 2012, the record minimum.With 2019 providing no reversal over past years, scientists continue to document and view the Arctic Death Spiral with increasing alarm. This story reviews the 40-year satellite record, along with some of the recent findings as to how Arctic ice declines are impacting the global climate.Researchers are increasingly certain that melting ice and a warming Arctic are prime factors altering the northern jet stream, a river of air that circles the Arctic. A more erratic jet stream — with increased waviness and prone to stalling — is now thought to be driving the increasingly dire, extreme global weather seen in recent years.The 40-year satellite record of rapidly vanishing Arctic ice — as seen in a new NASA video embedded within this article — is one of the most visible indicators of the intensifying climate crisis, and a loud warning to world leaders meeting at the UN in New York next week, of the urgent need to drastically cut carbon emissions. Arctic sea ice in eastern Greenland. What happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic. Scientists theorize that large-scale ice loss up north may be altering, and stalling, the northern jet stream, which can result in drought or storms hovering over one locale for long time periods. Image by mariusz kluzniak, Flickr.Arctic melt season watchers had a wild ride this year, with sea ice extent plummeting, and tracking with all previous record lows for time-of-year from March through mid-August, as 2019 appeared on course to challenge 2012 — the lowest minimum in the 1979-2019 forty-year satellite record.Then, once again proving the Arctic’s unpredictability, 2019’s melt slowed dramatically in late August and early September, only to take off again in a race to the bottom. As recently as Monday, extent appeared to be heading toward a fourth place finish behind 2016 and 2007, but overnight 2019 surpassed both, placing second only to 2012. And final results still aren’t in.“This year what we’re seeing is a good example of the natural variability of the system,” says Mark Serreze, director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). In the spring, it looked like we were heading for a new record low, but then, in August, the loss rate suddenly slowed.2019 now ranks among the lowest ice minimums in the 40-year satellite record. More importantly, during the four-decade time frame, the world has witnessed monumental declines in ice extent and volume in the Arctic. “In all months, sea ice extent is going down,” reports Serreze, with the biggest changes seen at the end of the summer melt season. Compared to when the satellite record began in 1979, sea ice extent is down about 40 percent in September. “It’s a big loss,” he says.By the numbers, the 1979 extent minimum, according to NSIDC, came in at 6.895 million square kilometers (2.662 million square miles), whereas by 2012 the September ice locked in at just 3.340 million square kilometers (1.289 million square miles). This year, as of September 17, sea ice extent sank to 4.100 million square kilometers (1.583 million square miles), shifting its ranking overnight from fourth to second place, surpassing 2007 at 4.147 square kilometers (1,601 square miles) and 2016 at 4.145 square kilometers (1.600 square miles).In recent years, we’re starting to see more significant losses in other seasons, too, says Julienne Stroeve, a senior research scientist with NSIDC. “The changes in summer have been dramatic, but it’s starting to manifest in other seasons as well, with later freeze-up and earlier melt. We’re lengthening the [progressively] ice-free season.”And sea ice isn’t only covering far less extent, it’s also getting thinner causing the volume of Arctic ice to drop precipitously, making the sea ice far more vulnerable to warming Arctic waters and atmosphere. With less thick, multiyear ice hanging around much of the sea ice in the Arctic is forming and melting away every year.In 1979, the daily minimum for sea ice volume was 17,065 cubic kilometers (4,094 cubic miles). While 2019 has likely not yet reached its lowest point, at the end of August, volume had fallen to just 4,170 cubic kilometers (1,000 cubic miles), putting it in close second place behind 2012, and already 75 percent lower than the 1979 minimum.Such dramatic changes in the ice are being driven by warmer air and water temperatures which eat away at the ice from all sides. Summers are longer than they used to be, and winters are warmer. “You put that together and you have a pretty strong formula for getting rid of ice,” says Serreze.Still, that doesn’t mean ice loss has followed a clear downward trajectory with every year lower than the one that came before. Rather, based on the natural variability of the climate and summer weather patterns, the trend of sea ice extent creates a kind of “sawtooth pattern,” where year-to-year extent and volume vary, but the long-term trend is ever downward, in what has been dramatically dubbed “the Arctic Death Spiral.”Thus far, 2012 has experienced the lowest September sea ice cover in the satellite record. “It sticks out like the proverbial sore thumb,” says Serreze. But low years are increasingly more frequent and recent, with the top ten all occurring after 2007. And if global temperatures continue to rise — as expected in a world where nearly no nations are currently expected to meet their Paris Climate Agreement goals — that melting trend is bound to spiral downward.How ice loss affects us all With so few long-term climate data sets, the importance of the sea ice record is hard to overstate. Sea ice is an extremely sensitive indicator of changes in the global climate, and it’s also very visual — unlike, say, changes in the global average air temperature. “You look at satellite data and you can very well see what’s happening,” says Serreze. And then there are those stunning pictures of beleaguered polar bears whose feeding habits are impacted by sea ice loss — with other polar species seriously affected too.However, climate change is now becoming increasingly visual beyond