Women’s football takes the Congress: the agreement is formalized

first_imgA chapter in women’s football closes. The 1st Spanish Women’s Soccer Collective Agreement was presented at the Congress of Deputies, after clubs and unions gave the green light this Tuesday with the rubric of this document, which will regulate the labor landscape of the players of the First Iberdrola. After being unanimously approved in the lower house, the president of Congress, Meritxell Batet, accompanied by representatives of all parliamentary groups, the president of the CSD, Irene Lozano, about twenty players and the top representatives of the AFE and clubs, opened the act by crossing out a “historical” date this moment.Ainhoa ​​Tirapu, player of Athletic Club and spokeswoman for the players, she wanted to thank all her teammates for the unity shown in the fight for this document. The Basque goalkeeper also apologized for the delay of this agreement and the possibility that several companions have been harmed by this delay. “I would like to make a reflection. I have been the visible face of this process and people have always told me that I am very brave for it. Today I want to say that courage is that of all those players who in situations much more precarious than mine and less dignified conditions have joined and fought for this agreement. I feel proud of that great unity that this group has shown. Today is a day of celebration, but I have the shin of not having achieved this before and I want to apologize to all those players who have suffered labor inequalities. Today we put the first stone to continue growing in women’s football“Tirapu said in his speech. The president of AFE, David Aganzo: “It has been a negotiation of more than a year and I thank everyone for your sensitivity to this issue. It has taken a lot of negotiation and pedagogical. This first agreement is a labor change for all the players. I want to thank them for their courage and unity. The strike was a turning point in the negotiation It has been long and hard but today you finally have your agreement It is a pioneer agreement in Europe It is a historic day Tomorrow will be another day But it will be another day in which our partners will have your regulated labor rights. ” For its part, the president of the Association of Women’s Soccer Clubs (ACFF), Rubén Alcaine, stressed the hard work of all parties to reach a consensus. “It is something historical. We are very proud since the Association. It has been many months. We have to thank all the clubs and players for this moment. I want to highlight the work of the parties that have worked for women’s football and have allowed us to reach this moment “Alcaine said. The Federation, absent in a historical photoThe Royal Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) did not attend the presentation of the I Collective Agreement of Spanish Women’s Soccer, although this document regulates the working conditions of the players of the First Iberdrola, a new women’s competition that launched under his tutelage this summer the federative entity. “I would have liked to have been all the agents involved in women’s football, including the Spanish Women’s Soccer Federation (RFEF), which is the organizer of the competition and we understand that we all have to work in the same direction. But it is a respectable decision, “Alcaine said after the act in the parliamentary chamber. Aganzo also reminded him: “He is missed. We have tried to be all parties here, but the RFEF has also helped in this agreement and you have to keep working together. “It should be noted that RFEF has not been part of the negotiations in this collective agreement, since legally it is an issue that belongs to clubs and unions. The body chaired by Luis Rubiales asked for a presence at the negotiating table, but the parties refused. It should also be stressed that the arrival of this collective agreement has been possible thanks to the agreement between Mediapro and the ACFF, after the clubs failed to close an agreement with the RFEF in order to enter the Elite Program, initial solution to give viability to the agreement due to the 500,000 euros of revenue per club offered by this plan.The most important points of this agreement– It will be retroactive, with an application date of July 1, 2019.– Minimum salary of 16,000 euros per year at 75% partiality of the working day or, what is the same, 12,000 euros. In this line, it also includes compensation for all the players who currently have contracts with a 50% partiality or working day, with a mandatory change to 75%. Thus, salaries between 12,000 and 15,999 will become 16,000 euros gross per year, applying a linear increase of 2,000 euros in which they are 16,000 to 30,000 euros gross annually. The salary increase would affect 40% of the players.– Maternity protocol: In the event that a player becomes pregnant, she can access an automatic renewal without a limit in the contract. It does not include any section for breastfeeding.– Seniority Plus: the prize of linking would range between 2,000 euros (6 seasons) and 3,500 (9 seasons or more).– The personal scope of the agreement: limited to players who are called at least twelve official matches with the first team or in their case ten games played.– Rest of a day and a half weekly.– Holidays: 30 days per year.– Workday: 7 hours a day / 35 hours a week on a semi-annual basis, not including concentration or travel periods. In the case of home games, the concentration shall not exceed 24 hours, with a maximum period of 72 hours for visiting matches.– Financial consideration for the player of 15% of the agreed price in case of transfer or image rights (agreement between the parties is required). In the latter case, it is established that for a player who exploits her image rights in her own name, the amount that the club satisfies to that for the use of her image, name or figure for economic purposes will be considered as a salary concept.last_img read more

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Meet the winners of the 2017 Goldman Environmental Prize

