An Indonesian forest community grapples with the arrival of the outside world

first_imgSiberut Island, part of the Mentawai archipelago in western Indonesia, is recognized as a U.N. Biosphere Reserve due to its outstanding cultural and ecological value.The traditions of the indigenous Mentawai people, including agroforestry and customary land tenure, have allowed the people of the island live off the forest without depleting it.Roughly half of the island is protected as a national park. The rest, however, has been parceled out for timber and biomass plantations, road building, and the development of a special economic zone including a yacht marina and luxury resort. DOROGOT, Indonesia — Toikot rises as the golden light of dawn begins to shine on the heavy mist that cloaks the rainforest canopy outside his home in Indonesia’s Siberut Island. The pigs leave their sleeping place under his traditional uma clan house and set out to forage in the forest. Later they will return to the farmstead to eat sago.An elderly indigenous Mentawai traditional healer, or sekerei, Toikot’s first task of the day is to gather “something beautiful from nature” with which to adorn himself. Today he plucks two red flowers and places one behind each ear. A loincloth, elaborate tattoos and headdress complete the distinctive customary dress for which the sekerei are known.Toikot’s home, the farming community of Dorogot, is a cluster of forest farmsteads on the eastern side of Siberut, around three hours’ walk from the nearest village, mostly through arduous lowland swamp forest.Siberut is the largest island in the Mentawai archipelago, which lies 140 kilometers (87 miles) west of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. The rainforest-swathed island has been isolated from the rest of Indonesia for half a million years, leading to an unusually high level of endemism. Two-thirds of the animals here are thought to be unique to the island.This unique biological and cultural diversity was recognized in 1981 when UNESCO designated the island a Biosphere Reserve. This was consolidated in 1993 when Indonesia’s Ministry of Forestry established Siberut National Park, spanning 1,905 square kilometers (736 square miles) and covering most of the island’s western half.Now, though, both Siberut’s traditional lifestyles and its biodiversity are under pressure from a spate of development projects. While the western half of the island is largely protected, the northeast is already home to a sizable timber concession and a biomass forestry concession. The central government also has big plans to develop a special economic zone in the south, and a highway linking it to the forest concessions in the north. The local government and a private company also plan to bring electricity to villages via a biomass project.last_img read more

