Flood Recovery: $1.2 Billion for Louisiana

first_imgLouisiana Governor John Bel Edwards and U.S. Representaive Garret Graves have announced that the federal government will allocate an additional $1.213 billion in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding for hazard mitigation projects in parishes that were impacted by the 2016 floods. Commenting this, Governor Edwards said: “This new investment from HUD is critically important to our rebuilding efforts. It will allow us to make investments in flood risk reduction and infrastructure projects in areas of our state that were devastated by the 2016 floods, including partnering with the Army Corps of Engineers to make investments in  large-scale projects such as the Comite River Diversion Canal.”“Once we have the full details from the federal government regarding how these funds can be spent, we will work with stakeholders and local governments to determine what projects to fund and outline our plan to HUD. I appreciate the congressional delegation’s continued efforts on our flood recovery, and I am confident these resources will be used to strengthen our communities against future disasters.”Representaive Graves added that “this is one of the largest flood protection, mitigation and resiliency disaster appropriations made to the state of Louisiana in history and brings the sum of federal recovery dollars for Louisiana’s 2016 floods to more than 10 billion, enabling us to advance critical projects that have been stagnant for far too long – projects like Comite, West Shore, Upper Barataria Risk Reduction and Morganza to the Gulf.”“These resources will be used as part of an overall solution for Comite – a solution that will include Army Corps of Engineers funding – but will also give Louisiana flexibility to directly take the lead on implementing and completing projects instead of being held hostage by the bureaucracy of the Corps.”This tranche of federal dollars was appropriated through the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, which became law on February 9, 2018last_img read more

