Conserving Congo’s wild places on a shoestring

first_imgThe park operates on a budget so small they can hardly afford to patrol the 76,000 hectares (188,000 acres) of mangroves, waterways, beach and ocean.Though the beach and savannah portions of the park are partially protected areas, a handful of communities have continuously lived there since long before the park’s creation.Park officials and rangers face the difficult task of protecting the vast area with just a handful of rangers and are up against generations of ingrained practices by residents, such as poaching turtles and their eggs. Muanda, Democratic Republic of Congo – Two elephant tusks are wedged behind a photocopier. A stuffed antelope stands by the door and a large framed photograph of President Joseph Kabila hangs on the back wall. Cosma Wilungula sits behind his desk in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s capital, patiently explaining his quandary.For 12 years he’s run the Congolese Institute for the Conservation of Nature (ICCN), the government agency responsible for the country’s protected areas. He knows only too well the limits of his influence.The truth is that the ICCN’s nearly 70 national parks, nature reserves and other protected areas — covering 25 million hectares or roughly 10 percent of the country’s landmass — are largely left to fend for themselves. Some rise to the challenge, while others don’t fare as well.The Mangrove Marine Park, 250 miles west of Kinshasa, is one of the ICCN’s sites trying to make the best of the unpromising hand it’s been dealt. The 76,000-hectare (around 188,000 acres) expanse of ocean, beach, savannah and mangroves hugs Congo’s 23-mile strip of coastline and the home strait of its eponymous river.Here, at the mouth of the Congo River, this waterway of monstrous dimensions concludes its epic passage across equatorial Africa and, raging at its denouement, has carved a 100-mile-long canyon into the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. In the aquatic forest which nestles into the Congolese side of the estuary, however, none of the ferocity is detectable. This riverine labyrinth of dense mangroves and little islands is utterly still, a haven to a variety of species, including manatees, and a bulwark against the coastal erosion wrought by the natural violence beyond.Map of the Marine Park in DRC. Courtesy of WWF.A complex historyIn theory no one should live inside the 20,000 hectares of mangroves, hardy trees which thrive in brackish wetlands and rise above the water on stilt-like roots, but funds envisaged for a resettlement program never materialized. A quarter of a century after the park was created, the forest continues to be home to seven villages and several semi-nomadic island-hopping communities.Strictly speaking, all flora and fauna is off limits within the park’s boundaries, but inhabitants are allowed to catch shrimp and oysters, both of which are abundant, and some forms of sustainable fishing are accommodated. Felling trees to make charcoal or firewood and hunting animals such as monkeys and buffalo is illegal.Marcel Collet, the park’s director since 2012, is a Belgian who has lived in Congo his entire life. Born into a family of coffee growers shortly before the end of colonial rule, he has spent more than three decades working with the country’s wildlife.The park currently operates on a shoestring annual budget of between $100,000 and $150,000, the bulk of which comes from donations.Marcel Collet discusses turtle conservation with local schoolchildren. Photo by Kris Pannecoucke/www.krispannecoucke.com.“The only thing the ICCN funds is the salaries of some of my full time staff,” Collet says, adding that these wages are “very small.” (The park has 21 permanent employees, including 12 rangers who are each paid about $45 a month). He knows exactly what he would do if he had the money to hire and equip enough rangers, who are usually men: “I’d make 20 to 30 permanent patrol posts in key places and we’d do multiple patrols in the forest every day.”As matters stand, he has the means for a single team which tours the mangroves once every two or three days.A delicate balanceThe beach and savannah sections of the park, partially protected areas in which existing communities are permitted to live, are even more exposed. The park’s guardians are continually trying to impress upon its residents the enduring advantages of conservation, but the marshy savannah is effectively free from surveillance all year round.Those wishing to poach buffalo and antelope or use the land for commercial agriculture can do so with near impunity. The Congo’s shoreline is also an important nesting site for several vulnerable species of sea turtles, including the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), the world’s largest living turtle. Collet can barely afford to put part-time rangers on the beaches during mating season. This year, due to financial constraints, he had to cut the program from five to three months meaning that turtle eggs will have been lost to high tides and lawbreakers.Park rangers pose with a turtle on the beach in the Mangrove Marine Park. Photo courtesy of Mangrove Marine Park.Despite the challenges, there has been progress. Upon his arrival five years ago, Collet decided to enforce the previously ignored law criminalizing the killing of turtles within the park and introduced the seasonal initiative which protects laying females and their eggs. Poaching has been cut dramatically, the courts have given wrongdoers heavy fines and recently even a custodial sentence, and more than 60,000 baby turtles have been freed into the ocean, according to Collet.He has also made headway in the mangroves against hunting and the scourge of deforestation. The density of mangrove wood makes it is a highly prized source of firewood and charcoal, indispensable for a population largely without access to electricity.“Everyone prefers to make charcoal from the mangroves because one can use a very small amount to prepare two or three cooking pots,” says Louis Ngeri Mpayi, the park’s anti-poaching chief. Ngeri Mpayi and his rangers have destroyed more than 2,000 homemade charcoal furnaces in the park since 2012, sometimes dismantling up to 20 during a single patrol.The mangrove forest and the turtle population might be faring better, though there is no official data available, but these improvements have come at the price of some degree of local resentment. Communities inside and outside the park are poor and the majority lack salaried jobs, living off their wits day-to-day.Accurate statistics are hard to come by in Congo but in recent years separate reports by the International Monetary Fund and the African Development Bank have put the country’s unemployment rate among the economically active population at 43 percent and 73 percent respectively. The dearth of available work and the rising cost of basic goods feature prominently in most conversations on the Congolese coast. The application of rules which used to exist only notionally has made hard lives that much trickier.last_img read more