the Arctic, with impacts ranging from devastating hurricanes to long-term droughts and raging wildfires. One metaphor says that the polar regions act as the Earth’s air conditioners, while also helping to set up many of the basic weather patterns that we have come to expect around the globe in the past. But as the Arctic grows out of sync, so goes the rest of the planet,“A strongly warming Arctic could influence weather patterns in the mid-latitudes,” says Serreze. As the saying goes: what starts in the Arctic, doesn’t stay in the Arctic.Researchers are increasingly certain that the strong temperature differentials between the Arctic and the temperate zone are one of the primary factors that create and propel the northern jet stream — a fast-moving river of air in the Northern Hemisphere that circles the Arctic. As sea ice vanishes and Arctic temperatures increase, the temperature variant between these regions is getting smaller. That means there’s less force driving the winds in the jet stream from west to east, and the weakened jet stream starts to swing wildly, deviating from its typical polar path into lower latitudes (even as far south as the Gulf of Mexico) which can also cause temperate weather patterns to stall in place — bringing punishing bouts of extreme weather.This spring saw one of the waviest jet streams in recent history, and in turn, severe weather slammed into much of the mid-latitudes. Bomb cyclones, severe thunderstorms, heavy rain and catastrophic flooding in the Mississippi River basin were all possibly born out of this year’s deeply askew jet stream. One possible impact could be the stalling of major storms, such as Hurricane Harvey over Houston, Texas; that storm’s stuck-in-place rainfall totals topped 60 inches in some locales.The unprecedented melting of sea ice has other serious ramifications. Less ice means the Arctic is now open for business. The world’s superpowers are paying increasingly more attention to northern economic opportunities, and the region is now considered to be of significant geopolitical importance. US President Donald Trump’s sudden interest in Greenland is just one example. That country made headlines this summer for another reason, seeing a huge amount of glacial melt into the North Atlantic. Scientists now estimate that ice loss in Greenland this year alone was enough to raise the average global sea level by more than a millimeter — glacial melt that is only expected to escalate, unless the world’s nations and corporations act aggressively to limit greenhouse gas emissions.The Arctic has large deposits of natural gas, oil and rare earth minerals, as well as methane hydrates, that if mined, would likely be game over for reestablishing a stable global climate. Moreover, the loss of ice has opened up shipping routes, such as the Northern Sea Route over Russia, and the Northwest Passage in Canada. “Right now, both [routes] are open. It’s pretty much clean sailing,” says Serreze. “I’ve been studying the Arctic years, but now I’ve unavoidably been drawn into issues of climate change and geopolitics.”PIOMAS Arctic Sea Ice Volume Death Spiral 1979-2019. Image © Andy Lee Robinson @ahaveland.Future of forecastingDespite the 40-year record, it’s still difficult for ice scientists to know how the melt season will shake out each year. Ice predictions are constrained by limited forecasting abilities for the natural variations in weather.Scientists like Stroeve are working on ways to improve measurements of sea ice thickness, which helps to inform ice forecasts. Currently, researchers aren’t able to directly map sea ice thickness in summer (relying on modeling for their statistical analysis), and are limited by how much snow lies atop the ice in other months. “That’s something we don’t observe well from satellites. Our understanding is pretty rudimentary. We have to make assumptions based on snow depths,” she says.The other big barrier in predicting sea ice outcomes is the accuracy of long-term weather forecasts. Right now, scientists can’t predict how natural variations in weather will impact the ice in the long run. Stroeve calls this the “spring predictability barrier,” which means that any ice forecast made before May isn’t very accurate. “Once you get to June, things get better.”In a sense, long range forecasts are easier. Without governmental and corporate action to curb carbon emissions, the global trend in Arctic sea ice will almost certainly be downward — with impacts both seen and as yet unforeseen, for us all.Note: This story was updated on September 19 to reflect further loss of Arctic sea ice in 2019, with new data showing that this year moved from fourth to second place in just 24 hours.Banner image caption: Pack ice after sunset in East Greenland near Kulusuk. Image by Markus Trienke, FlickrThis story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Study finds massive reorganization of life across Earth’s ecosystems

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon A new study pulls together data from 239 studies that looked at more than 50,000 biodiversity time series.The research reveals that almost 30 percent of all species are being swapped out for other species every 10 years.The scientists found that the reorganization and loss of species are happening much more quickly in some environments than in others, a finding that could help inform future conservation. Life is reshuffling itself at an unsettling clip across Earth’s surface and in its oceans, a new study has found.The research, published Oct. 18 in the journal Science, drills into data from 239 studies that looked at changes in biodiversity over time. It reveals that almost 30 percent of all species are being swapped out for other species every 10 years.Fish swim near a coral reef. Image by Maria Dornelas.The sweeping hemorrhage of species across the planet continues to rattle scientists and conservationists. A recent report from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services revealed that a million species or more could go extinct.But squaring that global trend with what’s happening at local levels has been difficult. At this level, research shows that the sheer number of species in many spots are holding steady or even going up. That’s led some scientists to believe that species richness, an oft-used measure of biodiversity that tabulates the number of species living in a given area, provides an incomplete understanding of how life on Earth is changing.