NYC’s New Rooftop Venue ‘Pier 17’ Announces Inaugural Concert Series

first_imgNew York City is about to receive another new concert venue, Pier 17–opening up on August 1, 2018. In Manhattan’s Seaport District, the 3,400-capacity, 1.5-acre rooftop venue will have the Brooklyn Bridge, Empire State Building, Statue of Liberty, One World Trade, and the Manhattan skyline as the backdrop. With Live Nation as the exclusive promoter to the new rooftop stage, the Seaport District venue has announced the full artist lineup for the inaugural Pier 17 concert series.To kick off the concert series, Jon Batiste with the Dap-Kings will perform a free public concert on Saturday, July 28 as a thank you to the community for its unyielding support. There will be a mix of general-admission and seated concerts through October 12, including Kings of Leon (2 nights), Michael McDonald, deadmau5, Dashboard Confessional, STS9 (two nights with Papadosio and Slow Magic), Diana Ross, Thievery Corporation, and more.Pier 17 will occupy the roof of a four-story, 400,000 square foot complex with retail stores, high-end restaurants by celebrity chefs like Jean-Georges Vongerichten and Andrew Carmellini plus a 50,000-square-foot food hall curated by Vongerichten, and entertainment, including Manhattan’s first iPic Theatre; Carla Sozzani‘s concept store, 10 Corso Como; and the new ESPN studios.Tickets for the Pier 17 Rooftop Concert Series can only be purchased through Seaport District NYC strategic partner, Ticketmaster. A 48-hour pre-sale will be offered to all Chase cardholders, starting May 14 at 10 a.m. (EST), with a general on-sale starting May 18 at 10 a.m. (EST) via Ticketmaster and by calling 1-800-745-3000. In addition, Heineken will be elevating the live entertainment experience at Pier 17 by way of special ticket giveaways for those visiting the Seaport District and the Heineken Riverdeck throughout the summer.See below for the full list of upcoming shows, and head to Pier 17’s website for more information. To see more pictures of the elaborate new venue, head here.Pier 17’s Rooftop Concert Series Calendar:Saturday, July 28 – Jon Batiste with the Dap-Kings (General Admission) – FREE COMMUNITY EVENTWednesday, August 1 – Amy Schumer & Friends (Seated)Thursday, August 2 – Kings of Leon (General Admission)Friday, August 3 – Kings of Leon (General Admission)Thursday, August 9 – Bebe Rexha (General Admission)Sunday, August 12 – Trevor Noah (Seated)Sunday, August 19 – The Summer Ever After Tour featuring All Time Low + Dashboard Confessional with gnash (General Admission)Tuesday, August 21 – Michael McDonald (Seated)Friday, August 24 – Hunter Hayes with Maggie Rose (General Admission)Saturday, August 25 – Gladys Knight + The O’Jays (Seated)Thursday, September 6 – Jeff Dunham (Seated)Friday, September 7 – Rebellion Rises 2018 Tour featuring Ziggy Marley, Steel Pulse and Tribal Seeds (General Admission)Saturday, September 8 – deadmau5 (General Admission)Friday, September 21 – St. Lucia (General Admission)Friday, September 28 – STS9 with Papadosio (General Admission)Saturday, September 29 – STS9 with Slow Magic (General Admission)Sunday, September 30 – Diana Ross (Seated)Friday, October 5 – Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators (General Admission)Saturday, October 6 – Pink Martini (Seated)Sunday, October 7 – Paul Anka Sings Frank Sinatra – His Songs, My Songs, My Way (Seated)Friday, October 12 – Thievery Corporation (General Admission)*Chase Preferred seating will be made available on May 18 at 10 a.m. EDT for cardholders in lieu of a Chase pre-sale for All Time Low + Dashboard Confessional.View Alllast_img read more

Brazilian wins CAF Super Cup for Onyango’s ‘Brazilians’

first_imgThe Brazilian did not cut off a pass, allowing Ben Malango to race through with only Uganda goalkeeper Denis Onyango to beat.But the Congolese hit the woodwork and when he connected with the rebound, struck the post again.It was the closest Confederation Cup holders Mazembe came to scoring in a match that Sundowns gradually took control of and wasted several second-half chances.Liberian Anthony Laffor was the chief culprit, twice missing excellent opportunities to break the deadlock, and Ivorian Gbohouo made several fine saves.The result maintained a Super Cup tradition of victories by the Champions League winners, who have enjoyed home advantage in all but three of the 25 matches.Al Ahly of Egypt have won the annual match a record six times followed by Zamalek of Egypt and Mazembe with three successes each.Share on: WhatsApp Onyango with the Super CupPretoria, South Africa | AFP | Mamelodi Sundowns of South Africa won the CAF Super Cup at the first attempt Saturday by defeating TP Mazembe of the Democratic Republic of Congo 1-0 in Pretoria.African champions Sundowns are known as the ‘Brazilians’ and the only goal came from Brazilian centre-back Ricardo Nascimento, who converted an 83rd-minute penalty.The award of the spot-kick by the Egyptian referee was hotly disputed with Sundowns captain Hlompho Kekana appearing to fall over Issama Mpeko.Nascimento displayed coolness to tuck a low shot into the left corner of the net while goalkeeper Sylvain Gbohouo dived in the opposite direction.Scoring was a relief for Nascimento as his blunder almost gifted Mazembe an early lead in the annual match between the Champions League and Confederation Cup winners.last_img read more

