Ronkonkoma Man Charged With Fatal DWI Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Ronkonkoma man was arrested for alleged drunken driving after he crashed his SUV, killing his 25-year-old passenger in Patchogue early Thursday morning, Suffolk County police said.Joseph Keleher, 24, was driving a Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo eastbound on Baker Street when he the truck hit a curb, drove across a grass embankment, overturned and came to a stop on Edwards Street shortly after midnight, police said.His passenger, Kevin Smith, of Oakdale, was ejected from the Jeep. Smith was taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center in Patchogue, where he was pronounced dead.Keleher was charged with driving while intoxicated. He will be arraigned Thursday at First District Court in Central Islip.Vehicular Crime Unit detectives impounded the vehicle, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information about this crash to call them at 631-852-6555.last_img read more

Auctions result in tight upper-end tussle

first_imgAuctioneer Mark Frater gets the crowd going at 332 Bowen Tce, New Farm. Photo: Steve PohlnerA recent hot run on property over the $1 million mark had seen some extraordinary auction results in recent weeks, with many homes exceeding reserve prices once the hammers fell.Today, however, demonstrated sometimes an auction isn’t a full stop on a marketing campaign.There’s been a real buzz around the stunning extension and renovation of 332 Bowen Tce, New Farm.The crowd was building at 332 Bowen Tce, New Farm. Photo: Steve PohlnerA mix of design elements created a cracking property in the lifestyle heartland of New Farm.Marketing agent at Place Kangaroo Point, Simon Caulfield, said the project was part of a high-end split-and-shift venture by a local small developer.“It’s a lady who lives in New Farm who wanted to create a hobby of renovating houses. She created the home out the back in accordance with the DA (development approval). The intention is to sell one and to rent one, because New Farm is such a strong area in terms of its capital growth and investment quality, so they don’t want to sell both of them.”Auctioneer Mark Frater stood behind the beautiful kitchen benchtop in the open-plan living space and called for numbers from the two registered bidder.Mr Frater was hoping a sale today would help celebrate an important professional milestone.“It’s 25 years to the day since I started auctioneering,” he said.An opening of $1.5 million didn’t stand for long and a mix of bids from both the buyers and the vendors brought things to a head at $1.725 million — unfortunately short of the reserve.At this point, Mr Frater passed in the property, however he was far from disappointed.A few interested parties came through the door today with buyers keen to discuss doing a deal subject to conditions.While Mr Frater wasn’t able to get this one away, he did score a win at 13 Lima Ct, Underwood earlier in the day.13 Lima Ct Underwood had a very successful auction result today.Mr Frater said the four-bedroom low-set brick and tile was a big crowd pleaser with approximately 50 people attending, including five registered bidders.“An opening bid of $450,000, which was a bit on the cheeky side, then we got the bidding to $620,000, and then talked the highest bidder up to $627,000, and that’s where we put it on the market and it was sold,” he said.Another beautiful home at 43A Dopson Street, Taringa, also failed to sell under the hammer today, but agents are confident a result is imminent.43a Dopson Street, Taringa failed to sell at auction but a sale looks imminent.The contemporary four-bedroom stunner rose up its steep block and was a marriage of open plan modernism and commercial construction.The eye line was drawn along the main living area which runs from the well elevated deck, past the kitchen and living space and right through a seamless connection to the courtyard and glass walled pool.The Taringa makes an architectural statement in the suburb.If you ever wanted to swing the putter on your practice green while catching the big game on an outdoor flat screen and correcting the kids swim stroke, then this was the place.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home4 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor4 hours agoEven the view from the open shower recess in the ensuite was extraordinary.Simon Wheelans of Place Paddington said the home had been very keenly watched by buyers.“It’s a pretty special type of build. We’ve got a great architect, Richard Kirk, and the property has turned out beautifully.“The current owner is a builder of high rise home units, and the concrete construction and stability of this house and all the steel and everything that’s gone into it — if you walk through the home you’ll see the finishes are well above what most other builders would put in.”Auctioneer Peter Bergin kicked off proceeding as the crowd of more than 25, including three registered bidders, warmed up to the idea of buying.An opening bid of $1.9 million was quickly upped by a vendor bid of $2 million. Proceedings were halted at a $2.3 million vendor bid so negotiations could be advanced.The auction was reopened at a buyer’s bid of $2.47 million but it was short of reserve and the property was passed in.“As we envisaged here today, we weren’t expecting an under-the-hammer sale but what we are very pleased and buoyed about it that we are moving in the right and I am very, very hopeful that we can get this thing together over the line in the coming hours or days,” said Mr Bergin.The home at 40 Oriel Rd, Yeronga had a bit more success finding a buyer today.This beautiful home at 40 Oriel Rd, Yeronga has new owners. Photo: supplied.Kristy Noble of McGrath Annerley Yeronga said the owner builder had originally planned to live in the five-bedroom beauty, but circumstances had changed and they decided to sell.“It was a quality owner builder. It was signed off a year ago so it’s a near new home,” she said.It was a tussle between two of the five registered bidders that saw the home sell at the fall of the hammer for $1.81 million.“Elimatta” at 33 Goodwood St, Hendra has found itself a new family.The owners, Mary Ann and Tony Beresford-Smith, had told the Courier Mail what a wonderful place it had been to raise their family, but it required a new brood to continue its story.And that’s exactly what’s happened with a family buyer paying $1.63 million at auction.At 38 Hunter St, Wooloowin, it was a case of a young buyers beating out the developers for a change.Amanda Butler of Butler and Co Estate Agents said the couple were thrilled to secure the home for $890,500.The classic features at 38 Hunter St, Woolwin helped convince the buyer to raise their paddle. Photo: supplied.Ms Butler said developers were keen on buying subject to conditions, but the auction format suited the young couple best and they were able to make it theirs.She said the sellers are pleased to see it continue with a new family as well.“The lady who owns it now, her father and mother bought the land and built the house. It’s been in the same family for 81 years,” Ms Butler said. “A tear or two was shed,” she added.And finally, three strata-titled apartments at 78 Tingira Cr, Sunrise Beach found a new buyer at $1.356 million for the lot.These three apartments at Sunrise Beach are now part of its buyer’s superannuation plan. Photo: suppliedGordon McDonald of The Auction Group said the new owner plans to pop the holdings into their superannuation fund.Mr McDonald said a crowd of more than 50 came to see the units sold.last_img read more