10 noteworthy books on conservation and the environment from 2019

first_img2019 produced a number of notable books on the environment, ranging from the memoirs of researchers and journalists to how-to guides and prescient novels.Here’s a sample of what was published in the past year.They cut across a variety of environment-related themes, though climate change is a common point of meditation for many of the authors on the list.Inclusion on this list does not imply Mongabay’s endorsement of a book’s content; the views in the books are those of the authors and not necessarily Mongabay. Grappling with the challenges of minimizing carbon footprints, memoirs of careers spent on the frontlines of conservation and stark warnings about the future inhabitability of our world, the roster of environment-related books published in 2019 covered a wide swath of pressing themes.We’ve included 10 released by mainstream publishing houses that promise to inspire, educate and prepare readers as we head into the third decade of the 21st century. They tackle climate change, altered marine environments and the global loss of species, but of course none of these issues exists in a vacuum. The challenges are all related, and the authors whose books made the list have worked to tease apart that complexity.Image courtesy of Hachette Book Group.1. The Snow Leopard Project And Other Adventures in War Zone ConservationBeginning in 2006, Alex Dehgan spearheaded an effort to create the first national park in Afghanistan. Dehgan, an evolutionary biologist who was working for the Wildlife Conservation Society at the time, brings to life the effort that became a beacon of hope in spite of ongoing conflict.“I felt that there was so much more to Afghanistan than the way it is portrayed on the evening news — a dusty, depressing landscape of pain, conflict, tribalism, and hopelessness,” he told Mongabay in April. “I wanted to show for both conservation, and for Afghanistan, that there could be optimism for the future of the country, for its people, and for its wildlife.”Image courtesy of Columbia University Press.2. Live Sustainably Now: A Low-Carbon Vision of the Good LifePart how-to guide, part entertaining memoir, Karl Coplan’s new book brings readers along for his journey into trimming his own carbon footprint. The Pace University law professor acknowledges the struggles inherent in minimizing one’s own impact in a modern society, but he also demonstrates the fulfillment to be had in meeting those challenges head on and devising creative solutions to address them.Image courtesy of Island Press.3. Rainforest: Dispatches from Earth’s Most Vital FrontlinesLike many of the authors whose books are on this list, Tony Juniper brings firsthand experience to his subject matter — in this case, the world’s rainforests. The outlook for this biome can seem bleak, especially given the recent surge in deforestation in many of the world’s tropical forests, and Juniper’s decades in the field bear out the hurdles conservationists face. But he also lays out the case for using every strategy at our disposal, from high-level agreements to supporting indigenous management, to protect the forests that, he argues — and many agree — are so essential to our own existence.4. The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys across the last untamed frontierInvestigative journalist Ian Urbina spent more than 3 years at sea with fishers all over the world to understand the connection between the epidemic of overfishing across the world’s oceans and the human rights abuses that are all too common in the industry. His reporting, which first appeared as a series in The New York Times, reveals the lawlessness of high seas and that the fates of the people who work it as well as the life that lives beneath are intertwined.“To me, the problem is an out-of-sight, out-of-mind reality that results in an utter lack of governance in a sprawling space that has for too long simply been thought of as a space — rarely a workplace,” Urbina told Conservation International. “There is a long cultural and intellectual history behind thinking of the sea and maritime as another world where things are different.”Image courtesy of Penguin Random House.5. Grinnell: America’s Environmental Pioneer and His Restless Drive to Save the WestGeorge Grinnell’s views on the American West were shaped by the time he spent there, steeped in the landscape and the cultures that precede the United States’ domination of the region. Along the way, biographer John Taliaferro writes, Grinnell also became an advocate for its protection in the face of “progress.” In doing so, he helped ignite a passion for conservation that continues to this day.6. The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After WarmingFrom the first page of his new book, David Wallace-Wells describes a perilous world that we’re striding closer to each day in what reviewers call “terrifying” and “riveting” prose. Wallace-Wells examines the future for humanity as the impacts of climate change deepen, and in his view, few aspects of our lives will remain untouched. There’s room for optimism in the future, but only if we act, and this book tells us why we must. As the reviewer for The Economist wrote, “Some readers will find Mr Wallace-Wells’s outline of possible futures alarmist. He is indeed alarmed. You should be, too.”Image courtesy of Macmillan.7. Losing Earth: A Recent HistoryThis retrospective looks back to the scientists who first alerted humanity to the dangers of climate change in the late 1970s and the 1980s. Journalist Nathaniel Rich first reported the series for The New York Times Magazine. It details how a handful of researchers initially realized our own role in climate change. There were missed opportunities to stave off the coming storm along the way, to be sure. Still unanswered is the question about whether we’ll learn from those missteps, or blindly barrel toward an uncertain and perilous future.Image courtesy of Macmillan.8. Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?In yet another volume to explore humanity’s relationship with Earth’s climate, Bill McKibben — the first popular author to sound the warning on climate change with The End of Nature in 1989 — follows the obstinacy of ideology and how it has precluded meaningful action. The details are frustrating. But McKibben also finds reason to hope, believing that the future of the world and our place depends on how we respond now.Image courtesy of Penguin Random House.9. HorizonBarry Lopez reflects on decades of travel to remote regions, during which he’s see the influence of humanity across the world’s landscapes. In Horizon, he wrestles with our capacity for both cruelty and generosity, and how the destruction and preservation of the earth are related. The depth of his meditations and observations leave few clearcut answers, other than to bring into focus the profound impact that we humans and our environment have on each other.Image courtesy of Faber and Faber Ltd.10. The WallIn the only work of fiction on our list, writer John Lanchester has put together a novel with perhaps the most contemporary of themes. Central to the plot is the wall in the imagined future that projects the United Kingdom from rising sea levels. Seemingly insurmountable political divisiveness conspires to create a world that’s suspiciously familiar in prevailing sentiment if not the details of everyday life, in which outsiders are viewed as enemies and our very existence seems under threat.Banner image of a glacier in Iceland by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Animals, Biodiversity, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Deforestation, Earth Science, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Journalism, Extinction, Fish, Fishing, Forest Carbon, Forest People, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Green, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Illegal Logging, IPCC, Journalism, Logging, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Cost-effective conservation: Study identifies key ‘umbrella’ species