School Security guard accidentally shoots coworker

first_imgThe Broward County Sheriff’s Office is currently investigating after an armed private school security guard accidentally shot a maintenance worker in the face.The incident was reported Thursday at The Sagemont School in Weston.Officials say the security guard and the maintenance worker were in the parking lot when the gun accidentally went off and struck the maintenance worker in the eye.The security guard then drove the worker to an area hospital before notifying the police about the situation.Not much is known about the incident at this time including the condition of the maintenance worker.Authorities did, however, report that no charges have been pressed against the guard at this time despite the guard also not being authorized to have a gun on school property.Legislatures passed a law requiring all public schools to have an armed police officer, guard or another employee on campus at all times after the Stoneman Douglas shooting that left 17 people dead and 17 injured, however, the ruling does not reportedly cover private schools.Authorities are continuing to investigate the incident.last_img read more

UPDATED: Injuries hamper Bombers against North Van’s Bodwell

first_imgIn the end, a short bench proved to be the undoing for the L.V. Rogers Bombers at the BC High School AAA Boy’s Basketball Championships in Langley.Already without power forward Vinnie Watson, the Bombers lost top scorer Josh Matosevic in the third quarter of Saturday’s consolation round game against Bodwell Bruins of North Vancouver.The injuries made it easy for the Lower Mainland squad to blast the Bombers 74-54 on Day four of the Provincial High School Basketball Tournament.The result left the Bombers in 14th spot in the 16-team tournament.Bodwell took a 18-10 lead into the second quarter, increasing the margin to 33-22 at halftime.Bombers remained close, but after Matosevic was taken out attempting a jump shot, the Kootenay reps had very little offence left to overtake Bodwell.Matosevic led all Bombers scorers with 22 points while Robby Dixon added 16 and Eamon Studer nine.Bodwell dominated the boards at both ends of the courts, finishing the game with a 40-8 points in the paint advantage.Bodwell also held the advantage shooting, shooting 53 percent to LVR’s 29 percent.LVR finished the tournament with a 1-3 record, losing to eventual champion Southridge of Surrey and Duchess Park of Prince George. The lone win came against Charles Hayes of Prince Rupert.Bombers knock off No. 4 Charles Hayes at Triple-A Basketball TournamentThe senior class led by example, combining for 78 points to spark the L.V. Rogers Bombers to an 81-74 upset victory over fourth-ranked Charles Hayes of Prince Rupert Friday in consolation round action at the BC High School AAA Boy’s Basketball Championships in Langley.Robby Dixon led the 16th ranked Bombers in scoring with 30 points while Josh Matosevic had 28 and Jake Anderson 20.LVR opened the game with a solid first quarter, building a 23-17 advantage.Charles Hayes closed the gap to 40-36 at the half before LVR increased the margin to 61-56 after three periods.LVR forward Kai Shave played most of the game in foul trouble and and Vinnie Watson injured a knee to limit the Bombers attack.”Vinnie is probably out of the tournament now,” said LVR coach Jeremy Phelan.The Bombers shot 45 percent from the field during the game and hit 89 percent at the foul line.LVR lost Thursday to Duchess Park of Prince George 80-57.”We brought it to within 10 but they pulled away on free throws and fast break at the end when we had to gamble and pressure then full court,” Phelan explained.The Bombers now meet Bodwell of North Vancouver in consolation action Saturday at 1:15 p.m.last_img read more

