Jamal Khashoggi is not the first Saudi journalist to disappear

first_imgNews News April 28, 2021 Find out more News NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for an independent international investigation into the fate of Jamal Khashoggi, the dissident Saudi journalist who has been missing ever since he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul a week ago. His disappearance has come amid a particularly harsh and opaque crackdown on Saudi journalists and bloggers. All trace of Fayez ben Damakh, a well-known Saudi journalist and poet, was lost in September 2017, when he was on the point of launching a TV news channel in Kuwait. According to the local media, he was abducted and extradited to Saudi Arabia without this ever being officially confirmed. RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance This was the case with Saleh el Shihi, a journalist whose arrest was only confirmed in February, when his family learned than he had been sentenced to five years in prison. He disappeared in December 2017 but his detention was not made official until his conviction and sentence were announced. The Saudi journalist and commentator Turad Al Amri has been missing since November 2016. In one of his last tweets, he condemned the clampdown on the Saudi media and, in particular, the blocking of an online newspaper for which he had written a sensitive article. Unannounced detention was also used to silence the respected economist and citizen-journalist Esam al Zamel. His arrest was however confirmed when his trial apparently began at the start of this month, a year after his actual arrest for criticizing the government’s economic strategy in tweets, reports and analyses. to go further Saudi media silent on RSF complaint against MBS March 9, 2021 Find out more RSF_en “The traditionally opaque methods used by Saudi Arabia to silence critical journalists constitute grounds for fearing the worst in the case of Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance,” said Sophie Anmuth, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. “We call for an independent international investigation to determine as quickly as possible what has happened to Khashoggi.” Organisation Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa Disappearances Follow the news on Saudi Arabia Between 25 and 30 professional and non-professional journalists are currently detained in Saudi Arabia, which is ranked 169th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. News Receive email alerts A former government supporter, Jamal Khashoggi had been in self-imposed exile in the United We call on Saudi Arabia to end its violence against journalistsSign the petitionStates where he had become well-known as a newspaper columnist and commentator critical of the current Saudi regime. He fled Saudi Arabia last year for fear of being arrested, after being banned from writing in the media and even posting on social networks. October 10, 2018 – Updated on November 23, 2018 Jamal Khashoggi is not the first Saudi journalist to disappear In the current crackdown, more than 15 journalists and bloggers have been arrested in a completely opaque manner in Saudi Arabia since September 2017. In most cases, their arrests have never been officially confirmed and no official has ever said where they are being held or what they are charged with. Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa Disappearances Help by sharing this information June 8, 2021 Find out more No evidence has so far been produced to support any of the various hypotheses for Khashoggi’s disappearance: his murder, his surreptitious removal to a Saudi prison or the Saudi government’s claim that he left the consulate of his own free will and then vanished into thin air. The pro-government Saudi media are meanwhile denouncing a media conspiracy designed to sully their country’s image.last_img read more

Syracuse searches for consistency at second outside wide receiver spot

first_img Published on November 14, 2017 at 8:13 pm Contact: [email protected] | @jtbloss Every time Devin C. Butler arrives at an away game, he walks onto the field and FaceTimes his mom. Whenever Jamal Custis gets frustrated, he prays or listens to Meek Mill, the rapper synonymous with his hometown of Philadelphia.Those opposite actions are how two wide receivers with a similar status battle the mental obstacles that come with their lack of job security. Syracuse’s head coach Dino Babers has made it no secret that Butler and Custis are competing for one spot.“I’m looking for a guy to take the position,” Babers said last month. “Just to flat take the position.”With two games to go, neither has. Syracuse (4-6, 2-4 Atlantic Coast) has reliable targets in seniors Steve Ishmael and Ervin Philips, but hasn’t found a lock for the second outside receiver position. Custis won the job out of camp, but an early-season injury derailed his season and left him with just eight catches. Butler assumed the role and hauled in 27 passes, but has not done enough to fend Custis off completely, Butler dropped two passes early last week against Wake Forest and Custis was in on the next series.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAnna Henderson | Contributing Digital DesignerBabers, however, did note this week that he’s been especially impressed by Butler. For the sophomore, stepping into this role has been adjustment. He played quarterback his entire life before arriving at SU — he’s thrown a pass in half of the Orange’s games this season — and is still searching for comfort on the outside.As the year has worn on, Butler has searched for small tweaks to his game to find that elusive comfort. He comes to the line of scrimmage with his hands tucked to his chest instead of dangling at his knees — something he learned from watching film of Julio Jones of the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons. He doesn’t predetermine which move he’ll use to beat the cornerback off the line of scrimmage and he catches the ball before he turns up field.Most of these are fundamentals any wide receiver should know. But Butler was in his own head. His quarterback, junior Eric Dungey, encouraged him to relax and that helped him get to where he is now.“He had more faith that I was going to play my game instead of playing the game for everybody else,” Butler said.Now, after “falling in love with the receiver position,” Butler is trying to take the jump from comfortable to consistent. It’s a word he uses to describe what Philips and Ishmael do so well. Consistency is what Babers said he needs out of Butler this week. Or Custis. Whoever wants to do it first.Custis, since returning against Clemson, has been relatively nonexistent save for a 47-yard touchdown against Florida State because of blown coverage. As a redshirt junior, not having a concrete role at this point has been frustrating, he said. But he’s stayed positive and tried to “let the chips fall where they may.”“Don’t get me wrong, it’s definitely hard. I’m not perfect and I’m a human,” Custis said “… but it’s best to control what you can control.”For now, all Custis can control is his effort, and he and Butler’s situation is one in which effort is a key ingredient to finding a solution. Butler called it a “friendly competition,” one that pushes the two of them in a battle for more snaps. They fight in practice, he said, but still dap each other up afterward.“Yeah, you my brother,” Butler said. “But sometimes I got to eat too. And I’m hungry.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Lawyer: Evidence shows coaches knew of NCAA family payouts