first_imgActivism, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Heroes, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Indigenous Peoples, Protected Areas The Goldman Environmental Prize, dubbed the Green Nobel Prize, honors grassroots environmental heroes from Europe, Asia, North America, Central and South America, Africa, and Islands and Island nations.The winners will be awarded the Prize today at the San Francisco Opera House.The winners include Uros Macerl from Slovenia, Prafulla Samantara from India, mark! Lopez from the United States, Rodrigo Tot from Guatemala, Rodrigue Mugaruka Katembo from DRC and Wendy Bowman from Australia. The world’s most prestigious award for grassroots environmental activism has announced its winners for 2017.Every year, the Goldman Environmental Prize, dubbed the Green Nobel Prize, honors grassroots environmental heroes from Europe, Asia, North America, Central and South America, Africa, and Islands and Island nations.This year’s winners include activists who went undercover to expose corruption, indigenous leaders who fought for the rights of their communities and took on big destructive development projects, and activists who strove to achieve safe environments for their communities, often at great personal risk.The winners will be awarded the prize today at the San Francisco Opera House, followed by a ceremony at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C. on April 26.Here are the winners of the 2017 Goldman Environmental Prize.Uroš Macerl (Slovenia)Uros Macerl, Slovenia. Photo courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.In 2003, Lafarge Cement, one of the world’s largest cement companies, took over a 130-year-old cement plant in Trbovlje in Slovenia and began burning petcoke, a carbon-rich byproduct of the oil refining process. Worried that the pollution from the cement plant was making water unpotable and soil infertile, Uroš Macerl, an organic farmer and president of a local environmental group, who lived on the outskirts of the Lafarge plant, got together farmers, residents, and local groups in his community to collect air quality data. He found that there had indeed been a sharp rise in pollutants since Lafarge had begun burning petcoke.When Lafarge, in 2009, applied for an environmental permit to co-incinerate hazardous industrial waste with petcoke, Macerl filed and won a lawsuit that canceled the permit. But when the company continued to burn petcoke and waste, Macerl organized protests and rallied community opposition until the plant was ordered to shut down in 2015.Prafulla Samantara (India)Prafulla Samantara, India. Photo courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.In the state of Odisha in India, an 8,000-year-old indigenous tribe, the Dongri Kondh, lives in the Niyamgiri Hills, a forested region rich in biodiversity. The tribe considers the Niyamgiri Hills to be sacred, and see themselves as its protectors. But for many years, the tribe has been at loggerheads with the Odisha State Mining Company (OMC), which in 2004, signed an agreement with UK-based Vedanta Resources to mine bauxite, an aluminum ore, in the hills.Prafulla Samantara, a social justice activist who grew up in a family of farmers, has fought for the rights of the Dongri Kondh for more than 12 years. He rallied the tribe to make their voices heard about the Vedanta mining project proposed on land they had called home for years, and filed a petition with the Supreme Court to halt the mine. In May 2016, the Indian Supreme Court denied a petition from the OMC that sought to overturn the tribal council votes and to mine the bauxite as a sole venture.mark! Lopez (United States)mark! Lopez, United States. Photo courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.In 2000, Georgia-based Exide took over an old battery recycling plant in Los Angeles, and increased the volume of batteries being processed at the plant. Emission levels of pollutants such as lead and arsenic are believed to have skyrocketed as a result. Following an investigation by a federal grand jury about its operations, Exide agreed to shut down the plant but nobody seemed to address the contamination beyond the smelter site.mark! Lopez, born in a family of activists in Los Angeles, went door to door to inform the community about the dangers of lead contamination, and rallied the residents into pressuring the California Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) to test homes around the smelter site. When the tests showed that most homes were contaminated and required remediation, Lopez and his team persuaded the state of California to approve $176.6 million for the testing and cleanup of affected homes.Rodrigo Tot (Guatemala)Rodrigo Tot, Guatemala. Photo courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.In 2006, the Guatemalan government issued a permit to restart the Fénix mine, a nickel mine that had once been operational between the 1960s and 80s. The indigenous Q’eqchi people who lived around the mine claimed that the company was forcibly removing them from their land without their consent.To find out if the community had legal claims to the land, Rodrigo Tot, an indigenous leader in Guatemala’s Agua Caliente, spent years gathering evidence of Q’eqchi’s land ownership. Then, based on the evidence he collected, Guatemala’s Constitutional Court, in 2011, ordered the government to issue land titles to the people of Agua Caliente.The battle over land ownership is ongoing,  but Tot and the community continue to fight for land titles of the indigenous peoples.Rodrigue Mugaruka Katembo (Democratic Republic of Congo)Rodrigue Mugaruka Katembo, Democratic Republic of Congo. Photo courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.In 2010, the Democratic Republic of the Congo allowed SOCO International, a British oil company, to explore for oil in an area that extends into Virunga National Park. Virunga is Africa’s oldest national park and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.When 41-year-old Congolese park ranger Rodrigue Katembo was offered money by SOCO to let their vehicles pass through Virunga National Park to set up an oil exploration base by the river, he decided to look into their dealings. Together with the park director, Emmanuel De Merode, Katembo began to document evidence of corruption by SOCO, its contractors and others. Katembo even used undercover cameras to record footage of SOCO and its contractors offering bribes and discussing illegal activities.His footage were featured in the documentary film Virunga that became hugely popular through Netflix and generated international outrage over SOCO’s conduct in Virunga. The Church of England, in 2016, announced it would divest its $1.8 million holding in the company, and a few months later, SOCO announced it was giving up its oil license. Katembo continues to to protect Virunga and its wildlife from poachers, militia, and extractive industries.Wendy Bowman (Australia)Wendy Bowman, Australia. Photo courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.Nearly two-thirds  of Hunter Valley in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, has been given away in coal concessions, producing 145 million tons of coal every year. As a result of the widespread coal mining, countless landowners have moved. And for those who remain, coal dust has become a part of their lives, affecting their homes, farmlands, water sources and health.But the now 83-year-old Wendy Bowman, one of the last residents left in Camberwell, a small village in Hunter Valley surrounded by coal mines, managed to take on a powerful multinational mining company and stopped it from taking her family farm and protected her community in Hunter Valley from further pollution and environmental degradation. Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Questioning militarization is essential for successful and socially just conservation (commentary)