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Conservation comics to the rescue

first_imgComics are great for sharing conservation science with people of all ages in new ways.Kids and teachers can print these comics out and fold them into a mini comic book.The researchers and topics shown in these comics are real. Comics have a way of rendering the seemingly mundane aspects of important events and pursuits, like conservation, as something verging on heroic. Or perhaps it just makes them more relatable and happening to real people (and creatures) in real time, but the idea of rescuing or otherwise helping animals certainly takes a page from the superhero tradition.Evan Keeling makes such comics, and has been working at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. for 12 years doing exhibit production, and concurrently self-publishing comics. The current comic work he’s doing started in late 2015 when he worked with the American History Museum on a project about the Japanese American incarceration during World War II, and he has since done comics and programs with the National Portrait Gallery and the Asian Pacific American Center.AN INTERVIEW WITH EVAN KEELINGErik Hoffner for Mongabay: What spurred you to create these comics about conservation field work I saw at the Smithsonian’s recent Earth Optimism Summit?Evan Keeling: Erin Chapman, one of the organizers of the Earth Optimism Summit, saw the (Japanese American incarceration) comics and was interested in seeing how something similar could be fit into the event. We met and talked over some different ideas and ultimately settled upon me doing three comics and the open workshop with other comic artists during the summit. The comic artists (including me) all went to panels at the summit and took notes to make comics live at the summit as well. I think they were largely looking for new ways to engage people with conservation issues.Detail of Keeling’s “Treetop Bridges over a Pipeline”Mongabay: Is graphic art like this better at explaining certain things or reaching a particular audience?Evan Keeling: The great thing I have found with comics is that there are all sorts of different elements to draw people in. A large book on a complex or difficult subject will generally only be picked up by a person who is already interested in the subject. With a comic, you have people who are drawn to it by the art, who like comics, who want to check out something new as well as people who are interested in the subject. The small size of the comics that I create is also good for drawing people in, they are small and provide an easily digestible portion of a larger subject. That will pique interest as well as give you a nice dose of information quickly.I don’t know if I should say it is better, because I am fairly biased. But I do think that comics make it very accessible.Detail of Keeling’s “Humpback Highway” comic.Mongabay: Can you describe the process of creating these comics?Evan Keeling: Smithsonian Conservation Commons selected three different conservation stories they wanted me to focus on. For my first step, I read articles provided me and contacted the principals for each of the projects. I did a few in-person interviews and was provided with a large array of materials about the different projects from articles to power point presentations to research papers. Using the interviews as a guide I distilled the information down to a short script for the 8-page comic.Sometimes I ink and color the comics by hand but I have found that working digitally gives me the most freedom to adjust things when working on a quick turnaround. I use the scanned-in pencils to digitally ink and paint the pages. I use a lot of layers so that I can adjust different elements easily. When the coloring is done all the pages are assembled and sent back out for a final round of edits.Mongabay: Who are these researchers that star in the “Treetop” and “Humpback” comics?Detail of Keeling’s “Treetop Bridges over a Pipeline”Evan Keeling: There were a number of people from different departments that I work on theses comics with but for ‘Treetop Bridges over a Pipeline,” Tremaine Gregory, a Conservation Biologist with the National Zoo Center for Conservation and Sustainability, (and for) “Humpback Highway,” Hector Guzman, a Research Biologist with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.Mongabay: Parents, kids and teachers are invited to print out and fold these to make a mini-comic book for the classroom or home? Are they available in Spanish too? Yes! These are planned as a free resource that anyone can download and print. A big drive behind utilizing the format of an 8-page zine made out of a single piece of copy paper is the ease of distribution. Anyone can print them and with a little instruction can fold them without having to be concerned about page order or stapling the pages together. I want people to print them out as much as they like, share the link and share the comics. The Earth Optimism comics can all be found here, this includes a few different file types and all three of them are in Spanish.All of the comics I have created so far for the Smithsonian can be found here.And anyone can make their own, using the templates you created?Anyone can do it with any size piece of paper once you work out the folding technique. My template is designed to make it a little quicker to get started especially during a workshop or class activity. The hope is that people will enjoy making the comics enough (that) they will branch out and make their own layouts.Detail of Keeling’s “Humpback Highway” Article published by Erik Hoffner Arts, Conservation, Education, Environmental Education, Interviews center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Measuring fish abundance through acoustics: spawning aggregations are key to improving fishery management plans