“It is increasingly recognized that species richness alone cannot fully describe how biodiversity is changing,” Shane Blowes, the paper’s co-lead author and a postdoctoral researcher at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research in Halle-Jena-Leipzig, said in an email. “Species richness will continue to play an important role in our understanding of taxonomic diversity, but a more complete, nuanced picture of biodiversity change emerges when it is combined with other metrics.”The researchers found that 28 percent of species are being replaced each decade. Image by Maria Dornelas.Blowes teamed up with ecologist Maria Dornelas and more than 20 other scientists from around the world to map changes in species richness as well as the composition of those local species groups across Earth’s surface and oceans with an open-source database called BioTIME. Developed by Dornelas and her colleagues at the U.K.’s University of St. Andrews, the BioTIME database gave the team access to more than 50,000 sets of data collected over time, known as time series, in nearly all of the world’s ecosystems.In 2014, Dornelas led a study revealing that the relative constancy of species numbers at local levels masked furtive changes in the identities of those species, which they referred to as reorganization. In the current research, the team found that this reorganization happens as species from elsewhere move in and replace the original inhabitants. As a result, the absolute number of species — captured as species richness — remains relatively constant, or might even go up.“Their study thus highlights that the global biodiversity crisis, at least for now, is not primarily about decline but, rather, about large-scale reorganization,” Britas Klemens Eriksson and Helmut Hillebrand wrote in a related commentary also in Science. Eriksson is an associate professor of marine ecology at the Netherlands’ University of Groningen, and Hillebrand is a biologist at the Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany.Tropical marine ecosystems had the highest rates of reorganization in the study. Image by Maria Dornelas.Blowes, Dornelas and their colleagues also showed that reorganization isn’t uniform. Indeed, it’s happening much faster in certain “hotspots” around the globe, like tropical marine ecosystems. In the most volatile spots, turnover in species is happening twice as fast as it is on land. Blowes said that marine species are more sensitive to swings in temperature and they live in a relatively continuous ocean environment with few hurdles to their movement, which could explain the quicker turnover. But, he added, they needed more data to know why for sure.On one hand, the variability of reorganization provides a measure of hope, at least in parts of the world.“Our study shows biodiversity is changing everywhere, but we are not losing biodiversity everywhere,” Dornelas said in a statement. “Some places are recovering and adapting.”However, the maps also show where the most worrying trends in species replacement are occurring.The study found that species turnover in some marine environments was twice as high as turnover in terrestrial environments. Image by Maria Dornelas.“High rates of species losses are particularly concerning for tropical latitudes, because in the context of climate change there are likely fewer species capable of replacing species lost,” Blowes said, “as tropical zones entering even warmer-temperature regimes have no current day equivalents.”Clarifying the differences in current biodiversity change across Earth’s ecosystems could prove invaluable in conservation planning, the authors write.“Mapping biodiversity change allowed us to identify regions of the world where rates of either species richness or compositional change are highest,” Blowes said. “And our results should help refine hypotheses of where different drivers of biodiversity change might be most important.”Banner image of a coral reef by Maria Dornelas.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitations:Blowes, S. A., Supp, S. R., Antão, L. H., Bates, A., Bruelheide, H., Chase, J. M., … Dornelas, M. (2019). The geography of biodiversity change in marine and terrestrial assemblages. Science, 366(6463), 339 LP – 345. doi:10.1126/science.aaw1620Dornelas, M., Antão Laura, H., Moyes, F., Bates Amanda, E., Magurran Anne, E., Adam, D., … Zettler Michael, L. (2018). BioTIME: A database of biodiversity time series for the Anthropocene. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 27(7), 760-786. doi:10.1111/geb.12729Dornelas, M., Gotelli, N. J., McGill, B., Shimadzu, H., Moyes, F., Sievers, C., & Magurran, A. E. (2014). Assemblage Time Series Reveal Biodiversity Change but Not Systematic Loss. Science, 344(6181), 296 LP – 299. doi:10.1126/science.1248484Eriksson, B. K., & Hillebrand, H. (2019). Rapid reorganization of global biodiversity. Science, 366(6463), 308 LP – 309. doi:10.1126/science.aaz4520FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Adaptation To Climate Change, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Biogeography, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Ecology, Ecosystem Services, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Green, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Protected Areas, Rainforest Biodiversity, Research, Species, Tropics, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Analysis: Floating solar power along the dammed-up Mekong River

