Untangling Services Microservices Functions

“Functions” are at the other end of the scale. A function is a software component whose outputs are totally dependent on the inputs; nothing internal is stored or used. Output = 2xInput1 + Input2 is an example of a very simple function. Functions are obviously small and generalized, so you can reuse them easily, and because the output is a function of the inputs alone, you can give an input to any copy of a function and get the same result. That makes them fully scalable and resilient. Because serverless computing loads function only when they’re used, these properties are critical to the serverless cloud. On the other hand, they’re not as obviously useful in the data center, where having a component stay resident can offer performance benefits without creating incremental cloud service charges. What Role Will Integrations, APIs Play in the Evolution of UCC? Todd Carothers June 27, 2019 RESTful APIs are bringing a wave of change to the communications industry. Building software from components has three goals, ones we could call the “three Rs.” There’s “reuse,” meaning that common functions can be implemented once and used where needed. There’s “redeployment,” meaning that changes to an application can be rolled out with less disruption, and there’s “repair,” meaning that fixing problems is easier because of availability and performance. As it happens, our three critical terms differ in at least one of these areas. Not All Beers & RosesWhich leaves us with “microservices,” perhaps the most confusing of all our new terms for application components in the cloud age. Google tends to use the term to mean much the same thing as a function, but among developers the term seems to have taken on a different meaning. To them, a microservice is a small component that shares the stateless property of functions, but is like services in that they’re persistent. Functions come and go as they’re used and the use ends, but microservices tend to deploy and stay in place for successive uses. That makes them a kind of waystation between services and functions, and that may be why microservices seem to dominate application planning these days. They’re easy to come to terms with, and they’re useful both in the cloud and in the data center. From One End to the Next“Services,” the original componentization strategy, are still in use today. By convention, a service is a functional component of an application that does some specific business thing. A service-oriented application might have services like “Add Employee,” “Pay Employees,” “Change Employee Information,” and so forth. Business activities, business processes, and business transactions determine the componentization. Obviously, these are all components of a single application (payroll/personnel, in my example), but while they’re smaller than the application overall, they’re not really very small and they’re also not particularly easy to reuse. You can’t fit “Pay Employees” easily into a customer resource management application or into check processing. Leading the Way to a Developer-Focused Future Beth Schultz April 29, 2019 Creating a developer mindset isn’t easy, but it’s an imperative as communications and collaboration technologies become increasingly software-centric. Microservices aren’t all beer and roses, though. Any strategy to break applications into distributable components has its own risks. The most obvious is that separate components mean moving work across a network from one to the other, something that takes significant time and creates risks that loss of connectivity will cause an application failure. Nowhere is that more obvious than in the way we refer to the autonomous components of distributed applications. We have “services,” a term that’s almost a decade old but still in use. We have “microservices,” which surely have to be more than tiny little services; and we have “functions,” or “lambdas,” which are often used in “serverless” cloud computing. But what’s the difference, and why should we care? Vonage Takes Care of Healthcare with New Services, APIs Zeus Kerravala April 16, 2019 Helps healthcare organizations fast-track digital transformation plans If microservices are smaller than services, it follows that there would be more of them, and thus more accumulated network delay and risk. Both are exacerbated if the application isn’t carefully designed. For example, a microservice that’s invoked a dozen times in connection with a single transaction multiplies the delay and risk by a dozen times too. Better to avoid using microservices where that kind of iteration is likely. Take CareComponentization offers benefits both in development and in running applications, but even though it’s been around for decades, we’re still grappling with the downside of those benefits. Services, microservices, and functions are all ways to build agile component-based applications, and the fact that even the terms are confusing to many means that special care is needed to build applications in the era of the cloud.Tags:News & ViewsSoftware architecturecloud eraMicroservicesAPIs & Embedded CommunicationsAnalyst InsightCloud CommunicationsDigital TransformationNews & Views Articles You Might Like untangle_774.jpg Software architecture has come a long way since punched cards and monolithic data centers, and the evolution has spawned terms faster than many organizations can learn them. With the cloud now driving software change, and becoming an almost-universal part of enterprise IT plans, we need to understand how cloud software is structured. That means learning its confusing terminology, a process hampered by the lack of clear and accepted definitions. Functions can also be misused. You pay only for what you run in a serverless cloud application, but that’s most valuable when you use functions for something you don’t run often. If a function is invoked hundreds of times per hour, it will surely cost you more than it would if it remained resident—i.e., became a microservice. Plugging Into the Power of APIs Gary Audin June 07, 2019 Evangelist Roy Kurver shares on the importance of APIs for communications today. Twilio Says, ‘Let’s Keep the Conversation Flowing’ Beth Schultz August 08, 2019 The cloud communications platform company showcases two new APIs aimed at improving conversational engagement for messaging and phone calls. They’re also generally implemented in a specific way. They’re persistent, meaning that they’re presumed to be available all the time, and stateful, meaning that they store information between transactions. The former condition means that they can waste resources in the cloud by being loaded and paid for when not in use, and the latter that you can’t scale performance by creating multiple copies to share the load, because the same information wouldn’t be stored in the copies as in the original. See All in APIs & Embedded Communications » Log in or register to post comments read more