Hazard inspires Chelsea comeback against Newcastle

first_imgHazard inspired Chelsea to 3-1 win over NewcastleLondon, United Kingdom | AFP | Eden Hazard gave England followers a glimpse of what to expect at next summer’s World Cup with a glorious display as Chelsea beat Newcastle United 3-1 at Stamford Bridge.Less than 24 hours after the World Cup draw put Belgium and England in the same group, Belgian Hazard was in imperious form, scoring twice and running at defenders at will. Chelsea’s victory, which keeps them third in the Premier League, ought to have been more emphatic but it briefly looked as if they might not collect the three points at all when Newcastle took a surprise lead in the 12th minute.Dwight Gayle chased down his own header and hurried Marcos Alonso into a back-pass which sold his keeper Thibaut Courtois short.Seeking to prevent Jacob Murphy nipping in to round him, Courtois was forced to dive at the Newcastle winger’s feet but succeeded only in pushing the ball back to Gayle, who stroked it into the empty net.The Chelsea response was immediate. Twice they went close before inevitable equaliser finally arrived after 20 minutes. Alvaro Morata contested a high ball and it bounced off him and dropped towards Hazard, who controlled his half-volley to perfection, driving the ball into the ground and bouncing it into the far corner of the net.That goal settled any anxiety that had been floating around Stamford Bridge and it came as no surprise when the home side took the lead just after the half-hour.Matt Ritchie’s clearing header was neither strong, nor decisive and fell straight to Victor Moses who quickly drilled over a cross that Morata merely had to divert home with his head.Danny Drinkwater, making only his second Chelsea start in the Premier League, was the next to go close with a shot which drifted away from the far post. The second half began as quietly as the first, with only a deflected Hazard shot raising excitement levels among the crowd above the soporific.That was until the 56th minute when the Belgian danced through the centre of the Newcastle defence only to stumble just he approached Karl Darlow in the Newcastle goal.At the other end, Ayoze Perez sent a bouncing shot just wide of the post, his last act before being replaced by Isaac Hayden.If anyone was going to add to the scoreboard, however, it was going to be Hazard. Prepared to drift all over the pitch in search of the ball, he picked it up in his own half after 69 minutes and had Newcastle defenders backpedalling and afraid to tackle lest he skip his way past them.A one-two with Drinkwater ended with the ball agonisingly out of his reach.When his second goal came, it was from the penalty spot, impudently chipping the ball beyond Darlow after Ritchie had brought down Moses.The Newcastle keeper exacted a revenge of sorts moments later when he stuck out a hand to deny Hazard his hat-trick.As if in an act of mercy by Chelsea manager Antonio Conte, that was Hazards last contribution as he was replaced by Willian. Chelsea did not need him by then and may even have won more convincingly had Darlow not blocked Alonso’s goal-bound shot.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Lukaku’s late equalizer saves Inter in Serie A

first_imgInter then made changes by throwing on Lukaku and Victor Moses, and it worked as the Belgian converted the penalty after Moses was tripped in the box.Inter still sit in second-place, temporarily cutting the deficit to Juventus to five points, while the Bianconeri will take on Lazio on Monday.Napoli rallied to beat Udinese in an entertaining 2-1 fixture, Arkadiusz Milik wiped out Rodrigo de Paul’s opener, and Matteo Politano’s blockbuster deep into stoppage time helped the Partenopei carve out three points.Parma fumbled a 2-0 lead as Sampdoria staged a second half show to claim a 3-2 away victory.In other matches on Sunday, Genoa beat Lecce 2-1, Brescia edged SPAL 2-1, and Fiorentina dominated Torino 2-0.****XINHUAShare on: WhatsApp Romelu LukakuKampala, Uganda | XINHUA | Romelu Lukaku’s late penalty saved Inter Milan on Sunday as the Nerazzurri drew with Roma in a 2-2 thriller.Stefan de Vrij gave Inter the early lead, Roma then turned the game around, but only for Inter to fight back for a 2-2 draw.Roma entered the Olimpico Stadium with three-game winning streak while Inter were also on a three-game unbeaten run.With Lukaku only fit enough for the bench, Inter’s coach Antonio Conte opted for Alexis Sanchez to pair with Lautaro Martinez on the forward line.The away side took the lead in the 15th minute when Sanchez whipped a corner into the box, de Vrij out-jumped the defenders to steer his bullet-header into the net.The Giallorossi got back on level terms before the break amid controversy as Roma went on the counterattack and Leonardo Spinazzola found the net from a tight angle.Inter appealed as Lautaro was kicked down by Aleksandar Kolarovin in the build-up, but the referee allowed the goal after viewing the VAR.Roma completed the turn around in the 57th minute as Henrikh Mkhitaryan smashed in from a point blank range.last_img read more