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – SUNDAY JANUARY 31, 2016

first_imgMichael Machowsky1633219%50%$145,098 SINK OR SWIM TIME FOR TRIPLE CROWN HOPEFULSAs American Pharoah fades majestically into the sunset, Derby Fever begins anew Saturday when Bob Baffert takes step one on what he hopes is the path to the Kentucky Derby and beyond with his leading Triple Crown candidate, Mor Spirit, in the Robert B. Lewis Stakes.The Lewis is one of four graded stakes on a highly appealing and diversified racing program that also features the $300,000 Las Virgenes Stakes marking the three-year-old debut of unbeaten champion two-year-old filly of 2015 Songbird; the $500,000 San Antonio Stakes for older horses which is a steppingstone to the $1 million Santa Anita Handicap on March 12; and the Grade II San Marcos Stakes for older horses at 1 ¼ miles on turf.“This is when you start heading to the deeper part of the pool,” said Baffert, who seeks his sixth win in the Lewis, named for his late client, who died at the age of 81 on Feb. 17, 2006.Baffert captured the Triple Crown with Horse of the Year American Pharoah last year and has won the Run for the Roses four times, with Pharoah; in 1997 with Silver Charm, owned by Lewis; Real Quiet in 1998; and War Emblem in 2002.The Lewis was named the Santa Catalina Stakes until 2007. Baffert previously won what is now the Lewis with General Challenge (1999), Domestic Dispute (2003), Pioneerof the Nile (2009), Flashback (2013) and Dortmund (2015).“They start separating themselves now,” said Baffert of the three-year-olds with designs on the classics. “I think with every start, we’re learning more about Mor Spirit and figuring out what he wants to do. He has a lot of tactical speed but you can’t let him use it too early.“We’re teaching him to sit and wait. He’s a big horse and beautifully made. He’s got a really long stride. He’ll be best going a mile and an eighth and further.”Gary Stevens, who has ridden Mor Spirit in three of his four starts including the Grade I Los Alamitos Futurity which resulted in a 1 ½-length victory on Dec. 19, is aligned with Baffert.“He’s doing really well,” Stevens said of Mor Spirit, a son of Eskendereya owned by Michael Lund Petersen. “He’s training forwardly since the Futurity and I’m looking forward to his first start since December, so we’re excited.“He’s got a huge stride and beautiful action.”Sharing Saturday’s spotlight is Songbird, the brilliant daughter of Medaglia d’Oro who captured the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies with complete authority and in a near-unanimous vote was acclaimed the best of her division. In fact, there are those who feel she is better than her male contemporaries, although any potential showdowns seem unlikely.Songbird has not been nominated to the Santa Anita Derby or any of the Triple Crown races. Her major goal beyond the Las Virgenes and the Santa Anita Oaks on April 9 is the Kentucky Oaks on May 6.“I don’t remember us running fillies against colts,” said Dan Ward, who has been Jerry Hollendorfer’s valued assistant for nine years. “Songbird’s owner (Kentucky-based Rick Porter, who races as Fox Hill Farm in Lexington) has never won the Kentucky Oaks and he wants to try for that.”Meanwhile, Team Hollendorfer has been able to dance through the raindrops in maintaining a regular training schedule for Songbird, who has not raced since Oct. 30.            “We got lucky,” said Ward, who served 22 years under the late Bobby Frankel before his tour with Hollendorfer. “It’s hard to say if Songbird is better than last year, but it is possible.”Now that’s flat-out scary. Victor Espinoza343829%38%$473,580 Bob Baffert4487818%52%$493,540 Joseph Talamo9412121313%39%$571,084 Tiago Pereira452624%22%$163,962 Edwin Maldonado77137917%38%$520,740 Kristin Mulhall1952126%42%$193,360 Abel Lezcano3131210%19%$133,870 Jerry Hollendorfer6156108%34%$331,822 (Current Through Saturday, Jan. 30) Flavien Prat901461416%38%$735,048 Karen Headley730043%43%$137,860 David Lopez841781320%45%$509,378 Drayden Van Dyke6177711%34%$417,994 TrainerSts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won Rafael Bejarano941820919%50%$970,180 Brice Blanc252178%40%$235,660 J. Keith Desormeaux2351622%52%$147,390 Martin Garcia5166712%37%$431,484 Doug O’Neill719101213%44%$430,952 Mike Puype363628%31%$160,930 Ron Ellis1731118%29%$87,970 Alonso Quinonez484738%29%$184,320 Gary Stevens2943314%34%$549,810 Jeff Mullins1234025%58%$99,780 Martin Pedroza4463214%25%$149,740 Alex Solis1230225%42%$185,044 FINISH LINES: With rain falling by 7 a.m. Sunday morning and intensifying steadily as the day wore on, the main track was closed for training. Track Superintendent Dennis Moore and his crew sealed the track after Saturday’s last race. Sunday’s three scheduled turf races were moved to the main track . . . Simon Callaghan reports two of his major stakes stars, La Canada winner Taris and Kentucky Derby runner-up Firing Line, are both doing well. “Taris came out the race (on Jan. 16) really good,” the trainer said. “She’s been jogging and taking it easy, but we’ll build up her training for the (Grade I) Santa Margarita on March 19. We’ve got time on our side so we’ll wait for that. I’m happy with Firing Line (who hasn’t raced since the Preakness last May). He looks great. He’s been tack-walking and we’ll start jogging on the