first_imgArticle published by dbettermann Despite the threat of overfishing in many fish populations, fisheries managers often lack accurate plans and quota systems to allow a sustainable harvest.Traditional methods of estimating fish populations can be costly, intrusive and laborious, so a team of researchers tested the use of acoustics to survey the Gulf corvina fish.The researchers found that deploying passive acoustic detection devices near spawning aggregations was a cost-effective and easy-to-use method of estimating abundance through data collected on the fishes’ vocalizations. Just as humans and many terrestrial animals do, marine creatures use sound for communication in breeding, feeding, social structure maintenance and survival.However, the sounds produced by marine species have also put them at risk of capture by commercial fisheries.Scientists have recognized over 100 families of marine fish that produce sound. Many fish species produce species-specific calls while mating, and the populations aggregate during spawning events. Aggregations enhance the sound’s volume. Fishers use listening devices to detect the sounds produced by the masses of fish to pinpoint the fishes’ location, making it easier to catch large numbers.Doctoral student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Timothy Rowell and his colleagues within the Marine Biology Research division published a study in June 2017 in which they adapted the way that the sounds were used. Rather than exploiting the population by catching the aggregated fish, they located the fish spawning aggregations (FSAs) to measure the abundance for conversation purposes.“As a group, we feel that researchers and managers need to greatly improve our understanding of the complex life histories of fishes and develop better, more efficient ways to monitor their presence and abundances,” Rowell said in an interview with Mongabay-Wildtech.Harvested Gulf corvina fish are loaded off a fishing boat. Photo credit: the Gulf Corvina Marine Program.The team studied the Gulf corvina (Cynoscion othonopterus) fishery in the Colorado River Delta in the northern region of the Gulf of California, which harvests the species during its spawning aggregations.According to Rowell, the specialized sounds produced by corvinas aided their exploitation by fishers, who locate the spawning events prior to deploying their nets.“So we said, let’s do that too; let’s listen for the fish and try to map their reproductive habitat and estimate their abundances,” Rowell said. “We sought to see if louder regions actually have more fish and if there was a way to quantitatively estimate their abundances from just sound levels.”Pros and cons of measuring abundance using acousticsTo manage stocks, fisheries managers establish quota systems according to independent data that estimate stock abundance and catch levels for the spawning season. Some of the fisheries’ data collection methods, such as mark-recapture, visual census and trawls, can be ineffective as well as costly, invasive and laborious.It is difficult to accurately measure fish abundance and set quotas for entire populations for several reasons. FSAs minimize several complications in measuring the abundance of fish because they happen at predictable times and locations. The researchers measured the abundance of corvina in the FSAs and developed a model to quantify relationships between the spawning sound levels and fish densities.Using acoustic devices can benefit both the fisheries management and the fish because they are noninvasive yet can survey fish in both shallow and deep waters with a range of visibilities.An illustrated demonstration on how an echosounder works when a boat emits sonar beams within a body of water. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons.Active acoustics, which the researchers measured using an echosounder, are essentially sonar beams that, when emitted from boats, bounce back after encountering an object. Larger fisheries often already use and trust active acoustic methods for collecting data on fish stocks. Smaller-scale fisheries have not yet picked up the method because of the cost and complexity of the collecting and processing data.The sound produced by FSAs also allows fishers to use passive acoustics to identify the timing and location of spawning. Passive acoustic devices listen for sounds underwater at specific frequencies, and the researchers used one type, a hydrophone or underwater microphone, to test whether fisheries could use passive acoustics to measure sound production and infer the fish abundance.“The use of passive acoustics to survey fish populations would be an easily transferrable method to pass onto local resource managers for long-term use, allowing them to estimate fish numbers in near-real time,” Rowell said.Fishermen lower a hydrophone into the Atlantic Ocean. Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons.The research team hypothesized that comparing measures of fish density and sound levels would result in a linear increase (i.e., larger numbers of fish produce greater sound energy) and that a strong relationship exists between the two.Do more fish vocalizations reflect more fish?Generally, assessing the corvina specifically using fisheries-independent methods presents its own problems when using fisheries-independent methods because these fish tend to aggregate in shallow waters with low visibility and extensive tidal ranges. These conditions make visual surveys difficult to complete and the more intrusive methods, such as trawling and mark-recapture, more appealing to fisheries management.According to the researchers, however, Gulf corvinas were the ideal fish species to study because they are croaker fish, which produce unique sounds during FSAs. Their species-specific sounds simplify the process of developing and testing relationships between the calls detected and the fish density measurements.  To better estimate corvina abundance, the researchers looked to establish acoustic methods that are more reliable and widely available. Rates of harvesting the species are high, even though stock sizes are relatively unknown and the management plan and quota system underdeveloped.The researchers focused their studies on the two days of peak spawning during FSA events, which take place two to three days before new and full moons. During these times, the team surveyed corvina populations using both active and passive acoustics twice a day, on the outgoing and incoming tides.A boat carries three researchers into the Gulf of California to survey the Gulf corvina populations. Photo credit: the Gulf of California Marine Program.Using active acoustics, the scientists conducted eight surveys to measure the density, length, abundance, biomass and spatial distribution of the fish during FSAs. The team used an echosounder that emits an acoustic beam into the water and bounces back echoed signals when the beam encounters objects.They recorded the ambient sound at several specific locations along each 300-meter transect and identified corvina sounds while removing environmental “noise” by visually examining the resulting echogram images.They used passive acoustics to measure the spatial distribution of the sound levels attributed to the fish sound production. A separate boat collected the data measurements using a portable hydrophone, an underwater microphone that records all the sounds in the sample area. The researchers then compared the results of passive sound collection with those of the active acoustics to model the relationship between measurements of density and sound production.Toward a more sustainable corvina harvest The croaker fisheries bring in tens of billions of U.S. dollars every year, in part because they are relatively easy for fishers to detect. However, overfishing threatens these revenue-generating fish.“Unfortunately, it has come apparent that a large proportion of fish populations are being harvested at unsustainable levels across the world,” Rowell said, “Thus, it is the responsibility of fisheries researchers and managers to gather more information about the health of fish populations and adjust current practices.”The team conducted active and passive acoustic surveys to measure the abundance of the Gulf corvina, and the results showed that both can offer information to the fishery managers.“…This improved knowledge and addition of multiple assessment methods will facilitate better informed management decisions that protect fish populations and the livelihoods of fishers by establishing sustainable harvest levels,” Rowell said.A group of fishermen gather around an area where a fish spawning aggregation (FSA) is occuring in the Gulf of California. Photo credit: the Gulf of California Marine Program.In the study, the active acoustic methods could accurately and non-invasively measure fish density, abundance and biomass. When measuring sound levels of the FSAs using passive acoustics, the research team found that their model accurately predicted fish density, demonstrating that the passive acoustics can provide the fisheries with a new method to independently assess FSAs.Active acoustic monitoring is a more costly and complex method for estimating fish abundance. This research suggests that cost-effective passive acoustics could be employed by small-scale fisheries to assess entire spawning grounds over a longer period of time, across several FSAs.“The continuation, improvement, and expansion of these methods across multiple species will validate passive acoustics as a frontier tool for the management and conservation of fish populations,” the study said.The research team is using their results to help the Gulf corvina fishery by sharing their methods with the communities that work with the corvina and holding training sessions on how to use the technology and apply it to other species.Banner image is of a fisherman tossing a Gulf corvina fish across his boat. Photo credit: the Gulf of California Marine Program.CitationsRadford, A.N., Kerridge, E., and Simpson, S.D. (2014). Acoustic communication in a noisy world: can fish compete with anthropogenic noise? Behavioral Ecology, 25 (5), 1022–1030.Rowell, T.J., Demer, D.A., Aburto-Oropeza, O, Cota-Nieto, J.J., Hyde, J.R., and Erisman, B.E. (2016). Estimating fish abundance at spawning aggregations from courtship sound levels. Scientific Reports, 7 (3340). Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Acoustic, Analysis, Communication, Conservation, data, Marine, Technology, Wildtech last_img read more