All that for nothing—Steelers and Browns settle for 21-21 tie (Sept. 12)

first_imgLike us at https://www.facebook.com/pages/New-Pittsburgh-Courier/143866755628836?ref=hlFollow @NewPghCourier on Twitter  https://twitter.com/NewPghCourier STEELERS RUNNING BACK JAMES CONNER, in his first career start, scored two rushing touchdowns against the Browns, Sept. 9, at FirstEnergy Stadium. But his fumble in the fourth quarter sparked the Browns’ comeback in an eventual 21-21 tie. (Photo by Courier photographer Thomas Sabol)Le’Veon Bell had this to say on Twitter after the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Cleveland Browns battled to a season-opening 21-21 tie at FirstEnergy Stadium: “No shade, just never witnessed a tie before.”Wow! What an astute observation by Bell. I am sure those very “team-like” words came straight to him after the game concluded. Jordan Culver, one of Bell’s fellow “Tweesters,” asked and answered his own question, saying: “Is this shade? I think this is shade.”By the way, Bell’s heir apparent, James Conner, had 31 rushes for 135 yards and two rushing touchdowns. Conner also had 5 receptions for 57 yards. I don’t know, yinzers, could the Steeler Nation soon be asking the question, Le’Veon who? Le’Veon Bell should navigate himself back to the Pittsburgh Steelers sidelines, post haste.Now as I have stated previously, I will not enter into the fray. It is not any of my business, nor should it be in regards to how much any athlete should be compensated for their services. It is entirely up to the performer to set his or her value and it’s up to the owner to honor or dishonor that value, period. In my opinion, Le’Veon Bell may be making an irreversible mistake in overvaluing his services. Maybe he is or maybe he isn’t worth all that he is demanding, but if I were due to make in excess of $850,000 per game, you would have to give me a lethal injection to keep me from making all of that cheese.Let’s hit rewind for a moment. The Steelers competed against the Jacksonville Jaguars in the 2017 divisional playoffs. “Big” Ben Roethlisberger threw for a zillion yards but had one pick and fumbled once. The two turnovers resulted in 14 points for the Jaguars. Roethlisberger’s miscues happened to be very significant because the Steelers lost, 45-42. However, after the loss all of the chatter was about how the Steelers defense was so atrocious and how Mike Tomlin was such an incompetent coach and how Steelers former offensive coordinator Todd Haley called such a bad game.Baloney. If the Steelers defense was so bad giving up 45 points, coupled with Ben Roethlisberger’s two turnovers, was the Jaguars defense bordering on pristine after giving up 42 points to the Black and Gold? No, it just confirms that the “prevent defense” oftentimes doesn’t prevent much at all.Todd Haley was not the offensive coordinator for the Steelers in this past weekend’s 21-21 fiasco, oops, I meant the game against the Browns. However, Roethlisberger tossed three picks. Had “Big” Ben converted just one of those possessions into three points the Steelers would have been 1-0 instead of 0-0-1, you dig? A tie game almost always indicates that on that day at least, your team was not better than your opponent. How can a team like the Pittsburgh Steelers, shepherded by a supposedly Hall of Fame-bound quarterback, score only 21 points against a “fledgling” Cleveland Browns defense?The majority of the TV and radio networks talking heads are now backtracking on a few of the accolades that have been heaped upon the shoulders of one Ben Roethlisberger during the 2018 preseason. The Pittsburgh talking heads seem to remain possible disciples of Roethlisberger but it seems that folks in other markets are less giddy about the prospects of “Big” Ben winning another Lombardi trophy. Football is sometimes like real estate. What usually wins for your opponent is when your team commits turnovers, turnovers, turnovers.last_img read more

Trail’s Crowe Hawks outlast Bombers 3-2 to claim second Kootenay Roundball title in three years