first_imgFormer amateur basketball league director Merl Code arrives at federal court, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2018, in New York. Code and two co-defendants have pleaded not guilty to charges that they committed fraud by plying families of college basketball prospects with cash so the prospects would attend colleges sponsored by Adidas. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)NEW YORK (AP) — A lawyer for a longtime Adidas employee urged jurors Thursday to use common sense and evidence to conclude college basketball coaches like Bill Self at Kansas and Rick Pitino at Louisville knew shoe companies were paying money to families of elite athletes to steer them to their schools.Attorney Michael Schachter, representing Adidas sports marketing manager James “Jim” Gatto, cited testimony and evidence that emerged during the fraud conspiracy trial of Gatto, aspiring sports agent Christopher Dawkins and Merl Code, a former Adidas consultant.“Ladies and gentlemen, what help do you think a coach thought Jim Gatto was going to provide in persuading a kid to go to their college?” he asked. “Jim works for a shoe company. He is not a guidance counselor. Kids don’t turn to him for assistance in where they should go to college.”Assistant U.S. Attorney Edward Diskant, who has portrayed the schools and sometimes their coaches as victims of the defendants, said in a closing statement that coaches were not “running rampant.”“Nothing can be further from the truth,” the prosecutor said, highlighting protocols in place at schools to ensure compliance with NCAA rules.He said the defendants hid payments from coaches, knowing they would be fired if they facilitated payouts to players’ families.“Does that mean that some of the coaches didn’t break the rules? No, it’s possible they did,” Diskant said.The prosecutor noted that there was no mention of money in two voice messages Gatto left for Pitino. He also cited evidence that Dawkins, speaking of a financial payout, told the Bowen family: “I would never tell Rick anything like this because I don’t want to put him in jeopardy.”Schachter told jurors that the government’s star witness — former Adidas consultant Thomas “T.J.” Gassnola — lied when he testified that he was concealing from universities the fact that cash was being paid to the families of top recruits.He cited Gassnola’s testimony about a North Carolina State assistant coach. Gassnola, who pleaded guilty to criminal charges and cooperated with prosecutors, told jurors that he delivered cash in 2015 to Coach Orlando Early, who planned to give it to a personal trainer for highly touted point guard Dennis Smith Jr. so it could be relayed to the athlete’s family.Schachter said evidence shows that Self “knew of and asked for a payment to be made to Silvio De Sousa’s handler.”The lawyer added: “More than that, Coach Self requested just that kind of help that Mr. Gassnola arranged as a condition for Coach Self to permit Adidas to continue their sponsorship agreement with the University of Kansas.”Schachter also cited a conversation his client had in late May 2017 with Pitino, saying it occurred just after Code told Gatto that he needed money for the family of Louisville recruit Brian Bowen Jr. because the University of Oregon, a Nike school, had made an “astronomical offer” to recruit him.Schachter said Gatto wanted to be sure Pitino wanted Bowen before he spent his employer’s money.“Why, precisely, would Louisville’s head coach think that a shoe company representative wants to speak with him about a player?” Schachter asked. “Ladies and gentlemen, I submit to you that the only explanation that makes any sense is that Coach Pitino knows exactly why Jim is calling to discuss a player.”Bowen committed to Louisville on June 1, 2017, though he never played for the school. He now plays professionally in Australia. Pitino, a legendary coach, was never accused of a crime but was fired amid the investigation’s fallout.North Carolina State announced last year that Early and the school’s head coach were leaving the program months before the corruption case became public.Smith played one year at NC State. He now plays for the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks.De Sousa is a sophomore at Kansas.The jury is likely to start deliberations Monday.___Associated Press Writer Tom Hays contributed to this report.last_img read more

Super Bowl Champion Malcolm Mitchell’s Nonprofit and Andrew Young YMCA to Launch After-School Reading Program

first_imgShare the Magic Foundation – the nonprofit organization of former UGA Football Star, NFL Super Bowl Champion and Author Malcolm Mitchell – and the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA have teamed up to launch a special after-school reading program for Atlanta youth who are at high risk of academic failure. READTeam was formed to directly address low reading proficiency levels and introduce early learners to the long-term benefits of being an active reader. The eight-month pilot of the program will involve 50 Atlanta Public School students in grades 2 through 6, whose reading scores are one to two years behind reading proficiency standards. Through grant support from Wells Fargo, the Bennett Thrasher Foundation and KPMG, students will amass their own home library of 20 books by the end of the program. “We are very excited to team up with Share the Magic Foundation to expand our after-school program to include a focus on building vocabulary and reading comprehension skills,” Gavin McGuire, executive director of the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA, said. “Reading is a fundamental skill —crucial for academic and life success. The support our students will receive from their Literacy Coaches as part of READTeam will be invaluable.” “Research repeatedly shows that motivation to read decreases with age, especially if a child’s attitude towards reading is not positive,” said Beth Pann, executive director of Share the Magic Foundation. “Through this partnership, we are building a literacy-focused model complementary to the Young Family YMCA’s existing after-school program. Our goal is to support each student in meeting, or exceeding, grade-level milestones in reading proficiency.”last_img read more