track next week.” . . . Live racing resumes at Santa Anita Thursday, with free General Admission and free general parking Thursday and Friday throughout the Winter Meet . . . Racing oddity: In three of seven career starts, Ipray, a four-year-old filly trained by Hector Palma in today’s fourth race, lost by identical margins of 7 ¾ lengths, the last two in a row. Tyler Baze11212201411%41%$645,872 Mario Gutierrez909151010%38%$516,024center_img Jeff Bonde1742224%47%$105,520 George Papaprodromou2032315%40%$82,630 Peter Eurton39611615%59%$371,360 Jose Verenzuela1421214%36%$49,430 FORMER JOCK KENNY BLACK RELISHES BIGGEST WIN AS TRAINEROne of America’s top apprentice jockeys in the early 1980s, Kenny Black was at times overcome with emotion yesterday following his biggest training achievement to date–a brilliant 3 ¼ length win in Saturday’s $250,000 California Cup Turf Classic by Old English Rancho-bred What a View, who was ridden by Kent Desormeaux.What made the win especially emotional was the fact that E.W. “Bud” Johnston, who had headed the farm’s breeding and racing operation (which was founded in California in 1948 by his father, E.B. “The Pie Man” Johnston and his wife, Betty) dating back to 1957, passed away unexpectedly one day shy of his 78th birthday last year on May 5.“I’ll be forever grateful to Buddy Johnston and his family for the opportunity they’ve given me,” said Black, who was hired by Johnston as the farm’s private trainer following the retirement of longtime conditioner Don Warren last year. “Buddy has had his horses here in the same stalls since 1953. This is tradition with Old English Rancho.“Mr. Johnston was so good to me, so to be able to win a stake like this is the start of a new era. Me and the (Johnston) family are moving on, so this was cool to win our first stake together.”Black, who was reduced to tears in a post race interview with Michelle Yu on Santa Anita’s simulcast network, was joined in the Winner’s Circle by an equally emotional Mary Hilvers, who is the daughter of Bud and Judy Johnston.“I grew up with this,” said Hilvers. “It’s amazing. Obviously, when we lost dad so unexpectedly and suddenly, there were questions about whether we’d be able to keep it (the family racing business) going…It’s a family thing. We really want to carry on my dad’s legacy and my grandmother’s.”And, thanks in-part to Kenny Black and homebreds like What a View, the future appears bright for the red and white colors of Old English Rancho. Mark Glatt4045210%28%$209,930 Steve Knapp1431221%43%$97,570 Philip D’Amato5312101023%60%$775,560 JockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won Fernando Perez80951311%34%$460,046 Steven Miyadi2847514%57%$168,084 PHIL D’AMATO RULES THE TRAINING ROOSTThanks to two winners Saturday, including Sunday Rules over males in the Don Valpredo California Cup Sprint with the impeccably-presented Tribal Rule mare, trainer Phil D’Amato increased his lead in Santa Anita’s standings to three over Doug O’Neill, 12-9.D’Amato also has more than a $280,000 lead over runner-up Bob Baffert in money won, at $775,560 to $493,540.D’Amato ran one-two in Saturday’s 10th and final race, with first-time starter ShyCamelita and apprentice David C. Lopez overtaking $2.30-1 second choice Desperate Chick by a half-length at a $26.20 win mutuel, capping a two-day Pick Six return of $13,253.20 on 61 winning tickets.An assistant to the late Mike Mitchell for 10 years, D’Amato has two goals for Sunday Rules, a five-year-old bay owned and bred by Nick Alexander, who also owns and bred Shy Camalita: first, earning black type as a graded stakes winner, and second, running in the Breeders’ Cup Filly & Mare Sprint.“Sunday Rules came out of the race good,” D’Amato said between raindrops at Clockers’ Corner Sunday morning. “We’re going to try and make her a graded stakes winner in the next month or two, so we’ll keep all our options open and give her a little extra time after yesterday’s race. She ran hard (although winning by 2 ¼ lengths under Edwin Maldonado) but she came out of it good.“Our main goal would be the Breeders’ Cup Filly & Mare Sprint at Santa Anita at the end of the year (Nov. 4). We’ll keep her sprinting for now.”D’Amato may not have the equine ammo of O’Neill, Bob Baffert, Jerry Hollendorfer and Peter Miller to stay atop the standings throughout the Winter Meet that ends April 10, but to paraphrase Al Jolson, “You ain’t seen nothing yet.”“I’m very happy with our success early on,” said the 39-year-old D’Amato, a native of San Pedro, “and come February and March, we’ve got a lot of young talent still to unleash, so I’m looking forward to that.” SANTA ANITA STATISTICS Peter Miller5783714%32%$316,060 Patrick Gallagher1642225%50%$265,008 John Sadler3445312%35%$197,170 Vladimir Cerin1661238%56%$154,690 Santiago Gonzalez11723161120%43%$916,248 Robertino Diodoro1234125%67%$96,090 Kent Desormeaux4278517%48%$607,800 MOR SPIRIT ON A BLOCKBUSTER SATURDAY CARDCHAMP SONGBIRD SET FOR LAS VIRGENES STAKESD’AMATO ADDS TO TRAINING LEAD, MORE TO COMEKENNY BLACK RELISHES CLASSIC WIN WITH WHAT A VIEW Brayan Pena1720012%12%$37,580 Mike Smith4653611%30%$502,240 J. Eric Kruljac2132514%48%$78,560 Jack Carava1642125%44%$90,410 William Spawr1865133%67%$152,414 Agapito Delgadillo3555414%40%$141,654 Richard Baltas4776315%34%$476,634 Kenneth D. Black830038%38%$230,250last_img read more