first_imgIt is important to question and critically analyze new directions in conservation, as failing to do so will undoubtedly lead to negative outcomes for people and wildlife. Justice for animals is not well served by perpetrating other injustices.I can agree that poaching is against the law and therefore is a crime. But the law is not a neutral or apolitical instrument. For example, the argument that wildlife laws are neutral instruments renders invisible the colonial origins of wildlife laws in Africa, which separated wildlife and people in ways that actively produce human-wildlife conflict today.It is useful and important to debate the problems of militarization, because this can and should shape policy and funding strategies for conservation.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Constructive engagement with concerns about the rise in militarized forms of conservation are very welcome. I currently run a four-year project funded by the European Research Council, BIOSEC, which explores the growing challenges, problems, and issues raised by an integration of security logics with wildlife conservation.Here I respond in brief to Niall McCann’s recent article, which criticized the questioning of militarization. But it is important to question and critically analyze new directions in conservation, as failing to do so will undoubtedly lead to negative outcomes for people and wildlife. Justice for animals is not well served by perpetrating other injustices.It is claimed that my criticisms are based solely on an ideological position, but they are also based on realities of conservation practice on the ground. It is not helpful to separate out those working in conservation and those researching conservation — many of us operate in both worlds.Our BIOSEC team undertakes research that is responsive to the concerns of conservation professionals on the ground — they point to the very same problems produced by militarized conservation that we have identified. This came through very strongly in our recent Knowledge Exchange workshop with conservation practitioners (a summary of those discussions can be found here).Ivory desk globe. Photo Credit: Meredith Gore.I can agree with McCann that rangers are in a very difficult position, indeed, especially in conflict areas where they risk their lives on a daily basis. That is the dominant narrative. But there are other ranger stories we wish to bring to light as our research progresses: the growing levels of stress, the lack of support for rangers suffering PTSD, rates of refusal and resistance because militarized conservation is not what they signed up for.McCann’s article claims that critics of militarization insult rangers. This couldn’t be further from my intention. We need to understand the spectrum of ranger experiences. To do anything else is insulting.Militarizing conservation can simply escalate conflict and violence (see research by Elizabeth Lunstrum and Francis Masse; Esther Marijnen and Judith Verweijen; as well as Bram Buscher and Maano Ramutsindela). We should also be aware of the risks that enhanced training and provision of weaponry can be turned back on wildlife, and increase rates of poaching.McCann refers to the figure of ‘more than one thousand’ rangers killed in action, which originates from the campaigns of the Thin Green Line Foundation; but that is likely to be a significant underestimate — ranger deaths go unrecorded in some cases because of fears of negative publicity. Equally, we do not know how many suspected poachers have been killed. Put simply, these deaths are deemed not worthy of recording.I can agree that poaching is against the law and is therefore a crime. But the law is not a neutral or apolitical instrument. For example, the argument that wildlife laws are neutral instruments renders invisible the colonial origins of wildlife laws in Africa, which separated wildlife and people in ways that actively produce human-wildlife conflict today (see work by Bill Adams and by Dan Brockington). Projecting a singular model of policing and military approaches across very different situations is also misleading and overlooks the ways that authorities can be involved in poaching and trafficking themselves.Poverty may be a driver of poaching, but the evidence base for this is thin. In a review of evidence for the UK Government Department for International Development (DfID), we found that the poverty-poaching connection is assumed but not proven. Also, which matters more: absolute or relative levels of poverty? (Freya St John will be running a major study of this connection via her WILDPOV project.)The argument that wildlife needs to be conserved because it can generate income from tourism is also problematic. I can agree that wildlife-based tourism can be a significant source of income, but we also need to examine where the money goes. There is an enormous body of work that shows that the income from wildlife tourism does not necessarily go to local communities, but is instead captured by elites, governments, and private companies.It is useful and important to debate the problems of militarization, because this can and should shape policy and funding strategies for conservation. But that debate has to include those of us who question and criticize — this is essential for producing conservation which is successful and socially just.Trafficked elephant feet. Photo by Rosaleen Duffy.Rosaleen Duffy is a professor in the Department of Politics at the University of Sheffield in the UK. She leads the BIOSEC project, which examines claims by national governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that wildlife poaching and trafficking are increasingly being used to fund organized crime and terrorist groups. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Anti-poaching, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Commentary, Conservation, Editorials, Environment, Law Enforcement, Poaching, Researcher Perspective Series, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Beehive fences can help mitigate human-elephant conflict