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Policy, Extinction, Government, Green, Parks, Plants, Protected Areas, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation A new study has found that incorporating threats, actions and costs into the selection of priority species for conservation can markedly increase the efficiency of these efforts.The researchers created a new list of “umbrella” species for Australia, incorporating these factors.They found that the new list of umbrella species would lend protection to 46% of Australia’s threatened species — a sevenfold increase over the current list. Governments could vastly improve the efficiency of money spent on conservation if they took a hard look at the species they prioritize, according to a recent study.The research probed the benefits of using “umbrella species” — key species that, by overlapping with other species, provide them with indirect protection — to guide conservation policies in Australia.“We noticed that many countries, including Australia, use umbrella species to target management,” Michelle Ward, the study’s lead author and a Ph.D. student at the University of Queensland, told Mongabay in an email. “However, the method of choosing these species is generally ad hoc in fashion, and doesn’t consider the actual management strategies needed to recover species.”A far eastern curlew. Image by Dick Daniels.In Australia and other parts of the world, range size is used to pick out these species, the theory being that protecting far-ranging species will inherently protect the other plants and animals found in those areas. Ward and her colleagues found that the 73 species that Australia’s federal government has listed as umbrella species only protect 6% of the country’s threatened plants and animals.The team reported their findings Nov. 5 in the journal Conservation Biology.The team wondered if a more nuanced selection process — one that incorporated not just species’ ranges size, but the specific threats they face, the actions required to address those threats and what they might cost — might pull in other species.They began with maps showing the distributions and threats facing the nearly 1,800 threatened land animals in Australia. They then looked at the costs of the necessary actions to address those threats. When a species overlapped in both its geographic range and its threats with other species with relatively “cost-effective” management actions, it made the umbrella list.An infographic showing the number of species benefiting from management if the top seven umbrella species are managed from both the priority government list, top, and the optimized list, bottom. The number of species in brackets is that which could be managed without considering the umbrella benefits of any other species. Image by courtesy of Ward et al., 2019.That meant that species like the koala, red goshawk and purple clover made the list, Ward said in a statement, even though they’re not currently listed as umbrella species by the Australian government.Using Australia as a case study, the team found that this revised list would protect 46% of threatened species — what amounts to a sevenfold increase compared with the current list — without spending any more money on conservation.“[W]e thought it would be more efficient, but 7 times is striking,” Ward said.She said their approach could be used for other countries as well.A red goshawk. Image by Summerdrought via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA).The researchers also developed the study with policymakers in mind. Senior author Hugh Possingham said he’s confident that they’ll see the value in this approach.“All our papers that push return on investment thinking and smart decision-making are enthusiastically embraced by senior managers in government, who often have an economics background,” said Possingham, who is chief scientist at the Nature Conservancy and a professor at the University of Queensland.The takeaway from the research is straightforward, Ward said: “Conservation doesn’t need to be expensive if done efficiently.”But, she added, “This investment must be backed by strong national environment laws that protect nature from further destruction.”Banner image of a koala by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitation:Ward, M., Rhodes, J. R., Watson, J. E. M., Lefevre, J., Atkinson, S., & Possingham, H. P. (2019). Use of surrogate species to cost‐effectively prioritize conservation actions. Conservation Biology. doi:10.1111/cobi.13430FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

How the Raiders can fill their most glaring need in 2019 NFL Draft

first_imgIt doesn’t take a rocket scientist or even a draft guru-turned-general manager to figure out where the Raiders need the most help after a dismal 2018. They finished last season with a mere 13 sacks, the fewest single-season total for any team since the 2008 Chiefs finished with only 10.The Raiders knew they wouldn’t wreak havoc in opposing backfields after trading All-Pro edge rusher Khalil Mack before the regular season, but nobody could’ve anticipated their pass rush being as anemic as it …last_img read more

Hair Makes You Bigger and Warmer

first_imgScientists found that hair increases a beast’s surface area by a factor of 100.“The hairier it is, the larger the creature’s true surface area,” Science Daily says. “In fact, the team says it’s 100 times greater than its skin surface area.”Hair insulates the creature, keeping it warm. But you may be surprised to learn, according to Live Science, that mammals are not the hairiest of creatures. Researchers at Georgia Tech estimate that luna moths and butterflies have 10 billion hairs, compared to 3 million on a squirrel.Summing the combined surface area of skin and hair increases the total surface area dramatically. A house cat, for instance, has the surface area of a ping-pong table. A honeybee grows to the size of a piece of toast. The mammal surface-area champion mentioned in the article is the sea otter. Its dense hair gives it a total surface area the size of a hockey rink.The Georgia Tech team is particularly interested in how animals clean their hair. It’s giving them ideas for biomimetics. Different animals use active or passive methods:“Dogs shake water off their backs, just like a washing machine,” said Amador, who recently graduated. “Bees use bristled appendages to brush pollen off their eyes and bodies. Fruit flies use hairs on their head and thorax to catapult dust off of them at accelerations of up to 500 times Earth’s gravity.“Other animals and insects use more efficient, renewable cleaning tactics.“They don’t do anything extra to stay clean. It just happens,” said Amador.Eyelashes, for example, protect mammals by minimizing airflow and funneling particles away from eyes. Cicadas have sharp points on their wings that act as pincushions, essentially popping airborne bacteria like water balloons.These strategies may inspire self-cleaning technologies for drones, Mars rovers or machines that need to operate in dusty environments.Very interesting research, but the articles didn’t mention the various functions of hair. Many mammals seem comfortable in both summer and winter with full coats of hair, so there must be more going on than just warmth. Have you considered how your eyelashes protect your eyes, and eyebrows provide some protection from bright sun?  (Think of how extra black is smeared on to prevent snow blindness.)Watch this cat video to see how hair may provide cats a soft landing when frightened.Presumably individual humans’ surface areas can vary dramatically depending on how they cut their hair, and whether men are bald or bearded. (Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

