Environment secretary of São Paulo faces controversies over management plans of protected areas

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Genevieve Belmaker The suspension of the implementation of MPs affects over a million hectares of marine regions and oceanic islands.One MP is under investigation following accusations that the secretariat surreptitiously introduced changes to decrease the level of protection for some areas.Critics accuse the environment secretary of putting industrial interests over the defense of the environment. SAO PAULO – In the Brazilian state of São Paulo, the relationship between the Environment Secretariat and environmentalists has proved to be tense and problematic. Just a few months after taking office last July, the secretariat’s new leader Ricardo Salles made the controversial decision to turn over the management of 25 state parks to private companies.In December 2016, Environment Secretary Salles announced the interruption of the creation of new Management Plans (MPs). The decision impacted five conservation units on the coast of the state. The affected areas comprise marine regions and oceanic islands that extend for more than one million hectares (2.47 million acres).Brazil manages natural resources through conservation units that are regulated by MPs, which define the use restrictions and activities that can be performed within each protected area.Despite being Brazil’s economic center, the state of São Paulo has great biodiversity. It is home to one of the largest remaining stretches of Atlantic Forest, unique marine ecosystems, and several endemic and endangered species. Many of these areas are environmentally protected, including over a hundred conservation units. According to Brazilian legislation, each of these units must have an MP to regulate them.The Atlantic Forest, as delineated by the WWF. Image by NASA and Miguelrangeljr via Wikimedia Commons.Salles is known for having controversial views on the environment and other issues. He has publicly stated that, before his tenure, the environment secretariat had been “run by academia’s darlings,” and the “productive sector”— industry, mining, agriculture — had been discriminated against, both issues he aims to change. He has also described current MPs as being “ideological,” arguing that they put “absolute restrictions to development.”Although the law requires all conservation units to have an MP within five years of their creation, in the state of São Paulo only about a third currently have implemented MPs.Conservation units and MPsThe implementation of MPs in São Paulo is a complex process that is often outsourced to environmental NGOs through a public bid. It involves technical studies and public audiences with all involved agents. Once the plan is developed, it must be approved by the management council of the conservation unit, the state department responsible for it and the Environmental State Council before it can be sanctioned by the state governor and implemented.Salles has stated on numerous occasions his dislike for the MP process, arguing it is “expensive” and “inefficient.” Late last year, the São Paulo Environment Secretariat announced a halt in current MP implementations while a new and more efficient implementation system is created.A cable car in the Atlantic Forest. Photo by Max Pixel.In March, members of the management council of two of the five affected units, the APA Marinha Litoral Norte and the ARIE São Sebastiao, joined with local environmentalists and civil organizations to send an open letter to Salles voicing their disagreement with the interruption.In the letter, they note their concern for the waste of public money that the halt could cause, considering that the plans are in their final stages. They also complained about the lack of information on the decision and demanded the return of the activities to finish the MPs.Salles did not respond to the letter, but a few days after it was published the secretariat announced the replacement of the head of both units.Camila Dinat is the project coordinator of the NGO that won the bid for all five MPs, the Instituto Ekos Brasil. Dinat defends the professionalism of her team and the quality of the work delivered, some of which has already been approved — but not paid — by the secretariat.“Despite this unfavorable scenario, our team has kept working and delivering new products,” Dinat said by e-mail. “However we haven’t received any comment whatsoever, be it of approval or disapproval.”In addition to not having had any feedback, Dinat also says they haven’t been officially informed of the interruption and haven’t been able to contact anyone in the secretariat to discuss the situation.“We tried several times to engage in a dialogue, we tried to set appointments with the executive director of the Fundação Florestal [the state department responsible for the plans] and the secretary,” Dinat says. “We sent three notifications, but still haven’t heard from them.”Asked about the criticisms of Salles regarding how MPs are implemented, Dinat admits that there is room for improvement, but questions the lack of dialogue in the development of the new model. Regarding the economic costs of making the plans, Dinat doesn’t mince words.“Thinking that spending on a MP for a conservation unit is an unnecessary spend is the stance of someone who doesn’t want to prioritize conservation,” Dinat says.Under investigationThe decision to interrupt the plans did not affect the MP of the APA Vârzea do Rio Tietê, a conservation unit near São Paulo, whose plan was only awaiting approval from the Environmental State Council. Although the MP was voted on and approved by the council on January 31, the Public Prosecutor’s Office launched an investigation a few days later over possible irregularities in the process.An aerial view of the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Salles and two members of the secretariat were accused of interfering with the implementation of the plan after a technician revealed he had been urged to surreptitiously introduce changes in some of the zoning maps prior to the vote.According to the accusation, the changes downgraded the level of protection of several areas, lessening restrictions on mining and industrial activities. The technician supported his testimony by presenting the e-mails he received from the secretariat where he was asked to introduce the changes. The thread of those e-mails suggests that the original request originated from the Industry Federation of the State of São Paulo, an association which includes companies with economic interests in the area.Salles accused the public prosecutor’s Office of “demagogy” and said that the organism that provides them with technical support “is full of former workers of the environment secretary who had to leave due to their incompetence and today act to retaliate the environment secretary.” He later gave a press conference where he denied any wrongdoing, stating that all changes made on the MP were justified and corresponded to technical corrections.He continues to face criticism.“The least he [Salles] should have done is to take the issue back to the Management Council of the conservation unit [where the maps had been previously approved] and the team who organized the public hearings,” says Roberto Francine, an environmentalist who is also a member of the Environmental State Council, in an interview. “They are the ones who should have said if there were technical issues that needed corrections.”Francine notes that many environmentalists believe that Salles is putting industrial and development interests over the protection of the environment. The fact that the decision to downgrade the protection of the areas came from within the environment secretary also worries him.“This move would be understandable if it came from the government’s industrial sector or the area of development or planning,” Francine said. “The role of the Environment secretary should be to argue against it.”The secretariat did not respond to numerous requests for comment on this story.Banner image: A cable car in the Atlantic. Photo by Max Pixel.Ignacio Amigo is a freelance journalist based in São Paulo, Brazil. You can find him on Twitter at @Sr_Tresillo.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Conservation, Conservation Philosophy, conservation players, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forestry, Forests, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Rainforests last_img read more

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First real test for Jokowi on haze as annual fires return to Indonesia