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Football No 4 Ohio State takes highscoring offense to matchup against Rutgers

The Buckeyes take to the field prior to the game against Oregon State game on Sept. 1 in Ohio Stadium. Ohio State won 77-31. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorBefore 2014, Ohio State had never faced Rutgers in the Buckeyes’ 124-year history.Since then, the Buckeyes have faced the Scarlet Knights four times, winning all four games by a combined score of 219-21.Still even with the recent history, both teams come into the game 1-0 and defensive coordinator Greg Schiano said Ohio State will come in expecting a fight.“It’s our job to beat them, and our job — my job is to make sure that the defense plays the way they’re capable of playing against them,” Schiano said. “And they’re better. You look at the offense, we’re game planning as we speak.”Schiano, who was the head coach at Rutgers for 10 seasons, said even with heightened emotions, this is just another game on the schedule for him as an Ohio State coach.“As far as it applies to game week, there is no factor,” Schiano said. “Is it sentimental? Sure it is.”Rutgers comes into the matchup off a dominant 35-7 victory over Texas State in Week 1. The Scarlet Knights held Texas State to 169 total yards while forcing three turnovers in the victory.Rutgers freshman quarterback Artur Sitkowski completed 20-of-30 pass attempts for 205 yards and a touchdown in the Rutgers victory, while throwing three interceptions in his first collegiate start.Ohio State redshirt junior defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones said the defensive line’s mindset doesn’t change with a freshman under center.“Our eyes light up regardless if he’s a freshman, sophomore, junior or senior, I mean, he’s a quarterback, and we want the quarterback,” Jones said. “We’re going to get after him.”Rutgers deployed three running backs — freshman Isaih Pacheco, sophomore Raheem Blackshear and redshirt senior Jonathan Hillman — heavily into the offense, with all three backs breaking 60 yards while averaging at least four yards per carry.In the Oregon State matchup, the Buckeye defense dominated the run game in the first half, allowing minus-4 yards, but then allowed two rushing touchdowns of more than 75 yards.Schiano said the defense cannot let up big plays like that later in the season.“82 percent of the offense came on seven plays, 82 percent of their production. We can’t allow that,” Schiano said Monday. “Have to go back a long time to remember two long runs like that, not only here but anywhere. It’s unacceptable.”Rutgers forced Texas State’s two quarterbacks to finish a combined 10-of-25 passing for 100 yards and an interception.Now, the Scarlet Knights must match up against redshirt sophomore Dwayne Haskins, who broke the record for passing yards in a game and touchdowns by an Ohio State quarterback in a first collegiate start.PredictionThough the Scarlet Knights found a way to disrupt the passing game against Texas State, they will need to pressure Haskins significantly more up against a much stronger offensive line.Offensively, Rutgers needs to dominate the run game with Pacheco, Blackshear and Hillman, finding ways past an Ohio State defense that appeared vulnerable to big runs against the Beavers.But Ohio State has too many weapons on the offensive side to make any of this matter. The Buckeyes have sophomore J.K. Dobbins and redshirt junior Mike Weber in the run game to alleviate pressure off Haskins even if the Scarlet Knights’ secondary is giving him problems.Everything would have to go perfectly for Rutgers to pull off a massive upset on the Buckeyes, and Ohio State’s defense would have to look even weaker than it did against Oregon State.This won’t happen, as, like Jones said, the Week 1 game was the game to make mistakes, and the Buckeyes won’t make those same ones in Week 2.“The first game is always like a feel-out game, how is your team going to be, you can always develop from the first game,” Jones said.Ohio State will develop from the first game and, even with an improved Rutgers roster, should take control of the matchup early.Wyatt Crosher: 52-14 Ohio StateColin Gay: 56-17 Ohio StateEdward Sutelan: 66-24 Ohio State read more

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