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Estonia’s trees: Valued resource or squandered second chance?

first_imgSoviet rule in the early 20th century led to the regrowth of many of the country’s forests. Today, Estonia is Europe’s fourth-most forested country.As private land ownership and industry expand in the country, however, so are the pressures to log.Estonia’s Ministry of Environment claims that Estonia’s forests are currently expanding in size, but conservation scientists say the opposite is true. Satellite data indicate the country gained 90,000 hectares of tree cover while losing 285,000.Local conservation organizations are pressing the government to adopt more sustainable practices, including a ban on logging during part of the year and the cessation of a new logging amendment that would lower the felling age of spruce trees. When the last of the Russian troops pulled out of Estonia in 1994, for many their departure was bittersweet. While most Estonians were eager to join the Western world and reestablish cultural ties with Finland and other Nordic countries, the country’s transition from communism to capitalism was hindered by poverty, cultural barriers, and dilapidated infrastructure. Today, however, Estonia appears to be coming into its own. The country has joined the EU, ranks 30th in the world on the Human Development Index, and has one of the fastest-growing economies in Europe.Estonia now has the autonomy to decide how it is going to allocate its resources, and how it wants to shape its identity on the international stage. Central to this decision is one notable parting gift left by the country’s Soviet occupiers: trees.A protected old-growth forest in Estonia. According to Global Forest Watch, 3 percent of the country’s forests are primary forests like this one. Photo by Asko Lõhmus.Trees are “one of the few positive things inherited from the age of Soviet domination,” said Linda-Mari Väli, founder of Helping Estonia’s Forests, a conservation-oriented citizens’ initiative. While Estonia is historically a tree-dense country, by the early 20th century much of its forestland had been converted to farms. Under Soviet rule, however, private landownership, and private farms, were abandoned for large collectives. By the time Estonia gained independence, the forest had reclaimed much of its former territory.The country now has over 50 percent tree cover, according to satellite data from the University of Maryland analyzed through Global Forest Watch. Of its forests, assessments by the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) pegs 90 percent as “naturally regenerated” and 3 percent old-growth. It is the fourth most forested country in Europe, and ranks eighth on the 2016 Environmental Performance Index.Satellite data from the University of Maryland indicate Estonia lost around 285,000 hectares of tree cover between 2001 and 2015. 2011 saw the most loss of any year during that period, with 2015 close behind.As private land ownership and industry expand in the country, however, so do the pressures to log. Estonia’s choices now appear poised affect the future of the country’s forests. Can a country that reforested largely through neglect now use this accidental opportunity to build a purposeful, forward-looking sustainable forest management model? Or will it follow in the footsteps of other post-Soviet countries currently systematically destroying their forests for short-term economic gain?Mongabay spoke to local scientists and representatives from local organizations and government agencies, finding a country still battling some communist cultural hangovers but eager to look forward and embrace the concept of sustainability. While everyone with an interest in Estonia’s forests appears to embrace the word, opinions differ as to what it means, and what goals Estonia should ultimately be striving for.Environmental activism has played an important role in Estonia’s political history. The Estonian Green Movement, established in 1988 to protest Soviet phosphorite mining, was one of the strongest opposition forces against the country’s occupiers. Its ultimate, highly ambitious goal went far beyond that single environmental issue – the Movement called for independence from the Soviet Union and establishment of the Green Republic of Estonia, a non-hierarchal country that promoted environmentally sound technology and lifestyles, preservation of wild places, and reasonable resource usage.This vision was lost once Estonia did gain independence, as the country struggled through the hardship of reintegrating with the Western world. Protest of any kind, in fact, disappeared during the 90s and early 2000s. In a 2002 survey, over half of Estonians said they would not take part in a collective protest, and over 40 percent said they had no interest in volunteering. Fear of the government—a holdover from the communist era—lingered, and advocacy waned.Last year, Linda-Mari Väli founded Helping Estonia’s Forests. Since then, the little initiative has made a name for itself as one of the more successful activist group since the country’s independence. Helping Estonia’s Forests hopes to bring the idea of a country built on sustainable values back into the public consciousness.Although a young initiative in a country where any form of public protest is unusual, its efforts have been met with growing support. While one protest—against a military building expanding its border into a future conservation area—was carried out by a grand total of four people, there are signs that the idea of public protest is gaining momentum. In the middle of a harsh Estonian winter last December, hundreds turned out with Helping Estonia’s Forests to protest a logging amendment that would lower the felling age of spruce trees.Martin Luiga, a member of Helping Estonia’s Forests, said that their success is built on reclaiming the idea of public protest. “The whole concept of civil disobedience is rather new to Estonia,” he said