ESPN Releases 2nd Half Prediction For Michigan-Iowa

first_imgA closeup of Jim Harbaugh wearing a Michigan hat and jacket.PISCATAWAY, NJ – NOVEMBER 10: Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines coaches against the Rutgers Scarlet Knights during the third quarter at HighPoint.com Stadium on November 10, 2018 in Piscataway, New Jersey. Michigan won 42-7. (Photo by Corey Perrine/Getty Images)Michigan and Iowa are currently two quarters into their heavyweight Big Ten fight at the Big House in Ann Arbor, Mich.The Wolverines have the lead over the Hawkeyes, 10-3, heading into halftime.It’s been an ugly game, with both teams struggling to take care of the ball. Michigan quarterback Shea Patterson and Iowa quarterback Nathan Stanley have combined to throw three interceptions. The teams combined for less than 300 yards of total offense in the first half.ESPN likes Michigan to come out with a win in the second half. ESPN’s Football Power Index is giving Michigan a 74.2 percent chance to win this game, giving Iowa a 25.8 percent chance of coming back.Michigan would improve to 4-1 on the season with a win today, while Iowa would drop to 4-1 with a loss. This would be a huge win for the Wolverines, who were blown out by Wisconsin their previous major Big Ten game.The second half of Michigan-Iowa should begin shortly. The game is being televised on FOX.last_img read more

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Oakland’s Melvin, Atlanta’s Snitker voted MLB’s top managers

first_img By RONALD BLUM, AP Baseball Writer By signing up you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service. “Everything I’ve been through, at my age I’m kind of very appreciative of what these guys do,” Snitker said. “I’m not looking to set the world on fire or anything like that. I’m just kind of just enjoying this ride.”Cy Young Award votes will be announced Wednesday. The New York Mets’ Jacob deGrom, Washington’s Max Scherzer and Philadelphia’s Aaron Nola are finalists in the NL, and Tampa Bay’s Blake Snell, Houston’s Justin Verlander and Cleveland’s Corey Kluber top the AL contenders. Published: November 13, 2018, 4:50pm Oakland’s Melvin, Atlanta’s Snitker voted MLB’s top managers Both lead teams to playoffs despite low payroll Receive latest stories and local news in your email: NEW YORK — Bob Melvin’s job was a lot different as a rookie manager with Seattle in 2002, and even when he was voted Manager of the Year with Arizona in 2007 and Oakland in 2012.“Organizations and certainly front offices are more a part of it now, and you have to understand that,” Melvin said Tuesday after winning his third manager award.Melvin won the American League honor after leading the Athletics to the playoffs despite the lowest opening-day payroll in the major leagues.Atlanta’s Brian Snitker won the National League award following a surprising first-place finish, a reward for a 63-year-old baseball lifer who has spent 42 seasons with the Braves. He thought back to how he returned to the minor leagues in 1986, 1991 and 2004 after stints on the staff of the big league Braves. Snitker received 17 firsts, nine seconds and one third for 116 points, the only manager picked on every NL ballot. Milwaukee’s Craig Counsell was second with 11 firsts and for 99 points. Colorado’s Bud Black was third with 41 points.Snitker played in Atlanta’s minor league system from 1977-80, then worked in the minors as a roving instructor (1981), a manager at rookie league (1996), Class A (1982-84, 1986-87, 1992, 1997-2001), Double-A (2002-05), Triple-A (2006, 2014-16) and a coach at rookie level (1993-94) and Class A (1995). He was with Atlanta as bullpen coach (1985 and 1988-90) and third base coach (2007-13).He was managing at Triple-A Gwinnett when he took over Atlanta in May 2016 after Fredi Gonzalez was fired for a 9-28 start. The Braves went 59-65 during the rest of the season, and Snitker was given the job full-time.Atlanta went 72-90, and then improved to 90-72 this year, when the Braves lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers in a four-game Division Series. Subscribe Today Oakland Athletics manager Bob Melvin was voted Manager of the Year for the third time, winning the American League honor after leading the Athletics to the playoffs despite the lowest opening-day payroll in the major leagues, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File) Photo Gallery 2 Photos The Columbian is becoming a rare example of a news organization with local, family ownership. Subscribe today to support local journalism and help us to build a stronger community. Share: “Hey, I’ve been recycled three times from the major leagues as a coach,” he said. “Everything that I’ve been through I think has prepared me better to understand what these guys go through and what this job entails.”A big league catcher from 1985-94, Melvin became a scout, instructor, front office assistant and coach before he got his first big league managing job in 2002 from Mariners general manager Pat Gillick, a future Hall of Famer. Now he works for Oakland executives Billy Beane and Dave Forst, proponents of the analytics movement that has swept baseball.“When I started doing this a long time ago with Mr. Gillick in Seattle, their job was to give me the players and then it was my job to put guys in the right spots. And things have changed since then,” Melvin said. “It can be a little bit top heavy as far as where the information comes from, from our front office now, and you have to be able to adapt, or at some point in time you might not have one of these jobs. So I’m lucky enough to be with an organization that not only it’s my hometown but from a guy that I’ve known for quite a while in Billy and they do the best they can to consistently try to implement stuff and get us better. And it’s my job to accept it and move forward.”Melvin received 18 first-place votes, 19 seconds and one third for 121 points from the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. He is the eighth manager to win three or more times and is one shy of the record shared by Bobby Cox and Tony La Russa. GO His A’s went 97-65, a 22-win improvement over 2017, even with a $68.6 million payroll when the season began. They overcame a 34-36 start to go a big league-best from June 16 on, even though Jharel Cotton, A.J. Puk, Sean Manaea, Kendall Graveman, Brett Anderson, Andrew Triggs and several other starting pitchers got hurt. They lost to the New York Yankees in the AL wild-card game.“At the beginning, we were at little bit taken aback by the fact that we lost so many guys early on,” Melvin said, “but I think after that it was more kind of a badge of honor that someone goes down, we have to continue to have expectations to win and know we have depth in our organization and it’s next man up.”Boston’s Alex Cora was second with seven firsts and 79 points after leading the Red Sox to a team-record 108 wins. Tampa Bay’s Kevin Cash was next with five firsts and 57 points. The Rays’ innovation of using a reliever as an “opener” was copied by other teams later in the season, including Oakland.“Based on the fact that we had so many starters go down and our bullpen was our strength, we were looking for ways to potentially get better,” Melvin said. “Certainly watching what they did over there and the success they had was partly one of the reasons we looked at it.” Share:last_img read more