New transport era for Joburg

first_img25 June 2010 Thousands of fans have been streaming off the City of Johannesburg’s new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system into the Soccer City and Ellis Park stadiums for the 10 World Cup matches that have already been played there. For the many South African spectators, it has been their first taste of the new transport system in the city, and all indications are that it will become a well-used mode of transport long after the World Cup has left the country’s shores. Known as the Rea Vaya (“we are going”), the system is one of the many transport and infrastructure projects that was accelerated for the kick-off of the 2010 Fifa World Cup™, and during the tournament it has been one of the largest carriers of fans to and from matches in the city. “The BRT is currently transporting around 30 percent of the fans to both Ellis Park and Soccer City,” said Sibongile Khumalo, Johannesburg host city coordinator for the World Cup. “We have received a positive response from the public and the uptake has been very good,” said Khumalo. “The BRT system takes fans straight to the stadiums, and the easy access and usage has made it very popular with fans.” The Rea Vaya transports fans to Soccer City in around 10 minutes from the Westgate station in the Johannesburg CBD, and under 15 minutes from the Thokoza Park station in Soweto. “The BRT saves people time, they can beat traffic as the system reliable and quick,” said Khumalo. Based on the Brazilian Curitiba, which was the first BRT system developed in the world, the Rea Vaya utilises specialised vehicles, dedicated bus lanes, easy access stations and reliable scheduling. The BRT system is a growing project, with new routes being planned for other parts of the city, ensuring that public transport in Johannesburg will continue to benefit more people once the World Cup concludes. “We plan to increase the network after the World Cup,” said Khumalo. “This is a system that will change the way people travel around the city. Already, 20 000 Johannesburg residents use the system daily, from home to work and back again.” For Khumalo, the publicity around the Rea Vaya system during the tournament has raised public awareness and understanding among South Africans. “The BRT was fairly new before the tournament. Using the buses on the way to matches means that new customers are being created every day, and these people will start using the system as part of their daily transport.” As fans arrived in Soccer City for the clash between Ghana and Germany on Wednesday night, commuters were impressed. “The buses are great, comfortable and fast,” said Koketso Baloyi. “It is great to finally have a system like this in South Africa. With the Gautrain and Rea Vaya, the travel around Johannesburg will change for good,” he said, referring to the recently completed Gautrain rapid rail link between the Johannesburg suburb of Sandton and OR Tambo International Airport. Isaiah Malatji first used the Rea Vaya on his way to the opening match at Soccer City between South Africa and Mexico. “It is really amazing and has done us proud, I’ve caught it to a few games now and in conversation with other commuters we can only sing its praises,” said Malatji. “I will definitely be using the buses regularly. Before this I relied on my car, but this will change for me after the World Cup. It is a great gift for our young nation having first-class infrastructure, and it makes us proud to be from Johannesburg. We will gain much from this World Cup.” Source: 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa Organising Committeelast_img read more

15 Awesome #Geocaching15 Photos from the Geocaching Road Trip ’15

first_imgLoading… SharePrint RelatedChronicle Your Road Trip with #Geocaching15 Photos!June 4, 2015In “15 Years”Ain’t no Mountain High Enough… for Geocachers – The Photo AlbumJune 14, 2015In “15 Years”A Geocaching Life in Pictures – Farogdatter – Celebrating 15 Years of Geocaching in 15 PicturesMay 28, 2015In “Community” Share with your Friends:Morelast_img