Colombian president honored in Washington, D.C. for efforts to protect biodiversity

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, Environment, Marine Protected Areas, Protected Areas, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Colombian President Juan Santos was honored by the National Geographic Society last week for his prodigious efforts since taking office in 2010 to expand the protection of Colombia’s biodiversity on both land and sea.Gary E. Knell, president and CEO of the National Geographic Society, praised Santos as “one of the foremost champions of the natural world” in an hour-long ceremony at the Society’s headquarters.Santos has more than doubled the number of hectares under national environmental protection — from 13 million hectares in 2010 to 28.4 million hectares today, including a doubling of Chiribiquete National Park in southern Colombia, one of the world’s most biodiverse places, from 1.29 million hectares to 2.78 million hectares.* WASHINGTON, D.C. – He prowled the stage like a puma moving through Colombia’s rainforest. With a deep knowledge of ecosystems ranging from marine to savanna to high mountains, he spoke clearly about why these wild places are important to his country and the world.He never mentioned jobs, new roads or dams, or leveraging his country’s vast trove of fossil fuels and precious metals for economic development. He was, for an hour on the morning of Sept. 21, a strange international figure in a city whose national leadership on the environment is the polar opposite of his.“We are a powerhouse of biodiversity,” said Juan Santos, the president of Colombia and the sole recipient of the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize for ending his country’s 50-year civil war. “With this power comes responsibility. We have a tremendous responsibility to play a role in the world to … preserve the environment and protect the rich assets of our house.”Santos is said to be more popular abroad than he is at home because of the controversial Peace Agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Yet he came to Washington to be honored by the National Geographic Society for his prodigious efforts since taking office in 2010 to expand the protection of Colombia’s biodiversity on both land and sea.Gary E. Knell, president and CEO of the National Geographic Society, praised Santos as “one of the foremost champions of the natural world” in an hour-long ceremony in Grosvenor Auditorium at the society’s headquarters. All 400 seats were filled, mostly with Colombians working in D.C., including its ambassadors to the U.S. and an array of indigenous leaders from Colombia dressed in traditional garb.Gary E. Knell, president and CEO of the National Geographic Society, praised Colombian President Juan Santos as “one of the foremost champions of the natural world.” Photo by Enrique Ortiz, Andes Amazon Fund.“President Santos is a shining example of everything National Geographic stands for and supports,” Knell said. “He is a bold leader with transformative ideas and a fearless trailblazer who champions policies that will help achieve a planet in balance — and help change the world.”Stark contrastSantos stood in stark contrast in a city where the new administration is dismantling the Environmental Protection Agency, proposing to shrink the size of U.S. national parks to make way for the extraction industry, and pulling out of the United Nations-brokered Paris Agreement to fight climate change.Santos spoke for 45 minutes about how “our treasure is the world’s treasure.” Though one-eighth the size of Brazil, Colombia ranks second behind its Amazonian neighbor in biodiversity worldwide. It’s first in its variety of birds and orchids, second in amphibians and butterflies, third in reptiles and palms, fourth in mammals, and fifth in marine and continental ecosystems.What Santos has done — and pledges to do more of by the time he leaves office in August 2018 — is more than double the number of hectares under national environmental protection — from 13 million hectares in 2010 to 28.4 million hectares today, including a doubling of Chiribiquete National Park in southern Colombia, one of the world’s most biodiverse places, to 2.77 million hectares (10,700 square miles). He has pledged to protect another 1.69 million hectares (6,560 square miles) in less than a year.Common woolly monkey (Lagothrix lagotricha) in Colombia. Photo by Rhett Butler.Offshore, he has ordered the protection of 4.4 million hectares (nearly 17,000 square miles) of Malpelo Flora and Fauna Sanctuary, a UNESCO World Heritage site rich in coral reefs and aquatic life. He is encouraging neighboring Panama and Ecuador to expand their abutting ocean reserves to create a huge Pacific Ocean coastal corridor “for turtles, sharks, and dolphins, which need protection.”“In doing this,” Santos said, “we are honoring the great American marine biologist Sylvia Earle, who said, ‘No water, no life. No blue, no green. No ocean, no us.’ From that I learned an important lesson — protect the coral reefs. This is critical.”Colombia’s environmental challengesWhat went unmentioned during Santos’ celebratory talk were the increasing challenges to his environmental agenda. Deforestation has risen dramatically in the past year. Coca growing for cocaine is increasing rapidly. The extraction industry is eager to get at Colombia’s enormous underground stores of oil, natural gas, coal, and precious metals, especially emeralds.Nor did he mention the recent report “Peace and Environmental Protection in Colombia,” which notes that environmental spending by the Santos Administration is “very low,” well behind other Latin American countries, and a third of what it was in 1998.Colombian President Juan Santos with indigenous leaders from Colombia. Photo by Enrique Ortiz, Andes Amazon Fund.The partial result has been a lack of enforcement in protected areas as illegal miners and ranchers claim rich land where the FARC once hid but is now leaving unoccupied.Instead, Santos, attaching part of his legacy to the unpopular Peace Agreement with the FARC, said last week: “For 50 years, the environment was one of Colombia’s war victims. I called it an ecocide. Drug trafficking fed the war, and the war fed drug trafficking through deforestation. The amount of oil spilled in our rivers and seas was equal to 14 Exxon Valdez (spills). That’s why the environmental dividend of our peace is so big. We are not only stopping this destruction, we’re trying to reverse it.”Much depends on the administration that follows Santos to power in Bogota next summer. His expansion of protected lands cannot be reversed without revising the nation’s constitution. But with poverty rates high and per capita income low, the pressure for economic development in Colombia will be intense.At National Geographic last week, those were worries for another day, as the society lauded an uncommon elected official’s will to protect, not plunder, his nation’s natural resources.In closing the ceremony, Mark Plotkin, the well-known environmentalist who leads the Amazon Conservation Team, praised Santos before adding, “The political leaders who ignore biodiversity will end up where they belong — on the ash heap of history.”*Correction: When originally published, this story misreported the total hectares protected in Colombia in 2010 and today. That error has since been corrected.Chestnut-eared Aracari (Pteroglossus castanotis) in Colombia. Photo by Rhett Butler.Justin Catanoso is a regular contributor to Mongabay and professor of journalism at Wake Forest University in North Carolina. Follow him on Twitter @jcatanoso.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