Five promising stories for Global Tiger Day

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Since the last Global Tiger Day in 2016, researchers have discovered tiger populations in unexpected areas, such as forested corridors along riverbanks and in areas that recently served as theaters of war.Several countries have worked to protect the tigers that live within their borders, including the creation of a massive national park and taking steps to end tiger farming.Camera trap surveys continue to prove invaluable to wildlife researchers in tracking down tigers and other species that can range over huge areas. Reporting on the plight of wild tigers (Panthera tigris) generally doesn’t lead us down very many pleasant paths. Poaching, habitat loss and the decimation of their natural prey has led to a 95 percent reduction in their numbers worldwide since 1900, and only about 3,900 tigers still live in the wild, according to WWF. But in the past year, Mongabay’s editors, writers and correspondents have managed to find a few stories demonstrating that there’s still some hope for the iconic cat.Here are five upbeat articles to celebrate Global Tiger Day.1. China contemplates, then approves, a massive national park that’s home to tigers and leopards.Most Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), also known as Siberian tigers, live in Russia. But more than 30 live at least part time in China, primarily in Jilin province. The provincial government began a proposal in mid-2016 to connect three protected areas and form a national park with an area of 14,600 square kilometers (5,640 square miles). That’s more than 50 percent larger than Yellowstone National Park in the United States. The park would also protect 42 Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) that inhabit the region.Experts say that such an expanse is necessary to support a growing tiger population. They also hope the park will help protect the tiger’s prey, such as roe deer. Deer and other ungulates compete with cattle for grass and are sometimes killed by herders. As more humans encroach on tiger habitat, the incidence of cattle killed by the big cats has risen.The Huffington Post reported that the Chinese Federal Government approved the park in May 2017.China hosts a growing population of Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica). Photo by S. Taheri, edited by Fir0002 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons.2. Laos pledges to shutter its commercial tiger farms.In September 2016, the Southeast Asian country of Laos, also known as Lao People’s Democratic Republic or Lao PDR, committed to shutting down tiger farms within its borders . Around 200 farms are thought to exist throughout Asia to provide tiger skins and body parts to markets in the region, and they hold perhaps twice as many tigers (or more) as currently live in the wild, according to the London-based Environmental Investigations Agency (EIA). But conservationists contend that these farms keep demand for tiger-related products alive and maintain the incentive to poach wild tigers.The announcement by Laos’ Minister of Natural Resources and Environment came following a call from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) for the closure of tiger farms in several countries throughout the region. The move garnered tepid praise from conservationists, who added that the country still needed to back up its commitment with action. They are also waiting to see if Laos’ decision will influence its neighbors.“All eyes now are on China, Thailand, Vietnam and other countries with tiger farms,” said Debbie Banks, head of EIA’s Tiger Campaign. “Will they follow suit and finally commit to ending tiger farming?”Government officials in Laos have said they will end tiger farming in the country. Photo by Hans, from Pixabay. Public Domain.3. Scientists find evidence that tigers and other animals are using forest corridors in Sumatra.Amid pulpwood plantations on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, protected bands of forest along riverbanks are helping populations of tigers, as well as tapirs, bears, pangolins, and elephants hang on. In a study published in January, camera trap photographs revealed the “significant presence” of these animals. Additionally, such riparian forests help maintain the health and water quality of rivers by locking down sediment and filtering out pollutants.The results prove that these strips of habitat can help wildlife species survive. Importantly, however, they must connect to larger banks of forest, such as Tesso Nilo National Park in Riau province, which is near the study site. And just as in gazetted parks, the animals rely on enforcement of the laws in place to protect them.A Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae). A recent study found that tigers in Riau province are using corridors that connect large swaths of forest. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.4. Scientists find a wildlife treasure trove in Myanmar.Until recently, parts of Myanmar haven’t been accessible to scientists for security or political reasons. But a study that included the use of camera traps published in the journal Oryx revealed tigers and 30 other species of animals living in Karen state, more than half of which are threatened.“It is incredibly rare to find such rich and diverse wildlife anywhere in the world today but certainly in Southeast Asia,” said Clare Campbell, who directs Wildlife Asia, an Australian conservation NGO that coordinates the Karen Wildlife Conservation Initiative (KWCI), in a statement. “Thanks to the long-standing conservation efforts of the Karen people this area is a refuge for the last tigers in the region, Asian elephants and so much more.”However, signs indicate that habitat destruction and poaching — especially for “high-value species” like tigers — may be on the rise, and the researchers argue that formal protection of the area is urgently needed.Camera trap photos revealed the existence of tigers and 30 other species of wildlife in an area previously out of bounds for scientists due to security issues. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.5. A camera trap survey reveals a second breeding population of Indochinese tigers in Thailand.Officials and conservationists released photographs of tiger cubs and adults in Thailand’s Dong-Phayayen Khao Yai Forest Complex in March — confirmation of just the second known breeding population of Indochinese tigers (Panthera tigris corbetti) in the world. By most estimates, the country is home to at most a few hundred tigers.In this forest complex, scientists estimate that there is approximately one tiger in every 159 square kilometers (61 square miles). That density is “exceptionally low,” but Thailand’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation heralded the tigers’ resilience in the face of the poaching and illegal logging that takes place in the forest complex. The agency credited increases in anti-poaching patrols for the continued existence of tigers in this area.“The extraordinary rebound of eastern Thailand’s tigers is nothing short of miraculous,” said conservation biologist John Goodrich of Panthera in a statement.“Thailand’s World Heritage Forest Complex is home to prime forested habitat that, with significant conservation resources, could support eight times as many tigers as it does now,” Goodrich added. “With continued infiltration of rigorous anti-poaching protection, there is no doubt that this population can be fully recovered.”The existence of Indochinese tigers (Panthera tigris corbetti) in Thailand’s Dong-Phayayen Khao Yai Forest Complex was hailed as ‘nothing short of miraculous.’ Camera trap image courtesy of DNP/Freeland/Panthera.A tiger in Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve, in Rajasthan, India. Photo by Koshy Koshy (Flickr: Male Tiger Ranthambhore) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Camera Trapping, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, China wildlife trade, Conservation, Corridors, Elephants, Environment, Forests, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Hunting, Illegal Logging, India-animals, India-wildlife, Iucn, Leopards, Logging, Mammals, Megafauna, Parks, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Tapirs, Temperate Forests, Tigers, trafficking, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Corridors, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