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsFor the second time in three years the J. Lloyd Crowe Hawks are off to the B.C. High School AA Girl’s Soccer Championships.The Hawks used timely scoring before holding off the Bomber charge to knock off defending champion L.V. Rogers 3-2 in the Kootenay High School AA Girl’s Soccer Championships Friday afternoon in Trail.A goal by Marlese Mauro off a free kick midway through the second half snapped a 2-2 tie sparking the Hawks to the narrow victory.“We dominated about 90 per cent of this game . . . we had multiple chances in the end but just couldn’t capitalize,” said Bomber head coach Deb Fuhr, thrust into the role on the sidelines after last season’s tag-team of Reed Bambrick and Heather Stewart were unable to commit to the coaching full time.“The girls showed a lot of heard and determination against Crowe and never gave up.””Everybody brought their A-Game to Trail,” added Fuhr.J. Lloyd Crowe, dumping Prince Charles Comets of Creston in semi final action, now represent the Kootenays to Port Coquitlam June 2-4 for the B.C. High School AA Girl’s Championships.Just what the doctor didn’t order for LVR was a Crowe team jumping to a 2-0 first half lead. A mix-up by defender Samantha Einarson and keeper Olivia Marshman gift-wrapped the first marker for the Hawks, heading into the tournament as the number one seed despite the two teams not playing this season.Crowe went up 2-0 before Andrea Stinson gave LVR some life when the skillful midfield curled the ball into the net off a corner kick.LVR tied the game early in the second half when senior striker Sarah Fuhr set up Paige Mansveld.However, minutes later Mauro drilled a free kick over the head of Marshman for the winning goal.“I always knew we could come back even though we were down by two goals,” said Fuhr. “We tied it 2-2 but the goal by Marlese took a little wind out of our sails . . . but still never game up, we just couldn’t finish.”For the Bombers the Kootenay Zones could not have come at a worse time.The squad was besieged by injuries with no less than striker Morag Paterson and defender Alex Hawes both having to leave the game.Defenders Brittany Wheeler and Austin McGauley as well as Sarah Fuhr were also hampered with injuries.LVR also missed the services of defender Kiraya Spencer, missing the tournament due to a previous commitment.LVR advanced to the final by stopping Stanley Humphries Rockers 3-1.A pair of second half goals by Paterson and Wheeler, with a lazer of a shot off a free kick, snapped a 1-1 tie powering the Bombers past the Rockers.Samantha Einarson scored in the first half for LVR, driving home a corner kick by Fuhr.The game marked the final contest of the high school career for Sarah Fuhr, Kiraya Spencer, Jessica Stack, Sara Einarson and Teresa Cutler.Despite losing some key pieces of the puzzle, the head coach says the Bombers will be back in the running next season.“This is a team to watch out for next season,” Fuhr said. “There’s some very good players coming up and some good Grade 11’s so LVR will be good next season.”[email protected]last_img read more

Nelson U12 Boys return from Icebreaker Tourney with silver medal

first_imgThe Nelson Youth Soccer U12 Boys lost 1-0 to Kelowna in the gold medal final of the Icebreakers Tourney recently in the Okanagan.The tournament was the first of the competitive rep season for the U12 squad.Nelson missed a pair of penalty kicks that came back to haunt the squad as Kelowna would score the only goal in the contest. “They represented the organization very well and I couldn’t be more proud of each and everyone of them,” said head coach Al Faraguna.”I was a little worried prior to the tourney, as I put our squad in the Gold division for the weekend and wasn’t sure how they would compete with the best there,” Faraguna added. “It didn’t take long for me to realize that they were one of the most well rounded teams in that category.”Nelson opened the tournament defeating Calgary 1-0 before rocketting past Vernon 6-1.”Our boys controlled the play from start to finish,” Faraguna said.Nelson then defeated Kelowna in penalty kicks to advance to the final.last_img read more

Indonesian court cancels dam project in last stronghold of tigers, rhinos

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Basten Gokkon Alternative Energy, Animals, Conservation, Dams, Energy, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Renewable Energy, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img A court in Indonesia’s Aceh province has ordered an end to a planned hydroelectric project in Sumatra’s unique Leuser Ecosystem.Environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the Aceh government and the dam’s developer earlier this year over potential environmental destruction and violation of zoning laws.The area is the last place on Earth that’s home to wild tigers, rhinos, orangutans and elephants — all critically endangered species whose habitat would be flooded and fragmented by the dam and its roads and power lines.Villagers in the region were also widely opposed to the project, which they say would have dammed up the river on which they depend and forced them to relocate to make way for the reservoir. BANDA ACEH, Indonesia — A court in Indonesia has annulled a permit allowing the development of a $3 billion hydropower plant in a forest that’s home to critically endangered tigers, rhinos and orangutans.The court in Banda Aceh, the capital of Aceh province on the northern tip of Sumatra, issued the ruling Aug. 28, in a lawsuit filed in March by the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s biggest green NGO. The respondents in the suit are the Aceh provincial government, which issued the permit, and PT Kamirzu, the Indonesian subsidiary of Hong Kong-based Prosperity International Holding, the recipient of the permit.Lesten village in Gayo Lues district, part of the planned site of the Tampur dam. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.The ruling orders the developer and the provincial government to stop the project to build a 443-megawatt plant on 4,407 hectares (10,890 acres) straddling the three districts of Gayo Lues, Aceh Tamiang and East Aceh. The Aceh government violated prevailing regulations, the court found, by permitting the development of forest land greater than 5 hectares (12 acres). Earlier during the hearings, the judges visited the site of the planned Tampur hydropower plant.Walhi welcomed the court’s decision.“This means that, besides being objective in assessing and making the decision, the presiding judge has given a new legal lesson for the people of Indonesia,” said Muhammad Reza Maulana, the legal counsel for Walhi’s Aceh chapter.Residents of Aceh Tamiang and East Aceh who would have been affected by the dam also welcomed the ruling. Damming the upstream section of the Tamiang River would have adversely affected the livelihoods of several communities that rely on the river downstream. It would also have forced the relocation of villages in areas set to be flooded by the dam’s reservoir.The project was widely opposed by residents on these grounds, while environmentalists have criticized the lack of nature protection and conservation. They note that the required environmental impact assessment carried out by the developer failed to evaluate natural risks, such as earthquakes and flash floods.The latter is already a serious problem here, where the annual rainfall exceeds 2,300 millimeters (91 inches) — double the amount of precipitation that falls in Portland, Oregon. In 2006, heavy downpours triggered a flash flood in Aceh Tamiang district, killing 28 people and displacing more than 200,000 from their homes. Damming the river could make similar flooding events upstream even more destructive, activists say.One of the villages in the Leuser Ecosystem at risk from the development of Tampur hydropower plant. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.Hornbills flock in the Leuser Ecosystem where the dam was to have been built. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.Critics also highlighted the lack of wildlife protections in the environmental impact analysis — a key oversight, given the dam’s location in the Leuser Ecosystem. The heavily forested region is highly biodiverse, and is the last place on Earth where Sumatran tigers, rhinos, orangutans and elephants — all critically endangered species on the brink of extinction — still coexist. Another criticism of PT Kamirzu’s permit is that it remains unclear whether the developer has finished mapping the forest areas that would be affected by the project.Maksum, a resident of Aceh Tamiang, said he was opposed to the dam because the developer had failed to engage with the community. He also said he was concerned the dam would exacerbate environmental disasters in the region.“We don’t want it, especially with the dam’s location being very close to people’s settlements,” he said at a discussion with the environmental NGO Forest, Nature and Environment of Aceh (HaKA) in Banda Aceh in late 2017.Officials from the Aceh provincial government visited a village in Gayo Lues on Aug. 19 this year that was expected to be affected by the dam development. During the visit, the officials expressed their support for the project as long as it used the most advanced technology and didn’t damage the environment.“What we must monitor is the methods which [the developer] apply to the project,” said Nova Iriansyah, the interim Aceh governor. “There will be an agency to monitor it. The hydropower plant has more benefits than disadvantages.”Nova said the current electricity supply in Aceh was sufficient to meet demand, but that would increase in the future. “This hydropower plant is important, and the biggest in Sumatra,” Nova said.But the statement met with disappointment from residents of East Aceh district.“The development will damage the environment,” said Mahmud, a resident, adding that he didn’t know of any hydropower project that didn’t harm the environment. “They’re going to build a dam and flood more than 4,000 hectares of forest. That is the problem.”Residents of the region rely on the river for their livelihoods. They say they fear the damming of the river will affect them adversely. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.A hearing in the lawsuit takes place at the site of the planned hydropower plant. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on Aug. 29, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Paper and fast fashion fan the flames burning Indonesia’s peat: Report