Forests and forest communities critical to climate change solutions

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Mining, Biodiversity, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Deforestation, Earth Science, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Gold Mining, Green, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, IPCC, Land Rights, Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Traditional People, Tribal Groups, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlights the importance of land use in addressing climate change.The restoration and protection of forests could be a critical component in strategies to mitigate climate change, say experts, but governments must halt deforestation and forest degradation to make way for farms and ranches.The IPCC report also acknowledges the role that indigenous communities could play.The forests under indigenous management often have lower deforestation and emit less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. How we use the planet’s land, including forests, will make a huge difference in determining the path of climate change in the future, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC.The IPCC released a summary of its special report on climate change and land on Aug. 8. Experts say the report reinforces the importance of taking land use into account as a front-line strategy for dealing with rising global temperatures as a result of increased carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.“Our options in terms of protecting, restoring and expanding forests are immediately available, proven at scale, and often very cost-effective, while also providing benefits for clean air, water, biodiversity, soil health, climate resilience — you name it,” Katharine Mach, a climate researcher and associate professor at the University of Miami, said in a press briefing on Aug. 1.Forest and terraced hillsides in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Forests collectively pull out roughly a third of global CO2 emissions, and the potential for keeping a lid on climate change is even higher with the right restoration and protection plans in place, Mach said. That emphasis on keeping forests standing and bringing them back in places where they once stood dovetails with the need to cut the amount of fossil fuels we burn for energy.“This relationship between fossil fuels and forests is a ‘yes-and’ relationship,” she added.A banana plantation in the village of San Jose in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.But holding back the tide of deforestation against interests intent on short-term financial gains has proven difficult.“That is why we need to ensure tropical forests are worth more standing than when they are cut down for grazing livestock, growing crops or harvesting timber,” David Festa, senior vice president for ecosystems with the Environmental Defense Fund, said in a statement.The sentiment echoes a remark from noted biologist E.O. Wilson during an interview with the BBC: “Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.”Residents playing basketball in the village of San Jose in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.That’s particularly true in the Brazilian Amazon, Carlos Nobre, a senior climate scientist at Brazil’s University of São Paolo, said at the briefing. The push for timber, agriculture, ranching and mining in the largest block of rainforest left on Earth has led to a surge in deforestation rates of 40 percent in the past three years.“That’s very worrying,” Nobre said. He added that continued deforestation in the Amazon could permanently turn the rainforest into a savanna that releases tens of billions of tons of CO2 into the atmosphere.“The Amazon forest may be closer to a tipping point than we assumed before,” Nobre said.Protecting forests because of their potential to mitigate climate change can have other positive effects, such as protecting biodiversity. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Part of the solution could come from overhauling the way we produce food, Charlotte Streck, founder of the think tank Climate Focus, said during the briefing. Streck pointed out that raising livestock to satisfy the global appetite for meat accounts for 15 percent of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions, as well as the majority of emissions from the global agricultural sector.“All this means that one of the most effective climate actions that we can take as individuals is to improve our diets,” she said. “The good news is that we are already seeing diet changes in the United States and Europe. The consumption of red meat is falling, in particular, in urban centers.”But for lasting changes to protect forests, we must take into account — and indeed, enlist the experience, knowledge and expertise — of the people who call them home, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the U.N. special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, said at the briefing.A local farmer in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.“No one understands the value of forests better than indigenous and local communities,” she said. “As experts, often guided by hundreds of years of knowledge, we are uniquely suited to manage, protect and restore the world’s forests.”Research has shown that forests managed by indigenous communities have lower deforestation rates and release less CO2 than those managed by governments, and the new IPCC report recognizes for the first time the role these peoples could play in addressing climate change.“Finally, the world’s top scientists recognize what we have always known,” a group of community and indigenous organizations from 42 countries said in their response to the report released on Aug. 8.A member of a group resisting a hydropower dam in Guatemala. Image by James Rodriguez/Global Witness.But critical to nurturing that beneficial relationship is acknowledging indigenous land rights around the world. The statement’s authors point out that these communities customarily take care of more than half the world’s surface. But governments only recognize their ownership of about a tenth of global land. Furthermore, the signatories to the response argue, these groups must be involved in decision-making processes about what happens to the land they hold — what’s known as free, prior and informed consent, or FPIC.But standing up for the right to have a say over what happens to a piece of land is often contentious and dangerous. On July 30, Global Witness released a report documenting the deaths of 164 “land and environmental defenders” in 2018 — an average of more than three a week.Another study, published Aug. 5 in the journal Nature Sustainability, found that more than one-third of killings between 2014 and 2017 over natural resources involved either agriculture or mining interests.“No one knows the conflicts playing out among food, fuel and forests better than indigenous peoples and local communities,” Tauli-Corpuz said. “We’re often in the cross-hairs of conflicts over land, especially forests.”The number of environmental and land defenders killed by country in 2018. Image courtesy of Global Witness.Banner image of a farmer looking over the new oil palm plantation abutting his land in Peru, by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitation:Butt, N., Lambrick, F., Menton, M., & Renwick, A. (2019). The supply chain of violence. Nature Sustainability, 2(8), 742-747. doi:10.1038/s41893-019-0349-4FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, Feb. 7, 2020

first_imgConservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsMalaysia estimates it will take a decade to build the Trans-Borneo Highway, connecting Malaysian and Indonesian Borneo with Brunei (The Malaysian Insight, The Edge Markets).The NGO African Parks will manage the 150,000-square-kilometer (58,000-square-mile) Iona National Park in Angola (Africa Geographic).Locusts have descended on Kenya, in the country’s worst infestation in 70 years (The Guardian).Malaysian lawmakers are expected to strengthen penalties levied against illegal loggers (Reuters).A dispute over land and resources may have left six indigenous people dead in Nicaragua (BBC News) …… While in Brazil a man was killed during a raid to stamp out illegal deforestation (Reuters).An economic study found that the U.S.’s biofuels policy has had an “insignificant” impact on deforestation in Malaysia and Indonesia (Agrinews).Numbers of the pig-like white-lipped peccary have dropped by as much as 90%, a study has found (ScienceDaily).Other newsBumblebees have lost almost half their habitat in North America (The Washington Post).Some Republican lawmakers in the U.S. see addressing climate change as electorally necessary (The Washington Post).A baboon in South Africa’s Kruger National Park kidnapped, then gently groomed, a lion cub (Africa Geographic).Researchers wonder whether the platypus can withstand the assaults from feral cats, habitat loss and wildfires (The New York Times).The loss of sea ice in northern Japan is both a benefit and a hindrance to spotted seals (The Washington Post).Illegal fishing off the Somali coast is upending the small-scale fisheries on which communities depend (Hakai Magazine).Millions of trees may have died after a tree-planting project in Turkey (The Guardian).Andean condor numbers are dropping due to deaths related to pesticide use (The Revelator).U.S. President Donald Trump didn’t mention climate change in his State of the Union address, but said he has a plan to plant a trillion trees (Undark) …… Even as his administration moves to open up once-protected areas in the western U.S. to grazing, drilling and logging (The Washington Post).Currents are speeding up across more than three-quarters of the world’s oceans as a result of climate change (The Washington Post, The New York Times).Scientists have observed Alaskan brown bears hunting sea otters for the first time (Hakai Magazine).Banner image of brown bears courtesy of Denali National Park and Preserve via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Looking beyond the divisive sound bite