Forests and forest communities critical to climate change solutions

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Mining, Biodiversity, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Deforestation, Earth Science, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Gold Mining, Green, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, IPCC, Land Rights, Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Traditional People, Tribal Groups, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlights the importance of land use in addressing climate change.The restoration and protection of forests could be a critical component in strategies to mitigate climate change, say experts, but governments must halt deforestation and forest degradation to make way for farms and ranches.The IPCC report also acknowledges the role that indigenous communities could play.The forests under indigenous management often have lower deforestation and emit less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. How we use the planet’s land, including forests, will make a huge difference in determining the path of climate change in the future, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC.The IPCC released a summary of its special report on climate change and land on Aug. 8. Experts say the report reinforces the importance of taking land use into account as a front-line strategy for dealing with rising global temperatures as a result of increased carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.“Our options in terms of protecting, restoring and expanding forests are immediately available, proven at scale, and often very cost-effective, while also providing benefits for clean air, water, biodiversity, soil health, climate resilience — you name it,” Katharine Mach, a climate researcher and associate professor at the University of Miami, said in a press briefing on Aug. 1.Forest and terraced hillsides in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Forests collectively pull out roughly a third of global CO2 emissions, and the potential for keeping a lid on climate change is even higher with the right restoration and protection plans in place, Mach said. That emphasis on keeping forests standing and bringing them back in places where they once stood dovetails with the need to cut the amount of fossil fuels we burn for energy.“This relationship between fossil fuels and forests is a ‘yes-and’ relationship,” she added.A banana plantation in the village of San Jose in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.But holding back the tide of deforestation against interests intent on short-term financial gains has proven difficult.“That is why we need to ensure tropical forests are worth more standing than when they are cut down for grazing livestock, growing crops or harvesting timber,” David Festa, senior vice president for ecosystems with the Environmental Defense Fund, said in a statement.The sentiment echoes a remark from noted biologist E.O. Wilson during an interview with the BBC: “Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.”Residents playing basketball in the village of San Jose in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.That’s particularly true in the Brazilian Amazon, Carlos Nobre, a senior climate scientist at Brazil’s University of São Paolo, said at the briefing. The push for timber, agriculture, ranching and mining in the largest block of rainforest left on Earth has led to a surge in deforestation rates of 40 percent in the past three years.“That’s very worrying,” Nobre said. He added that continued deforestation in the Amazon could permanently turn the rainforest into a savanna that releases tens of billions of tons of CO2 into the atmosphere.“The Amazon forest may be closer to a tipping point than we assumed before,” Nobre said.Protecting forests because of their potential to mitigate climate change can have other positive effects, such as protecting biodiversity. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Part of the solution could come from overhauling the way we produce food, Charlotte Streck, founder of the think tank Climate Focus, said during the briefing. Streck pointed out that raising livestock to satisfy the global appetite for meat accounts for 15 percent of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions, as well as the majority of emissions from the global agricultural sector.“All this means that one of the most effective climate actions that we can take as individuals is to improve our diets,” she said. “The good news is that we are already seeing diet changes in the United States and Europe. The consumption of red meat is falling, in particular, in urban centers.”But for lasting changes to protect forests, we must take into account — and indeed, enlist the experience, knowledge and expertise — of the people who call them home, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the U.N. special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, said at the briefing.A local farmer in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.“No one understands the value of forests better than indigenous and local communities,” she said. “As experts, often guided by hundreds of years of knowledge, we are uniquely suited to manage, protect and restore the world’s forests.”Research has shown that forests managed by indigenous communities have lower deforestation rates and release less CO2 than those managed by governments, and the new IPCC report recognizes for the first time the role these peoples could play in addressing climate change.“Finally, the world’s top scientists recognize what we have always known,” a group of community and indigenous organizations from 42 countries said in their response to the report released on Aug. 8.A member of a group resisting a hydropower dam in Guatemala. Image by James Rodriguez/Global Witness.But critical to nurturing that beneficial relationship is acknowledging indigenous land rights around the world. The statement’s authors point out that these communities customarily take care of more than half the world’s surface. But governments only recognize their ownership of about a tenth of global land. Furthermore, the signatories to the response argue, these groups must be involved in decision-making processes about what happens to the land they hold — what’s known as free, prior and informed consent, or FPIC.But standing up for the right to have a say over what happens to a piece of land is often contentious and dangerous. On July 30, Global Witness released a report documenting the deaths of 164 “land and environmental defenders” in 2018 — an average of more than three a week.Another study, published Aug. 5 in the journal Nature Sustainability, found that more than one-third of killings between 2014 and 2017 over natural resources involved either agriculture or mining interests.“No one knows the conflicts playing out among food, fuel and forests better than indigenous peoples and local communities,” Tauli-Corpuz said. “We’re often in the cross-hairs of conflicts over land, especially forests.”The number of environmental and land defenders killed by country in 2018. Image courtesy of Global Witness.Banner image of a farmer looking over the new oil palm plantation abutting his land in Peru, by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitation:Butt, N., Lambrick, F., Menton, M., & Renwick, A. (2019). The supply chain of violence. Nature Sustainability, 2(8), 742-747. doi:10.1038/s41893-019-0349-4FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Norway freezes support for Amazon Fund; EU/Brazil trade deal at risk?