first_imgBanner image: Fires in peat land in Pedamaran of South Sumatra’s Ogan Komering Ilir district. Image by Nopri Isim/Mongabay-Indonesia. carbon, Carbon Emissions, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Haze, Peatlands, Plantations, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Southeast Asia Haze Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Pulp and paper giants APP and APRIL continue to source their raw material from plantations located on carbon-rich peatlands in Indonesia.The burning of these peat forests prior to planting accounts for much of the fires that have made Indonesia one of the world’s top greenhouse gas emitters, and of the toxic haze that spreads out to neighboring countries.A report by a coalition of NGOs warns that these problems could get worse under the companies’ current peat-intensive business model and a relaxing of peat-protection regulations by the government.The companies have disputed the scale of the fires attributed to their suppliers’ plantations, and say they already carry out peat conservation initiatives. JAKARTA — The toxic haze that swept across large swaths of Southeast Asia this year from forest and land fires in Indonesia could become a common phenomenon if two of the region’s biggest paper companies continue doing business as usual, a new report says.Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) and Asia Pacific Resources International Limited (APRIL) get much of the wood pulp from which they make paper and other products from vast plantations run by subsidiaries or suppliers in Indonesia, largely on the island of Sumatra. APP’s suppliers manage approximately 6,000 square kilometers (2,316 square miles) of pulpwood plantations on peatland, while APRIL’s subsidiaries or long-term supplier oversee more than 2,650 square kilometers (1,023 square miles) of plantations, also on peat.It’s the burning of peat forests — areas with thick layers of moist, partially decomposed vegetation that store vast amounts of carbon dioxide — during the annual dry season that contributes to the haze and accounts for the bulk of Indonesia’s greenhouse gas emissions. And the situation is projected to only get worse, according to the report published by a coalition of NGOs.“Will this situation change? Yes — but likely not for the better,” says the coalition, which includes the U.S.-based Rainforest Action Network, the Environmental Papers Network, and Indonesian environmental NGOs Auriga and Hutan Kita Institute.That’s because both APP and APRIL have failed to sufficiently shift their operations to non-peatland areas that are less combustible than fire-prone peat, the report says. Instead, they’ve both made large capital investments in capacity expansion and new business ventures that could put further pressure on peatlands.At the same time, the government has also relaxed measures put in place after the 2015 fire and haze crisis to protect and restore peatlands. This combination, the report says, is the perfect recipe for a future disaster.APP and APRIL, it says, “are likely to perpetuate elevated levels of fire and haze risk in Indonesia for many years to come.”Fires in peat land in South Sumatra’s Ogan Komering Ilir district. Image by Nopri Isim/Mongabay-Indonesia.More carbon than the burning of the AmazonThe 2019 fires have pumped at least 708 million tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere — almost double the emissions from the fires that swept through the Brazilian Amazon this year.And many of those fires broke out in pulpwood plantations. Of the eight worst-affected plantations in terms of the number of fire alerts, six supply APP and one supplies APRIL.Syahrul Fitra, a researcher with Auriga, one of the NGOs in the coalition, said the high number of hotspots showed that not much had changed since the 2015 fire and haze episode.“It’s been four years since the disastrous 2015 fires, and these companies said they had adopted best management practices,” he told Mongabay. “But we can see for ourselves the reality of the fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan [Indonesian Borneo]. This is because these peatlands have long been dried out. So this year’s fires are a result of this long process of peat draining.”Both APP and APRIL said the hotspots didn’t necessarily correspond to fires. APRIL said only 8 percent of the alerts corresponded to actual fires.“This is based on years of monitoring and ground verification,” the company said in a response to Mongabay. “Every hotspot is ground-truthed and reported within 24 hours to confirm the risk or incidence of fire. World Resources Institute [WRI] and NASA all issue caveats around satellite data, which is why ground-truthing is required.”Syahrul said there was no way to confirm APRIL’s data because the company didn’t share its ground-truthing hotspot findings publicly.“They just say the NASA data is wrong and expect us to believe their claims without providing evidence,” he said. “Our sense is that if their claims were accurate, they would be far more transparent with providing the documentation to support it.”He noted that unlike APRIL, APP provides daily and weekly fire reports on its website, indicating how many hotspots have been detected and how many of these have been verified as fires. The information is presented in both raw data form and on maps.“APRIL should learn from APP about how to be transparent with fire data reporting if they want people to take their claims about fires seriously,” Syahrul said.Responding specifically to the fire alerts detected on an APRIL supplier plantation in Sumatra’s Riau province, the company said the burning occurred on an undeveloped, unmanaged area that was also claimed by a local community. It added it was working to resolve the disputed claim.But Syahrul said the company was trying to shirk responsibility for the fires by blaming others.“APRIL is continuing a pattern that we have seen again and again from them of shifting blame to communities for problems to which the company has clearly contributed,” he said.Separately, APP didn’t deny the findings in the NGOs’ report when asked by Mongabay. However, the company told Al Jazeera that based on its internal data, less than 20 percent of hotspots detected were related to actual fires.Syahrul said the data on APP’s own website showed the opposite: “[B]etween October 8 and November 5 … 79 percent of hotspots were confirmed as fires, 10 percent were verified as not fires, and 11 percent had yet to be verified,” he said. “This suggests a significantly higher rate of actual fires to hotspots than either company acknowledges in their responses to the report, and it aligns pretty closely to the false positive rate that NASA indicates for the dataset.”Citing NASA’S VIIRS sensor data in the report, APP noted that hotspots on pulpwood plantations only made up a small portion of the total number of hotspots in Indonesia (41,073 fire alerts, or 11 percent of the total 389,048 fire alerts through Oct. 31).This “suggests that properly managed plantations are better able to address the problem of fires,” Elim Sritaba, the chief sustainability officer at APP, told Mongabay.Syahrul acknowledged that there were more fire alerts outside of pulpwood plantations than within them, but that the pulpwood companies still had a responsibility to tackle the problem, given the large areas of peatland included in their concessions.Fires in peat land in South Sumatra’s Ogan Komering Ilir district. Image by Nopri Isim/Mongabay-Indonesia.Balancing conservation and developmentBoth APP and APRIL say their suppliers are carrying out programs to protect the peat areas of their concessions, including restoring areas that have been drained and dried out, and conserving other areas that haven’t been cleared yet.But the NGOs say these suppliers are still cultivating large areas of drained peatland — areas that are at high risk of burning, according to the report. The report also says the companies’ efforts are focused on initiatives that will allow them to keep using the drained peatland, instead of retiring, restoring and rewetting these areas altogether.