first_imgLand and forest fires have broken out in pockets of Indonesia since mid-July.Last year the country caught a break, when a longer-than-normal wet season brought on by La Niña helped mitigate the fire threat.This year, hotspots have started appearing in regions with no history of major land and forest fires, like East Nusa Tenggara and Aceh.The government has responded by declaring an emergency status as well as deploying firefighters. JAKARTA — Fire season has returned to Indonesia, marking the first real test of President Joko Widodo’s efforts to prevent a repeat of the 2015 haze crisis.Land and forest fires have broken out in pockets of the archipelago country since mid-July, with the majority of fire-linked hotspots detected in the provinces of West Kalimantan, East Nusa Tenggara and Aceh.On Aug. 6, the number of hotspots reached 282 nationwide, compared to just 239 detected the previous week, according to Indonesia’s space agency.Since late July, West Kalimantan has had the most hotspots, with 150 on Aug. 6, followed by South Sumatra (23) and South Sulawesi (18).“The forest and land fires in West Kalimantan keep raging on even though fire-extinguishing attempts keep going on. The number of hotspots is still high,” National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said. Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar said that the number of hotspots in July was 49 percent higher than last year.Meanwhile, U.S. weather satellite NOAA-19 detected 1,341 hotspots this year to Aug. 6, up from 1,233 during the same period last year.“In the field, the number of hotspots is likely to be larger [than recorded] because there are some regions that are not passed by satellites during the land and forest fires,” Nugroho said.Following the uptick in hotspots, the government has declared an emergency status in five provinces: Riau, Jambi, South Sumatra, West Kalimantan and South Kalimantan.So too have five West Kalimantan districts: Kubu Raya, Ketapang, Sekadau, Melawi and Bengkayang. “But districts that have many hotspots, such as Kapuas Hulu [23], Sanggau [45], Sintang [22] and Landak [13], haven’t declared red-alert status,” Nugroho said.President Joko Widodo announces a moratorium on new oil palm and mining permits on an island outside Jakarta in 2015. Photo courtesy of the Indonesian government.Challenge for Jokowi’s presidencyIndonesia has in the last two decades become prone to widespread fires during dry periods, thanks to the industrial-scale drainage of its vast peat swamp zones by palm oil and paper interests. The dried peat is highly combustible, and peat fires can be extremely difficult to put out.2015 posed a tremendous challenge for the government when thousands of forest and peat fires raged across the country during the prolonged dry season brought on by the El Niño weather phenomenon.While the scope of this year’s fires is still a far cry from 2015, analysts have predicted a return of the haze after a mostly haze-free year of 2016, when the rainy season lasted longer due to La Niña.Arief Wijaya, senior manager on climate and forests at the World Resource Institute, a thinktank with an office in Jakarta, cited a University of Columbia project that has predicted a drier season this September to October than in the same period last year.“Therefore, the probability of fires is bigger, maybe not as big as 2015 which was affected by El Niño strong swing, but surely this year’s fire risks are bigger than 2016,” he said in an interview.He believes 2017 will present the first real test for the Indonesian government since 2015 because this time, La Niña is not around to help out.“I think the impact of a policy would be tested when the condition is there to test the success or failure of the policy,” he said.On the heels of the 2015 fires, Jokowi, as the president is popularly known, responded with some unprecedented measures, such as declaring a moratorium on peatland conversion even within existing concessions, and banning new oil palm plantation permits.Last month, he extended the moratorium on the issuance of new conversion permits for primary forest and peatlands, the third extension of the moratorium, which was established in 2011 under then President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.“The government is on the right track in terms of policies,” Wijaya said. “But the devil is in the implementation. The biggest enemy is how to implement those policies.”At the same time, Singapore, which lies just downwind of Indonesia, is keeping an eye on its neighbor in anticipation of major fire breakouts which could send toxic haze its way.From July 25-28, Maliki Osman, Singapore’s senior minister of state for defense and foreign affairs, visited Riau and Jambi provinces, two frequent sources of the fires.During the visit, Maliki reaffirmed Singapore’s commitment to work together with Indonesia on haze, while applauding Riau’s efforts to mitigate fires.“Efforts to manage and prevent forest fires that have been done by the Riau provincial government have been very impressive,” he told Indonesia’s Antara news agency during his visit to Riau.Drainage canals bisect a peatland planted with acacia trees in Indonesia’s Riau province. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.New forest-fire trendIn Indonesia, fires usually break out in regions with large plantation areas and big concessions — land granted to developers — especially in Sumatra and Kalimantan.“The plotting of hotspots’ locations from 2015 until 2017 shows that land and forest fires are happening over and over again every year in places like Tesso Nilo National Park [in Riau], Ogan Komering Ilir district [in South Sumatra] and the border between Riau and Jambi,” said Nugroho, the disaster agency spokesman.But this year, hotspots have started appearing in regions with no history of major land and forest fires, like East Nusa Tenggara and Aceh.“This morning, I saw [hotspots appearing] in Bangka Belitung,” Bakar, the environment minister, told reporters in Jakarta recently. “These are new regions. For me, this is worrying because these regions are unlike other regions which already have task force [to handle forest fires].”In Aceh in July, fires engulfed 222 hectares of land, an area the size of Monaco. As many as 241 West Aceh residents suffered respiratory infections from the smoke.“We have repeatedly reminded [the public] not to burn waste or throw cigarette butts, especially on dry soil, because it’s the peak of the dry season in Aceh now,” said Zakaria, Aceh spokesman for Indonesia’s meteorology agency, who like many Indonesians uses only one name.Officials and environmentalists are also bewildered by fires in East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia’s southernmost province, part of an island chain north of Australia.“The fires in East Nusa Tenggara are weird because there’s mostly savanna in the province,” Wijaya said. “So the types of forest are different from those in the western part of Indonesia and in Papua, which have tropical forests. “Second, the soils in East Nusa Tenggara are infertile, making them unfit to be planted with oil palm trees. Therefore, if there are fires, they must be caused by natural hazards because it’s dry, not because of oil palm conversion.”Bakar said this year’s fires are mostly caused by slash-and-burn activities by small farmers.“Truthfully, lots of persuasion need to be done to the public because most of the fires are caused by traditional public land clearing done simultaneously,” she said.Meanwhile, recent observation from Indonesia’s peatland restoration agency (BRG) shows that more than half of the manmade fires occurred in concession areas, many of them owned by large companies.“Data from the end of July until this August shows that lots of the fires occurred in industrial forest areas, not palm oil plantations. This is a bit surprising,” Nazir Foead, head of Indonesia’s Peatland Restoration Agency, told reporters in Jakarta.He added that 26 percent of the fires occurred on peatlands.Nugroho, on the other hand, said that the fires occurred in company concessions, local lands and national parks, hinting that there are multiple underlying causes.But efforts to engage local villagers in preventing forest fires seem to be having some effect.In recent years, both big companies and local governments have been trying to create “fire-aware communities” in which villagers are equipped with firefighting skills and given incentives for keeping their land from burning.“Regions with many fire-aware communities and disaster-prone villages have fewer hotspots throughout 2017,” Nugroho said. “On the other hand, places with few of them have more hotspots. This shows that regions with lack of monitoring are prone to fires.”A fire on Mount Lemongan in East Java in 2015, when forests on the mountain burned amid a drought. Photo by Petrus Riski for Mongabay.Government’s responseThe government has responded to the return of forest fires by declaring an emergency status as well as deploying firefighters. Jokowi also summoned the environment minister twice in the second week of August to discuss how to handle the fires. After the first meeting with Jokowi, Bakar said she planned to hold a coordinating meeting with all regional heads to anticipate escalating forest fires, which are expected to peak between August and September. “If we look at last year’s weather, the peak [of dry season] was in August. And in 2015, it was in September. So we have to anticipate this. That’s why I am suggesting for a coordinating meeting,” Bakar explained. “I will send letters soon to ask for a coordinating meeting with all regional heads, especially those of fire-prone areas, because there are new areas [with fire outbreaks], such as Aceh, Southeast Sulawesi, North Sulawesi and East Nusa Tenggara.”The environment ministry has also launched joint patrol in three provinces — Riau, South Sumatra and West Kalimantan — as well as a firefighting operation with the military, the police and regional disaster mitigation agencies in North Sumatra, Riau and Jambi.As the threat of forest fires looms, officials in Jambi have resorted to extreme measures with the head of the province’s land and forest fire task force, Refrizal, ordering his subordinates to “shoot on sight” when spotting people setting fires in the province. “It won’t be a fatal shot,” he told BBC Indonesia. “First, of course it will be a warning shot.” Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Banner image: A peatland burns in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Agriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forestry, Forests, Law Enforcement, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Peatlands, Plantations, Pulp And Paper, Rainforests, Southeast Asian Haze, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wetlands, wildfires Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Documenting Africa’s poaching epidemic: Q&A with the director of ‘The Last Animals’