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation On Thursday, Norway announced a freeze on US$33.2 million, Amazon Fund donations slated for projects aimed at curbing deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The REDD+ Amazon Fund was launched in 2008, and was expected to continue indefinitely.However, the anti-environmental policies of Brazil President Jair Bolsonaro have put the Fund’s future in grave doubt. Norway’s freeze came as the direct result of the Bolsonaro administration’s unilateral action to drastically alter the rules for administering the fund, even as monthly deforestation rates shot up in Brazil.Bolsonaro seems not to care about the loss of funding. However, some analysts warn that Norway’s decision could lead to a refusal by the European Union to ratify the recently concluded EU/Mercosur Latin American trading bloc agreement. Brazil’s troubled economy badly needs the pact to be activated.Other Bolsonaro critics have raised the prospect that the Amazon Fund freeze could be a first step toward a global consumer boycott of Brazilian commodities. Meanwhile, state governments in Brazil are scrambling to step up and accept deforestation reduction funding from international donors. Trucks loaded with trees illegally harvested within an indigenous reserve. The rhetoric and policies of the Bolsonaro administration are increasingly viewed as putting thriving Amazon ecosystems at risk from agribusiness and mining expansion. Photo by Sue Branford / Mongabay.Ola Elvestrun, Norway’s environment minister, announced Thursday that it is freezing its contributions to the Amazon Fund, and will no longer be transferring 300 million Norwegian Krone (US$33.2 million) to Brazil. In a press release, the Norwegian embassy in Brazil stated: “Given the present circumstances, Norway does not have either the legal or the technical basis for making its annual contribution to the Amazon Fund.”Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro reacted with sarcasm to Norway’s decision, which had been widely expected. After an official event, he commented: “Isn’t Norway the country that kills whales at the North Pole? Doesn’t it also produce oil? It has no basis for telling us what to do. It should give the money to Angela Merkel [the German Chancellor] to reforest Germany.”According to its website, the Amazon Fund is a “REDD+ mechanism created to raise donations for non-reimbursable investments in efforts to prevent, monitor and combat deforestation, as well as to promote the preservation and sustainable use in the Brazilian Amazon.” The bulk of funding comes from Norway and Germany.The annual transfer of funds from developed world donors to the Amazon Fund depends on a report from the Fund’s technical committee. This committee meets after INPE (the National Institute of Space Research), which gathers official Amazon deforestation data, publishes its annual report with the definitive figures for deforestation in the previous year.But this year the Amazon Fund’s technical committee, along with its steering committee, COFA, were abolished by the Bolsonaro government on 11 April as part of a sweeping move to dissolve some 600 bodies, most of which had NGO involvement. The Bolsonaro government views NGO work in Brazil as a conspiracy to undermine Brazil’s sovereignty.The Brazilian government then demanded far-reaching changes in the way the Fund is managed, as documented in a previous article. As a result, the Amazon Fund’s technical committee has been unable to meet; Norway says it therefore cannot continue making donations without a favorable report from the committee.Archer Daniels Midland soy silos in Mato Grosso along the BR-163 highway, where Amazon rainforest has largely been replaced by soy destined for the EU, UK, China and other international markets. Photo by Thaís Borges.An uncertain futureThe Amazon Fund was announced during the 2007 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Bali, during a period when environmentalists were alarmed at the rocketing rate of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. It was created as a way of encouraging Brazil to continue bringing down the rate of forest conversion to pastures and croplands.Government agencies, such as IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, and NGOs shared Amazon Fund donations. IBAMA used the money primarily to enforce deforestation laws, while the NGOs oversaw projects to support sustainable communities and livelihoods in the Amazon.There has been some controversy as to whether the Fund has actually achieved its goals:  in the three years before the deal, the rate of deforestation fell dramatically but, after money from the Fund started pouring into the Amazon, the rate remained fairly stationary until 2014, when it began to rise once again. But, in general, the international donors have been pleased with the Fund’s performance, and until the Bolsonaro government came to office, the program was expected to continue indefinitely.Norway has been the main donor (94 percent) to the Amazon Fund, followed by Germany (5 percent), and Brazil’s state-owned oil company, Petrobrás (1 percent). Over the past 11 years, the Norwegians have made, by far, the biggest contribution: R$ 3.2 billion (US$ 855 million) out of the total of R$ 3.4 billion (US$ 903 million).Up till now the Fund has approved 103 projects, with the dispersal of R$1.8 billion (US$ 478 million). These projects will not be affected by Norway’s funding freeze because the donors have already provided the funding and Brazil’s national development bank, BNDES, is contractually obliged to disburse the money until the end of the projects. But there are another 54 projects, currently being analysed, whose future is far less secure.One of the projects left stranded by the dissolution of the Fund’s committees is Projeto Frutificar, which should be a three-year project, with a budget of R$29 million (US$7.3 million), for the production of açai and cacao by 1,000 small-scale farmers in the states of Amapá and Pará. The project was drawn up by the Brazilian NGO IPAM (Institute of Environmental research in Amazonia).Paulo Moutinho, an IPAM researcher, told Globo newspaper: “Our program was ready to go when the [Brazilian] government asked for changes in the Fund. It’s now stuck in the BNDES. Without funding from Norway, we don’t know what will happen to it.”Norway is not the only European nation to be reconsidering the way it funds environmental projects in Brazil. Germany has many environmental projects in the Latin American country, apart from its small contribution to the Amazon Fund, and is deeply concerned about the way the rate of deforestation has been soaring this year.The German environment ministry told Mongabay that its minister, Svenja Schulze, had decided to put financial support for forest and biodiversity projects in Brazil on hold, with 35 million euros (US$39 million) for various projects now frozen.The ministry explained why: “The Brazilian government’s policy in the Amazon raises doubts whether a consistent reduction in deforestation rates is still being pursued. Only when clarity is restored, can project collaboration be continued.”Bauxite mines in Paragominas, Brazil. The Bolsonaro administration is urging new laws that would allow large-scale mining within Brazil’s indigenous reserves. Photo by Hydro/Halvor Molland found on flickr.Alternative Amazon fundingAlthough there will certainly be disruption in the short-term as a result of the paralysis in the Amazon Fund, the governors of Brazil’s Amazon states, which rely on international funding for their environmental projects, are already scrambling to create alternative channels.In a press release issued yesterday Helder Barbalho, the governor of Pará, the state with the highest number of projects financed by the Fund, said that he will do all he can to maintain and increase his state partnership with Norway.Barbalho had announced earlier that his state would be receiving 12.5 million euros (US$11.1 million) to run deforestation monitoring centers in five regions of Pará. Barbalho said: “The state governments’ monitoring systems are recording a high level of deforestation in Pará, as in the other Amazon states. The money will be made available to those who want to help [the Pará government reduce deforestation] without this being seen as international intervention.”Amazonas state has funding partnerships with Germany and is negotiating deals with France. “I am talking with countries, mainly European, that are interested in investing in projects in the Amazon,” said Amazonas governor Wilson Miranda Lima. “It is important to look at Amazônia, not only from the point of view of conservation, but also — and this is even more important — from the point of view of its citizens. It’s impossible to preserve Amazônia if its inhabitants are poor.”Signing of the EU/Mercusor Latin American trading agreement earlier this year. The pact still needs to be ratified. Image courtesy of the Council of Hemispheric Affairs.Looming international difficultiesThe Bolsonaro government’s perceived reluctance to take effective measures to curb deforestation may in the longer-term lead to a far more serious problem than the paralysis of the Amazon Fund.In June, the European Union and Mercosur, the South American trade bloc, reached an agreement to create the largest trading bloc in the world. If all goes ahead as planned, the pact would account for a quarter of the world’s economy, involving 780 million people, and remove import tariffs on 90 percent of the goods traded between the two blocs. The Brazilian government has predicted that the deal will lead to an increase of almost US$100 billion in Brazilian exports, particularly agricultural products, by 2035.But the huge surge this year in Amazon deforestation is leading some European countries to think twice about ratifying the deal. In an interview with Mongabay, the German environment ministry made it very clear that Germany is very worried about events in the Amazon: “We are deeply concerned given the pace of destruction in Brazil … The Amazon Forest is vital for the atmospheric circulation and considered as one of the tipping points of the climate system.”The ministry stated that, for the trade deal to go ahead, Brazil must carry out its commitment under the Paris Climate Agreement to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 43 percent below the 2005 level by 2030. The German environment ministry said: If the trade deal is to go ahead, “It is necessary that Brazil is effectively implementing its climate change objectives adopted under the [Paris] Agreement. It is precisely this commitment that is expressly confirmed in the text of the EU-Mercosur Free Trade Agreement.”Blairo Maggi, Brazil agriculture minister under the Temer administration, and a major shareholder in Amaggi, the largest Brazilian-owned commodities trading company, has said very little in public since Bolsonaro came to power; he’s been “in a voluntary retreat,” as he puts it. But Maggi is so concerned about the damage Bolsonaro’s off the cuff remarks and policies are doing to international relationships he decided to speak out earlier this week.Former Brazil Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi, who has broken a self-imposed silence to criticize the Bolsonaro government, saying that its rhetoric and policies could threaten Brazil’s international commodities trade. Photo credit: Senado Federal via Visualhunt / CC BY.Maggi, a ruralista who strongly supports agribusiness, told  the newspaper, Valor Econômico, that, even if the European Union doesn’t get to the point of tearing up a deal that has taken 20 years to negotiate, there could be long delays. “These environmental confusions could create a situation in which the EU says that Brazil isn’t sticking to the rules.” Maggi speculated. “France doesn’t want the deal and perhaps it is taking advantage of the situation to tear it up. Or the deal could take much longer to ratify — three, five years.”Such a delay could have severe repercussions for Brazil’s struggling economy which relies heavily on its commodities trade with the EU. Analysists say that Bolsonaro’s fears over such an outcome could be one reason for his recently announced October meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping, another key trading partner.Maggi is worried about another, even more alarming, potential consequence of Bolsonaro’s failure to stem illegal deforestation — Brazil could be hit by a boycott by its foreign customers. “I don’t buy this idea that the world needs Brazil … We are only a player and, worse still, replaceable.” Maggi warns, “As an exporter, I’m telling you: things are getting very difficult. Brazil has been saying for years that it is possible to produce and preserve, but with this [Bolsonaro administration] rhetoric, we are going back to square one … We could find markets closed to us.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Report: First Giants GM candidate emerges as manager search continues