in an email. Protest, and picketing, is still considered a “Western-style tactic.”Thus far, the movement’s primary achievement has been momentum, but some concrete actions have come out of its protests. They helped pressure the government to sign a flying squirrel defense program, and won full protection for an additional 1 percent of state forests. Their primary objective now is a decline in national deforestation rates and the establishment of green corridors to link protected areas. According to founder Väli, the ultimate goal of the initiative is to achieve representation for uses of the country’s forests in addition to logging (such as tourism, berry-picking, and wildlife conservation) “without discrimination.”A protest held on December 16, 2016 against an amendment lowering the legal felling age of spruce trees. Photo by Lea Tammik.Rural residents protested, concerned about clear-cutting occurring near their homes. Photo by Lea Tammik. Asko Lõhmus, lead research fellow of conservation biology at the University of Tartu, explained that Estonia is in many ways managing its forests better than other nearby countries. According to Lõhmus, Estonia allows more natural regeneration after clear cutting, leaves more dead wood, and has a good network of protected forest. However, he said that because of the chance it was given upon gaining independence, the country has—or had—the opportunity to do much more.“I think there was an excellent opportunity in the 1990s for Estonia to become a global innovator of sustainable forest management. Despite many people having worked toward it, I am afraid we are losing this hope now … recent trends are drifting us away from the sustainable and multi-purpose forestry course,” Lõhmus said.Satellite data from the University of Maryland backs up this statement: Estonia lost more trees in 2015 than it had in the previous 15 years, with the exception of 2011. In total, the country lost around 285,000 hectares of tree cover cover between 2001 and 2015 while gaining 90,000 hectares.Estonia’s Ministry of Environment and Private Landowner’s Association, however, both appear to think that current forest policy is fully in line with the idea of sustainable management.“The main objective of our National Forest Programme 2020 is to ensure the viability and productivity as well as diverse and efficient use of forests,” said Marku Lamp, Deputy Secretary General for Wildlife in Estonia’s Ministry of Environment. He described current forest usage as “well balanced,” with 12 percent of Estonia’s forests under strict protection and about 75 percent managed for commercial purposes. Lamp and Lõhmus both cited retention trees (mature trees required by law to be left in clear-cut areas to facilitate healthy re-growth) as an example of a good management practice in Estonia.However, while the Ministry of Environment claims that Estonia’s forests are currently expanding in size, Lõhmus said his research indicates that Estonia is losing forest—a conclusion more in line with Global Forest Watch satellite data.An example of a clear-cut forest with “retention trees.” The largest trees are kept standing to facilitate regeneration. All clear-cut areas are required by law to be replanted within two years. Photo by Asko Lõhmus.  Trees are an integral part of the country’s economic and cultural exchange with its northern neighbors. Both Luiga and Lõhmus believe that Estonia would benefit from better, more transparent data on the state of its forests.“The competitiveness of the timber industry is extremely important for the Estonian economy,” Lamp said. He then, however, went on to highlight how Estonia abides by the “Nordic principle of free access to nature,” allowing berry-picking and the gathering of mushrooms and medicinal plants. Access to, and exploitation of, Estonia’s forests are both part of its modern ethos, but one requires the careful monitoring of the other. But only half of Estonia’s forests are under government control; the other half are privately owned.To this end, Mikk Link, the chairman of the board for the Estonian Private Forest Union, said that his organization’s primary objective is “to ensure our members [a] good environment for sustainable forest management.” Link cited “not exceeding the annual growth of the forests with the logging” and “avoiding forestland being transformed to other types of land use” as criteria for good sustainable management.Luiga from Helping Estonia’s Forests also noted that the Estonian Private Forest Union recently pressured the government not to pass a seasonal ban on logging, designed to protect nesting birds. While scientists, activists, private landowners, and the government all use similar language to describe their goals, the actions of the latter two indicate short-term monetary gain ultimately takes priority—at least right now.The fate of Estonia’s forests, then, appears to rest on its willingness to taking the long view. But for a newly capitalist country, the short-term benefits of intensive logging could prove too alluring to resist.“For almost a year, there has been an unprecedented societal discussion on the state and future of forests in Estonia,” Lõhmus said. “It is unclear how that will end.”Correction (11/09/2017): A previous version of this article incorrectly paraphrased a quote from Mikk Link. We have removed the errant sentence.Citations:Raudsepp, Maaris, Mati Heidmets, and Juri Kruusvall. “Environmental justice and sustainability in post-Soviet Estonia.” Environmental Justice and Sustainability in the Former Soviet Union. MIT Press: Cambridge, Massachusetts (2009): 215-237.Rausing, Sigrid. Everything is Wonderful: Memories of a Collective Farm in Estonia. Grove Press: New York, New York (2014). FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Daviscenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Forests, Law, Logging, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Secondary Forests, Timber Laws, Trees last_img read more