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This year, the first floating solar power generating system in Southeast Asia was deployed on a reservoir in Vietnam.Floating solar power systems are being written into the energy master plans of Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines as well as Vietnam, and into the calculations of investment banks.The technology presents an alternative to additional hydroelectric power projects. For two decades or more, alarms have been sounding for the Mekong Delta. It’s being hammered by climate change, by a proliferation of upstream dams, by unsustainable and inappropriate farming practices, by greed and political expediency. The punishment the delta’s taking has been well reported, first in scholarly papers, then in specialized publications and appeals by NGOs.Now there’s a consensus: an environmental disaster is inexorably unfolding over 75,000 square kilometers (29,000 square miles) of famously fertile lowlands in Vietnam and Cambodia, home to some 35 million farmers and fishermen. Major media are publishing melancholy obituaries for the Mekong that once was.And yet, in the autumn of a year when the Mekong flood pulse came later than ever, there’s reason to believe that disruptive technology and market forces will spare the Mekong Delta more irreversible disturbance to its hydrology and ecosystems. It boils down to this: low-cost, easily scalable solar power generating technologies have destroyed the economic case for additional hydroelectric power projects.Gaining groundA floating solar power generating system, the first in Southeast Asia, was deployed this year on a reservoir in south-central Vietnam. The 47.5 megawatt Da Mi project was financed by an Asian Development Bank loan. Its builder and operator is a subsidiary of Vietnam’s national power company, EVN.Da Mi is not a heavily subsidized demonstration project, but instead a very sensible response to market incentives. To jump-start a shift toward solar power generation, Vietnam’s government had instructed EVN to pay 9.35 U.S. cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for 20 years to any project brought online by June 30, 2019. For the operators of the Da Mi hydroelectric power plant, the economics of integrating a solar system with the existing dam were compelling. The 50-hectare (124-acre) array of solar panels, each tilted to a precisely calculated angle to maximize solar gain, began supplying power to Vietnam’s national grid in May.Because the cost of solar photovoltaic panels has fallen so sharply in the last decade, and because utility-scale installations can be completed in a matter of months, these projects are now competitive with coal, gas, hydro or nuclear. Panel fabrication and battery storage costs are widely expected to fall much further. Floating solar power arrays constructed on the reservoirs of existing hydropower dams are particularly cost-effective; there are no site acquisition costs, they are simple to scale up as demand increases, transmission infrastructure is already in place, and power generation can be optimized by relying chiefly on photovoltaic power during daylight hours and on hydropower at night.Floating solar power systems are being written into the energy master plans of Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines as well as Vietnam, and into the calculations of investment banks.Floating solar power on a larger scale, 400 megawatt peak (MWp) power, also figures as an alternative to plans to build a massive dam and power plant on the Mekong in eastern Cambodia. By 2014, growing concern over the proposed Sambor Dam’s ecological impact persuaded the Cambodian government to commission a study of alternative designs. The study, delivered three years later by the California-based Natural Heritage Institute (NHI), declared the project an ecological disaster that no set of environmental mitigation features could overcome. Remarkably, the NHI found that an entirely different alternative, floating solar photovoltaic arrays on the nearby Lower Se San 2 reservoir, could deliver electricity to the Cambodian grid at lower life-cycle cost than any permutation of the Sambor scheme, and without significant environmental impacts.Purely on economic and financial grounds, the Sambor hydro plan ought to be dead. However, Cambodia is a country in the early stages of industrialization; its power needs are growing by 15 to 20 percent annually. The country is also a de facto ally of China, on which it counts to deter efforts by Vietnam or Thailand to push it around. Official corruption is rife. Complaints from citizens don’t seem to impress the Phnom Penh authorities. If Chinese state banks remain willing to lend Chinese companies the cash needed to build Sambor and another controversial dam further upstream at Stung Treng, will Phnom Penh have the sense to refuse it?Laos still dreams of getting rich from power exports. Although it, too, is considering an NHI floating solar proposal, neither the ever more dismal economics of hydropower nor accumulating debts to Sinohydro and other Chinese contractors have yet dimmed Vientiane’s enthusiasm to host about 200 power-producing dams. Nor have its neighbors yet backed away from promises to import large amounts of power from Laos. Thailand has reportedly committed to raise its import of power from Laos to 9,000 megawatts (MW) by 2025 from the present 4,000 MW or so; Vietnam, meanwhile, has plans to take 5,000 MW by 2030; and Cambodia has just promised to take 2,400 MW beginning in 2024 from coal-fired power plants now under construction in Laos.In Vietnam, which has left hardly a river within its own borders undammed, expert opinion has now turned sharply against hydroelectric projects on the Mekong and its tributaries. As often reported in the Vietnamese vernacular press, dams in China, on tributaries of the Mekong in Vietnam’s highlands, and on river after river in Laos have throttled the annual flow of nutrient-laden silt to Vietnam’s Mekong Delta provinces and depleted fishing stocks there. Ironically, an engineering and construction firm with close government ties, PetroVietnam Power, has announced that it will begin construction of a $2 billion, 1,400 MWp dam and power plant on the