first_imgSlowly but surely the Giants’ front office picture is starting to gain clarity.Ken Rosenthal, attributing a report from The Athletic, tweeted Wednesday morning that the Giants are interested in Cubs assistant general manager Scott Harris for their vacant G.M. position.The search for the #SFGiants’ new GM and manager continues.#MLBNHotStove | @Ken_Rosenthal pic.twitter.com/I5wtJCzrOi— MLB Network (@MLBNetwork) November 6, 2019 Rosenthal described the Giants general manager …last_img read more

Team South Africa profile: Austin Smith

first_img11 May 2012“The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary”. That’s the motto that drives the captain of the South African men’s hockey team, Austin Smith.Under coach Gregg Clark, Smith recently led South Africa to a stirring 2-1 victory over Japan in the Olympic qualifying tournament in Kakamigahara to claim the last available hockey place at the London Olympic Games.That victory brought to an end a tough qualifying road for the South African men’s team. They were guaranteed a place at the Olympics after being crowned African champions in September 2011, but the South African Sports Commission and Olympic Committee (Sascoc) ruled that they would have to prove themselves against tougher competition to secure a place in London.Narrow missSascoc tasked the South Africa team with finishing at least runner-up in the Champions Challenge. They narrowly missed out on achieving that finish; a 3-1 win over world number eight Argentina left South Africa in third place.That left Smith and company with the option of winning the qualifying tournament in Kakamigahara, or staying at home while the South African women’s team, which won an Olympic qualifying tournament in New Delhi, went to London. Thankfully for the men’s team, they did what was necessary.Smith will be playing in his second Olympics. Previously, in 2008 in Beijing, he finished as the team’s top scorer, netting four times as the side finished a disappointing twelfth, without a win. Four years on from Beijing, Smith will lead a much better team in London.Sacrifices and commitmentIt has been quite a journey to the top for Smith, and it has required some sacrifices and huge commitment to his chosen sport.The youngest of four children, he began playing the game at the age of five. With the guidance of his siblings and of parents who played competitive hockey in South Africa and the United Kingdom, the game came to him quickly.He found a mentor at school in speedy former national striker Murray Anderson, who encouraged Smith to focus his energy on hockey. Anderson believed that his young protege had it in him to become an international player, and Smith was just 12 years of age at the time!National coloursIn high school, he represented his province at under-13 level and then earned national colours in the under-16 and under-18 age groups, and captained both teams.In March 2004, aged only 18, he earned his first call-up for South Africa in a three-test series against Canada. “It was an incredible feeling walking onto the field to play my first match for South Africa, and it remains a special moment every time I wear the green and gold,” he said in a recent interview with the South African Hockey Association.Smith, though, later admitted that he wasn’t quite ready for the big step up and said he felt out of his depth. Once he had the opportunity to train regularly with the national team, he began to feel more comfortable.ReadingThe following year, Smith played for South Africa at the Under-21 World Cup in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. He also joined top English club Reading, where he remained for four years.“Playing in the English Premier League made the biggest difference in my game. The standard of the training sessions was what I enjoyed the most. Although we only trained for two hours twice a week, with a game on the weekend, the quality of what we did, and with the players I had around me, made it top quality,” he said.“I chose Reading Hockey Club because of the level of players that were already there. It meant that every time I trained I needed to be at my best, and my game rapidly developed in all aspects.”During his time with Reading, the club won the English Premier League twice and made the last eight of the European League in consecutive years.Olympic dreamIn 2008, Smith realised a lifelong dream when he took part in the Olympic Games. He was named the South African men’s Player of the Year, as well as Reading Hockey Club Player of the Year.The following year, he was appointed captain of South Africa. He also made a move from the UK to The Netherlands, joining Den Bosch to play in the Dutch League, regarded as possibly the best league in the world.That same year, 2009, Smith was named in the World All Star Team, proof that he had elevated his game to among the elite of the hockey world.World CupHe helped South Africa qualify for the 2010 World Cup by leading the team to victory in the African Championships.They finished tenth in the World Cup and placed fifth at the Commonwealth Games. Smith was once again named South Africa’s Player of the Year.In 2011, he led South Africa to the title of African champions once more.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more