NBA legend Julius Erving defends LeBron James’ NBA Finals record

first_img“Dr. J” Julius Erving (left) with fellow NBA legends Oscar Robinson and Bill Russell  (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)Despite taking part in the National Basketball Association’s (NBA) last six Finals—with eight total appearances overall—LeBron James has drawn flak for his subpar 3-wins-and-5-losses championship record.Although his individual greatness on the court cannot be questioned, the NBA’s premier superstar remains hounded by pundits questioning his presumed lack of success on the league’s grandest stage.ADVERTISEMENT Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet “So, 3-5 doesn’t mean anything. I’m more impressed with eight Finals than I am with the record in the Finals,” he said.“If he was 0-for-8 in Finals, that would still be an amazing achievement. That’s like going to eight Super Bowls.”  Khristian Ibarrola /raSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next NCAA: Letran scrapes past EAC for first win Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Makabayan bloc defends protesting workers, tells Año to ‘shut up’ PLAY LIST 02:11Makabayan bloc defends protesting workers, tells Año to ‘shut up’00:50Trending Articles01:50Palace defends Duterte’s absences from Asean events02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ MOST READ LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ View comments National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Having won titles in both the NBA and ABA (American Basketball Association), Julius Erving put in his two cents on James’ record and what it means for his legacy.The retired legend, best known as “Dr. J,” who experienced several Finals setbacks of his own as a member of the Philadelphia 76ers, said that LeBron’s past shortcomings do not entirely fall on his shoulders.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“The game is a team sport, so individuals don’t win championships. Teams win championships,” he told FS1’s Undisputed. “You’re only as good as the team can take you. You can only go as far as the team can take you.”Knowing first-hand how hard it is to contend for a championship on a consistent basis, the NBA Hall of Famer also lauded James’ efforts throughout his storied career.last_img read more

Old vs. New Marketing Haiku

first_imgAnd the winner of the haiku challenge is…Lorraine. Not only is she good, she’s prolific. I loved them all, but she takes the cake (book, actually). Here’s my favorite from her body of work:Old Marketing HaikuSuch a big, loud adCosts your client a fortuneWith no ROI.New Marketing HaikuWant to sell your stuff?Stop shouting at your buyers.Try conversation.Lorraine, email me your address for your free copy of Robin Hood Marketing!last_img

Examples of the Good and the Bad in Online Fundraising Appeals

first_imgYou can almost see the line over to Katya ‘89, who is marketing for good. Open it up and it says, “Haverfordians make a difference in the world through their support.” And it asks me to support the education of people like them. It’s about me, people I can help, and the difference we all make. I love this appeal because it connects to the reader literally and emotionally. It’s like looking in the mirror and seeing a reflection of myself – and my aspirations.What’s good: focusing on the donor. What’s bad: focusing on yourself. It doesn’t feel good to look at something that should reflect you and not see yourself. My alma mater, Haverford College, earlier this year sent me a bad email appeal. I lamented this poorly led, “all about us” missive. Here’s what it said:January 1 is New Year’s Day, according to the Gregorian calendar. Sometime between January 21 and February 21 is the Chinese New Year, also known as the Lunar New Year. Many cultures celebrate the New Year on the day of the vernal equinox, which is also when the ancient Babylonians used to celebrate it. April is the month of the Nepali, Thai, and Cambodian New Year’s celebrations, among others. And at Haverford, when the calendar hits July 1, it is the new fiscal year!The last fiscal year was one of unprecedented success for the Haverford Fund, with 52% of our generous and loyal alumni contributing $4.2 million dollars!The 2007-2008 fiscal year promises to be an exciting year on campus, with the arrival and inauguration of Steve Emerson ‘74 as president. We hope to show him how committed the alumni body is to the current life of the College by sustaining and improving upon last year’s great success by increasing our participation to 53%!Why do I care about these dates, the fiscal year or the development department? What does this have to do with me? I looked at this appeal and I did not see myself. I did not recognize the do-gooder, warm institution I remember.Later in the year, Haverford sent me a fantastic mailed appeal this week that is gold-standard marketing. I looked at this and I saw myself; literally.last_img read more