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New flowerpecker species discovered in imperiled lowland forests of Borneo

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Birds, Environment, Forests, Fragmentation, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Islands, New Species, Palm Oil, Research, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation The Spectacled Flowerpecker wasn’t entirely unknown up until now. Scientists and birdwatchers have spotted the small, gray bird in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo in the past, with the first sighting appearing to have occurred in Sabah, Malaysia’s Danum Valley in 2009.A team led by scientists at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. collected a specimen and studied the species for the first time earlier this year. The researchers formally described the Spectacled Flowerpecker to science in a study published in the journal Zootaxa yesterday.The researchers say that it’s likely the bird’s current distribution has “become increasingly fragmented and diminished” thanks to human impacts on Borneo’s forests. They hope that by formally describing the new species of flowerpecker, they can help call attention to the importance of Borneo’s lowland forests. There’s a new species of fruit-eating bird in Borneo that is now known as the Spectacled Flowerpecker.The species wasn’t entirely unknown up until now. Scientists and birdwatchers have spotted the small, gray bird in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo in the past, with the first sighting appearing to have occurred in Sabah, Malaysia’s Danum Valley in 2009. But a team led by scientists at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.  collected a specimen and studied the species for the first time. The researchers formally described the Spectacled Flowerpecker to science in a study published in the journal Zootaxa yesterday.There are close to 50 species in the flowerpecker family spread throughout tropical southern Asia, Australia, and neighboring islands. Borneo is home to 13 of the currently known and accepted flowerpecker species; only the island of Sumatra and the Philippines harbor more flowerpeckers, with 16 species and 15 species, respectively.Despite living in close proximity to so many of its cousins, molecular analysis shows that the Spectacled Flowerpecker isn’t closely related to any other known flowerpecker species, according to Christopher Milensky, the collections manager for the National Museum of Natural History’s Division of Birds who led the survey during which the discovery of the new species occurred.“This bird is totally unique,” Milensky said in a statement. “It’s unlike anything else, and it is the latest example of the rich biodiversity that can be found in this region.”A scientific illustration of the Spectacled Woodpecker eating mistletoe. Illustration by John Anderton.When it was first photographed by a group of birders in 2009, the new bird’s stout body shape and short bill immediately suggested it was a flowerpecker, but the white markings above and below its eyes, which give the bird its distinctive “spectacled” look, didn’t match up with any known flowerpecker species.The bird was sporadically observed in the wild over the next decade. No scientists got their hands on a specimen to study until earlier this year, when Milensky and Jacob Saucier, a specialist at the Smithsonian museum and the lead author of the study describing the new species, discovered the bird in the Lanjak Entimau Wildlife Sanctuary, a wildlife preserve in southwestern Borneo several miles from any previously reported sighting of the species.Milensky and Saucier took their unexpected discovery back to the museum in order to analyze its external features and DNA. The genetic analysis revealed yet another surprising find: the bird that was immediately tagged as a flowerpecker isn’t terribly similar to its closest relatives. “It isn’t related to any of the other flowerpeckers all that closely,” Saucier said. “It’s a whole new species that distinctly stands out.”The Spectacled Flowerpecker had been seen eating mistletoe, a parasitic plant that grows high in the forest canopy and is a staple of many flowerpecker diets. Saucier and the research team used DNA analysis and inspected seeds found in the bird’s digestive tract to determine exactly which type of mistletoe the bird prefers, affording new insight into the bird’s ecological needs and habitat preferences as well as, hopefully, making it easier for people to spot the new species even though it typically sticks to the treetops, Saucier said.He added that, because assistance from local communities was vital in granting the research team access to the wildlife preserve and animals for study, they gave the Spectacled Flowerpecker the scientific name Dicaeum dayakorum in honor of the Dayak native people of Borneo. “Their immense knowledge of the flora and fauna of their homeland forests is irreplaceable and crucial to future conservation efforts of Borneo’s endemic ecosystems,” Saucier and his co-authors write in the study.The expedition team preparing to set out on boats with local Iban guides who helped the Smithsonian team of researchers explore Borneo’s forest. Photo Credit: Holt Thrasher.Based on the many locations across the island of Borneo where the species has been observed, the researchers believe the new flowerpecker could be widespread. “We think that wherever primary forest and mistletoe occur, there’s a good chance this bird could be there,” Saucier said.But given how little we know about the distribution of the species, habitat fragmentation and disturbance “should not be underestimated” as threats to the birds, Saucier and team write. The researchers also note, however, that the fact that the species was discovered in Lanjak Entimau Wildlife Sanctuary “is a reason to be hopeful… We see no reason why D. dayakorum would not occur throughout the sanctuary’s pristine forests, or the contiguous Batang Ai National Park to the south.”Still, the researchers say that it’s likely the bird’s current distribution has “become increasingly fragmented and diminished” thanks to human impacts on Borneo’s forests. Saucier and team hope that by formally describing the new species of flowerpecker, they can help call attention to the importance of Borneo’s lowland forests.“Lowland forests such as this are the heart of Borneo’s ecosystems,” they write in the study. “Sadly, these sanctuaries are under increasing threat with the encroachment of intensive selective logging and unsustainable agricultural practices, including widespread conversion of lowland forest to oil palm. It should also be noted that the indigenous Iban Dayak inhabitants of the region are the primary facilitators of conservation upkeep and protection. The imperilment and continued diminishment of these traditional longhouse communities is an underappreciated threat to the protection of these vital areas.”A photo of the Spectacled Flowerpecker taken in the Lanjak Entimau Wildlife Sanctuary. While scientists and birdwatchers have previously glimpsed the small, gray bird in lowland forests around the island, a Smithsonian team of scientists surveying the birdlife of Borneo is the first to capture and study it, resulting in its formal scientific description as a new species. Photo Credit: C. M. Milensky.CITATION• Saucier, J.R., Milensky, C.M., Caraballo-Ortiz, M.A., Ragai, R., Dahlan, F.N., & Edwards, D.P. (2019). A distinctive new species of flowerpecker (Passeriformes: Dicaeidae) from Borneo. Zootaxa. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4686.4.1center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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PSG : Léonardo, la meilleure recrue de l’été ?