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Interviews, Mammals, Northern White Rhino, Poaching, Rhinos, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Isabel Esterman FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Note: This article has been modified to correct the name of the Elephant Protection Initiative. A deadly combination of consumer demand, transnational criminal syndicates and local poverty and conflict drives the illicit trade in ivory and rhino horn.War photographer turned filmmaker Kate Brooks traveled through four continents to document the wildlife trade for her film “The Last Animals.”The film is a finalist for the Special Jury award at the 2017 Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival in Jackson, Wyoming. After years of documenting some of the world’s bloodiest conflicts, a vacation in Kenya inspired photojournalist Kate Brooks to turn her lens to a different kind of violence: the slaughter of elephants and rhinos to feed black-market demand for ivory and rhino horn.Poaching is having a devastating impact on Africa’s wildlife.From 2006 to 2015, the population of African elephants is estimated to have declined by around 110,000, leaving just 415,000 still alive in the wild. The situation is no better for the continent’s rhinos: demand for their horns as decorative items and in traditional medicine has caused more than 7,100 to have been poached in the last decade, leaving a population of just 25,000.In her film “The Last Animals,” war-photographer turned filmmaker Kate Brooks traces this deadly trade across four continents — traveling from protected areas in Africa to wildlife markets in Asia and North America in order to illustrate the complex web of global consumer demand, transnational criminal syndicates and local conflicts and political problems that contribute to the current poaching epidemic.  Along the way, Brooks also meets with investigators, scientists, zookeepers and rangers engaged in an all-too-often life threatening struggle to preserve the last remaining elephants and rhinos.The Last Animals is a finalist for the Special Jury award in the 2017 Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival taking place September 24-29 in Jackson, Wyoming. Winners in 25 awards categories will be announced September 28.In an email interview, Kate Brooks shared her experience documenting the plight of Africa’s elephants and rhinos, as well as her thoughts on what can be done to help these animals.Director of The Last Animals, Kate Brooks, filming over Garamba National Park. Photo Courtesy of The Last Animals.Mongabay: What inspired you to make a film about poaching and the wildlife trade?Brooks: In 2010 after embedding with a medevac unit at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan as a photojournalist, I went to Kenya on a long-planned vacation. It was in the Maasai Mara that I was able to heal from some of the inhumanity I had witnessed: countless troops and Afghan civilians having their limbs blown off by IEDs and Afghan children being erroneously bombed by coalition forces.Seeing a herd of elephants cross my eye line for the first time reminded me that in spite of all the human destruction on the planet, there is still some natural order which ultimately lead me to want to protect it.A couple of years later I applied to the Knight Wallace Fellowship and was accepted as the Ford Environment, Transportation and Technology Fellow.I saw stories trickling in about the poaching crisis, but the issue was largely underreported then. When I learned of an elephant massacre on the border of Chad in which over 80 elephants were gunned down, I felt I had no choice but to pick up my cameras to help bring attention to the crisis.Mongabay: How did your background as a war photographer inform this project? And what parallels and connections do you see between the conflict zones you’ve worked in and the front lines of the trade in ivory and rhino horn?Over the course of three years, I discovered a web of international criminal activity and a network of the most devoted people I have ever met – scientists, activist and conservationists working around the clock to protect the planet’s animals. The rangers who risk their lives every day to preserve the beauty and life that remain are the unsung heroes. I think what sets The Last Animals apart from many wildlife documentaries is that the film is more focused on the human beings than the animals themselves. Being on patrol with rangers in Garamba can be just as dangerous as being on a patrol with a military unit in Afghanistan and that is one of the reasons I went there – I wanted to document the front lines of this ivory war and put the human sacrifice into focus.Today there are only three Northern White rhinos left in the world, all of whom live at Kenya’s Ol Pejeta Conservancy where they are heavily protected. Photo Courtesy of The Last Animals.Mongabay: The film introduces the idea that warning signs about the northern white rhino — which is now going extinct before our eyes — could be seen decades ago, and that now the same kinds of signs are being seen with elephants. What are some of those signs, and what lessons should we learn from the fate of the northern white rhino?Brooks: Wildlife is disappearing at such an alarming rate that it’s nearly impossible for the human mind to comprehend. In Chad I spent a few weeks with a group of conservationists searching by air and land for the country’s last elephants. Outside of Zakouma National Park, there are less than 300 left — desperate little groups, fighting for survival, shot up and becoming genetically isolated. In Garamba National Park, there are more militia in the park than giraffe, and the rangers who are fighting to protect the relatively few animals that remain are being killed in the process. There is a great deal of talk that elephants and rhinos could be extinct in the next 10-20 years, but the reality is that localized extinction is happening now.The story of the Northern Whites is foreboding — what happens when too little is done too late, in spite of all the will and commitment in the world. We are at a critical moment in history and time is running out. The illegal wildlife trade is a global problem that requires global and local action from consumer responsibility to government action.Mongabay: Ultimately, the film paints a pretty grim picture of the situation for elephants and rhinos. Were there things you encountered during filming that give you some hope?Brooks: In spite of how grim the big picture is, there is also a lot that gives me hope. The US implemented a near total ban on the ivory trade last year and seven states have further banned intrastate trade with many other states trying to follow suit.  China committed to banning the ivory trade by the end of 2017 and is following through on that commitment. Hong Kong is currently debating a ban as well. Wildlife trafficking penalties in Kenya have been stiffened to be a true deterrent rather than a slap on the wrist. There is also the Elephant Protection Initiative, which is an African sovereign-led initiative — the only one of its kind anywhere in the world — committed to the protection of a common natural resource: the African elephant. To date, there are more than a dozen African country signatories to the platform, which is recognized by the United Nations, various multi-laterals, and leading NGOs.A ranger looks out over Garamba National Park at daybreak. Garamba, in Democratic Republic of the Congo, is the second oldest national park in Africa and one of the deadliest for both elephants and rangers. Photo courtesy of The Last Animals.Mongabay: What messages do you hope people who view The Last Animals come away with?Brooks: The film not only endeavors to expose the horrors of this crisis, and that extinction is real, but also how the trade is linked to the darkest sides of global criminal activity. My greatest hope is that The Last Animals will help close the world’s remaining ivory markets and raise awareness about how many species are threatened with extinction. The illegal wildlife trade is a global problem that requires global and local action. It’s imperative that countries and states shut down their domestic ivory markets and that illegal wildlife trafficking laws and penalties be stiffened.Mongabay: What are some things people can do if they want to help elephants and rhinos survive?People who want to get involved in the US should put pressure on their state to ban intrastate trade of ivory and ensure that wildlife trafficking laws and penalties are strict in their state. Wyoming for example has yet to implement a state ivory ban. We have a map on our website that shows which states have passed laws and which haven’t. If legislation is pending or has yet to be introduced, concerned citizens should send a letter to their State Senators and Assembly Members in support of ending the intrastate trade. If a bill has already passed both houses, but has not yet been signed, send a letter to the Governor. Having a robust legal frame work in place to protect vulnerable, threatened and endangered species is critical to combating environmental crime.Elephants in Chad’s Zakouma National Park. According to the recent Great Elephant Survey, there are less than 800 elephants left in the country of Chad. Photo courtesy of The Last Animals.Mongabay: What’s next for you?I’m in discussions about directing four different film projects next year – three are documentaries and one is a narrative. I would be thrilled to work on any of them. That said, The Last Animals festival run and impact campaign are going to be consuming a lot of my time for some time to come. We have dozens of screenings coming up around the world over the next couple of months and many booked into next year.last_img read more

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Bolsonaro expresses ‘love’ for Amazon as it burns, offers no policy shift