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Crop-raiding by elephants can devastate small farmers, leading to food insecurity, lost opportunity costs, and even death, as well as negative attitudes towards elephants, but finding effective and inexpensive solutions has proven extremely difficult.Beehive fences—surrounding crops fields with beehives attached to fence posts and strung together with wires—may serve as a humane and eco-friendly way to protect crops from elephants.Repeated farm-level trials have demonstrated benefits to farmers of using beehive fences, including fewer elephants approaching their fields and, for communities willing to manage the bees, production of “elephant-friendly” honey. However, the strategy doesn’t work everywhere: it requires management by farmers and willingness of bees to occupy at least some of the hives, and appropriate length and positioning to dissuade elephants from just walking around them.Beehive fences have benefited farmers in several East African countries, and projects elsewhere have begun to test them as well, but several uncertainties, including their success at a scale that doesn’t just displace the elephants to the first unfenced farm, suggest they should still be used with other techniques as part of a toolkit to reduce human-elephant conflict. Human-elephant conflict poses major threats to the well-being of both humans and animals. Crop-raiding by elephants across Asia and Africa can be devastating for small farmers, leading to food insecurity, lost opportunity costs, and even death. Crop-raiding and property damage can also result in negative attitudes towards elephant conservation and retaliatory killings of elephants.A camera trap photo captured after midnight of an elephant bull turning away from the beehive fence (one of the hives is on the left). Image courtesy of Southern Tanzania Elephant Program (STEP).Finding effective and inexpensive solutions has proven extremely difficult. Farmers guarding their fields at night lose sleep and put themselves in potentially close proximity to hungry elephants. Killing “problem” elephants is not only inhumane, but is also ineffective at reducing human-elephant conflict. Electric fences, while effective in theory, often fail in practice because they are costly and difficult to maintain.Bees to the rescueMore recently, conservationists have explored the use of beehive fences as a humane and eco-friendly way to protect crops from elephants. Zoologist Lucy King of the NGO Save the Elephants told Mongabay the idea came from Kenyan farmers, who noticed that elephants avoided foraging in trees that contained beehives.A beehive fence under Sagalla Mountain in Kenya. Hives are supported by posts and connected by wires, so that pressure on the wire disturbs the nearest occupied hives along the fence. Thatched roofs protect the hives from direct sunlight. The NGO Save The Elephants has experimented with various designs, including units that are not occupied hives but that contribute to the technique. A higher percentage of occupied hives gives a better chance of success in discouraging elephants from approaching further. Image by Lucy King.In the late 2000s, King and several Save the Elephants colleagues conducted a pilot study to determine if beehive fences could protect farms in Kenya. They placed locally constructed beehives on fence posts every 8 meters (about 26 feet) and connected them with wires. If an elephant tried to enter between the hives, it would knock into the wires, causing the hives to sway and disturbing the bees. In this study, the researchers found that elephant raids were reduced by almost half on a farm with a beehive fence compared to an unprotected farm.Since then, King and her colleagues have conducted two sets of field trials in Kenya. The first set of trials, published in 2011, found that beehive fences were better at protecting crops than traditional thorn bush barriers. The second set of trials, published in 2017, reported that 80 percent of elephants that approached the beehive fences were deterred from entering the farms. However, this second study did not report data from control farms – those not protected with beehive fences – so we cannot know if this represents a significant improvement.Currently, King and her colleagues at Save the Elephants are studying or implementing beehive fences for crop protection in 15 countries in Africa and four countries in Asia. The beehive fence concept has generated high levels of interest and acceptance among farmers in Africa and Asia. In Kenya, participating farms more than doubled over the course of field trials as farmers requested to join, and in Thailand, over 80 percent of cassava and sugar cane plantation owners reported that they were interested in trying beehive fences.However, comparatively few studies on beehive fences have been performed in Asia. One small study in India observed that elephants were less likely to enter agricultural areas through areas with beehive fences, although statistical evaluations were not performed.Kennedy holding jar of elephant-friendly honey produced by his community from management of the bees in the beehives. Image courtesy of Jane Wynyard / Save the Elephants.Beehive fences can provide many benefits to a community. In addition to humanely deterring elephants from entering farms, bees provide pollination services (which could increase crop yields) and honey (which farmers can sell to diversify their income). King and colleagues also found that even long-term use of beehive fences does not seem to negatively impact wild bee diversity.Problems and solutionsAlthough these trials seem to show great success overall, beehive fences have yet to be implemented at a broad scale. Wildlife veterinarian Richard Hoare, a member of the IUCN Human-Wildlife Conflict Task Force states that, “the sample sizes of farms in bee fence projects claiming success are too small to be extrapolated to general use.”Furthermore, beehive fences don’t work everywhere, and several factors can decrease their efficacy, including the design of the fences, the species of bee, and bee activity. A trial in Zimbabwe did not find any difference in crop damage between farms with beehives and those without. However, this may be because hives were hung on poles and not connected with wire. In other words, elephants could easily pass between the hives without disturbing the bees.The STEP team in southern Tanzania discussing the beehive fence including the costs and benefits of shielding hives from direct sun in the form of makuti thatch roofs. Image courtesy of STEP.Efficacy may also be affected by the species of bees that live in different regions. King says that the honey bees kept in many parts of Asia – called Apis cerana indica – are much less aggressive than African bee species and are less effective at deterring elephants.Even for beehives inhabited by the same species, not all hives deter elephants equally. A trial in Gabon found that while high-activity hives were very effective at protecting fruit trees from elephants, low-activity hives (and empty hives) were less effective. Unfortunately, this same study found that bees in very high-activity hives may produce less honey and be more aggressive than bees in low-activity hives.Challenges inherent to beekeeping have affected the effectiveness of some beehive fence projects. Conservationist and biological anthropologist Katarzyna Nowak told Mongabay that in many places in Africa, beekeepers simply provide hives and must wait for bees to come colonize them, sometimes resulting in low hive occupancy and consequently, less effective beehive fences. Furthermore, it can be hazardous to work with hundreds of stinging insects. African bees can be very aggressive – during one trial, two goats were stung to death, and people could not work in nearby fields when a hive was knocked