TSX in solid advance as 2014 trading winds down

TORONTO — The Toronto stock market registered a solid advance Monday, building on gains racked up last week in the wake of stronger than expected economic growth numbers from Canada and the United States.[np_storybar title=”Five investment themes for 2015 and beyond” link=”https://business.financialpost.com/2014/12/27/five-investment-themes-for-2015-and-beyond/”%5DDavid Kaufman: Since this is the season for prognostications, I thought I would make a few of my own as this is my last column for 2014. But rather than attempting to predict specific events or pick specific stocks that will be winners in 2015, here are five macro themes that you might want to watch carefully next year — and beyond. Keep reading. [/np_storybar]However, the S&P/TSX composite index was off session highs as energy stocks and oil prices lost early momentum. The main Toronto index was down from a 122-point gain to close up 54.67 points at 14,663.92. The Canadian dollar dipped 0.05 of a cent to 85.99 cents US.New York markets were mixed, with the Dow Jones industrials down 15.48 points at 18,038.23, while the Nasdaq inched up 0.05 of a point to 4,806.91 and the S&P 500 index added 1.8 points to 2,090.57.The TSX is on the way to a gain of around eight per cent for 2014, with the market getting a lift of one per cent last week after data showed Canada’s gross domestic product rose by 0.3% in October, beating economists’ expectations of 0.1% growth for the month.And in the U.S., GDP growth figures for the third quarter were revised upward to five per cent from a previous figure of 3.9%.The data reassured markets that the United States continued to be the major prop for the global economy against a background of slowing growth in China and a still tentative economic recovery in Europe.The American data is a big plus for Canada as a surging U.S. economy benefits Canadian exports and, in turn, provides lift to the TSX.Could oil’s nosedive be the shock that will finally brings global stocks back to earth?The biggest investing winners in 2014: India, Amaya Gaming, coffee and moreAn advance of about eight per cent on the TSX would be down sharply from a 15% surge at mid-year. But that was before oil prices started to slide. They now are down 50% from summer highs amid a huge increase in global supply and lower demand from economic weak spots like China and Europe.Energy stocks have been heavily punished along with Toronto’s energy group, down about 16 per cent year to date, while traders wonder how low crude oil prices can go. Prices plunged to levels in the mid-US$30s after the 2008 financial collapse. But Brian Belski, chief investment strategist at BMO Capital Markets, notes that those prices occurred during a global recession and such a drop now would be too drastic. “There‘s going to be a lot of volatility in the world going forward . . . so I think you need a period of digestion,” he said, adding that it’s hard to say whether the bottom will be in the $40s or $50s.“You need to start seeing more humble forecasts and again, going back to good old-fashioned investing. When we get to a point where energy companies aren’t over promising and under delivering, that’s when they will be attractive again.”The TSX energy sector slipped 0.3 per cent as February crude in New York erased early gains to slide $1.12 to US$53.61 a barrel. Prices had been higher during the morning on reports of a fire affecting oil storage terminals in Libya.However, most other sectors advanced with the base metals group ahead 0.55% as March copper rose one cent to $2.82 a pound.The gold sector was also up 0.4% even as February bullion dropped $13.80 to US$1,181.50 an ounce.Outside the resource sectors, financials and industrials climbed 0.55%. read more

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Football Dwayne Haskins meets expectation in historic debut

Redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins is hiked the ball in the game between Ohio State and Oregon State on Sept. 1. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorIn the tradition of head coach Urban Meyer, Ohio State, winning the first coin toss of the 2018 season, elected to defer, giving Oregon State the ball to begin the game. Six plays and 38 yards later, Ohio State fans, saw what it had been waiting for all offseason. Redshirt sophomore Dwayne Haskins jogged onto the field, beginning his tenure as the starting quarterback at Ohio State. With the expectations high after he completed six of seven pass attempts for 94 yards, leading Ohio State to a 31-20 win over Michigan last season, Haskins came out acting like he had something to prove. In his first collegiate start, Haskins did prove something. He was the first quarterback in Ohio State history to record 300 yards passing in his first collegiate start, also breaking the school record with five passing touchdowns in his first career start. “It’s been an 11-year dream,” Haskins said. “I was thinking about that yesterday. It’s like how far I came to be here and have this opportunity. It’s a blessing. Just take a deep breath and realize that it’s finally here.” Heading into the season opener, acting head coach Ryan Day said the team, as a whole, came in with “a quiet confidence,” despite the attention that has been on the program in the last few weeks. Going into the first game of the 2018 season, his first as the leader of the Ohio State offense, Haskins felt he had older guys help instil that “quiet confidence” in him. “I feel like I was pretty mellow, pretty good, ready to start,” Haskins said. “Just having the older guys like Isaiah [Prince] and Terry [McLaurin] and Parris [Campbell] and Johnnie [Dixon] to be able to trust me and know that I would get the job done just helps me out a lot.”  Redshirt senior wide receiver Terry McLaurin was a major factor in creating Haskins’ confidence. After handing the ball off twice to sophomore running back J.K. Dobbins, the third-year quarterback hit McLaurin in the middle for a 27-yard gain. Haskins connected with the fifth-year receiver on the final play of the drive, giving Ohio State its first touchdown of the season on a 2-yard slant pass to McLaurin. Ending the day with four catches for 121 yards and two touchdowns, McLaurin said his role, as one of the captains on the team, was to make his quarterback feel as comfortable as possible, putting him in the best position to succeed. “The first thing that came to my mind was poise,” McLaurin said. “When I saw him today and I came over to talk to him, you know, everybody has probably seen the video of him saying, when he was little, he was going to come play quarterback here. I told him it’s already written. God set this out for him and to go out there and be yourself. As my part as a leader, I wanted to instil some confidence in him and make the plays when they presented itself.”With all of the hype regarding his arm, Haskins ran an efficient offense to start the game in his first collegiate start. He completed each of his first eight pass attempts for 98 yards, eclipsing 10 yards on all but three of those throws. Much of this had to do with the tempo-based offense Day ran in his first game as acting head coach. He said, with Haskins at the helm, the offense played quickly and aggressively, and successfully stretched the field both vertically and horizontally. Even with Haskins leading the Ohio State offense to 77 points and 721 yards of total offense, Day said there is still room for improvement. “I think this is a first start for Dwayne. It was a good start. We’ll be building on it as we go,” Day said. “I don’t want to get too far ahead of ourselves. It’s one game, and we have a long way to go.” Much like how he came out with something to prove, Haskins left believing that his offense proved something in the first game of the 2018 season. “I feel like since our offense is so dynamic, not only me, but everyone else, can do a lot of things this year,” Haskins said. “I feel like the fans have something to look forward to.” read more

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Womens Hockey No 4 Ohio State splits road series with No 3

Ohio State then-redshirt sophomore defender Jincy Dunne (33) gets back on defense in the first period of the game against Minnesota on Jan. 19. Ohio State won 3-2. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignThe No. 4 Ohio State women’s hockey team (6-2, 3-1 WCHA) traveled up to Minneapolis to take on the No. 3 Minnesota Golden Gophers (6-1-1, 4-1-1 WCHA) in an early Top 5 matchup that saw a series split. The first game was won by Minnesota by a score of 3-0 and the Buckeyes won the second by a score of 3-2. Game 1Ohio State found themselves overmatched on the road against a tough Minnesota team and despite its efforts, lost 3-0.The first period saw Ohio State coming out hot, getting the first three shots on goal of the game, but none of them found the net and the same went for Minnesota throughout the first period. Both teams notched 10 shots on goal but remained scoreless after 20 minutes. Minnesota took the lead more than 11 minutes into the second period when senior forward Taylor Williamson shot one past freshman goaltender Andrea Braendli off a rebound that got away from the goalie to give the Golden Gophers a 1-0 lead. Senior forward Tianna Gunderson and junior defenseman Patti Marshall earned assists on the play. Throughout the second period, the Buckeyes were outshot by the Gophers 18-5. Momentum did not shift to Ohio State’s favor as the Gophers extended their lead off another rebound shot, this time by freshman forward Catie Skaja with assists by redshirt senior forward Nicole Schammel and sophomore forward Gracie Zumwinkle. In an attempt to mount a late comeback, Braendli was pulled in favor of another attacker for the Buckeyes, but it resulted in an empty net goal with just 32 seconds left for Williamson’s second goal of the game to clinch the victory for Minnesota. Ohio State was severely outshot by Minnesota 19-3 in the period.Fresh off winning player of the week for her efforts against Minnesota State, Braendli notched a career high 44 saves. Game 2On Saturday, Ohio State held off a late Minnesota comeback to win the game 3-2, splitting the series. The Buckeyes took the lead just 5:10 into the first period when freshman defenseman Sophie Jacques scored her first career goal. Minnesota struck back when Schammel got one by Braendli later in the period to tie it up, 1-1. Schammel was assisted by Zumwinkle and freshman defenseman Gracie Ostertag. Moving to just past the halfway point of the second period, sophomore forward Emma Maltais scored a power play goal to shift momentum back to Ohio State and give them a 2-1 lead. Redshirt junior Jincy Dunne recorded an assist on the goal. The Buckeyes extended their lead early into the third period when senior forward Madison Field scored an insurance goal to put Ohio State up two. Maltais and Dunne assisted Field on the play. Minnesota was not to be deterred, and a shot by senior forward Taylor Williamson with just under three minutes left in the game cut the lead to 3-2. However, that one goal was all that the Gophers were able to muster as Braendli put together another strong performance, this time saving 40 shots to give Ohio State the victory.Minnesota outshot the Buckeyes 42 to 27, but Ohio State took advantage of scoring opportunities when they presented themselves, and Braendli and the defense combined to clinch a tough away victory against a Top 5 Minnesota team. Ohio State remains on the road for next week as they travel to Canton, New York for a non-conference matchup against St. Lawrence. Puck drop for the series opener is set for 6 p.m. on Friday. read more