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer The number of fires in the Amazon biome topped 41,858 in 2019 as of August 24 (up from 22,000 this time last year). Scientists are especially concerned about wildfires raging inside protected areas, such as Jamanxim National Forest in Pará state and Mato Grosso’s Serra de Ricardo Franco Park.While the Bolsonaro government blames hot weather for the Amazon blazes, others disagree. They point to the link between fires and their use to illegally clear rainforest by land speculators, who — emboldened by Bolsonaro’s lax enforcement policies —sell cleared land for 100-200 times more money than it would sell for with trees covering it.Preliminary data shows deforestation rising under Bolsonaro. The rate in June 2019 was 88 percent higher than in June 2018; deforestation soared by 278 percent in July 2019 as compared with July 2018. The rise, analysts say, is due in part to the dismantling of IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental enforcement agency.Bolsonaro has pledged to bring in the army to fight the Amazon blazes and deployed the first units over the weekend, while on Monday the G7 nations promised an emergency $20 million in aid to help Amazon countries fight wildfires and launch a long-term global initiative to protect the rainforest. Aerial view of burning Amazon rainforest, near the city of Porto Velho, Rondônia state. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.On Friday night, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro appeared on national television, expressing his “profound love” for Amazônia and saying that his government had “zero tolerance” for environmental crimes. He also pledged to send in the armed forces to end illegal burning of the Amazon rainforest.Bolsonaro, who, unusually for him, read from a prepared text, timed his address to influence world leaders, gathering at that moment in the French resort of Biarritz ahead of the G7 summit. Some, including French President Emmanuel Macron, called for an international response to force Brazil into decisive action to protect the rainforest. The Irish Taoiseach, Leo Varadkar, said on Friday that the EU should rethink whether to ratify the huge trade deal just concluded with the South American free trade area, Mercosur, saying that Bolsonaro’s attempt to blame the fires on NGOs and environmental groups was “Orwellian.”The possibility that the trade deal, which took 20-years to negotiate, will be wrecked and that Brazil could also face a trade boycott, has greatly alarmed some in the Brazilian agribusiness sector, including former agriculture minister, Blairo Maggi, who has called for the government to change policies, warning that Brazil’s agricultural exports are “replaceable” on the world market.Bolsonaro said that “forest fires, unfortunately, happen each year” and that the number of fires was “within the average of the last 15 years,” a figure provided by NASA. But, as analysts pointed out, this figure, though true, is misleading. In 2004 and 2005 — years when Amazon deforestation was peaking — there was also an alarming rise in annual fires, which topped 70,000. After that, thanks to impressive efforts by authorities, the number of fires generally fell, to 24,000 in 2017 and under 16,000 in 2018.What is alarming observers is the resurgence this year: 41,858 Amazon fires by August 24, according to INPE (the National Institute of Space Research), which uses NASA images. The the neighboring Cerrado savanna has seen 23,000 fires (up from 20,000 last year).Fire map showing active fires for the week starting Aug. 13, 2019, in the Brazilian Amazon using VIIRS and MODIS satellite data. Image courtesy of Global Forest Watch (GFW).These fires sent “rivers of smoke” to Brazil’s urban south last week, causing the skies of São Paulo, the country’s largest city, situated 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) from the Amazon, to become unusually dark. It was only then that this year’s Amazon’s fires became a big news story for the Brazilian press, and for the rest of the world.But by that time, all the Amazon states, except Amapá in the north, had been feeling the  effects of the infernos for several weeks; some since July. “The consequences for the [local] population are immense. The air pollution makes people ill and the economic impact can be high,” said Paulo Moutinho, senior researcher for IPAM (the Amazon Environmental Research Institute), a non-profit organization.Those impacts flow far beyond Brazil’s borders, as the thousands of fires spew large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere, intensifying the global climate crisis.As of Saturday, the first Brazilian troops were reportedly being hastily deployed to fight the Amazon blazes, while on Monday, the G7 nations pledged $20 million in emergency aid to help Amazon countries fight wildfires and to launch a long-term global initiative to protect the rainforest. Bolsonaro has not yet accepted the assistance.2019 fires burning within a protected area in Amazonas state, Brazil. Image courtesy of the MAAP Project, data courtesy of ESA.Fires burning inside protected areasOne of the worst affected Amazon states is Rondônia in the western part of the basin. On August 16, a wall of smoke forced a plane approaching Porto Velho, the state capital, to reroute to Manaus. One Rondônia fire has raged unchecked for three weeks inside the Margarida Alves Environmental Reserve in Nova União. About 1,000 hectares (2,471 acres) have burnt. “It’s hard to breathe,” said journalist Evans Fitz. “Rondônia is dying, suffocated.”The neighboring state of Acre saw 366 fires in July. Because of the high level of airborne carbon monoxide, way above those considered safe by the World Health Organization, the state health secretariat issued an August 9 epidemiological alert.But it is Mato Grosso that has registered more fires than any other state; 12,990 from  January 1 to August 15. Even the municipality of Colniza in the state’s northwest, which had managed to preserve much of its biodiversity and its forests, has been seriously affected; 1,049 fires have been detected there since July 15. Mato Grosso is located along the so-called “Arc of Deforestation,” the line differentiating rainforest from encroaching agribusiness.Mato Grosso’s Serra de Ricardo Franco Park, on the border with Bolivia, is also burning. It has exceptional biodiversity, because it is located transitionally between three biomes — Amazonia, the Cerrado and Pantanal. The Bolivian section of the park is so valued it has been declared a Natural Heritage Site by UNESCO.In Amazonas state, the municipality of Apuí, in the southern region has registered 673 fires. Importantly, eight of them are inside conservation areas protected by the federal government. Amazonas declared a state of emergency back on August 9, well before the rest of the world awoke to the Amazon crisis.A 2019 fire that appears to be being utilized to expand an existing plantation into neighboring forest in Amazonas state, Brazil. Image courtesy of the MAAP Project, data courtesy of Planet.Fire, the biggest tool in the illegal deforestation toolbox In his speech, Bolsonaro attributed the spike in fires to unusually hot weather. But this is not how scientists see it, especially since 2019 has not seen severe drought. “There is no such thing as a natural fire in Amazonia,” said Ane Alencar, IPAM’s director of science. “What happens is that people cut down the vegetation and burn it.” This has been the traditional way of clearing land in the Amazon and, when practiced on a small scale or done on existing farmlands to prepare for new crops, does little harm.But over the last few months, deforestation — and the fires used to accomplish it – has run at an alarmingly high rate. The deforestation rate in June 2019 was 88 percent higher than during the corresponding month in 2018, reported INPE. Deforestation soared to more than 278 percent in July as compared with the same month a year ago, according to IPAM.Much of this burning, especially on federal lands, say analysts, is likely driven by land grabbers who frequently use fire as a means of clearing forest in preparation for land sales to ranchers and farmers. They recognize that the Bolsonaro administration has largely disarmed the government’s environmental agencies, that no longer have budgets with which to fight fires, nor possess the authority to arrest perpetrators.Scientists are especially concerned by fire-driven deforestation this year, as the blazes are spreading into várzea and igapó, areas flooded during the rainy season but within which can be found islands of unflooded forest. Normally, deforesters don’t venture into these protected areas, but Carlos Durigan, director of the Wildlife Conservation Society Brasil (WCS), told Amazônia Real that this changed in 2019, with distressing results. “This situation has caused irreparable damage to aquatic biodiversity, since areas of unflooded forest, which serve as a refuge and feeding areas for many species when the river is in flood, don’t exist anymore,” he explained.According to environmentalists, deforestation had been held in check under previous governments by a coalition of forces — including federal and state agencies, NGO partners, indigenous and traditional communities, academics and scientists. That coalition has now collapsed. The implosion of the Amazon Fund earlier this month, which had curbed deforestation and backed sustainability in Amazon communities for more than a decade is an example of the systemic administrative failure underway.“The position of the current government is to confront the efforts that for decades have been trying to construct a positive socio-environmental agenda for Amazonia,” said Durigan. “These efforts have stemmed from the mobilization of civil society, government agencies, universities and the private sector.” Durigan is now extremely worried that the situation “can deteriorate at a fast rate.”Alejandro Fonseca Duarte, a Federal University of Acre professor, agrees: “Public policies have clearly changed [since Bolsonaro took over]. The government’s discourse and its policies now favor the lifting of protection over indigenous land, the promotion of mining, the extension of soy farming from Mato Grosso to Acre, the discrediting of the indicators of deforestation and the weakening of international support for the protection of the Amazon. This is the reality we are living. And we are beginning to see what it leads to.”Six of the nine state governors in Amazonia are Bolsonaro backers, and have endorsed his policies; some have rejected the rule of law regarding the environment. In late May, Gladson Cameli, Acre’s governor, openly encouraged ruralists not to pay fines resulting from environmental crimes for which they’d been found guilty. “If IMAC [the Institute of the Environment in Acre] fines someone, tell me,” he said “And don’t pay any fine, because I’m in charge now.”Cameli was elected last year after the left-leaning Workers’ Party which had governed Acre for 20 years, was voted out. When asked why he was encouraging ruralists to break the law, he replied: “Before, our farmers were traumatized by the excessively tough [environmental] measures taken by previous governments. They went further than they were required to by law.” Cameli is now promoting the spread of soy plantations across Acre.A blurred photo used by the Folha do Progresso newspaper to report on the “Day of Fire,” an event the ruralist-supported newspaper itself promoted. Image by Folha do Progresso.Ruralists declare “A Day of Fire”INPE data shows that, of all the deforestation occurring across Amazônia between August 1, 2018 and July 31, 2019, an estimated 59 percent took place in Brazil’s Pará state. Importantly, most of that (71 percent) occurred on federal lands. Pará is an epicenter of the struggle between Amazon conservationists and ruralists who strongly support agribusiness expansion.It also appears that Bolsonaro is working to tip the balance in favor of deforesters in Pará. Although the president has been in office for nearly eight months, IBAMA, the federal environmental agency, has yet to appoint a superintendent for the state. In response to questions about the federal government’s failure to combat environmental crime, Mauro de Almeida, Pará’s environmental secretary, said on August 16 that the lack of an IBAMA chain of command is harming state efforts to battle deforestation.Not surprisingly, Pará land grabbers now act as if they are above the law. Some proof of that came on August 5 in Novo Progresso, a town on the BR-163 highway dominated by ruralists. On that day they announced in A Folha de Novo Progresso, the local newspaper which they control, that they would be holding a “Day of Fire” on August 10. They called on all those who had cut forest in 2019, to set fire to it simultaneously. The cry was also taken up in Altamira, the largest municipal district in Brazil.On August 10, more than 120 fires were registered in Novo Progresso, the highest number this year. But that record didn’t stand: the following day there were even more – 203 fires. No one was arrested or fined. Altamira recorded 194 fires, a 743 percent increase over the previous day, which then jumped to 237 the following day. According to the Queimadas Program, run by INPE, Novo Progresso and Altamira were national champions for forest fires over that weekend.The residents said they felt “supported by the words of Jair Bolsonaro,” and were keen, as they told the local newspaper, “to show the President that we want to work.”  