down.Beehive fence in Kenya protecting maize (corn) from elephants that approach looking for a high-calorie meal. Image by Lucy King.Due to hazards like these, Hoare notes that the beehive fence technique, “will most likely only work in rural communities with a previous culture of beekeeping.” Indeed, Nowak says that it’s very important to take community history and preferences into account on these projects. “It’s as much about how people receive the particular deterrent method – and therefore maintain it – as it is about the efficacy of it,” she says.Farmers extracting honey from hives in the beehive fence. Communities with beekeeping interest are good candidates for beehive fence programs. Image courtesy of STEP.Another problem is that hives and the honey within them are subject to theft – sometimes by other humans, but often by honey badgers. Colonies often abandon a hive after a honey badger attack. However, simple additions like cages or motion-activated lights have shown promise in reducing honey badger impact on beehives.King says one of the biggest threats to beehive fence projects in more arid areas is actually climate change. “With climate change, the rainfall has become so erratic that we’re getting erratic flowering seasons, so the bees are being affected,” she says. “We’re losing colonies because they’re not holding on through the dry seasons…I don’t know what it means for our project long-term.”A line of beehives designed to protect crops on in northern Kenya. As dry seasons lengthen, bees may not be able to support themselves inside hives throughout the year, a concern for beehive fence farmers. Image by Lucy King.Some of the challenges of keeping bees — like hive maintenance, attacks by honey badgers, bee stings, and problems with hive occupation during the dry season — could be solved by using a stimulus that mimics bees rather than actual bees.Some trials have shown that buzzing bee sounds seemed to disturb elephants – one study found that 94 percent of African elephant families quickly left the area when the sound of disturbed bees was played. In India, news reports have detailed minor reductions in elephant fatalities in train collisions by using bee noises near the train tracks (although it’s unclear if this small decrease merely represents random variation that occurs year-to-year). Another study found that chemicals contained in bee alarm pheromones seemed to cause elephants to hesitate or retreat.But these bee-mimickers aren’t universally applicable either. A study in South Africa noted that elephants appeared, at most, mildly disturbed or attentive in response to bee noises alone. Another study found that Asian elephants did not retreat from beehive noises significantly more than they moved away from control noises (although they did move farther away when movement occurred).The human-elephant conflict toolboxThe moral of the story is that no single technique is 100 percent effective. Researchers acknowledge that several strategies should be used to foster the peaceful coexistence of elephants and people. “I’m a huge fan of what we call the human-elephant conflict toolbox,” says King. “There’s a variety of options you can use to keep elephants out of your farm and to live better with elephants. Without question, beehive fences should be one of those tools, but it’s not necessarily a silver bullet for the entire problem, nor are any of the others.”A remote camera captures an elephant approaching a beehive fence and deciding its next move. Image courtesy of Lucy King.Several other strategies have been determined to be at least partially effective, including setting off small handheld fireworks  putting chili oil on fences surrounding crops. King says her team is experimenting with growing crops that are regionally appropriate but less palatable for elephants. These include tea, ginger, sunflowers, and chilis.Overall, King says that beehive fences have been quite successful and word of that success has spread. “We have people queuing up for beehive fences, literally coming to the research center and emailing me from all over the world, requesting these.”An example of combining techniques to reduct human-elephant conflict: fences made of chili-oil (left) and beehives (right) between the Udzungwa Mountains National Park boundary and adjacent farms in Tanzania. Image courtesy of STEP.CitationsGubbi, S., Swaminath, M. H., Poornesha, H. C., Bhat, R., & Raghunath, R. (2014). An elephantine challenge: human–elephant conflict distribution in the largest Asian elephant population, southern India. Biodiversity and conservation, 23(3), 633-647.Hoare, R. (2012). Lessons from 15 years of human–elephant conflict mitigation: management considerations involving biological, physical and governance issues in Africa. Pachyderm, 51, 60-74.Johnson, Abigail S., “The Effects of Tactile and Visual Deterrents on Honey Badger Predation of Beehives” (2019). CUNY Academic Works.https://academicworks.cuny.edu/hc_sas_etds/409Karidozo, M., & Osborn, F. V. (2005). Can bees deter elephants from raiding crops? An experiment in the communal lands of Zimbabwe. Pachyderm, (39), 26-32.King, L. E., Douglas-Hamilton, I., & Vollrath, F. (2007). African elephants run from the sound of disturbed bees. Current Biology, 17(19), R832-R833.King, L. E., Lawrence, A., Douglas‐Hamilton, I., & Vollrath, F. (2009). Beehive fence deters crop‐raiding elephants. African Journal of Ecology, 47(2), 131-137.King, L. E., Douglas‐Hamilton, I., & Vollrath, F. (2011). Beehive fences as effective deterrents for crop‐raiding elephants: field trials in northern Kenya. African Journal of Ecology, 49(4), 431-439.King, L. E., Lala, F., Nzumu, H., Mwambingu, E., & Douglas‐Hamilton, I. (2017). Beehive fences as a multidimensional conflict‐mitigation tool for farmers coexisting with elephants. Conservation Biology, 31(4), 743-752.King, L. E., Serem, E., & Russo, L. (2018). Minimal effect of honey beehive fences on native bee diversity and abundance at the farm scale during the dry season in southern Kenya. Apidologie, 49(6), 862-871.King, L., Pardo, M., Weerathunga, S., Kumara, T. V., Jayasena, N., Soltis, J., & de Silva, S. (2018). Wild Sri Lankan elephants retreat from the sound of disturbed Asian honey bees. Current Biology, 28(2), R64-R65.Mackenzie, C. A., & Ahabyona, P. (2012). Elephants in the garden: Financial and social costs of crop raiding. Ecological Economics, 75, 72-82.Nair, R. P., & Jayson, E. A. (2016). Effectiveness of beehive fences to deter crop raiding elephants in Kerala, India. Int. Res. J. Nat. Appl. Sci, 3, 14-19.Ndlovu, M., Devereux, E., Chieffe, M., Asklof, K., & Russo, A. (2016). Responses of African elephants towards a bee threat: Its application in mitigating human-elephant conflict. South African Journal of Science, 112(1-2), 01-05.Ngama, S., Korte, L., Bindelle, J., Vermeulen, C., & Poulsen, J. R. (2016). How bees deter elephants: beehive trials with forest elephants (Loxodonta africana cyclotis) in Gabon. PloS one, 11(5), e0155690.Sitati, N. W., & Walpole, M. J. (2006). Assessing farm-based measures for mitigating human-elephant conflict in Transmara District, Kenya. Oryx, 40(3), 279-286.van de Water, A., & Matteson, K. (2018). Human-elephant conflict in western Thailand: Socio-economic drivers and potential mitigation strategies. PloS one, 13(6), e0194736.Wright, M. G., Spencer, C., Cook, R. M., Henley, M. D., North, W., & Mafra-Neto, A. (2018). African bush elephants respond to a honeybee alarm pheromone blend. Current Biology, 28(14), R778-R780.Disney has supported the beehive fence research, including on this farm in Kenya. Image by Lucy King.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Agriculture, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Conservation Solutions, Elephants, human-elephant conflict, Human-wildlife Conflict, low-tech, Subsistence Agriculture last_img read more