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Every so often, a sound bite comes along – from Bush Sr.’s “little brown ones” to Kanye West’s “Bush (Jr.) doesn’t care about black people” – that puts the melting pot on fast boil. Last week, it was comments on Bill Bennett’s radio show. Responding to a caller and an out-there hypothesis in the book “Freakanomics,” Bennett freaked out more than a few when he said, “But I do know that it’s true that if you wanted to reduce crime, you could, if that were your sole purpose, you could abort every black baby in this country, and your crime rate would go down.” He said it was “an impossible, ridiculous and morally reprehensible thing to do, but your crime rate would go down. So these far-out, these far-reaching, extensive extrapolations are, I think, tricky.” Damage control is even trickier. The White House, already in Pat Robertson vs. Hugo Chavez repulsion mode, distanced itself from the remarks of the Reagan administration education secretary. Bennett released a clarification statement. Dems had fodder to help further a distorted image of the GOP. Blogs went on the offensive and the defensive, and many shades in between. As an Irish-American conservative from a neighborhood where whites are the minority, I find that no response is right. I’ve decried Bennett’s comments, and been accused of falling into lockstep with those who would gladly crucify any right-wing pundit. Yet on the flip side, not accusing Bennett of being a Klan groupie also draws fire. So I step back and observe the situation, the latest can of worms opened in race relations by a sound bite. Yes, I know crime stats, but I am disturbed at the statement’s implication – not necessarily intended meaning – that the world would be a safer place without blacks. I am disturbed at the abortion hypothetical, because abortion is already grievously slashing through the African-American community at an incidence three times greater than whites. There has been overreaction at the Bennett comment, yet I do wonder why he picked the example he did. It is a fact that we have many troubled black communities, and many of the politicos – on both sides of the aisle – claiming to have the answers rarely stray south of Culver City. From gang violence to dropouts and deadbeat dads, being born in Watts presents an entirely different set of challenges than does being born on the Westside. But nothing will ever change if we believe those challenges are insurmountable. Pot-stirring sound bites come and go, but I fervently hope that this current worm can will stay cracked open long enough for people to look inside our black communities and care enough to effect change. Hopefully constructive debate can be sustained and, more important, action can supersede talk. I hope we can really see these neighborhoods as more than defined by statistics. Bars on a window decorated with dainty curtains often tell the story of a person whose home is their refuge from a neighborhood gripped by fear, places where kids can’t ride their tricycles because of gang crossfire. A statistic may tell you how many mothers are raising children alone, but how many let their charges roam the streets and how many keep them off the streets? The man who looks like trouble to an outsider may be honest and hard-working, just trying to hack out a living for his family in an affordable neighborhood. And the bleak crime stats won’t tell you about the bright spots in our local black communities, including Magic Johnson’s efforts at economic development, “Sage from South Central” Larry Elder’s contributions to political discourse, “Sweet Alice” Harris’ tireless devotion to her Watts neighborhood, and homeless activist Ted Hayes’ committed community involvement. There are strong churches, grass-roots anti-gang efforts, and black women graduating from college in record numbers. But more people need to step into the fray. More truths need to be sought, more attitudes adjusted, more fear squashed, more of the old guard changed. What nanny policies – social, educational, economic – are locking our black communities into a tragic cycle of low expectations? How has affirmative action impacted youths by telling them they need a governmental crutch to get ahead? What can we do to make our black communities the last example any radio host will think of when looking for a hypothetical on crime stats? Bridget Johnson writes for the Daily News. E-mail her at [email protected]last_img read more