They have little reason to fear reprisals. Normally, during the dry season, IBAMA opens a base in Novo Progresso to curb environmental crimes. But this year Helder Barbalho, the governor of Pará state, refused to authorize Military Police participation in IBAMA’s operations. Without the help of the Military Police, or the National Force (a law enforcement agency run by the Justice Ministry), IBAMA’s team would have found itself unprotected from violent reprisals, so cancelled its 2019 Novo Progresso operation.A firefighter combats an Amazon fire in a past year. In 2019, under Bolsonaro, IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, has been largely stripped of money and authority to fight forest fires. Photo courtesy of IBAMA.Now, with no more IBAMA environmental monitoring money coming from Norway through the Amazon Fund, the chance of the agency’s deforestation enforcement activities restarting is increasingly remote.The agribusiness frontier continues advancing rapidly in southwest Pará, and that advance occurs by fairly predictable steps. First, loggers extract the most valuable timber, then land speculators send in local workers, commonly held in slave-like conditions, to cut down and burn the remaining forest. The deforesters, who in many cases are wealthy land speculators, do not farm the land themselves, but sell the cleared forest land to cattle ranchers at high prices. In the bizarre economy of the Amazon frontier, speculators generally get 100, or even 200 times, more money for an acre of cleared land — denuded of its exuberant native vegetation and vibrant wildlife — than they would get for that same acre if forested. Finally, when cattle have grazed the land even further, it is resold for conversion to soy or other cash crops for export.One of the areas that loggers and speculators are targeting most aggressively near Novo Progresso is the Jamanxim National Forest. Of all Brazil’s protected areas, it is the one most heavily devastated this year. The preserve lost 3 percent of its forest cover — 44,800 hectares (110,700 acres) — in May alone. Now loggers have paid for an illegal bridge to be built over the Jamanxim River, which will make it far easier to transport timber to the port of Itaituba on the Tapajós river. When the bridge is finished, probably by October, a threefold increase in traffic is expected. At the moment logging trucks have to be barged across the river. If Bolsonaro is sincere about his pledge to send in large numbers of troops to save the Amazon, this might be a place to start.Bridge under construction by illegal loggers over the Jamanxim River. The Bolsonaro administration has so far done nothing to stop its building. Image by Jeso Carneiro.After a group of independent public litigators from Pará state’s federal public ministry (MPF) travelled to Novo Progresso to investigate the “day of fire,” they published a statement expressing alarm at IBAMA’s inability to carry out its legal function there. “Confronting illegal deforestation is a state policy,” imposed under the Brazilian Constitution, the MPF said. “Public Power does not have the right to decide whether or not it implements this policy. It is its duty!”Most Brazilian seem to agree with the public prosecutors. A recent poll showed that 96 percent of the population, including many Bolsonaro supporters, partially or completely backed the statement that “President Bolsonaro and the Federal government should increase monitoring to prevent illegal deforestation in Amazônia.”Going by last Friday’s speech and the army’s deployment, the president seemed to be listening. But for many people living in the Amazon, a better measure of Bolsonaro’s commitment would be the rebuilding of dismantled regulatory bodies, particularly IBAMA, as a means of protecting their homes and forest livelihoods from growing lawlessness, conflict and violence.Meanwhile, Brazil’s dry season is ongoing and the Amazon continues burning.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Banner image and above image: Forest fire burning out of control in the municipality of Colniza, Mato Grosso state, Brazil. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace. Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Failure Factors: Sometimes the most important thing to know is what did not go as planned (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler The problem with focusing so much on unearthing positive or affirmative evidence is that we humans often learn more from our failures than from our successes, write David Wilkie of WCS, Kara Stevens of the Walton Family Foundation, and Richard Margoluis of the Moore Foundation.People working to conserve nature and improve people’s lives may not report failures because they may worry about compromising their own and their organization’s reputations and jeopardizing future support.To address those concerns, the Failure Factors Initiative has been established to identify ways that individuals, teams and their organizations can grow to value failure, learn from it, and improve their decisions and actions.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the authors, not necessarily Mongabay. Evidence of success. It is the holy grail sought by teachers, health workers, engineers, natural resource managers, policy makers, and funders. Like us, all have the same wish: “Just let me know what works and I will replicate that.” But the problem with focusing so much on unearthing positive or affirmative evidence is that we humans often learn more from our failures than from our successes.David loves to bake bread. Each time it is an experiment that relies on a never truly understood, almost magical, transformation of yeast, water, and flour into an airy, crispy, edible platform for butter, cheese, jam, or anything. When he makes a perfect loaf, he doesn’t think about it. He simply lets it cool (well, not always) and eats it gleefully with family and friends. But when he botches a new or even a tried-and-true recipe, he ponders deeply about why it failed and what must be done in the future to avoid repeating the same mistake.Though bakers like David learn from their mistakes, they rarely if ever make them public. Along similar lines, people working to conserve nature and improve people’s lives may not report failures because they may worry about compromising their own and their organization’s reputations and jeopardizing future support. Neither organizations nor individual professionals who have worked hard to be regarded as experts are anxious to be associated with failure.To address those concerns, WCS is taking the lead in launching what we are currently calling the Failure Factors Initiative. We hope to identify ways that individuals, teams and their organizations can grow to value failure, learn from it, and improve their decisions and actions, making our efforts to conserve nature and benefit humanity more effective and quicker to adapt to change.We want everyone to happily describe and discuss things that turned out to be undoable, caused undesired outcomes, or just did not achieve the results that we wanted.Mother Sumatran rhino with calf in Way Kambas, Indonesia. Sumatran rhino conservation efforts have been plagued by failures, offering plenty of lessons for current initiatives working to save the species from extinction. Photo by Rhett Butler.The trickiest element is ensuring a way to capitalize on our errors without stigmatizing those who made them. This requires a cultural shift both within institutions and between organizations and funders. The military, aviation and engineering sectors have long embraced failure to learn and adapt, and the tech sector is increasingly pushing for a similar cultural change. The development and conservation sectors have been slower to adopt.You might assume that simply creating a safe space for sharing of unexpected outcomes, surprises, blunders, errors, and mistakes would allow us to more easily harvest the lessons offered by failure. Indeed it is not hard to imagine ways to allow people to talk about stuff that did not work out as expected without the fear of risking their reputations.Using Chatham House Rules—a system for holding discussions on controversial topics established by the UK Royal Institute of International Affairs, based in Chatham House, London—is a proven approach to encourage open discussion unattributed to the speaker or their organization. Using an online survey that does not capture any information identifying the survey taker (e.g. their internet address) is another option for maintaining anonymity.Both approaches avoid directly divulging the name of an individual or their organization. But merely reporting on something that did not work as expected may be enough for a savvy listener or reader to deduce the author of the story, particularly when embellished with sufficient detail to enable a clear understanding of what went wrong. The context that makes the failure story understandable and interpretable to others in similar or different contexts risks revealing its authors.Thus, we face a dilemma. Even Chatham House Rules may inadvertently identify the storyteller, risking their reputation. At the same time, assured anonymity may demand a level of abstraction in the story telling such that its value as a lesson learned is lost. A failure story in the abstract simply states that a failure happened. Without the context surrounding the failure, we are unlikely to fully understand why it happened and change our behavior.The Kihansi spray toad nearly went extinct in the wild and captivity before successful efforts to grow its population and eventually reintroduce it to its native habitat in Tanzania. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Hence the Failure Factor Initiative. Our goal is to encourage and value open discussion of things that did not work out as expected even within otherwise successful projects. We want to identify ways we can use these regular “confessions” within and across teams and organizations to learn faster and avoid the same pitfalls in the future.And, in truth, like previous attempts to discuss and learn from failure, the Failure Factors Initiative itself might fail. That said, we argue that it is worth a try. Because as all bakers know, our recipes and techniques get better as we learn what works and—most importantly—what does not, and why.Authors: David Wilkie is the Executive Director of Conservation Measures and Communities at the Wildlife Conservation Society; Kara Stevens is the Senior Strategy, Learning and Evaluation Department (SLED) Officer for the Walton Family Foundation; Richard Margoluis is the Chief Adaptive Management and Evaluation Officer at the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.Disclosure: Mongabay is a grantee of both the Walton Foundation and the Moore Foundation, but neither institution has editorial influence over our reporting.center_img Commentary, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Editorials, Environment last_img read more