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Miner charged for murder of cousin

A miner who allegedly murdered his cousin during an argument was on Tuesday remanded to prison when he appeared before Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan.David SmithDavid Smith, 31, of Black Water Island, Mazaruni, Region Seven (Cuyuni-Mazaruni) appeared in the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts where the charge stated that on March 22 at Black Water landing he murdered his cousin David Boyer on March 22, 2019 at Cuyuni Landing.The prosecution’s case is contending that an argument ensued between duo after which Smith armed himself with an arrow and dealt his cousin several stabs.According to police reports, the teen miner of Batavia, Cuyuni River, Region Seven (Cuyuni-Mazaruni) was killed at about 22:00h on Friday last.Reports are that Boyer and other miners were in their hammocks when the alleged perpetrator entered the mining camp. He appeared intoxicated and commenced cutting down the hammocks that the miners (including Boyer) had tied.According to the police, Boyer tried to persuade his relative to desist from doing so, and it was during this intervention that the suspect picked up an arrow and fatally stabbed the teenager in the abdomen.Boyer died as a result of the injuries that he sustained.When the matter was called on Tuesday, Chief Magistrate remanded the miner to prison.The case will continue on April 10 at the Bartica Magistrate’s Courts. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedTeen miner fatally stabbed by drunk employerMarch 23, 2019In “Crime”Brazilian charged with murder of Guyanese minerDecember 7, 2016In “Crime”Miner remanded over 2016 fatal stabbing at Sand HillsMay 10, 2017In “Court” read more

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Govt Minister calls out Indigenous peoples over land claims

…says all Guyanese have a right to resourcesSome Indigenous villages in the country have failed to adequately occupy and accordingly utilise the lands that they possess, yet, they are applying for more access to lands.This is according to Indigenous Peoples’ Affairs Minister Sydney Allicock, who, at the launching of Indigenous Heritage Month 2019 on Sunday, pointed out that while the issue of land rights is important, Indigenous peoples need to take into consideration that they are not the only ones who are entitled.“Then, there are those (villages) that have outgrown their land space. Let us firstly justify our need for land extension, showing how, and what plans are in place to utilise the additional land….It is also important that Indigenous peoples understand that all Guyanese have a right to share in the distribution of our resources…,” Allicock told the gathering.Minister of Indigenous People’s Affairs Sydney AllicockHe stated that Indigenous peoples across the country need to collaborate with others to find “a middle ground” in relation to ownership and rights of lands that belong to the country.“Our land rights are multifaceted and while it is important that our policy makers understand the value of space for other forms of life to survive, many villages have been applying for land extension with no clear vision with how the land will be used.Claims for ancestral lands which our fore parents used…to hunt, fish and farm now need to be supported by a village improvement plan,” he explained.Minister Allicock further noted that a village improvement plan is important in identifying development that is needed and that this should be the focus of the Indigenous communities in the country.“It is only you who would be able to know what your most valuable resources are and what kinds of projects will be benefitting to you. We have to be able to understand what we have so that we can better plan. We have to be able to develop a land management plan to keep us properly organised so that 100 years from now, we would still be able to have our lands bringing benefits to us”.According to the Indigenous Peoples’ Affairs Minister, the APNU/AFC Government did not set out to deprive Indigenous persons of their lands, but instead, the administration is “encouraging efficient land management” of resources in a country with a growing population and rapid economic development”.“Our development hinges on our ability to efficiently manage and sustain our resources. In almost every village, there is an abundance of natural resources,” he added.Just recently, former President of the Amerindian Peoples’ Association (APA) and Chairman of the Upper Mazaruni District Council, Toshao Mario Hastings, said that in cases where titles may have been issued, these were done without consultation and without the Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) of Indigenous peoples.Inevitably, this has resulted in severe challenges on rights violations since Indigenous peoples’ right to own, use and occupy traditional lands is constrained in many ways, he noted.“Our hunting, fishing, spawning, farming, gathering grounds, lie outside of our titled lands. Our sacred sites outside of titled lands are being desecrated by mining which is done without our consent. We are faced with fragmented titles enabled by deficient laws that do not recognise our collective right nor support our collective decision making”. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedHeritage Month launched- Green Agenda seen as synonymous to Indigenous cultureSeptember 2, 2017In “latest news””We need to attack the issues and change our mindset of attacking personalities” – NTC ChairmanAugust 22, 2017In “latest news”Integrating Traditional Knowledge Project officially launchedSeptember 5, 2017In “latest news” read more

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