first_img“Il a remis de l’ordre”“Il a remis de l’ordre, en replaçant au centre le club et non les joueurs. Il était temps qu’il revienne. Il va apporter un peu d’humilité”, a salué Michel Denisot, son ancien président au PSG à l’époque où il évoluait au Parc des Princes (1996-1997), cité par Le Parisien. “Il existe un côté financier, structurel du mercato qui n’est pas facile pour tout le monde. Je pense que ce sera une saison difficile (…) Ce ne sera pas la saison bling-bling, ‘On va gagner la Ligue des champions’. Non, ce n’est pas comme ça”: la promesse d’un nouveau train de vie modeste n’aura tenu que quelques heures.L’homme qui avait attiré Zlatan Ibrahimovic durant son premier mandat (2011-2013) a renoué avec la magie des débuts en réalisant deux gros coups juste avant la clôture du marché des transferts, malgré les contraintes financières : Navas, le gardien aux trois Ligues des champions, et Icardi, l’attaquant aux 124 buts en 219 matches avec l’Inter Milan. De quoi voir fleurir sur les réseaux sociaux plusieurs photo-montages grimant “Leo” en Napoléon ou Louis XIV du mercato.“Je trouve que le mercato du PSG a été bien fait. Si on part du principe que Neymar reste à son niveau, ils ont amélioré l’équipe. C’est le travail de Leo, qui est beaucoup plus foot, alors qu’Antero Henrique était beaucoup plus business”, confie Bernard Caïazzo, dirigeant de l’AS Saint-Etienne. Seul bémol, la vente massive des talents issus de la formation parisienne, entamée par Antero Henrique (départs de Thiago Motta, coach des U19, suppression de l’équipe réserve, …) qui pose question sur l’avenir des futurs “titis” à Paris. Après Adrien Rabiot (libre à la Juventus Turin), Moussa Diaby (15 M EUR au Bayer Leverkusen), Timothy Weah (10 M EUR à Lille), Christopher Nkunku (13 M EUR au RB Leipzig), “Leo” a laissé partir Stanley Nsoki (12,5 M EUR à Nice), Metehan Güçlü (Rennes), ou encore Arthur Zagre (10 M EUR à Monaco), considéré pourtant comme l’un des talents les plus prometteurs de l’académie parisienne. Même Alphonse Aréola, pourtant champion du monde, a été poussé vers la sortie ! Malgré une nouvelle organisation, portée par le duo Stéphane Roche – Vincent Guérin, le centre de formation aura besoin de nouveaux signaux positifs pour endiguer la fuite des talents. L’un des prochains défis de Leonardo.AFP Partager Et si la meilleure recrue estivale du PSG se trouvait davantage en coulisses que sur le terrain ? De l’épineuse gestion du feuilleton Neymar à l’arrivée sur le gong de Mauro Icardi, Leonardo a mené son premier mercato d’une main de maître pour son retour au poste de directeur sportif.La scène est devenue aussi virale que populaire auprès des supporters parisiens. A la demande de “transparence” d’un journaliste concernant les dernières tractations avec le FC Barcelone pour le transfert de Neymar, le dirigeant brésilien a lâché un rire franc… avant de reprendre le plus tranquillement du monde son point-presse improvisé à Metz vendredi soir (2-0). Le symbole d’une communication maîtrisée de bout en bout dans l’un des dossiers les plus explosifs de l’ère QSI, qui ne l’a pas empêché en parallèle de mettre à profit ses talents de négociateurs pour attirer plusieurs joueurs majeurs comme Keylor Navas et Mauro Icardi.Tout a commencé par deux “coups de bâton” médiatiques — un communiqué de presse pour fustiger le retard à l’entraînement de Neymar, puis un exposé de sa vision au Parisien — pour affirmer la prééminence de “l’institution” PSG sur sa superstar brésilienne. Pour se terminer par des compliments publics, dans l’espoir d’accélérer l’entreprise de réconciliation entre “Ney” et les supporters parisiens. Durant plus de deux mois, “Leo” a joué le jeu de la négociation, répétant qu’il était ouvert au départ du joueur le plus cher de l’histoire au FC Barcelone, uniquement si une proposition venait à satisfaire ses “conditions qui ne sont jamais arrivées”. Dans ce jeu de poker menteur en mondovision, l’élégant polyglotte (49 ans) n’a jamais hésiter à se jeter dans l’arène médiatique pour ne pas laisser les autres parties dicter le tempo. Une omniprésence, qui contraste avec le mandat effacé de son prédécesseur Antero Henrique (2017-2019).last_img read more

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Tennis : Mandy Minella se qualifie pour sa première finale de la saison

first_imgAlors qu’à l’issue de cette semaine, il ne lui restera plus que deux semaines de compétition, Mandy Minella brille sous le soleil du Texas. Elle s’est qualifiée ce samedi pour sa première finale de 2019.Les jours et les résultats se suivent pour une Mandy Minella qui s’est qualifiée ce samedi soir pour la finale du Tournoi ITF 80 000 dollars qu’elle dispute cette semaine à Tyler au Texas.Après avoir remporté deux matches vendredi, l’Eschoise classée 169e mondiale a battu en demi-finale l’Américaine Danielle Lao (28 ans, WTA 190) en deux sets, 6-1 et 7-5. Partager En favorite pour la finaleCe dimanche, Minella s’avancera en favorite pour ce qui est sa première finale de la saison. Elle fera face à l’Américaine Alexa Glatch, 30 ans et seulement 423e mondiale. Mais attention, cette ancienne finaliste de l’US Open juniors (en 2005)  dont la carrière est faite de pas mal de bas mais aussi de quelques moments (très) hauts ne serait plus à un exploit près, elle qui a sorti la tête de série n°1 cette semaine, l’Australienne Astra Sharma (WTA 102) ou l’ancienne 48e mondiale, Shelby Rogers.Julien Carettelast_img read more

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Fed Cup : La France décroche le trophée et parachève la saison des retrouvailles