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2019’s top 10 ocean news stories (commentary)

first_imgMarine scientists from the University of California, Santa Barbara, share their list of the top 10 ocean news stories from 2019.Hopeful developments included progress toward an international treaty to protect biodiversity on the high seas and a rebound in the western South Atlantic humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) to nearly its pre-whaling population size.Meanwhile, research documenting rapidly unfurling effects of climate change in the ocean painted a dire picture of the present and future ocean. These include accelerating sea level rise, more severe marine heatwaves and more frequent coral bleaching events.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the authors, not necessarily Mongabay. 1. Climate change and oceansClimate change impacts on land made almost daily headlines this year: fires, floods, more extreme storms. Equally intense effects are being realized in our seas. This year, more than 100 scientists from 30 countries brought these impacts on the ocean into sharp focus with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on the ocean and cryosphere. The findings were bleak: Sea level rise is accelerating, marine heatwaves are more extensive and intense and coral bleaching events are occurring with increasing frequency. The report’s predictions up the ante on action. Even if we meet the Paris Agreement mandate to keep warming to below a 2-degree Celsius rise over pre-industrial levels, the report suggests that by 2100 sea levels will rise by 0.3 to 0.6 meters (1 to 2 feet), there will be 20 times more marine heatwaves and the ocean will be 40% more acidic. The urgency for ocean/climate action was happily mirrored at the close of this year with an all-time bump in importance for oceans at the recent U.N. climate negotiations (COP 25) in Madrid, with the event even being billed by some as the “Blue COP.”Roads washed away due to sea-level rise and storm surge from Hurricane Sandy at Assateague Island off the coast of Maryland and Virginia in 2012. Image by NPS Climate Change Response via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).2. A year for youth leadershipWhile detailed scientific reports and formal international negotiations are making slow progress, 2019 was the year that youth climate activists stood up to demand a much more rapid response. This included youth from the Pacific islands who are already dealing with the impacts of sea-level rise. Greta Thunberg inspired millions of students to participate in school strikes, and Fridays for Future marches became a common occurrence in towns and cities across the globe. More than 4 million people in over 163 countries are estimated to have participated in the global climate strike in September. 2019 could be called the year when youth undeniably spoke their mind about climate change, but it remains to be seen how well the world listened.Protesters at a global climate march in Melbourne, Australia, in March 2019. Image by John Englart via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0).3. Treaty governing the high seas within reach2019 was a big year for progress on protecting biodiversity on the high seas, the two-thirds of the ocean that lie outside of national waters. The U.N. hosted two rounds of negotiations on a possible new global treaty to better manage and protect biodiversity on the high seas — life that too often has slipped through international regulatory cracks. This protection is critical for pelagic populations that have already suffered huge losses due to overfishing or bycatch. Marine scientists from around the world presented results to the U.N. this year as to which parts and how much of the high seas should be protected. Considerations include hotspots for migratory marine top predators such as seabirds and sharks, important fish spawning and feeding grounds and areas that may provide a buffer to climate change impacts. A draft treaty text was released in November. With only one more planned negotiating session left this spring in New York, all eyes in 2020 will be on whether the treaty indeed becomes something that matters for ocean life on the high seas.Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Image by Noah Kahn/USFWS via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).4. Sprint to the finish line on parks in the seaMore than 3 billion people globally rely on healthy marine ecosystems for their livelihoods. However, fish stocks are overexploited, marine pollution is rife and ocean acidification is on the rise. A key target of U.N. Sustainable Development Goal 14 is to protect 10% of marine areas by 2020, a goal also encapsulated in Aichi Target 11 of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). With several large new protected areas announced in recent years and current ocean protection at around 7.5%, we are now close to reaching the 10% target, but it remains to be seen if this can be achieved before the next CBD Conference of the Parties in October 2020. Even so, meeting the target does not ensure conservation success. Hard work remains to be done to ensure that all marine protected areas are effective. This year also saw increasing calls from scientists, conservationists and governments to raise global ambitions and aim to protect 30% of the ocean by 2030, part of which would include high seas waters.Grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) in the waters of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Image by Kydd Pollock/USFWS – Pacific Region via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).5. Unsolved oil spillAn oil spill detected off the coast of Brazil in late August of this year is estimated at over 7,000 tons of crude oil, covering a 2,700-kilometer (1,680-mile) stretch of coastline. The spill has contaminated hundreds of beaches, estuaries, reefs and mangroves and is threatening important biodiversity hotspots and at least 48 marine protected areas. One of these is Abrolhos Bank, the largest coral reef area in the South Atlantic Ocean. The source of the spill has yet to be identified, but it seems likely to have come from a “dark ship” that had switched off its location transponder. Analysis of satellite data has helped to identify ships that were in the area at the time of the spill, and the Brazilian authorities are currently reviewing the information. Brazil’s National Contingency Plan was activated late, and citizens whose livelihoods depend on coastal resources were those most impacted by the spill. An improved response requires a crisis emergency fund and trained personnel to help citizens respond safely to environmental disasters. Further investment is also needed to improve both the science of spills and the technology that will enable a modern satellite monitoring system of ship activity.Oil tanker at sea. Image by Timo Adam via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).6. Our plastic seaEvery year it seems we learn more and more about the severity of the plastic pollution crisis. Actions to address the crisis kicked off at the start of the year when the Alliance to End Plastic Waste, a group of household-name companies (think Procter & Gamble, Shell and Dow), committed $1 billion to reduce plastic waste and improve recycling. Other recent commitments include the Sea the Future initiative from the Minderoo Foundation, which hinges on businesses pledging a voluntary contribution that will make fossil fuel-based plastics more expensive to produce and more valuable to collect. At the country level, Vietnam released its National Action Plan on Ocean Plastic Waste Management, Panama