Mekong just above Luang Prabang in 2020; a Thai firm, Chart Karnchang, is expected to be a major subcontractor.Cambodia and its upstream neighbor, Laos, are willing to take foreign aid aimed at greening up their power grids, but neither feels much obligation to reduce an admittedly tiny carbon footprint. In short, though generating power from coal or damming rivers is fast becoming uneconomical, the old ways still have considerable momentum.The Mekong River in Laos, site of the Xayaburi Dam. Photo by International Rivers CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0 (Flickr)A bold visionNetting out these crosscurrents, it’s by no means certain that good technology will drive out bad, particularly at a scale that meets mainland Southeast Asia’s fast-growing power demand.Still, environmentalists can dream.One of them is Vietnamese-American engineer Long Pham. Since 1995, Long’s Viet Ecology Foundation has fostered dialogue between experts in the Vietnamese refugee diaspora and counterparts in Vietnam. Now he is urging policymakers in Cambodia to consider his vision of a 28,500 MWp floating solar energy plant on Southeast Asia’s largest lake, the Tonle Sap.Long’s “Sun on the Lake” project is bold in its scope: he proposes a floating installation that is scaled up year after year in step with Cambodia’s growing power needs until it is 590 times the size of the Da Mi solar generating plant in Vietnam mentioned earlier, 70 times larger than the solar plant proposed by the NHI on Cambodia’s Lower Se San 2 reservoir as a partial alternative to the Sambor hydro project, and the equivalent of 47 average-sized coal-powered generating plants.The Tonle Sap is an ideal location for a floating solar power array: it’s one of the sunniest places in Southeast Asia. Panels tilted south at a 14 degree angle will receive, on average, 2,034 kWh of irradiation per square meter per year.Long foresees that a floating solar power system on the Tonle Sap can be built out in 34-square-kilometer (13-square-mile) annual increments to keep pace with Cambodia’s thirst for power. He assumes that the cost of solar panels, currently about $800/kWh, will decline 2 percent per year and battery storage costs will also decline. Adding operational and maintenance costs and the cost of connection to Cambodia’s national grid, Long calculates that the floating solar array could meet all of Cambodia’s energy demand from 2020 to 2045, and likely beyond, for a levelized cost of 7.73 cents per kWh. That’s comparable to the cost of building more dams on the Mekong mainstream, and less than half what Cambodian consumers now pay for electricity.A floating village on the Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia. Upstream dams are impacting the Mekong River, and with it, the lives of those who live downstream. Image by Jialiang Gao GNU Free Documentation License 1.2 (Wikimedia).When avoided losses — the preservation of inland fisheries and agricultural land, and the creation of jobs for Cambodia’s riparian population — are considered, the levelized cost of power from the Sun on the Lake project falls by Long’s calculation to only 4.93 cents per kWh.Long does not suggest who’s going to provide the $31 billion he estimates will be needed to build the 330-square-kilometer (127-square-mile) Tonle Sap project. Will Chinese banks be as keen to fund a huge floating solar array as they have been to lend to hydroelectricity projects? That’s entirely conceivable; China’s factories produce more than 60 percent of the global supply of solar panels and its engineers have plenty of experience building solar farms. “It would be a high-profile opportunity for the Chinese to show their neighbors that they are good big brothers,” Long says.Choices aheadIf not China, perhaps Western development banks and contractors can be persuaded to step up to this unique opportunity to avert ecological catastrophe and profit from doing so. In the near term, however, they’ll more likely focus on the floating solar concept proposed by the NHI in July 2018, which would leverage existing hydropower plants and their reservoirs — five in Cambodia and nine in Laos — to produce an additional 5,000 MW of power.Co-locating floating solar with existing hydropower plants, explains NHI CEO Greg Thomas, roughly doubles power output and reduces its variability. This is because the two modes of power generation are complementary. During the day, the hydropower turbines can be ramped down except when needed to balance dips in solar output induced by passing clouds. At night, taking advantage of the water added to the reservoirs during the day, the turbines can be run at higher speed.Solar retrofit of existing dams, Thomas adds, would enable Laos to meet its ambitious power export targets by building fewer dams and bringing additional power online far faster and at substantially lower cost.An image from National Geographic’s May 2015 feature on Mekong Dams shows the Miaowei dam under construction in 2012. Image courtesy of manhhai/Flickr.Will the decision-makers in Vientiane and Phnom Penh forgo the hydropower projects that they endorsed many years ago, before environmental impacts were properly understood and when wind and solar power alternatives were hardly conceivable?In Cambodia, Prime Minister Hun Sen and a few trusted aides monopolize decision-making. The national power development plan, about to be updated, will likely be once again a grab bag of possibilities. Chronic power shortages are a brake on Cambodia’s economic growth, and conventional wisdom has it that what gets built will be whatever somebody is willing to finance at power prices set by the national power company, EDC. The urgency of getting more power onto the grid should favor solar, especially floating solar, but for that to become a big part of the solution, EDC will have to improve its grid stabilization capability.As utility-scale power generation from wind and solar (floating or not) gains traction in Thailand and Vietnam, the Lao government will face difficult choices. It must face up to the very real possibility that the fast-falling cost of generating power within their own borders will induce both Thailand and Vietnam to walk away from commitments to purchase power produced by the erstwhile “Battery of Southeast Asia.” In that case, further hydropower development on the Mekong and its tributaries will no longer be financeable.David Brown, a retired American diplomat, is now a frequent writer on contemporary Vietnam and its neighborhood. In 2016 he produced an in-depth, four-part series for Mongabay exploring threats facing the Mekong Delta and how they might be addressed. Banner: A fisherman on the Mekong River in Laos. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Analysis, Coal, Dams, Economics, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Economics, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, Mekong Dams, Renewable Energy, Rivers, Solar Power, Water center_img Article published by mongabayauthorlast_img read more

Cost-effective conservation: Study identifies key ‘umbrella’ species

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Policy, Extinction, Government, Green, Parks, Plants, Protected Areas, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation A new study has found that incorporating threats, actions and costs into the selection of priority species for conservation can markedly increase the efficiency of these efforts.The researchers created a new list of “umbrella” species for Australia, incorporating these factors.They found that the new list of umbrella species would lend protection to 46% of Australia’s threatened species — a sevenfold increase over the current list. Governments could vastly improve the efficiency of money spent on conservation if they took a hard look at the species they prioritize, according to a recent study.The research probed the benefits of using “umbrella species” — key species that, by overlapping with other species, provide them with indirect protection — to guide conservation policies in Australia.“We noticed that many countries, including Australia, use umbrella species to target management,” Michelle Ward, the study’s lead author and a Ph.D. student at the University of Queensland, told Mongabay in an email. “However, the method of choosing these species is generally ad hoc in fashion, and doesn’t consider the actual management strategies needed to recover species.”A far eastern curlew. Image by Dick Daniels.In Australia and other parts of the world, range size is used to pick out these species, the theory being that protecting far-ranging species will inherently protect the other plants and animals found in those areas. Ward and her colleagues found that the 73 species that Australia’s federal government has listed as umbrella species only protect 6% of the country’s threatened plants and animals.The team reported their findings Nov. 5 in the journal Conservation Biology.The team wondered if a more nuanced selection process — one that incorporated not just species’ ranges size, but the specific threats they face, the actions required to address those threats and what they might cost — might pull in other species.They began with maps showing the distributions and threats facing the nearly 1,800 threatened land animals in Australia. They then looked at the costs of the necessary actions to address those threats. When a species overlapped in both its geographic range and its threats with other species with relatively “cost-effective” management actions, it made the umbrella list.An infographic showing the number of species benefiting from management if the top seven umbrella species are managed from both the priority government list, top, and the optimized list, bottom. The number of species in brackets is that which could be managed without considering the umbrella benefits of any other species. Image by courtesy of Ward et al., 2019.That meant that species like the koala, red goshawk and purple clover made the list, Ward said in a statement, even though they’re not currently listed as umbrella species by the Australian government.Using Australia as a case study, the team found that this revised list would protect 46% of threatened species — what amounts to a sevenfold increase compared with the current list — without spending any more money on conservation.“[W]e thought it would be more efficient, but 7 times is striking,” Ward said.She said their approach could be used for other countries as well.A red goshawk. Image by Summerdrought via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA).The researchers also developed the study with policymakers in mind. Senior author Hugh Possingham said he’s confident that they’ll see the value in this approach.“All our papers that push return on investment thinking and smart decision-making are enthusiastically embraced by senior managers in government, who often have an economics background,” said Possingham, who is chief scientist at the Nature Conservancy and a professor at the University of Queensland.The takeaway from the research is straightforward, Ward said: “Conservation doesn’t need to be expensive if done efficiently.”But, she added, “This investment must be backed by strong national environment laws that protect nature from further destruction.”Banner image of a koala by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitation:Ward, M., Rhodes, J. R., Watson, J. E. M., Lefevre, J., Atkinson, S., & Possingham, H. P. (2019). Use of surrogate species to cost‐effectively prioritize conservation actions. Conservation Biology. doi:10.1111/cobi.13430FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, Feb. 7, 2020