On a Philippine island, indigenous groups take the fight to big palm oil

first_imgAgriculture, Environment, Featured, Forests, Green, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations Banner image: Larry Arcuyo, Chairman of the Aramaywan Farmer’s multi-purpose cooperative, holds up a handful of palm oil kernel. Photo by Rod Harbinson for Mongabay. Please contact the author if you’re interested in republishing any images in this story: [email protected]: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Many Palawan indigenous communities say they have suffered unfair land acquisition or lease arrangements for oil palm plantations. The situation hit a peak around 2007, when palm oil company Agumil Philippines promoted palm oil around the island as a miracle get-rich-quick crop.Many tribal landowners leased or sold parcels of land to Agumil. Those who leased said they were provided loans from the government-run Land Bank of the Philippines, negotiated by Agumil, to clear the land and plant oil palm saplings. Title deeds to the leased land were lodged with the bank as collateral against the loans, where they remain.Today the plantations are producing plentiful bunches of oil palm fruit. Still, landowners say they have yet to see any financial returns on their leased land. The problem all cite is that the loans came with crippling 14 percent annual interest rates, which left the original loan amounts inflating out of control. The terms of the lease contracts also stipulate that ongoing operational and managements costs be subtracted from the loan and harvest income.Now tribal groups are fighting back on multiple fronts. A tribal representative in the municipality of Rizal recently won a mayoral election. The re-elected mayor of neighboring Brooke’s Point has also pledged a halt to more oil palm plantations. Three of the seven municipalities in southern Palawan have now placed limitations on oil palm cultivation. The sandy path from the village of bamboo houses winds down through the coconut palms, which gives way to mangroves growing along the muddy shoreline. The seven elders inspect their fishing boats. Hand-built using timber from their communal forest, the small craft have bamboo outriggers to keep them stable in the open sea.The Sarong community on the island of Palawan in the Philippines has for generations been living a similar way of life from the forest, cultivated fields, stands of coconut and fishing. But a few years ago, in 2012, their lives were turned upside down when they noticed that their communal forest was being logged and cleared without any consultation, let alone their permission.“A contractor coming from another barangay [village] was clearing the land,” says Romeo L. Japson, who grew up in the community.Community members say the company responsible then went on to plant oil palm saplings on 200 hectares (500 acres) of their ancestral land. They add that now, every time they pass by the plantation, they’re reminded of how their community forest was razed. To this day they are bitter that the situation persists and they have no redress.Sarong community members chatting on the porch of a village house, in Southern Palawan. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.They are not alone, as many other Palawan indigenous communities have also suffered what they see as unfair land acquisition or lease arrangements for oil palm plantations. The situation hit a peak around 2007, when palm oil company Agumil Philippines promoted palm oil around the island as a miracle get-rich-quick crop. Twenty-five percent Filipino- and 75 percent Malaysian-owned, Agumil is a subsidiary of Agusan Plantations (API) and operates the only palm oil processing plant on Palawan.Now tribal groups are fighting back on multiple fronts. A tribal representative in the municipality of Rizal recently won a mayoral election. The re-elected mayor of neighboring Brooke’s Point has also pledged a halt to more oil palm plantations. Three of the seven municipalities in southern Palawan have now placed limitations on oil palm cultivation.Meanwhile, a growing number of communities are responding to threats to their ancestral domains by pursuing legal recognition of their community land and water resources. Two communities celebrated success in 2018, and at least 12 more claims are in process.Tribal land appropriationMany tribal landowners leased or sold parcels of land to Agumil. Those who leased said they were provided loans from the government-run Land Bank of the Philippines, negotiated by Agumil, to clear the land and plant oil palm saplings. Title deeds to the leased land were lodged with the bank as collateral against the loans, where they remain.“Until now I am riding only in my thongs,” said Mily Saya, landowner and member of the village cooperative in the barangay of Aramaywan. He explains how early company promises of a car and stone house failed to materialize. He says he “has no idea how to get back the land title” for his 4.7 hectares (11.6 acres) from the Land Bank.“I don’t know how big the loan is from the Land Bank,” he says, explaining how the company planted oil palm seedlings on 1 hectare (2.5 acres) of his land but abandoned the rest with no explanation.Mily Saya Landowner and member of the Aramaywan cooperative, leased most of his land to Agumil but has yet to realize any return. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.In time, the saplings matured and today the plantations are producing plentiful bunches of oil palm fruit. Still, members of the landowner cooperatives say they have yet to see any financial returns on their leased land. The problem all cite is that the loans came with crippling 14 percent annual interest rates, which left the original loan amounts inflating out of control. The terms of the lease contracts also stipulate that ongoing operational and managements costs be subtracted from the loan and harvest income.