Fresh hope for reopening of Glenties playground after funding secured

first_imgThere are fresh hopes for the reopening of Glenties community playground after it was announced today that funding has been secured for repair works.The playground was locked to the public last month after the committee said they could no longer fund the insurance and upkeep of the space.The playground was originally constructed through local funding, Leader and Lottery grants, which meant that the local authority was not in a position to cover the insurance costs. Recent interventions have sparked fresh hope that Donegal County Council can take over the responsibility of the playground so it can be enjoyed by families again. Glenties Community Playground. Photo: Sue Barrington PhotographyDeputy Pat the Cope Gallagher and local County Councillor Anthony Molloy confirmed today that funding has been secured to carry out the necessary repairs at the playground. A notice of motion to takeover the playground will be submitted to Donegal County Council “at the earliest opportunity”, they said.In a joint statement, Pat the Cope and Cllr Molloy said: “The playground was originally funded through Leader, Lottery and by local contributions, and since its opening the running costs have been the responsibility of the local committee, who have carried out trojan work over the years. We wish to compliment the commitment of the local voluntary group who continue to look after the playground.“We would be hopeful that once the repairs are completed and the playground brought up to a high standard, that the Council will then be in a position to take over the responsibility. “Both of us would like to publicly acknowledge the co-operation of the Playground Committee, Glenties Community Development Group and the benefactor for funding the repairs. We will both maintain the pressure so that the repairs are completed and that Donegal County Council can secure the long term viability of the playground.”  Fresh hope for reopening of Glenties playground after funding secured was last modified: November 17th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Learn to cook the perfect Christmas dinner with chef Brian McDermott

first_imgShow off your cookery skills this Festive Season with a Christmas Cookery Demonstration by one of Ireland’s top chefs, Brian McDermott.Celebrity chef Brian will demonstrate how to master the perfect Christmas dinner at home.He will take the stress out of cooking the most important meal of the year with step by step recipes for the complete festive meal at home. The event at the Foyle Hotel in Moville includes lots of tips for preparation, cooking and serving plus wine & drink recommendations.With Top Tips, Spot Prizes, Mulled Wine & More, this promises to be a great night out!Venue: The Foyle HotelDate: Thursday 12th DecemberTime: 7.30pm – 10pmPrice: €20 per ticket – Book with our Reception Team* Recipe Booklet for all attendees * Spot prizes on the night* Mulled Wine on Arrival* Gift Shop on the Night with Vouchers, Chopping Boards, Knives, Aprons, Brian’s Award Winning Book – Have it signed & many moreThis will be a ticket event with tickets purchased in advance.Tickets are limited and available at hotel Reception, call our team on +353 (0) 749385280 or email [email protected] with tickets priced at only €20 Why not enjoy a pre-show Dinner Offer for Only €50 per couple including a two course meal & wine each. Book a table with our reception team *show starts at 7:30pmPlanning to stay the night?Our Overnight B&B Package is ONLY €99 for two people including TWO tickets to the Christmas Cookery Demo!Book Your Overnight Stay here: https://bookingengine.myguestdiary.com/1236/offer/7785/3898/0/2019-12-12/2019-12-13/2/0/1 Contact Our TeamTo Book a ticket, dinner or an overnight stay please contact our reception team on +353749385280 or reply to this email.Please do not hesitate to contact us should you require any further information on the event at www.foylehotel.ieLearn to cook the perfect Christmas dinner with chef Brian McDermott was last modified: November 28th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Brian McDermottchefChristmas Dinnerdemonstrationlast_img read more

NBC Sports Bay Area & California network has a new chief

first_imgNBC Sports Regional Networks today announced the hiring of Matt Murphy as senior vice president and general manager of NBC Sports Bay Area & California, effective Jan. 2.Murphy, a native of Connecticut, will be responsible for the network, its multi-platform content and the relationships it has, as rights holder, with the San Francisco Giants, Golden State Warriors, Oakland A’s, Sacramento Kings, and San Jose Sharks.The announcement was made by Bill Bridgen, President, Group Leader, NBC …last_img read more

How the Raiders can fill their most glaring need in 2019 NFL Draft

first_imgIt doesn’t take a rocket scientist or even a draft guru-turned-general manager to figure out where the Raiders need the most help after a dismal 2018. They finished last season with a mere 13 sacks, the fewest single-season total for any team since the 2008 Chiefs finished with only 10.The Raiders knew they wouldn’t wreak havoc in opposing backfields after trading All-Pro edge rusher Khalil Mack before the regular season, but nobody could’ve anticipated their pass rush being as anemic as it …last_img read more