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Emperor penguins could disappear by 2100 if nations don’t cap emissions

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Climate Change, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Birds, Marine Conservation, Oceans, Penguins, Research, Sea Ice, Wildlife Researchers have combined a global climate model that projects where and when sea ice forms and a model of penguin populations to predict how penguin colonies would react to changing sea ice under future climate scenarios.The models found that under the business-as-usual scenario, where countries fail to halt climate change, emperor penguin numbers will decline by around 86 percent by 2100.However, if countries meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement, limiting the global increase in temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels, then emperor penguin numbers would decline by about 31 percent, giving them a fighting chance at survival. If the climate continues to change at its current pace, most emperor penguins could become extinct by the end of this century, a new study predicts. However, if countries meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement, limiting the global increase in temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels, then that would give penguins a fighting chance, with one-third of their population still projected to decline, researchers say.“If global climate keeps warming at the current rate, we expect emperor penguins in Antarctica to experience an 86 percent decline by the year 2100,” Stéphanie Jenouvrier, a seabird ecologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and lead author on the study, said in a statement. “At that point, it is very unlikely for them to bounce back.”Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri), the largest of all living penguins, need stable sea ice in Antarctica to thrive. They use the ice as a breeding platform, to rear chicks, to molt, feed, and protect themselves from predators. Sea ice also influences the food that the penguins rely on, such as the Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) and Antarctic silverfish (Pleuragramma antarctica). So fluctuations in sea ice directly affect the birds’ survival: if the sea ice breaks up early, then the chicks could struggle to live; if the sea ice cover is higher than usual, then the penguins have to move farther to get food.Jenouvrier, who has spent more than two decades studying emperor penguins’ lives on the harsh Antarctic sea ice, and her colleagues wanted to see how all known 54 colonies of emperor penguins would respond to changing sea ice conditions under three future climate scenarios: where no action is taken and greenhouse gas emissions continue at their present rates; where the global temperature rise is restricted to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels; and one where global temperature rise is capped at 1.5 degrees Celsius.To get these estimates, the researchers combined a global climate model that projects sea ice formation under different climate scenarios and a model of penguin populations that predicts how penguin colonies would react to changing sea ice.“We’ve been developing that penguin model for 10 years,” Jenouvrier said. “It can give a very detailed account of how sea ice affects the life cycle of emperor penguins, their reproduction, and their mortality.”The model suggests that under the business-as-usual scenario, where countries fail to halt climate change, penguin numbers will decline by around 86 percent by 2100. However, if nations manage to limit emissions and the rise in global temperature to 2 degrees Celsius, then emperor penguin numbers would decline by about 44 percent. If the global temperature rise is further limited, to 1.5 degrees Celsius, that would result in a 31 percent decline in the penguin population, the model predicts.“Our model indicates that these population declines will occur predominately in the first half of this century,” Jenouvrier wrote in the Conversation. “Nonetheless, in a scenario in which the world meets the Paris climate targets, we project that the global Emperor Penguin population would nearly stabilize by 2100, and that viable refuges would remain available to support some colonies.“Our findings starkly illustrate the far-reaching implications of national climate policy decisions,” she added. “Curbing carbon dioxide emissions has critical implications for Emperor Penguins and an untold number of other species for which science has yet to document such a plain-spoken warning.”Emperor penguins need intact sea ice until the chicks are ready to leave their nesting grounds. Image by Christopher Michel via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).Banner image of emperor penguins by Michael Van Woert, NOAA NESDIS, ORA (Public domain).Citation:Jenouvrier, S., Holland, M., Iles, D., Labrousse, S., Landrum, L., Garnier, J., … Barbraud, C. (2019). The Paris Agreement objectives will likely halt future declines of emperor penguins. Global Change Biology. doi:10.1111/gcb.14864center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

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Pangolins top the charts while climate stories lag: Insights on our 2019 reporting (insider)

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Insider center_img Mongabay’s traffic hit a new record in 2019, with pageviews increasing 34% to 102 million and monthly active users climbing 50% to 4.3 million. But the high level numbers don’t reveal much, so here are some more interesting insights on how various topics performed and how our articles fared across geographies.Given Mongabay’s bureaus in Indonesia and India, it’s not surprising that those countries represent two of our three biggest markets. The Philippines, where we hired a staff writer in 2019, ranks fourth. Mongabay has especially high readership on a per capita basis in certain Latin American and Asian countries, led by Bolivia, Indonesia, and Paraguay.Wildlife-related stories attracted the most readers in 2019, while climate science stories were the least read.This post is insider content, which is available to paying subscribers. Mongabay’s traffic hit a new record in 2019, with pageviews increasing 34% to 102 million and monthly active users climbing 50% to 4.3 million. But the high level numbers don’t reveal much, so here are some more interesting insights on how various topics performed and how our articles fared across geographies. In summary: wildlife stories… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists.last_img read more