“You will become a rich man,” Larry Arcuyo says he and other landowners were promised, “before entering into contracts” with Agumil. Arcuyo chairs the Aramaywan farmers’ cooperative, one of 14 such growers’ cooperatives on the island. He says Aramaywan has 26 members who have leased land to Agumil. “There are rich men in Palawan — rich of debt,” he says. “We are praying that someone helps us to resolve that problem.“From the start almost 11 years [ago], the landowners have never seen any money even through the harvesting started eight years ago … Some landowners already died in the meantime,” Arcuyo says. He adds that the price per kilo of palm fruit set by Agumil “is already very low.” Even then, he says, this payment never reaches the farmers who have leased their land to the company; instead, “it is given to the Land Bank for settling the debt,” including for preparation of the land and the initial seedlings. “All decisions regarding finances are controlled by the company,” Arcuyo says.Palm oil fruit harvested from a plantation in Aramaywan community awaits transport to the Agumil processing plant. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.According to the Coalition against Land Grabbing (CALG), a local indigenous organization campaigning for indigenous people’s rights, 9,000 hectares (22,200 acres) in Palawan have been cleared for oil palm plantations, and the government is inviting foreign investors to develop more. Agumil spokesman Eric Ang told Mongabay, “We intend to expand our business in the oil palm industry but for now we are consolidating in Palawan.”CALG says that if rules and regulations had been implemented properly, Agumil would never have been able to develop its plantations in the first place. It claims the Philippines’ Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Act (IPRA Law) has been ignored, and that the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development (PCSD) has failed to implement its Strategic Environmental Plan as required under a 1992 act. The group also says that environmental compliance certificates should never have been issued to palm oil companies by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The department did not respond to an email request to comment from Mongabay.Arbitration between tribes and companyThe Palawan Palm Oil Industry Development Council (PPOIDC), a multi-stakeholder industry body, is seeking a solution to the ongoing disagreements. However, four meetings “resulted in deadlock,” according to the minutes of the most recent meeting, held last November, and an agreement has still not been reached.According to lease agreements obtained by Mongabay, Agumil offered a land rental rate of 17,000 pesos ($333) per hectare for a 10-year period, amounting to 1,000 to 2,000 pesos ($20 to $40) per hectare per year to each landowner. In addition, it offered 200 pesos ($4) per ton for harvested palm fruit.The price of processed palm oil has been dropping in recent months, and on May 31 stood at $563 per metric ton, the sixth-lowest monthly valuation in the past five years.Palm oil from the Agumil processing plant at Maasin is trucked to the port at Brookes Point from where it is shipped to other parts of the Philippines and abroad. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.It was noted at the PPOIDC meeting that the estimated tonnage of palm oil per hectare was well below that promised to farmers by Agumil at the project initiation. In contrast, the palm oil cooperatives demanded a signing bonus of 20,000 pesos ($400), production sharing of 400 pesos ($8) per metric ton, and land lease rental of 10,000 pesos ($200) per hectare per year.The meeting recommended that Agumil reconsider its offer to the cooperatives and if still no agreement could be reached, the committee should “render a report to the committee on Cooperatives, House of Representatives, and recommend/request Congress to provide legal assistance to the Palm Oil Cooperatives for the filing of appropriate case, a class suit against Agumil.”It also recommended that the “Top management of the Landbank of the Philippines conduct a thorough investigation on the various accounts of the Oil Palm Cooperatives and possibly cooperate with the Oil Palm Cooperatives in filing appropriate legal charges against Agumil.”Back in 2015, only one co-op had already repaid its loan and four were up-to-date with payments and on course for full repayment by 2023. Seven, however, needed loan restructuring and two had defaulted on their repayments. Restructuring in previous meetings had involved interest rate reductions from 14 percent to 7 percent, and the management fee charged by Agumil reduced from 10 percent to between 2.5 and 5 percent.Summing up, board member B.M. Rama said that, “with what had happened to this industry, somebody must be [held] responsible and liable to this problem and that this case should be brought to the proper forum which is the court.”Workers load bunches of palm oil fruit onto a truck bound for the Agumil processing plant at Brookes Point, Palawan. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.Asked by Mongabay whether Agumil would be improving terms to co-ops in future, Ang said: “There is no change in the terms and conditions of the Lease Agreement entered between the Coops and the Company.” He maintained that the coops are still liable for a start-up 20 percent equity advance, a matter hotly disputed in the meeting. “We are agreeable to an independent audit of the 20 percent equity advance,” Ang said, adding that none of the co-ops had yet initiated the auditing process.The idea that the capital debt of the co-ops be assumed by another entity was recommended by a study commissioned by the government’s Cooperative Development Authority. Ang says this “was explored by the Land Bank of Philippines (LBP) and Agumil.” Such a restructuring scheme has yet to be implemented, and according to Ang, would entail a new company assuming the capital debt and a further loan from the Land Bank along with a “processing agreement with Agumil.”Moratoria stop palm oil plantationsThese days, the tribes are getting organized and pursuing ways to seek justice for their lost earnings. Mobilizing to stem the spread of oil palm plantations in Palawan, groups such as CALG have networked with Palawan’s tribal groups to explain the risks of leasing their land. According to CALG chairman Kemil Motalib, the lessons have been learned and nobody is leasing land to Agumil any longer, though some are selling plots in areas where cultivation is still permitted.There’s another cause for celebration among Palawan’s indigenous communities: the planting of oil palm has been banned in two other provinces in the Philippines, a trend others may follow in the coming months.“No to expansion of palm oil planting in Rizal for five years,” says Kemil, explaining the substance of the moratorium declared by the Rizal municipal government in October 2018. Kemil, who is from the Tagbanwa tribe, said that a year of painstaking lobbying that included frequent meetings with government officials by CALG members and local indigenous people had finally paid off: “After one year the moratorium was signed by the Municipal Mayor of Rizal,” he says. “Agumil cannot question it because that is ordinance. That is the law made by the municipal government.”This sense of victory was reinforced by the election of Rizal’s first indigenous mayor. Otol Odi, a member of the Palaw’an tribe, was won the May 13 election, polling nearly twice his nearest rival. Odi, now in his seventies, attracted widespread support among Rizal’s population of 50,000 with his platform of defending the area’s natural resources from big business.The municipality of Quezon was the first in the Philippines to declare a moratorium on oil palm cultivation, back in 2014. After recent victories, CALG is now pressing for similar moves in the municipalities of Española and Bataraza. When asked by Mongabay whether Agumil would respect the moratoria, Ang said, “We will abide by any rules and regulations imposed by the Government.”Youth and children from Brookes Point hang out on a shipping buoy at the edge of the harbor where palm oil is exported. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.A further challenge to palm oil companies came from the May 16 re-election of Mary Jean Feliciano as mayor of Brooke’s Point. Despite Agumil being headquartered at Maasin near Brooke’s Point, where its processing plant is located, and using the town’s port facilities for exporting palm oil, Mayor Feliciano has pledged no new oil palm plantations in her region. (She says the two existing plantations can stay for now.) When asked what impact this would have on Agumil’s business, Ang said the company was “not aware of Mayor Feliciano’s pledge.”Recognizing ancestral domain landIn an August 2018 ceremony, ancestral domain titles were awarded to the Tagbanwa tribes in the barangays of Berong and Aramaywan. In all, the titles awarded by the National Commission on Indigenous People (NCIP) covered 31,000 hectares (76,600 acres) of territory, comprising 23,000 hectares (56,800 acres) of land and 8,000 hectares (19,800 acres) of ancestral waters.“The forest land is inside the ancestral domain because the forest provides many things, such as honey, rattan, and almaciga [Agathis philippinensis] tree resin,” says Sarong resident Romeo Japson. “They are hunting grounds and provide clean water to drink. There are also natural medicines in the forest that can prevent and cure many illnesses.”A tribal elder from Sarong community in Southern Palawan. Photo by Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.After an application has been filed, it is assessed by the NCIP at the national office in Manila. Here the order is issued for a survey of the area to determine parcel size and boundaries.“Ancestral domain land is the common land of the indigenous peoples. So the indigenous people are claiming their land, no limits to the thousands of hectares that they claimed. They can own that but only communally, not in the name of one person,” Japson says. He adds that marine and mangrove areas can also be applied for under ancestral domain.However, there are hurdles. According to Kemil, it takes at least five years to process an application, with the domains granted to Berong and Aramaywan the result of “12 years hard work.” Part of this is due to the average cost per application of around 1 million pesos ($19,500), which can take a while to amass. Then there’s the issue of capacity.“The NCIP is very stretched as there is only one office in the whole of Palawan and only a few staff,” Kemil says.An indigenous community member from Aramaywan village, Palawan. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com.Despite the obstacles, the number of ancestral domain applications has grown, with 12 currently in the pipeline. CALG has an ambitious program in the works that intends to support three barangays each in the municipalities of Batarazza and Matarazza and six in Quezon, according to Kemil.After years of struggling against the odds for the rights to their land, the indigenous peoples of Palawan appear to be making progress.“Ancestral domain is the only way the Katutubo [indigenous peoples] can protect their rights, their land,” Japson says. “It will decide whether they live freely and whether they maintain their own traditions and culture.“Indigenous people believe if there is a forest, there is food, there is medicine, there is everything else.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Indigenous communities, nat’l parks suffer as Malaysia razes its reserves

