ESPN Releases 2nd Half Prediction For Michigan-Iowa

first_imgA closeup of Jim Harbaugh wearing a Michigan hat and jacket.PISCATAWAY, NJ – NOVEMBER 10: Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines coaches against the Rutgers Scarlet Knights during the third quarter at HighPoint.com Stadium on November 10, 2018 in Piscataway, New Jersey. Michigan won 42-7. (Photo by Corey Perrine/Getty Images)Michigan and Iowa are currently two quarters into their heavyweight Big Ten fight at the Big House in Ann Arbor, Mich.The Wolverines have the lead over the Hawkeyes, 10-3, heading into halftime.It’s been an ugly game, with both teams struggling to take care of the ball. Michigan quarterback Shea Patterson and Iowa quarterback Nathan Stanley have combined to throw three interceptions. The teams combined for less than 300 yards of total offense in the first half.ESPN likes Michigan to come out with a win in the second half. ESPN’s Football Power Index is giving Michigan a 74.2 percent chance to win this game, giving Iowa a 25.8 percent chance of coming back.Michigan would improve to 4-1 on the season with a win today, while Iowa would drop to 4-1 with a loss. This would be a huge win for the Wolverines, who were blown out by Wisconsin their previous major Big Ten game.The second half of Michigan-Iowa should begin shortly. The game is being televised on FOX.last_img read more

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Iowa State’s AD Calls Out The SEC In Response To Florida AD’s Call For Challengers

first_imgFlorida AD Scott Stricklin introduces Dan Mullen.GAINESVILLE, FL – NOVEMBER 27: Florida Gators athletic director Scott Stricklin speaks during an introductory press conference for new football head coach Dan Mullen at the Bill Heavener football complex on November 27, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)Florida football is looking to level up its non-conference scheduling, and add to future slates that already feature games with Miami, Colorado, Utah, and Texas. It doesn’t sound like we’re going to be adding Iowa State to that list anytime soon.Florida athletic director Scott Stricklin put out a public call for teams from the other four Power Five conferences to schedule home-and-homes with the Gators. This is a rare move, given that Florida hasn’t played one of those games out of the state since 1991.A few ADs have responded to the interesting public challenge from Stricklin. Among them: Iowa State athletic director Jamie Pollard.He jumped in to levy a pretty common criticism of the SEC’s eight-game conference schedule. As of now, the ACC and SEC are the only Power Five leagues to hold on to an eight game league slate, though the leagues have mandated at least one non-conference game against another Power Five team. Florida, of course, fills that spot with an annual series with Florida State, which is currently on the books through 2037, but expected to last in perpetuity.Pollard flexed a bit here, because on top of nine Big 12 games every year, the Cyclones have a tough rivalry game with the Iowa Hawkeyes.We already play 10 P5 games every year (9 conference games plus Iowa). Maybe the @SEC should play 9 conference games like the @Big12Conference— Jamie Pollard (@IASTATEAD) October 23, 2019Ultimately, I don’t know that Iowa State wants to compare schedules with a team that has already played Auburn and LSU this year, and has an annual game with Georgia, especially with Kansas on the slate annually.I certainly support Florida, and other teams of that ilk, looking to get us more interesting home-and-home games. We’ve seen a number of schools, including Alabama, Georgia, and Texas, go on scheduling sprees with other powers to give us matchups that we rarely see, that is much better for the fans than the neutral site games we’ve had for years, and extra games against overmatched Sun Belt foes.Florida and Iowa State have never faced off on the football field.last_img read more

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Ohio State faces second classaction lawsuit pertaining to doctors alleged sexual abuse

Ohio State now faces its second class-action lawsuit in a matter of days regarding the sexual abuse of a former Ohio State doctor after a former Ohio State athlete who was allegedly sexually assaulted by Dr. Richard Strauss filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the university. He is being represented by Sauder Schelkopf LLC and Karon LLC.Richard Strauss, a former wrestling team physician and an assistant professor of medicine, is being investigated by Ohio State on allegations of sexual misconduct. Credit: Lantern file photoThe complaint comes from a former wrestler at Ohio State from 1982 to 1984 who said he was sexually abused by Strauss while seeking medical treatment before dropping out of the university. He is listed only as John Doe in the case filing.Joseph Sauder, one of the lawyers from Sauder Schelkopf LLC representing the client in the suit, told The Lantern this is separate from the one filed by four former wrestlers on Monday. He said at this time his group has not contacted the other group.Ohio State also faces a third class-action lawsuit over allegations a former diving coach for the Ohio State Diving Club sexually abused a 16-year-old athlete.Though the lawsuit is listed as a class-action, Sauder Schelkopf is currently representing just one client in the case.“We are filing on behalf of one individual at this time, but have been in contact with others who we will likely add at a later time,” Sauder told The Lantern. He did not confirm how many additional people might be involved.The lawsuit said the nationwide class encompasses “all individuals who were examined by Richard H. Strauss, M.D. at The Ohio State University.”University spokesman Ben Johnson said Ohio State is aware of the allegations made that Ohio State ignored claims of sexual abuse in a statement made to The Lantern Tuesday.“We are also aware of the lawsuits filed today by former wrestlers and we are reviewing them as we do all litigation,” Johnson said. “The Ohio Attorney General’s Office has appointed Michael Carpenter of Carpenter Lipps & Leland to represent the university in this lawsuit.”The claims for relief listed in the lawsuit are a violation of Title IX, invasion of privacy, sexual harassment, negligence, gross negligence and/or wanton and reckless misconduct, negligent supervision, negligent hiring/retention and negligent failure to warn, train or educate.The alleged abuses suffered by the victim listed in the lawsuit were but were not limited to: “sexual harassment and inappropriate touching during examinations, including regularly touching Plaintiff’s genitals and breast area, often at the same time, regularly measuring Plaintiff’s scrotum, and taking photographs of Plaintiff.”The lawsuit claims he received care from Strauss on at least 20 occasions. It said the plaintiff was young and believed Strauss’ treatment to be “medically necessary.”According to the lawsuit, the victim is seeking appropriate relief on behalf of other individuals who experienced similar mistreatment by Strauss and Ohio State.As with the class-action suit from the four former wrestlers, this lawsuit said the plaintiff believed Ohio State coaches were aware of Strauss’ conduct yet chose to ignore it. It said the university received reports from students as early as the late 1970s, but that, despite repeated accusations from students, Ohio State kept the reports secret “to avoid negative publicity.”“This is not what you expect to happen when our children go off to college. Our client is courageously adding his voice on behalf of the many individuals who have been victimized while students at OSU. We look forward seeking compensation for our client and all individuals who were sexually assaulted by Dr. Strauss. We also will be seeking to implement changes at OSU so this never happens again,” Sauder said.Sauder Schelkopf LLC also represents current and former students from the University of Southern California who were sexually assaulted by Dr. George Tyndall, USC’s gynecologist.Johnson urged anyone with information about sexual abuse from Strauss while he was at Ohio State to contact investigators at osu@perkinscoie.com.Updated at 6:53 with the statement from Ben Johnson. read more

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