“Neither company has committed to nor begun implementing large-scale restoration measures of the hundreds of thousands of hectares of drained peatlands on which they currently grow acacia wood for pulp production,” the report says. “Without taking this fundamental step, it is doubtful these companies can significantly reduce the fire risk from their operations.”But with 43 percent of Riau province comprising peatland, it’s not economically feasible to avoid developing on peat, according to APRIL.“Development without conservation is not sustainable; conservation without development is not viable,” the company said. “The key is to ensure that peatlands are managed actively, responsibly and based on science and that there is a balance with conservation.”Fires in peat land in Cengal of South Sumatra’s Ogan Komering Ilir district. Image by Nopri Isim/Mongabay-Indonesia.Relaxing protective measuresThe notion that development on peatland is inevitable appears to have also colored the government’s softening stance on the issue.The slate of regulations rolled out after the 2015 fires were aimed at freezing the development of peatlands, including those already part of existing concessions, and rezoning them for conservation to prevent future outbreaks of fire and haze. Peatlands eligible for this protection, initially at least, were those with peat layers deeper than 3 meters (10 feet), those containing high biodiversity, and peat domes — landscapes where the peat is so deep that the center is topographically higher than the edges.These types of peat areas account for a combined 12,000 square kilometers (4,600 square miles) of concessions supplying APP and APRIL, located mostly in Sumatra. A previous spatial analysis by the NGO coalition found that banning the development of these areas for plantations would lead to a supply crunch for APP and APRIL, affecting 30 percent and 25 percent of their respective supply chains.Earlier this year, the government issued a new regulation limiting the types to peat landscapes eligible for protection to just peat domes, leaving 3-meter and high-biodiversity peat areas once again open for exploitation.According to NGOs’ report, nearly 50 percent of the fire alerts in the worst-affected pulpwood concessions through October were located within these areas previously designated as protection zones.“Shortly after the regulation was issued, we can see for ourselves that the areas that were supposed to be restored were burned instead,” Syahrul said. “While we can’t say that the regulation exacerbated the fires, we can say that fires in peat areas are still severe.”Regardless of the impact the new regulation had on the subsequent fires, it’s still a misguided policy because it caters to the interests of pulp and paper companies, Syahrul said.“We haven’t seen how the peat domes are being restored, but the regulation has already shrunk the peat location that has to be protected,” he said. “At a time when peatlands are still burning, the protection zones are being diminished.”Allowing companies to continue cultivating carbon-rich peatlands means permitting a business model that’s not sustainable, he added.“These fires are connected to these pulp and paper companies’ dependence on peatlands for their crops,” Syahrul said.Peatland in Indonesia drained to prepare the land for agriculture. Peatlands accumulate their rich carbon stores over thousands of years, but begin to decompose once they lose their moisture. Carbon release is further accelerated due to fire, when “carbon goes out much faster than it went in,” explains Guido van der Werf of the University of Amsterdam. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Peat-intensive investmentsThat dependence looks set to deepen, with both APP and APRIL investing in new projects that will likely intensify existing cultivation of peatlands.APP has since December 2016 operated one of the world’s biggest pulp mills in South Sumatra province. Operation of the mill at full capacity is expected to increase APP’s overall demand for wood fiber in Indonesia by 75 percent, according to the NGOs’ report.That increase will difficult for APP to commit to major peatland restoration initiatives, which, by their nature, would reduce the group’s pulpwood plantation base, Syahrul said.“If APP restores its peat concessions to the maximum, then it will face supply crunch,” he said.APRIL, meanwhile, has entered the textile market in a bid to become the world’s largest producer of viscose staple fiber (VSF).APRIL recently converted pulp lines at its Sumatra mill to produce the higher grade (dissolving) pulp used in VSF production. APRIL’s dissolving pulp supplies a new VSF mill in the same location owned by the company’s parent conglomerate, RGE International Group, under the name Asia Pacific Rayon, as well as other RGE-owned VSF mills in China under the Sateri Group, the world’s biggest VSF producer.Sateri’s customers include global clothing retailers Zara and H&M, according to a 2017 report by the Changing Markets Foundation.VSF is increasingly popular in the textile industry, marketed as an “eco-friendly” and less water-intensive alternative to cotton. At the World Economic Forum in Davos in January, RGE director Anderson Tanoto said VSF could help the fast-fashion industry become more sustainable, touting it as biodegradable and “sourced from sustainably managed tree plantations.”But VSF from Indonesian pulpwood plantations might not be quite so sustainable, Syahrul said. He noted that the pulp APRIL uses to produce VSF comes from Acacia crassicarpa, an acacia species that the company cultivates only on peatlands; Acacia mangium, the species that APRIL grows on mineral soils (i.e. non-peat areas) for its paper products, isn’t suitable for producing the type of pulp required to make VSF.APRIL said there wouldn’t be an increase in its production capacity and thus no increase in the group’s overall pulpwood requirements.Even so, the need for trees that can only be grown on peatland provides a strong incentive for APRIL to continue draining, planting, replanting, and harvesting in peatland areas rather than reducing its operational footprint there, Syahrul said.“And the possibility of them restoring their peat concessions is going even further down,” he added.The combination of the companies’ peat-intensive investments and the government’s relaxation of peat-protection policies is “evidence of the lack of commitment in restoring peatlands,” he said.“The strange thing is that the government knew that if the demand for the raw material increased [because of the new investments], the threat to peatlands would also grow,” Syahrul said. “But the government still issued licenses [for the new investments].”last_img read more