first_imgForest loss appears to be accelerating in peninsular Malaysia in 2019. Much of this deforestation is happening in “permanent forest reserves,” which are supposed to be under official protection. However, Malaysian state governments have the authority to spontaneously degazette forest reserves for development. Sources say this has created a free-for-all, with loggers rushing to clear forest and sell timber.Satellite imagery shows logging happening right up to the border of Taman Negara National Park, which lacks the buffer zone typical around national parks in other countries. Researchers say this is likely to have detrimental impacts on the parks’ wildlife.Sources on the ground say deforestation is also affecting forest-dependent indigenous communities. Residents of one such community say mining – which often follows on the heels of logging in Malaysia – is also harming them.Earlier this year, 15 Batek residents of the village of Kuala Koh died and more than 100 others were hospitalized due to mysterious illnesses. The government claims the deaths were caused by a measles outbreak, but outside experts say extremely high and unhealthy levels of manganese in their drinking water due to nearby mining may also be to blame. Advocates say the loss of their forests make indigenous communities more vulnerable to disease and illness, referring to the deforestation of their homes as “structural genocide.” KUALA KOH, Malaysia — On a daytime flight into Kuala Lumpur airport, it’s hard not to feel a certain sense of despair. The land, at times adorned by jungle-clad mountains, all too often descends into rows as uniform as those on a corduroy jacket. These endless green lines, comprised of the unmistakable presence of oil palm plantations, represent agriculture that’s systematically stripped away native jungle.Many plantations appear in Malaysia’s forest reserves, which, in theory, should protect high conservation-value jungle. Yet malleable laws and vague government structures mean they are regularly degazetted. This leads to widespread deforestation and, thanks to a lack of buffer zones, harms nearby national parks. Malaysia’s marginalized indigenous people, known as Orang Asli, also live in these areas and depend on the forest to maintain their traditional way of life. When it’s cut down, they are left in poverty, stripped of their means of survival and increasingly susceptible to deadly illnesses. Some even say this amounts to a form of structural genocide.A group of Batek children living in the village of Kuala Koh. The Batek is a tribe of the Orang Asli. While widespread throughout peninsular Malaysia up to the 1970s, logging has confined Batek communities today to Taman Negara National Park and the area surrounding it. Photo by Chris Humphrey for Mongabay.Kelantan state, four hours northeast of Kuala Lumpur, provides a typical example. Around one-third of Taman Negara, peninsular Malaysia’s largest national park, fills the state’s southern stretches. At 130 million years old, it’s considered one of the world’s oldest rainforests, and is a vital haven for endangered species — vast, sprawling tropical jungle forms a home for tigers, macaques and rare birdlife. It’s also considered customary land for a number of Malaysia’s Orang Asli. Although the area remains protected, timber criminals still hack away at bordering forest, and the rest of the state has faced rampant deforestation over the last 20 years. Between 2001 and 2018, Kelantan lost around 28 percent of its tree cover, according to data from the University of Maryland (UMD). Two regions — Tanah Merah and Gua Musang — accounted for 71 percent of the state’s tree cover loss during this time.This trend shows no sign of slowing, and only appears to be getting worse. UMD detected more than 33,000 deforestation alerts in Kelantan in July this year, which was higher than in July 2018 — but not to be eclipsed by August. With more than a week left in the month, UMD has detected around 45,000 deforestation alerts in the state. Of these, some 33,500 occurred in the Gua Musang region, with many alert hotspots occurring very close to Taman Negara National Park. There, satellite imagery shows plantation expansion and logging roads denuding large areas right up to the park boundary.Satellite data from the University of Maryland show large areas of recent tree cover loss in forest reserves that border Taman Negara National Park. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch; forest reserve boundaries are from Forest Trends.This area of clearcutting in a forest reserve directly abuts the park and is actively expanding. Imagery from Planet Labs.Logging roads and deforestation have proliferated right up against the park border. Imagery from Planet Labs.Satellite images show this area is in the process of being cleared. Imagery from Planet Labs.The problem with forest reservesBeside the road leading to one of Taman Negara National Park’s northern entrances, an ochre dirt track peels away to the left. At its base, a huge tree trunk has been dumped to prevent access to vehicles. Walking up the muddy road behind it, however, leads to a storage area for timber cut down during recent clear-cutting in Lebir Permanent Forest Reserve that stretches north of the village of Kuala Koh. Behind these piles, the track stretches beyond sight into the hills, leading to the deforested area.Tan Dok Fung supervises the Syabas Tiara mine in the area. He said that his company’s mining concession comprises 100 hectares (250 acres) adjacent to a 200-hectare (500-acre) logging concession. According to Tan, loggers are clearing forest within the concessions where it’s allowed, as well as illegally outside of concession bounds.“My boss was offered the opportunity to mine within a 1,000-acre [400-hectare] area outside the National Park,” he said. “However, because a licence hasn’t been issued, my boss refused to mine without a permit. The 1,000 acres hasn’t been cleared but they have furtively gone in and [started logging] in a 500-acre area… Next to this 1,000-acre area outside the park, 500 acres has already been logged.”A long dirt road connects the storage site with the logging area. Photo by Chris Humphrey for Mongabay.The trunk of a recently felled tree in Kelantan State. Photo by Chris Humphrey for Mongabay.Tan said that government intervention to stop the logging has been largely unsuccessful.“When the government officials turn up, the [logging company] staff do the disappearing act — they have informants … They have gone beyond the 500-acre concession area and they have trespassed into the 1,000-acre zone,” he said.During a recent visit, Mongabay asked Tengku Zulpuri Shah Raja Puji, the deputy minister for water, land and natural resources, if he knew about the recent logging.“Might be; sorry, not sure,” he said and laughed. “In Malaysia, we have two powers. One is federal power, another is state power. To allow them to make the mining or timber is under state power. It’s not under federal power. But my side is under federal power. We just can only give guideline[s] to them. Whether they want to follow or not is up to them.”The lack of authority of top-level ministers highlights a growing issue with Malaysia’s “Permanent Forest Reserves,” which cover a large portion of the country’s land area, including about half of Kelantan. Malaysian governance is divided into federal and state powers, and state governments have the power to degazette reserves without any approval from the federal government, experts or the general public. And they do so seemingly at a whim.The legal flexibility of forest reserves means deforestation has become commonplace. Land is covered instead by oil palm and rubber plantations or, increasingly, durian farms. Forests have become heavily fragmented due to timber exploitation and conversion for agriculture. At times, the federal government has stepped in. Earlier this year, it sued the state of Kelantan after the state gave logging licenses to companies that were establishing plantations on indigenous people’s customary land. Yet, more often than not, the federal government’s lack of power over such matters means that most state decisions to relax protections for forest reserves go unchecked and unchallenged.last_img read more