first_img Partager Au complet, les Françaises ont relevé leur défi du bout du monde en s’offrant la Fed Cup aux dépens de l’Australie de la N.1 mondiale Ashleigh Barty, dimanche à Perth.Les Françaises, à égalité un à un avec les Australiennes à l’issue du premier jour, se sont imposées trois victoires à deux au bout du double décisif, remporté par Kristina Mladenovic et Caroline Garcia face à Barty et à Samantha Stosur (6-4, 6-3). C’est le troisième sacre de la France en Fed Cup, après 1997 et 2003. Le trophée continue en revanche à se refuser à l’Australie de Barty, en pleurs lors de la remise des récompenses.L’Australie est la troisième nation la plus titrée avec sept trophées, mais n’a plus triomphé dans la compétition par équipes depuis 45 ans. Cette victoire arrive dès la première campagne de Julien Benneteau dans le rôle de capitaine et vient récompenser notamment sa capacité à fédérer les joueuses. “Je suis l’homme le plus fier de la planète”, a lancé Julien Benneteau, juste après le match victorieux. Avant son arrivée au capitanat, Caroline Garcia n’avait plus mis les pieds en équipe de France depuis la défaite en finale en 2016 (3-2 contre la République tchèque). Avait suivi une brouille avec ses coéquipières, Mladenovic et Alizé Cornet notamment, après que la meilleure Française d’alors avait décidé de donner la priorité à sa carrière individuelle. Elle avait récolté un triple “LOL” ironique sur les réseaux sociaux quand elle avait déclaré forfait, pour une blessure au dos, avant le match de barrage face à l’Espagne au printemps 2017. “Cela représente beaucoup d’émotion de partager cela avec Caroline”, a déclaré Kristina Mladenovic. Pour sceller définitivement leur réconciliation, les deux joueuses se sont allongées cote à cote sur le court après la balle de match.Mladenovic en pilierA Perth, c’est Kristina Mladenovic qui a porté les Bleues tout au long du week-end de la finale. Au lendemain de sa victoire expéditive contre la N.2 australienne Ajla Tomljanovic (6-1, 6-1), Mladenovic a signé un des exploits les plus retentissants de sa carrière en renversant la N.1 mondiale sur ses terres dimanche matin, au bout de plus de 2h30 min de combat, dans un match à rebondissement. Irrésistible la veille face à Garcia, étouffée (6-0, 6-0) en 56 minutes, Barty est parfaitement entrée dans le match, avec quatre aces dans ses deux premiers jeux de service et un break d’entrée, pour mener 3-0. Mais Mladenovic n’a pas baissé les bras et, après avoir écarté une balle de 5-3 dans le deuxième set, a égalisé à une manche partout.Dans une fin de match à haute tension, Mladenovic a fait céder Barty qui a fini par payer ses 47 fautes directes. Pauline Parmentier (122e), préférée à Garcia pour le quatrième simple, n’a elle jamais vraiment mis en danger Tomljanovic, victorieuse (6-4, 7-5), ce qui a permis à l’Australie de rester en vie dans cette rencontre. Mais comme en demi-finale, l’association Mladenovic-Garcia en double a trouvé les ressources pour aller conquérir le point de la victoire en Fed Cup, dont la formule changera à partir de la saison prochaine. Un scénario du bout du monde qui rappelle le triomphe de leurs homologues masculins en Coupe Davis en 2001. A Melbourne, dans la Rod Laver Arena, les Bleus étaient eux aussi venus à bout de l’Australie et d’un N.1 mondial, en l’occurrence Lleyton Hewitt, sur le même score, trois victoires à deux.AFPlast_img read more

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NCAA men’s volley: Perpetual earns finals berth after elims sweep

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award MOST READ Nonito Donaire vs Naoya Inoue is BWAA 2019 Fight of the Year Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Almazan vows to comeback stronger after finals heartbreak The Altas ended the eliminations undefeated at 9-0 after the 23-25, 25-22, 25-22, 23-25, 15-9 victory and will wait for the stepladder matches between second seed Arellano, third seed San Beda, and the fourth seeded Blazers to determine their finals foe.The 6-3 Blazers and 7-2 Red Spikers will be the first to play with the winner facing the 8-1 Chiefs in the final stepladder match.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkPerpetual head coach Sammy Acaylar said winning the title won’t come down solely to the whoever makes the correct plays, but which team has the attitude to go all the way.“It’s not about the Xs and Os anymore, the championship will be won by the team that is more mentally prepared,” said Acaylar, who is hoping to steer the school to its 11th title. “That is what we need to win this thing again.” OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PCCL Elite Eight beginscenter_img LATEST STORIES OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson View comments Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Newsome sets focus on helping Bolts open new PBA season on right track Michael Porter Jr. stays patient as playing time increases University of Perpetual Help earned itself an automatic slot to championship round after surviving a grueling five-setter against defending champion St. Benilde in the NCAA Season 93 men’s volleyball tournament Tuesday at Filoil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Treasure Hunt is Back

first_imgThe organizing committee of Treasure Hunt, Liberia’s biggest Christian drama competition has revealed that this year’s event will kick off on the last Sunday of this month. A press release signed by the organizing committee said the five Sunday events will bring together drama teams from sixteen churches. The release added that each of the churches will for fifteen minutes dramatize Christian messages that promote Liberian culture.Quoting Vision International Production (VIP) founder Cosme R. Pulano, the release added: “To ensure that this year’s event is better than last year’s, some participating churches were trained in story development, drama scriptwriting, acting and or stage performance.“Now that the churches have been trained along with other strategies put in place to make this year great, VIP’s overall goal of turning churches’ drama teams into motion picture houses will soon be achieved.“One of the reasons we want to turn drama teams into film houses is to establish an audiovisual industry that contributes to the transformation of our society. “As we envisage a holistic approach to achieving this target, we are cognizant that the church is a vital medium through which internationally accepted films can be produced that will contribute to a change in society,” the release noted. The release also said training received by participating churches will solve problems like having a good vocal emphasis, facial expression, and stage posture, which was lacking during the first edition.According to the press release, the winner of this year’s event will walk away with L$44,550 and a customized Treasure Hunt trophy.The VIP release added that second place winner is expected to carry home a trophy, and individual winners for categories like ‘Best Director’ will only receive certificates.“After the event, all the performances will be recorded and shown on Base TV, online and all VIP social sites,” VIP released said.This year’s events will be held at the Philadelphia Central Church, from 4 PM to 6:30 PM daily and tickets for each day’s event are now on sale at the church for only L$100 a piece. Meanwhile, the organizing committee was quick to note that the activities of VIP are not limited to Treasure Hunt, as the organization will soon begin to work with non-Christian institutions, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, education institutions, motion picture houses, and others to achieve its overarching goal of developing a motion picture industry that contributes to thetransformation of Liberia.GROUP ONE – October 30Philadelphia Central ChurchChristian Interdenominational AssemblyMonrovia Christian FellowshipLiving Hope Mission ChurchGROUP TWO – November 6City Hill ChurchOvercomers’ Central ChurchVoice of PentecostGrace & Glory ChurchGROUP THREE– November 13Blessed Assembly MinistryProvidence Baptist ChurchChrist Redemption World Outreach Ministries (CREWOM)Winners Chapel International GROUP FOUR– November 20Effort Baptist ChurchBetter Living SDACitizens Assembly InternationalGreater Refuge TempleFINAL– December 11Group II WinnerGroup I WinnerGroup III WinnerGroup IV WinnerShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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