became the first Central American nation to ban plastic bags, and Kenya committed to banning single-use plastics in 2020. Awareness has also increased about the role that rivers play in the flow of plastic into the ocean, and innovative solutions are being developed to tackle the problem, such as Baltimore Harbor’s Mr. Trash Wheel and The Ocean Cleanup’s Interceptor.An 11.5-m (38-ft) tall whale made from 4,500 kilograms (10,000 pounds) of plastic was installed in a canal in Bruges, Belgium. Image by Richard Harris via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).7. Ocean miningThe world moved closer this year to answering a landmark question for oceans: Should we legalize mining of the seafloor? The International Seabed Authority hopes to finalize the answer to that question next year by completing international regulations on commercial ocean mining in the high seas, but it faces significant political opposition. In 2019 a host of countries, including Fiji, formally called for bans on ocean mining, citing concerns about the possible negative impacts that mining may have on fisheries, carbon storage in the oceans and fragile deep-ocean ecosystems. Paralleling the race to mine the seafloor is the race to reduce our dependence on these marine minerals, through both the transformation of battery chemistry away from the reliance on rare metals — for example, with potential breakthrough moments in next-generation battery research from labs at MIT and Berkeley — and the improvement of methods to recycle metals from existing products.A garden of coral on the Sibelius Seamount at a depth of 2,465 m (8,087 ft). Image by NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).8. End of the line for fisheries subsidiesHarmful fisheries subsidies are contributing to the depletion of marine life globally, with one-third of the world’s fish stocks now harvested at unsustainable levels compared to just 10% some 40 years ago. Subsidies are payouts provided to fishers by governments to offset costs, such as fuel and fishing gear, and they can often encourage illegal catch or fishing beyond biologically sustainable limits. Members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) have been in negotiations to end harmful fisheries subsidies since 2001, and with talks picking up momentum in 2019, it was hoped an agreement would finally be reached by the end of the year. Unfortunately, that opportunity has now passed, but in early December members agreed on an intensive program of negotiations for early 2020 aiming to reach agreement by the next WTO ministerial meeting in June. The appointment of a new chair of the negotiations has injected fresh energy and hope into the talks process, and many voices of influence have joined the call for a swift conclusion to the negotiations, including the WTO’s director-general, Roberto Azevêdo, and famed British naturalist Sir David Attenborough.Snapper fish for sale at Scarborough Fish Market, Queensland, Australia. Image by Kgbo via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).9. Ups and Downs for the world’s whalesIt’s been a rollercoaster year for whale populations. In 2018 it looked like the Canadian government might have tackled the causes of a spate of untimely deaths of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis), mainly caused by collisions with ships. However, nine strandings of whale carcasses this year in Canada and one in the U.S. have shown that vessel strikes are still a worrying threat for this critically endangered marine mammal. There may be a glimmer of hope, though, for the world’s smallest cetacean, the vaquita (Phocoena sinus), as three pairs of mothers and calves have been spotted in the northern Gulf of California, Mexico. The species is verging on extinction due to entanglement in fishing gear, with perhaps two dozen animals remaining. In even better news, new research estimates that the western South Atlantic population of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) has now reached around 93% of its pre-whaling size. This is a huge bounceback from the lowest numbers of just 450 individuals in the mid-1950s. (Incidentally, that’s about the size of the current North Atlantic right whale population.) More whales in the ocean is not only good for biodiversity and ecosystems; new analyses out this year suggest it might also help to tackle climate change.North Atlantic right whale mother and calf (Eubalaena glacialis). Image by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, NOAA Research Permit # 665-1652, via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).10. Ocean weirdnessIt’s often quoted that we know more about the moon’s surface than the ocean floor, and even in 2019 the ocean still continues to surprise us. Though we’ve known about biofluorescence in the marine world for a while, the mechanism for why some shark species emit a green glow was only worked out this year. Researchers have now discovered a small family of molecules that produce the green glow, which is only visible to other sharks, and the compounds may even offer protection from microbial infection. It can be a challenge to keep up with the changes happening in the ocean, many of which are driven by climate change. The appearance of a go-kart-size hoodwinker sunfish (Mola tecta) washed up on Coal Oil Point Reserve in Santa Barbara, California, caused confusion for locals and scientists alike. This species, which was only discovered in 2014, is usually more at home in the waters of the Southern Hemisphere. And finally, the so-called “Blob,” a patch of unusually warm ocean water that formed in the Gulf of Alaska in 2013 and spread along the entire North American west coast, continues to leave its mark. While waters cooled in mid-2016, the previous warmer temperatures have been tied to a crash in cod stocks in the Gulf of Alaska, and this month fisheries managers made the unprecedented decision to close the Pacific cod fishery. Worryingly, NOAA reported in September on the beginning of another marine heatwave covering the same region and extent as the blob with the potential to further impact marine and coastal ecosystems.Fluorescent and white light images of a female swell shark (Cephaloscyllium ventriosum). Image courtesy of Scientific Reports (CC BY 4.0).Emma Critchley is a project scientist at the Benioff Ocean Initiative at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she works on projects that are developing science- and technology-based solutions to ocean problems. Her background is in marine spatial ecology, particularly the overlap of marine top predators and human activities. Douglas McCauley began his career as a fisherman but later transitioned to marine science. He now serves as an associate professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and director of the Benioff Ocean Initiative. McCauley studies how marine ecosystems function and what management practices best support ocean health. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kessler Animals, Biodiversity, Climate Activism, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Coral Reefs, Climate Change Policy, Commentary, Conservation, Coral Bleaching, Critically Endangered Species, Deep Sea, Deep Sea Mining, Emission Reduction, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fishing, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Mammals, Marine Protected Areas, Mining, Ocean Acidification, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Oil Spills, Overfishing, Plastic, Pollution, Protected Areas, Sea Ice, Water Pollution, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Basket : Etzella sacré champion en battant le T71 (102-100)