first_imgConservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsMalaysia estimates it will take a decade to build the Trans-Borneo Highway, connecting Malaysian and Indonesian Borneo with Brunei (The Malaysian Insight, The Edge Markets).The NGO African Parks will manage the 150,000-square-kilometer (58,000-square-mile) Iona National Park in Angola (Africa Geographic).Locusts have descended on Kenya, in the country’s worst infestation in 70 years (The Guardian).Malaysian lawmakers are expected to strengthen penalties levied against illegal loggers (Reuters).A dispute over land and resources may have left six indigenous people dead in Nicaragua (BBC News) …… While in Brazil a man was killed during a raid to stamp out illegal deforestation (Reuters).An economic study found that the U.S.’s biofuels policy has had an “insignificant” impact on deforestation in Malaysia and Indonesia (Agrinews).Numbers of the pig-like white-lipped peccary have dropped by as much as 90%, a study has found (ScienceDaily).Other newsBumblebees have lost almost half their habitat in North America (The Washington Post).Some Republican lawmakers in the U.S. see addressing climate change as electorally necessary (The Washington Post).A baboon in South Africa’s Kruger National Park kidnapped, then gently groomed, a lion cub (Africa Geographic).Researchers wonder whether the platypus can withstand the assaults from feral cats, habitat loss and wildfires (The New York Times).The loss of sea ice in northern Japan is both a benefit and a hindrance to spotted seals (The Washington Post).Illegal fishing off the Somali coast is upending the small-scale fisheries on which communities depend (Hakai Magazine).Millions of trees may have died after a tree-planting project in Turkey (The Guardian).Andean condor numbers are dropping due to deaths related to pesticide use (The Revelator).U.S. President Donald Trump didn’t mention climate change in his State of the Union address, but said he has a plan to plant a trillion trees (Undark) …… Even as his administration moves to open up once-protected areas in the western U.S. to grazing, drilling and logging (The Washington Post).Currents are speeding up across more than three-quarters of the world’s oceans as a result of climate change (The Washington Post, The New York Times).Scientists have observed Alaskan brown bears hunting sea otters for the first time (Hakai Magazine).Banner image of brown bears courtesy of Denali National Park and Preserve via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

49ers report: Eric Reid’s move tops things we learned Thursday

first_imgAdded linebacker Reuben Foster: “It’s about … (CLICK HERE, if you are unable to view this photo gallery on your mobile device.)YOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES?Pick against our pros all season long and win!***SANTA CLARA — As safety Eric Reid reboots his career with the Carolina Panthers, the 49ers defense marches on without him, while also applauding him.“I’m happy for him to get a chance on a good Carolina team,” cornerback Richard Sherman said. “He’s a good player and always has been.”last_img read more

Girl Ladies Fashion Diamante Crystal Stone Bow Hair Clip With Various Colours, It does look very pretty tho but im not sure what happened after a

first_imgI like this effectively joyful with this clip 🙂 not way too small and defo not a enormous big matter. ,its a pretty coloure of pink/pink 🙂 also arrived 2 days after ordering far too :)would advise to get this four the selling price very well really worth the money paid out 🙂 think i may possibly buy one more two/3 in change coloures 🙂 x.Really very, the ladies beloved them.Ideal but marginally more compact than i was expecting.Key specs for Girl Ladies Fashion Diamante Crystal Stone Bow Hair Clip With Various Colours:Girls Brand New Crystal Stone Bow Hair ClipSize1 : Double Bow Length Approx = 9 cm Width = 8 cmAcrylic StoneSize2 : Bow Length Approx = 11 cm Width = 8 cmExcellent Quality Hair ClipsLovely Item for ChristmasComments from buyers“Lovely. Really big, glitzy and glamorous. Just what we needed. Good quality., It does look very pretty tho but im not sure what happened after a , Just what it says on the tin”Wonderful high quality and was sent actually swift too.Ideal but marginally more compact than i was expecting.It does appear quite really tho but im not positive what transpired after a. Pretty weighty so its not really acceptable for young children with slender hair. It does seem quite very tho but im not guaranteed what transpired right after a few of months with limited usage the material turned eco-friendly. The clip is extremely durable and it didnt eliminate any of the dimontès like most issues do.Really very, the ladies beloved them.Pretty hair bow for my buddies daughter who wears them all the time. I preferred to get distinct colours for her.Wonderful merchandise but a little bit smaller than envisioned and the diamantes drop off extremely effortlessly.Arrived when stated, and my daughters loved them.I purchased a several bows from right here and two of them arrived with gems missing and the glue was actually recognizable, variety of dissatisfied but the some others came wonderful.My very little girl absoultey enjoys these bows awesome and massive quite glitterly truly stand out defo propose these i have brought various of these.Exceptional high-quality for the rate appears pretty fairly.Wonderful, i wore it in my hair for crufts & it appeared definitely beautiful :-).Exceptional high-quality for the rate appears pretty fairly.Just what it states on the tin. Attractive bow, just as in the description, fantastic price.Rather my granddaughter enjoys it.Seems charming in my daughters hair.Wonderful merchandise but a little bit smaller than envisioned and the diamantes drop off extremely effortlessly.I like this effectively joyful with this clip 🙂 not way too small and defo not a enormous big matter. ,its a pretty coloure of pink/pink 🙂 also arrived 2 days after ordering far too :)would advise to get this four the selling price very well really worth the money paid out 🙂 think i may possibly buy one more two/3 in change coloures 🙂 x.I purchased a several bows from right here and two of them arrived with gems missing and the glue was actually recognizable, variety of dissatisfied but the some others came wonderful.Arrived when stated, and my daughters loved them.Beautiful little bow which was price for cash. The clip is solid sufficient to keep in and doesn’t slide out. The only draw back is that some of the sequins have begun slipping off.My daughter extremely content this.last_img read more