15 Awesome #Geocaching15 Photos from the Geocaching Road Trip ’15

first_imgLoading… SharePrint RelatedChronicle Your Road Trip with #Geocaching15 Photos!June 4, 2015In “15 Years”Ain’t no Mountain High Enough… for Geocachers – The Photo AlbumJune 14, 2015In “15 Years”A Geocaching Life in Pictures – Farogdatter – Celebrating 15 Years of Geocaching in 15 PicturesMay 28, 2015In “Community” Share with your Friends:Morelast_img

How machine learning analytics can accelerate IoT results

first_imgHow Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua… What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Follow the Puck Tags:#analytics#IoT#Machine Learning#PTC#ThingWorx center_img ReadWrite Sponsors Too often, machine learning requires a massive investment of time and terabytes of data before it can deliver meaningful insights. But that doesn’t have to be the case. A well-configured machine learning analytics tool can rapidly provide initial results — a key advantage for developers who can then start using those results to create value.To understand this dynamic, companies have to start taking a data approach that embraces the fact that what is driving companies in today’s connected world is not data, but insight. And the volume of data being created in today’s connected world is not just what powers this insight…but also blocks you from finding it. In order to fully take advantage of a predictive world created by this data, companies need a solution that can help them fully understand the baseline data of their business and what is “normal,” and then apply real-time data over that to power both predictive solutions as well as optimizing future performance. Only a tool that can deliver across all three of these stages can maximize your IoT results.One such tool is ThingWorx Analytics, part of PTC’s expanding portfolio of solutions that enable customers to create, operate, service and experience smart, connected products. ThingWorx is a platform for building Internet of Things (IoT) analytics-driven applications across a wide spectrum of industries including manufacturing, healthcare, and agriculture, to name a few. ThingWorx Analytics is different than traditional solutions in that it was built for the world of streaming real-time data. With the volume of data that the IoT ecosystems of tomorrow will deliver, the ability to take real-time data and turn it into timely business insights will drive the return on investment. Without this ability to process real-time data, your company will still be stuck in the old model of batch-driven queries running on top of a static data store. What makes ThingWorx Analytics perfect for the IoT world of today and tomorrow? At its heart, ThingWorx Analytics is a machine learning tool that turns real-time streaming IoT data into insights. Compared to traditional analytic tools, it provides application and solution developers an easy way to use advanced analytics methods without requiring expert training in data science, complex mathematics or machine learning. Its algorithms automatically learn from data, detect patterns, and build predictive models, and then send that information to nearly any type of app or technology. That, in turn, produces concrete, real-world results.One ThingWorx customer is Flowserve, a company that makes flow management products. The company’s sophisticated pumps control and protect the flow of materials in critical industrial applications. If a pump malfunctions on a client’s manufacturing site, costs can run into the millions of dollars. To avoid that, Flowserve outfits its water circulation pump with six sensors to collect data on discharge pressure, suction pressure, and more.By churning through a stream of 30,000 data points per second, ThingWorx Analytics learns the normal operating conditions of the pump. If pump efficiency drops or an impeller is at risk of failing, ThingWorx sends out a notification. Because the pump self-evaluates all the time, nobody has to monitor it, and problems get addressed before serious downtimes occur.And in the telecommunications industry, Finnish company Elisa, a market leader in mobile and fixed broadband subscriptions, relies on ThingWorx to power its open service and development platform for customers. Business customers use the platform to build their own IoT business solutions to suit their unique objectives.  By implementing ThingWorx technology, Elisa can offer those customers seamless connectivity and management of business systems, people, and remote devices. The telco now offers a comprehensive set of IoT services, including data analytics, product development, and device management.  As the concept of IoT becomes more familiar, how companies can derive differentiated value from it becomes crucial. The real value of IoT lies not in connecting devices (although that is important) but in analytics — specifically, the kinds of powerful analytics that you can derive actionable insights without expertise in complex analytics.  For more information on IoT analytics, detailed case studies, and more information on getting up to speed with IoT data, please visit https://www.thingworx.com/moreanalytics.This article was produced in partnership with ThingWorx. Related Posts last_img read more