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Le Borussia Dortmund confirme le recrutement de Thorgan Hazard

first_img Partager Le Borussia Dortmund a confirmé mercredi le recrutement pour cinq ans du Belge Thorgan Hazard (Mönchengladbach), frère d’Eden, pour un montant évalué par la presse à 25,5 millions d’euros.Le milieu de terrain de 26 ans avait déjà publiquement annoncé fin avril qu’il était tombé d’accord avec le club vice-champion d’Allemagne, et le transfert était depuis l’objet de pourparlers entre les deux clubs.“Nous sommes très heureux que Thorgan soit venu nous rejoindre par conviction, c’est un joueur expérimenté en Bundesliga et un international belge qui va nous aider par son tempo et ses qualités devant le but”, a déclaré le directeur sportif du Borussia, Michael Zorc. “C’était exactement le bon moment pour faire le prochain pas dans ma carrière”, a dit Hazard de son côté, “je suis fier de pouvoir jouer pour le Borussia Dortmund, c’est une grande équipe avec des fans incroyables”.Dortmund, qui veut se donner les moyens de remporter le titre de champion la saison prochaine, a déjà recruté le défenseur international Niko Schulz (Hoffenheim). L’arrivée de Julian Brandt, milieu offensif international, pourrait également être annoncée dans les prochains jours, selon des médias allemands.AFPlast_img read more

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[Coupe de Luxembourg] Et à la fin, c’est encore le Fola qui gagne

first_imgDe fait, après ce petit moment qui n’a même pas eu le temps se transformer en frayeur, le Fola ne s’est pas senti plus obligé de commencer à faire le jeu qu’auparavant. Il ne s’est même contenté que de deux jaillissements supplémentaires. Un dédoublement Sacras-Bensi côté gauche, un appui plein axe sur Sinani pour une accélération de Corral côté droit en bout de chaîne. Palha veille au grain (22e). Dix minutes plus tard, une immense ouverture va se transformer en bijou. Seydi élimine Schneider à l’épaule, passe du bout du pied un sombrero qui monte haut à Hauguel et reprend du gauche, de volée (0-1, 32e). On a beau se douter que cela peut arriver à tout moment avec cette équipe, on arrive encore à se laisser surprendre par la soudaineté de la chose et la classe collective et individuelle.Y avait-il hors-jeu ?Parce qu’après dix nouvelles minutes de stérilité pétangeoise, les Eschois vont remettre un énorme coup de feu d’artifice. En contre, Bensi lance Sinani côté droit. Son centre va être coupé par Seydi au premier poteau mais il laisse filer entre ses jambes pour Corral, qui arrive seul pour reprendre. Palha parvient à contrer le tir mais Bensi a suivi, derrière, pour crucifier le portier pétangeois de volée (0-2, 44e). Quatre tirs, deux buts, de l’or en barre.Pour perturber cette sérénité absolue, il faut un grand Titus. Cela sous-entend une certaine maturité autant qu’une capacité à se rebeller. Et à y mettre utilement les moyens qu’il faut pour renverser une situation très mal embarquée. De ce point de vue, la deuxième période va apporter la preuve que la jeune génération pétangeoise est sur le bon chemin mais pas encore assez outillée pour maintenir pendant 45 minutes une pression comme celle qu’elle va imposer lors du premier quart d’heure, au retour des vestiaires. Enfin dans l’intensité et dans le registre de l’agression, le leader se rue à l’attaque et à la 55e, Soladio surgit plein axe sur un centre de Hamzaoui. Son plat du pied est raté, mais au deuxième poteau, Abreu est là pour pousser au fond (1-2). Il faudrait profiter encore un peu plus du temps fort mais sur une tête de Mokrani, la parade de Hym empêche Pétange de revenir à hauteur autant que le hors-jeu ambigu signalé par l’arbitre de touche. Le Fola a gagné : Pétange est éliminé !Julien Mollereau Pétange – Fola : 1-2 (0-2)Stade municipal. Arbitrage de M. Durieux, assisté de MM. Da Costa et Stammet. Pelouse catastrophique. 420 spectateurs.Évolution du score : 0-1 Seydi (32e), 0-2 Bensi (44e), 1-2 Abreu (55e)Cartons jaunes : Hamzaoui (24e), Hauguel (31e), Soladio (47e), Kaboré (85e) à Pétange. Ouassiero (54e), Mura (68e), Sinani (79e), Hym (82e), Muharemovic (90+3) au Fola.PÉTANGE : Palha – Hamzaoui, Hauguel, Diouf, Schneider (56e Held) – Kakoko, Kaboré – Teixeira (77e Kalonji), Gashi (46e Soladio), Abreu – Mokrani.FOLA : Hym – Ouassiero, Klein, Mura, Sacras – Muharemovic, Dikaba – Corral, Sinani (83e Freire), Bensi (89e Hadji) – Seydi (72e Mersch). Partagercenter_img Quasiment irréprochable défensivement, plein de virtuosité offensive, le Fola file vers les huitièmes, lui qui s’était si souvent laissé piéger ces dernières années, quand le tirage au sort n’était pas clément avec lui…Pendant vingt minutes, le Fola n’a rien produit d’autre que des fautes (quatre) mais on s’imagine bien dans la tête de Carlos Fangueiro et des joueurs pétangeois, qui, tout en monopolisant le ballon de manière assez insolente, devaient guetter avec une certaine anxiété ce moment où le Fola parviendrait à leur rappeler qu’il est un monstre à sang froid.Et puis l’instant est venu. Un bout de pied insignifiant de Corral qui traîne sur une relance un peu trop laxiste de Schneider et un ballon qui atterrit dans les pieds d’un homme à qui il ne vaut mieux pas le laisser quand il a du temps, de l’espace et un intervalle évident : Sinani. La passe a pris immédiatement la profondeur, vers Seydi, mais l’avant-centre n’est pas parti dans le même timing et il a tranquillement repris sa position, tête baissée. Côté eschois, personne n’a rien dit. Ni eux ni qui que ce soit d’autre n’avait finalement besoin de ce non-évènement pour se rappeler ce que le club eschois a fait, ces dernières semaines, au Titus à l’aller, mais aussi au Progrès ou au F91, à qui il a abandonné le ballon pour mieux les battre avec un cynisme de tueur à gages.last_img read more