Indonesia fires cost nation $5 billion this year: World Bank

first_imgBanner image: Peat fire in Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Haze, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Southeast Asia Haze, Southeast Asian Haze, Tropical Forests Land and forest fires in Indonesia cost the country $5.2 billion in damage and economic losses this year, equivalent to 0.5% of its economy, according to a new analysis from the World Bank.Half of the estimated economic loss came from the agriculture and environmental sectors, as fires damaged valuable estate crops and released significant greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, estimated at 708 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).The actual economic loss could be higher as the World Bank hasn’t taken into account the impacts of the fires on the public health and on the image of Indonesia’s palm oil industry. JAKARTA — Land and forest fires in Indonesia cost the country $5.2 billion in damage and economic losses this year, equivalent to 0.5% of its economy, according to a new analysis from the World Bank.The World Bank calculated the figure based on the fires’ impacts on the nation’s agriculture, transportation, trade, industry and environmental sectors.The fires burn annually across Indonesia’s vast peat swamp zones, which have been widely drained and dried for planting. They produce a toxic haze that blankets parts of Indonesia as well as neighboring countries. This year’s fires had burned nearly 10,000 km2 (3,861 mi2) of land as of October, according to the environment ministry.This year’s fires and haze, the report said, “led to significant negative economic impacts, estimated at $157 million in direct damage to assets and $5 billion in losses from affected economic activities.”Half of the estimated economic loss came from the agriculture and environmental sectors, as fires damaged valuable estate crops and released significant greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, estimated at 708 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).The World Bank predicts the economic impacts to be long lasting because production of affected commodities such as perennial crops and timber require at least two to five years to harvest.“Hence, the economic growth in 2019 and 2020 is predicted to be lower by 0.09 and 0.05 percentage points, respectively,” the report said.In 2015, the disastrous fires that razed 26,000 km2 (10,038 mi2) of lands and forests, were estimated to cost Indonesia at least $16.1 billion, equivalent to 1.9 percent of 2015 GDP.The World Bank estimates that the economic toll would be more severe at the provincial level, with a decline of up to 1.5 percentage points in affected provinces’ GDP growth in 2019.Central and West Kalimantan were the worst-affected provinces the most, with losses estimated at 7.9% and 6.1% of their respective GDPs.An analysis by the University of Riau estimates that Sumatra’s Riau province could suffer from 50 trillion rupiah’s ($3.5 billion) worth of economic loss due to this year’s fires.“The loss comes from disruption in trade, service, culinary, agriculture activities as well as delay in flights,” Suwondo, the university’s environmental study center coordinator, said as quoted by Tempo.Doni Monardo, the head of the national disaster mitigation agency, the BNPB, said the government was well aware of the economic impacts of the annual fires.“The president has said that if fires have broken out, they’re difficult to be extinguished,” he told Mongabay. “The losses are from various aspects, such as health, aviation and security, schools closing down and people not working. They are very harmful.”Doni added that the agency would use the World Bank’s 2019 report for future reference.“The BNPB doesn’t have experts [to calculate these figures],” he said. “The expert is the World Bank. So just use one data [from the World Bank] as a standard. The 2015 data [of economic loss] is also from the World Bank. We need to have a standard.”A group of locals in West Kalimantan participates in a flag-raising ceremony amid toxic haze from nearby peat fires. Image by Aseanty Pahlevi/Mongabay Indonesia.Health impactThe World Bank said it did not take into account the long-term effects of repeated exposure to haze on human capital, such as acute respiratory illnesses and reduced quality of education due to affected health of teachers and students.As of September 2019, over 900,000 people had reported respiratory health diseases and hundreds of schools in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore had to temporarily close.An analysis by Madani, an environmental NGO, found that this year’s fires choked at least 45 districts and cities around Indonesia with high levels of PM2.5, a fine particulate matter small enough to penetrate deep into the lungs and cross into the bloodstream.According to the World Health Organization, PM2.5 causes acute respiratory issues such as asthma and is increasingly linked to death from heart and lung disease.In Riau, Madani found that the haze emitted from fires in the province was linked to various diseases, with upper respiratory infection being the most common illness.In 2018, 31.4 percent of pneumonia cases on children under the age of five was in Riau.Madani executive director Teguh Surya said sometimes the health impacts from the fires and toxic haze weren’t detected until the fires were gone.“This year’s fires might be over now as rain starts to fall, but the disaster doesn’t end,” he said. “There are long-lasting impacts that could last for years. The impacts aren’t just today, but have to be calculated for the next 20 years.”According to a recent study published in GeoHealth, exposure to air pollution from Indonesian fires will cause some 36,000 premature deaths per year on average across Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia over the next few decades if current trends continue – that is, if no comprehensive land management strategies, such as peatland restoration, are undertaken.Therefore, Teguh called on the government to consider the long-term impacts of the recurring haze and fire episode when tackling fires.“This is a threat to our generation,” he said. “How can the young generation lead the country if they’re sick, or even dead?”A peat swamp in Sumatra smolders during the 2015 haze crisis. The drainage canals were dug in order to prepare the land for planting with oil palm, but the practice renders the land vulnerable to catching fire. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Unaccounted impactsThe World Bank figure also didn’t take into account how the recent fires might damage the image of Indonesia’s palm oil sector, thus affecting trade. Indonesia’s peat swamps are often drained by oil palm planters.The report said the annual fires had exacerbated the negative global perception of Indonesian palm oil, driving down demand from European countries, and factoring into the European Union’s (EU) plan to phase out palm-oil based biofuel by 2030.“This year’s spike in fire activities are unlikely to help Indonesia’s bilateral negotiations with the EU through the World Trade Organization,” the report said.The BNPB’s Doni said the bad image of the country’s palm oil had resulted in some products being labelled with “no palm oil” in some countries.“We are currently being punished by the international world,” he said during a recent government meeting on the preparation for 2020 fire season. “Biscuits in some countries are labelled with ‘no palm oil’. If this is copied in other major countries that have been utilizing Indonesia’s palm oil, [our market] will keep dwindling.”Isna Fatimah, a researcher at the Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL), said the government could start considering these unaccounted impacts when they’re trying to hold companies responsible for fires on their concessions.So far this year, the Environment and Forestry Ministry has prosecuted 17 companies linked to fires. Nine of them have received their verdicts and ordered to pay a total of 3.15 trillion rupiah ($225 million) in fines.Isna said the amount of money that the companies had to pay still fall short of what’s deemed to be fair because the damages calculated by the government were usually limited to environmental degradation.Meanwhile, the money spent by the government on tackling the fires, including outbreaks on company lands, isn’t taken into account when the government sues these companies, according to her.This year, the BNPB alone spent up to 3 trillion rupiah ($213 million) to extinguish fires, triple the amount it usually spends, while other state bodies like the environment ministry also have their own budget to fight fires.“The government should start thinking about this so that these costs can be reimbursed [when suing companies],” Isna told Mongabay. “It means that the money spent by the state to mitigate the loss from fires isn’t limited to health and environmental impacts. This might include declining investment in the palm oil industry because it has a bad image. These things should be considered.”center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more