Limpopo goes the Ivory Route

first_img3 March 2004Limpopo province is running an ambitious programme to “convert” villagers and township residents into tourists by sending them on an adventure odyssey into their own country and culture.The department of environmental affairs and tourism has been taking residents who live along the African Ivory Route to attractions like the Rain Queen’s royal kraal and the ancient mountain top citadel of Mapungubwe.“Tourism was not very popular in the province, especially among black people, so the department wants to see more of us getting involved”, says programme manager Xolile Hlungwane. “The aim is for the African Ivory Route to benefit its communities.”Since the opening of route in 1998, the department has held tourism awareness campaigns in villages and started training residents as tour and field guides, as well as tourism entrepreneurs.There are five cultural camps based in villages along the route, where tourists get to see traditional dances, eat local food, enjoy traditional music and storytelling, and interact with the villagers.The camps represent the VaTsonga, VhaVenda and Bapedi peoples, and offer self-catering accommodation in traditional huts.There are also six safari camps in game reserves along the route.For hiking enthusiasts, there are trails among 800-year-old cycads, while bird watchers can wonder at the abundant bird life of the region.The route includes attractions like Lake Fundudzi, where legend has it that the python rules the underwater spirit world, the Holy Forest where the ancestors guard the Venda traditions, the Tshatshingo potholes and the Thathe-Vondo Dam and tea estates.There are already 46 local people working for the African Ivory Route project, which has been promoted at acclaimed world tourism fairs, including the Tourism Indaba in Durban and the World Tourism Market in London.“This project is without a doubt successful, because communities are benefiting directly from it”, says Hlungwane, “and people who visit the province suddenly realise that we have more to offer than they imagined.”Source: BuaNews Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Augmented Reality Field Trips & the 150th Anniversary of the U.S. Civil War

first_imgThe Sesquicentennial: The Opportunities for Mobile, AR, Linked DataMummert’s Civil War Augmented Reality Project is one of many efforts underway to commemorate the 150th anniversary through technology. The Civil War Data 150 Project is one example – a partnership that aims to support and connect linked data across local, state, and federal institutions so that information can be found and utilized, no matter the collection, the archives, or the library in which it’s housed. The Civil War Data 150 Project will help pull together the open data upon which developers can build the sorts of apps that Mummert and others envision.Although a fundraising effort on Kickstarter last summer was unsuccessful, Mummert is moving forward with his plans for the Civil War Augmented Reality Project. He believes the 150th anniversary of the Civil War will be an important moment for historians, educators, archivists, and technologists. It’s a nice round number to build a celebration upon, of course. But just as importantly, Mummert argues, we’re at a key moment in the adoption of mobile and augmented reality technologies, a new way to help invite and engage the public and students in a more engaging and interactive experience with Civil War history. Related Posts Tags:#Augmented Reality#Location#web audrey watters 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… April 2011 will mark the 150th anniversary of the first hostilities of U.S. Civil War, and museums, municipalities, and historic sites are making their preparations for the events and exhibits to commemorate it. And while, no doubt, times are tough for funding cultural heritage projects, there’s a lot of excitement and momentum building around the sesquicentennial, making it a great opportunity for those exploring how technology can make history more interactive.“A more valuable field trip” – that’s the argument that Pennsylvania high school social studies teacher Jeff Mummert makes, pointing to the increasing accessibility of both mobile and augmented reality technologies as ways to “offer deeply interactive projects for students and the general public.” To that end, Mummert has created the Civil War Augmented Reality Project (which recently evolved to become HistoriQuest). Aimed at giving both students and the general public a richer experience, the Civil War Augmented Reality Project wants to build apps that will use augmented reality to connect primary documents and photographs to local historic points of interest.Knocking Down the Museum Walls with Mobile AR The Civil War’s sesquicentennial provides both challenges and opportunities for many local historic sites. It’s estimated, for example, that Gettysburg, Pennsylvania will receive some 3 to 4 million visitors in 2013, the 150th anniversary of the battle and of Lincoln’s famous address. How can mobile technology and AR provide better, smarter, more active experiences – inside and outside the museum walls? How can building localized apps encourage the public to do more than just walk through a battlefield or a visitors’ center?Mummert walked me through one app under development: a body of an identified Union soldier was found in the town of Gettysburg on one of the first days of the invasion in 1863. At the spo where the body was found, the mobile app triggers a CSI investigation, of sorts, where Gettysburg visitors can follow clues (a photograph of a wife and child found on the body) through various points of interest in the town: to the churches that served as hospitals during the battle, to the David Wills House – now a museum, and the site where President Lincoln stayed the night before he gave the Gettysburg Address – to battlefield site and the Gettysburg National Cemetery, and eventually to the soldier’s grave-site. 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe Applast_img read more