first_img tweet Partager LA FINALE 1re mancheEtzella-T71 : 97-772e mancheT71-Etzella : 89-803e mancheEtzella-T71 : 105-954e mancheT71-Etzella : 100-102center_img En s’imposant 102-100 contre le T71 samedi soir, Etzella a remporté le titre de champion. Son premier titre depuis 13 ans…Le T71 était dos au mur et devait absolument vaincre lors de cette 4e manche de finale du championnat pour empêcher Etzella d’être sacré… Au final, les Dudelangeois s’inclinent 100-102 au terme d’un match assez fou. Avec cette victoire, Etzella s’arrache donc le titre au championnat. Après avoir remporté la Coupe mi-mars, les Nordistes réalisent donc le doublé.Le T71 a tout donné, mais n’a pas réussi à s’imposer lors de cette 4e manche. (Photo : Editpress/Jeff Lahr) LQlast_img read more

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[Roud Léiwen] 88e match pour Luc Holtz

first_img35% de matches qui se terminent bienPaul Philipp savait bien que cela arriverait un jour et depuis pas mal de temps, il en souriait. Lui qui avait été débarqué par Henri Roemer fin 2001 à la suite d’une défaite en Yougoslavie (6-2) afin de moderniser la fonction avec l’intronisation d’Allan Simonsen, a d’ailleurs encore renouvelé le contrat de son entraîneur en mai dernier.Holtz est ainsi assuré de continuer au moins jusqu’en 2021 et donc de passer la barre des 100 matches dirigés à la tête des Roud Léiwen. L’intéressé ne peut pas y être insensible. Pourtant, il ne le dira pas comme ça, et préférera certainement insister sur l’intérêt d’une telle longévité pour installer un projet sur la durée.C’est exactement ce qu’il a fait depuis son tout premier match, débuté par une lourde défaite 1-5 au pays de Galles, à Llanelli. Développer un projet de jeu ambitieux qui, presque dix ans plus tard, fait dire à Fernando Santos, le coach du Portugal, que « le Luxembourg mériterait d’être dans le top 30 mondial ». Le bilan est plutôt très bon pour lui : 16 victoires et 15 nuls, il n’a pas perdu que 35% du temps, c’est-à-dire un match sur trois.Lui reste à franchir l’un des derniers caps, à savoir faire du fond de jeu développer par cette génération dorée une garantie de résultats réguliers puis l’installer sur la durée. Combien de temps (et de matches) cela peut-il donc bien prendre ? Parce que Holtz court encore après Paul Philipp sur la durée de son mandat (15 ans à la tête des Roud Léiwen) et Paul Feierstein (16 ans)…De notre envoyé spécial à Aalborg, Julien Mollereau Le sélectionneur national, en poste depuis un déplacement au pays de Galles le 15 août 2018, va fêter ce mardi soir son 88e match au poste. Un de plus que son président, jusqu’alors coach le plus capé du pays.C’est finalement passé inaperçu devant l’énormité de se retrouver face au champion d’Europe et à Cristiano Ronaldo pour le compte des éliminatoires de l’Euro-2020, vendredi dernier mais voilà : à Lisbonne, devant les 47 000 spectateurs du stade Alvalade, Luc Holtz a rejoint Paul Philipp au rang de sélectionneur le plus capé de l’histoire du pays. Et ce mardi soir, dans le froid d’une bourgade danoise de 115 000 habitants, il va entrer dans l’histoire nationale.Il y a une certaine forme de logique là-dedans : Holtz est actuellement le troisième sélectionneur européen à être resté le plus longtemps en poste. Seuls l’Allemand Joachim Löw, 13 ans et 94 jours et l’Andorran Jesus Koldo, 9 ans et 254 jours, font mieux que le Luxembourgeois de 50 ans, installé lui sur son banc depuis 9 ans et 71 jours. En comparaison, son homologue Age Hareide, à la tête du Danemark depuis le 1er mars 2016, fait figure de petit jeune. Les sélectionneurs les plus capés de l’histoireLuc Holtz et Paul Philipp……….87 matchesRobert Heinz……….64 matchesPaul Feierstein……….63 matchesGuy Hellers……….47 matchesLouis Pilot……….38 matchesGilbert Legrand……….34 matchescenter_img Partagerlast_img read more

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[BGL Ligue] Vrabec : «il y avait la place pour faire mieux et Pétange l’a fait»

first_imgIl vous faut absolument recruter des défenseurs cet hiver ou pourriez-vous vous en passer ?Non, on doit faire quelque chose et on va le faire. La situation nous a montré qu’on ne peut pas seulement jouer avec quatre ou cinq défenseurs dans l’effectif. Il nous en faut au moins un de plus, peut-être deux, même avec le retour de Yann Matias.Le week-end dernier, Thomas Gilgemann, votre directeur sportif, a évoqué comme ça, en passant, le nom de Chris Philipps…Je ne saurais vous dire à 100 %. Il n’est pas satisfait dans son club, il cherche un nouveau challenge mais je ne sais pas s’il veut se relancer au Luxembourg. Ce serait peut-être une bonne chose pour lui de venir jouer ici six mois et de chercher quelque chose en été. On va attendre de voir ce qui se passe.Vous n’avez pas peur de perdre d’autres joueurs cet hiver ? Un De Almeida, un Skenderovic ?Je ne pense pas non. On a déjà parlé avec eux, on leur a rappelé qu’ils ont des contrats et qu’on veut gagner un titre, que ce soit celui de champion ou la Coupe. Bref, on a quelque chose à accomplir et on a besoin de ces deux joueurs pour le faire. S’ils partent, ce sera cet été.Revenons au match de ce week-end. Pétange vous a-t-il surpris sur cette première partie de saison ?Je les ai vus deux fois en live et un peu plus en vidéo. C’est une équipe qui a de la qualité partout. Ils ont 14/15 bons joueurs et ils ont fait de belles choses, alors j’imagine que leur confiance en eux est très élevée. Je pense qu’ils vont vouloir aller chercher le titre et ils ont ce qu’il faut pour durer en deuxième partie de saison.Vous avez inscrit 19 buts ces cinq derniers matches en même temps. Vous êtes de retour aux affaires ?Oui, on a eu une très courte période sans marquer, mais on s’est créé des opportunités. Mais voilà, on marque de nouveau. Mieux : avant, c’était surtout Emmanuel Françoise qui marquait. Maintenant, Shala et Tekiela s’y mettent et c’est très important.Vous êtes moins lisibles ?Vous savez, même si vous êtes lisibles, cela ne veut pas dire que vous n’êtes pas difficiles à contrer. Ce n’est pas que vous savez ce que l’autre équipe va faire que tu peux bien défendre.Ils pourraient être tentés de jouer longVous allez aussi devoir défendre contre le Titus. Pensez-vous que Carlos Fangueiro, qui avait voulu exploiter les espaces dans le dos des défenseurs de la Jeunesse, le week-end passé, pourrait vous remettre Soladio plutôt que le titulaire habituel en pointe, Mokrani ?Non. Je pense que ce sera Mokrani. Parce qu’il marque beaucoup. Soladio, je pense que c’était juste une option pour la Jeunesse. Pas contre nous. J’ai cru comprendre que leur terrain n’était pas bon et ils pourraient être tentés, parfois, de jouer long. Donc Mokrani.Et qui allez-vous installer en face d’Artur Abreu ?Il est ailier gauche et on a plusieurs options au poste d’arrière droit. Mais je ne m’intéresse pas trop particulièrement à cette question. Je cherche surtout des solutions globales.Comment voyez-vous ce match ? Une chance de revenir à 1 point ou un risque de se retrouver à 7 pts ?Non, non, c’est toujours une chance, jamais un risque. Et c’est ce qu’on va faire dimanche : aller chercher de quoi revenir à 1 point.Entretien avec Julien MollereauPétange (1er)-Progrès (2e) : dimanche 16 heures Partager [13e JOURNÉE] Roland Vrabec, le coach du Progrès, s’offre un premier bilan demi-parcours avant un match dimanche contre le leader Pétange ultra-important.Est-ce curieux d’avoir réalisé une aussi bonne première moitié de saison et de ne pas être leader ?Roland Vrabec : Non, parce qu’on a pris 27 points sur 36. C’est “O. K.”, mais il y avait de la place pour faire mieux et Pétange, lui, l’a fait. Il est parvenu à gagner là où nous avons fait match nul. Mais être deuxième aujourd’hui, ça me va. Ce n’est pas maintenant qu’il faut être premier.Vous ne seriez pas plus proches des 36 points si vous n’aviez pas perdu quelques joueurs ayant signé pro en début d’année et cumulé par mal de petits pépins ?Je pense, oui ! En plus, nous, par rapport à Pétange, on a joué six matches de plus et commencé quelques semaines plus tôt aussi. On a abattu beaucoup de travail, cela fait quand même six mois qu’on est ensemble. Mais pour revenir à la question, oui, avec Tim Hall et Marvins Martins, on aurait eu plus d’options et cela nous aurait permis de mettre plus de pression sur les joueurs présents. Parce que oui, on a eu plein de petites blessures. Rien de grave, mais dans cette première partie de saison, des joueurs savaient d’avance qu’ils joueraient. Comment leur mettre la pression en tant que coach ? Mais bon, on a quand même fait du bon boulot.last_img read more

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[Natation] Florent Manaudou au Luxembourg pour l’Euro meet 2020

first_imgC’est une première : l’équipe de natation Energy standard, l’une des plus célèbres équipes de natation du monde, sera sur les plots de départ de l’Euro meet Luxembourg, le 24, 25 et 26 janvier.Grosse annonce, ce jeudi matin : trois grands champions participeront à l’Euro meet Luxembourg en janvier, dont Florent Manaudou, champion olympique en or en nage libre à Rio.L’équipe Energy standard emmène également la suèdoise  Sarah Sjöström, championne olympique et détentrice du record du monde sur le 100 mètres papillon, et Pernille Blume, championne olympique du 50 mètres nage libre à Rio. Partager Ça promet !LQlast_img read more

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