Commercial ‘artiste’ Sachin Tendulkar Gets Tax Break

first_imgSachin Tendulkar was levied an income tax of Rs 2,08,59,707 on an income of Rs 5,92,31,211 he earned from ESPN Star Sports, Pepsico and Visa in foreign currency during 2001-02 and 2004-05.Sachin Tendulkar, super God of cricket, has formally declared that he is an actor and not a cricketer. The,Sachin Tendulkar was levied an income tax of Rs 2,08,59,707 on an income of Rs 5,92,31,211 he earned from ESPN Star Sports, Pepsico and Visa in foreign currency during 2001-02 and 2004-05.Sachin Tendulkar, super God of cricket, has formally declared that he is an actor and not a cricketer. The excuse: he models for TV advertisements. In order to save tax of around Rs 2 crore on income derived from doing TV commercials, Tendulkar told the Income Tax tribunal that acting, not cricket, is his profession. The tribunal accepted that he is an artist on the grounds that “he has to use his own skills, imagination and creativity in the commercials”.Tendulkar was levied an income tax of Rs 2,08,59,707 on the income of Rs 5,92,31,211 that he earned from ESPN Star Sports, PepsiCo and Visa in foreign currency during 2001-02 and 2004-05. He had challenged the order of the Commissioner of Income Tax-Appeal (CIT-A), to pay up. In an order on May 20, the tribunal ruled that Tendulkar could claim deduction in tax on his income from modelling as he is an artist.Tendulkar had claimed deduction of tax under Section 80RR of the Income Tax Act. The section states that a person can claim tax deduction if he is a playwright, artist, musician, actor or sportsman and the income for which deduction is claimed is derived by him in the exercise of his profession.When the assessing officer asked Tendulkar to explain the nature of his profession, the master blaster submitted that “he is a popular model who acts in various commercials for endorsing products of various companies”. He further stated that the income derived by him from ‘acting’ had been reflected as income from “business and profession” whereas income from playing cricket was reflected as “income from other sources” since he is a non-professional cricketer. Tendulkar explained that the claimed deduction in tax was from the exercise of his profession as an ‘actor’.advertisementThe assessing officer rejected Tendulkar’s claim and looked up the dictionary for the meaning of the term ‘professional’. “It could be correct to say that playing cricket is the source of his livelihood and is therefore his profession,” the officer observed, adding that “if Sachin is not a cricketer, then who is a cricketer?” He noted that Tendulkar had received remuneration for providing a wide variety of services to these companies. The various activities mentioned in the agreement with these companies had nothing to do with his claim of being an actor. Therefore, the officer said, his claim was not justified. Tendulkar has an agreement with these companies for the use of the name, photo, original voice, clothing, footwear, playing product spokesman, personal and media appearances.”It is true that while appearing in ad films Tendulkar would have to dress in a certain way and would have to follow the script suggested by the director. However, that does not make him an actor. In all the advertisements in which he appears, what is highlighted is his personality as a cricketer. It is important to note that the company that wants Tendulkar to endorse its brand uses him because he is Sachin Tendulkar, the cricketing legend,” the officer noted.After his claim was rejected, Tendulkar submitted that he should be considered an ‘artist’ for the purpose of Section 80RR. He submitted that the meaning of ‘artist’ be read along with the several clauses of the endorsement agreements. However, the CIT-A did not buy this argument. He ruled: “Tendulkar is primarily involved in playing cricket and irrespective of whether he is a professional or not, it cannot be disputed that his profession is playing cricket. Tendulkar is not being paid for his activities as an actor or his performance as an artist. The nature and quality of his acting or performance as an artist would never have resulted in the contracts and payments made out to him.”Tendulkar appealed against this ruling to the tribunal. An earlier ruling by the tribunal allowing tax deduction to actor Amitabh Bachchan helped his case. In 2004, the tribunal had ruled that the income derived by Bachchan as a host of TV show Kaun Banega Crorepati (KBC) was liable for deduction of tax under Section 80RR because he used his skills as an artist in the show.Asha Vijayaraghavan, judicial member of the tribunal, and R.K. Panda, accountant member, ruled: “While appearing in advertisements and commercials Tendulkar has to face the lights and camera. As a model he brings to his work a degree of imagination, creativity and skill to arrange elements in a manner that would affect human senses and emotions and to have an aesthetic value. No doubt, being a successful cricketer has added to his brand value as a model. But the fact remains that he has to use his own skills, imagination and creativity. Every sportsman does not possess that degree of talent or skill or creativity to face the lights and camera. The income received by him from modeling and appearing in TV commercials and similar activities can be termed as income derived from the profession of an artist.”advertisementTendulkar had also claimed deduction of Rs 57,969 towards staff welfare expenses that included expenses incurred on tea and snacks provided to his staff, Rs 50,000 each on account of entertainment expenses and telephone expenses and Rs 1,42,824 on account of car expenses. However, the tribunal dismissed these claims saying that the use of telephone, car and food was for him and his family.This is one act where the man who holds almost all the batting records in cricket has outdone himself.last_img read more