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[Europa League] F91-APOEL : Thomas Doll n’a «pas la pression»

first_imgCe jeudi, l’APOEL peut se qualifier en cas de succès et de défaite de Qarabag. Mais le coach de Nicosie, qui était mercredi soir en conférence de presse au stade Josy-Barthel avant de filer au stade Jos-Nosbaum pour un dernier entraînement (fraîchement installée, la nouvelle pelouse était bâchée), reste très tranquille.Vous êtes sous pression ?Thomas Doll (qui rit) : Non, j’ai grandi avec la pression et j’aime même ça. Je n’ai pas la pression. On va juste essayer de faire de notre mieux pour pouvoir fêter au coup de sifflet final. Partager La météo peut-elle changer vos options de jeu ?Non. Nous avons des joueurs qui viennent d’endroits qui connaissent ce genre de météo. Moi-même, j’ai toujours aimé jouer sous la pluie. Ce n’est absolument pas un problème. Oui, il y a une nouvelle pelouse qui peut se retourner ou gêner les déplacements mais on doit être prêt.Que vous reste-t-il de ce surprenant match aller qui vous a vu perdre à domicile face à Dudelange ?Tout le monde était choqué. Mais plusieurs semaines après, vous pouvez sentir qu’on est plus stables et pas que par nos résultats. Ce sera un match très intéressant parce que le F91 veut prendre la deuxième place et que nous, on vient la défendre.Recueilli par Julien Mollereaulast_img read more

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Celtics pick Texas A&M’s Robert Williams in NBA draft

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award “He won’t have any better role models than the guys in front of him,” Stevens said.The Celtics followed an appearance in the 2017 Eastern Conference finals with an offseason overhaul that brought in Hayward and Kyrie Irving. Despite losing both of them to injuries during the season, they returned to the league’s final four thanks in part to Jaylen Brown and Jayson Tatum, back-to-back No. 3 picks in the previous two years.But after stockpiling eight first-round picks in the previous four drafts, including three lottery picks, the Celtics were left with just their own first-rounder this year and no picks in the second. They could have up to four first-rounders next year.Speaking at the team’s brand new practice facility, the Auerbach Center, Stevens said Williams was a good athlete with good feet and an arm-span of 7-feet, 5-inches. Williams blocked 155 shots in college — third in Texas A&M history, with 78 as a sophomore that were the second-most in a single season for an Aggie.“Right now he is an elite athlete, with incredible length,” Stevens said. “And he plays well above the rim. Obviously, if you can have four shooters in the game and a guy like that rolling to the rim, you can just throw it into the air and he can go get it.”ADVERTISEMENT Taal victims get help from Kalayaan town Bicol riders extend help to Taal evacuees In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Harvey Weinstein rape trial Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding LATEST STORIES Serena Williams: Young boys need domestic abuse education Boston Celtics coach Brad Stevens speaks during a news conference, hursday, June 21, 2018, in Boston, after the team selected Robert Williams of Texas A&M with the 27th pick in the NBA basketball draft. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)BOSTON — Power forward Robert Williams was projected to be a lottery pick — and that was last year, after his freshman year at Texas A&M.But there he was, sliding down to the Boston Celtics at the 27th overall pick in the NBA draft Thursday night.ADVERTISEMENT “It’s not my job to know what the other 26 teams are thinking,” Celtics coach Brad Stevens said after adding the two-time Southeastern Conference defensive player of the year. “We thought that he was the right pick for us, and we felt very fortunate to be able to get him.”A 6-foot-10, 237-pound Oil City, Louisiana, native, Williams was considered a certain first-round pick as a freshman — maybe in the top 10.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownBut he decided he wasn’t ready. He returned and averaged 10.4 points and an SEC-leading 9.2 rebounds while leading the Aggies to the NCAA tournament’s Sweet 16.He still has some work to do— especially on offense, according to scouting reports. Stevens said current Celtics big men Al Horford and Gordon Hayward will be a big help in getting Williams ready. Because Williams was expected to go higher in the draft, the Celtics did not have a workout for him in Boston. Stevens said having a prospect visit is “just a formality in a lot of ways” for general manager Danny Ainge and his staff.“They’ve already watched them pay live a bunch, spent time with their coaches and everybody else,” Stevens said. “But I don’t think you need to watch must to tell how athletic he is. It’s pretty obvious.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Christopher Tolkien, son of Lord of the Rings author, dies aged 95 MOST READ Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Cloudy skies over Luzon due to amihan Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew View commentslast_img read more

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