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Untangling Services Microservices Functions

“Functions” are at the other end of the scale. A function is a software component whose outputs are totally dependent on the inputs; nothing internal is stored or used. Output = 2xInput1 + Input2 is an example of a very simple function. Functions are obviously small and generalized, so you can reuse them easily, and because the output is a function of the inputs alone, you can give an input to any copy of a function and get the same result. That makes them fully scalable and resilient. Because serverless computing loads function only when they’re used, these properties are critical to the serverless cloud. On the other hand, they’re not as obviously useful in the data center, where having a component stay resident can offer performance benefits without creating incremental cloud service charges. What Role Will Integrations, APIs Play in the Evolution of UCC? Todd Carothers June 27, 2019 RESTful APIs are bringing a wave of change to the communications industry. Building software from components has three goals, ones we could call the “three Rs.” There’s “reuse,” meaning that common functions can be implemented once and used where needed. There’s “redeployment,” meaning that changes to an application can be rolled out with less disruption, and there’s “repair,” meaning that fixing problems is easier because of availability and performance. As it happens, our three critical terms differ in at least one of these areas. Not All Beers & RosesWhich leaves us with “microservices,” perhaps the most confusing of all our new terms for application components in the cloud age. Google tends to use the term to mean much the same thing as a function, but among developers the term seems to have taken on a different meaning. To them, a microservice is a small component that shares the stateless property of functions, but is like services in that they’re persistent. Functions come and go as they’re used and the use ends, but microservices tend to deploy and stay in place for successive uses. That makes them a kind of waystation between services and functions, and that may be why microservices seem to dominate application planning these days. They’re easy to come to terms with, and they’re useful both in the cloud and in the data center. From One End to the Next“Services,” the original componentization strategy, are still in use today. By convention, a service is a functional component of an application that does some specific business thing. A service-oriented application might have services like “Add Employee,” “Pay Employees,” “Change Employee Information,” and so forth. Business activities, business processes, and business transactions determine the componentization. Obviously, these are all components of a single application (payroll/personnel, in my example), but while they’re smaller than the application overall, they’re not really very small and they’re also not particularly easy to reuse. You can’t fit “Pay Employees” easily into a customer resource management application or into check processing. Leading the Way to a Developer-Focused Future Beth Schultz April 29, 2019 Creating a developer mindset isn’t easy, but it’s an imperative as communications and collaboration technologies become increasingly software-centric. Microservices aren’t all beer and roses, though. Any strategy to break applications into distributable components has its own risks. The most obvious is that separate components mean moving work across a network from one to the other, something that takes significant time and creates risks that loss of connectivity will cause an application failure. Nowhere is that more obvious than in the way we refer to the autonomous components of distributed applications. We have “services,” a term that’s almost a decade old but still in use. We have “microservices,” which surely have to be more than tiny little services; and we have “functions,” or “lambdas,” which are often used in “serverless” cloud computing. But what’s the difference, and why should we care? Vonage Takes Care of Healthcare with New Services, APIs Zeus Kerravala April 16, 2019 Helps healthcare organizations fast-track digital transformation plans If microservices are smaller than services, it follows that there would be more of them, and thus more accumulated network delay and risk. Both are exacerbated if the application isn’t carefully designed. For example, a microservice that’s invoked a dozen times in connection with a single transaction multiplies the delay and risk by a dozen times too. Better to avoid using microservices where that kind of iteration is likely. Take CareComponentization offers benefits both in development and in running applications, but even though it’s been around for decades, we’re still grappling with the downside of those benefits. Services, microservices, and functions are all ways to build agile component-based applications, and the fact that even the terms are confusing to many means that special care is needed to build applications in the era of the cloud.Tags:News & ViewsSoftware architecturecloud eraMicroservicesAPIs & Embedded CommunicationsAnalyst InsightCloud CommunicationsDigital TransformationNews & Views Articles You Might Like untangle_774.jpg Software architecture has come a long way since punched cards and monolithic data centers, and the evolution has spawned terms faster than many organizations can learn them. With the cloud now driving software change, and becoming an almost-universal part of enterprise IT plans, we need to understand how cloud software is structured. That means learning its confusing terminology, a process hampered by the lack of clear and accepted definitions. Functions can also be misused. You pay only for what you run in a serverless cloud application, but that’s most valuable when you use functions for something you don’t run often. If a function is invoked hundreds of times per hour, it will surely cost you more than it would if it remained resident—i.e., became a microservice. Plugging Into the Power of APIs Gary Audin June 07, 2019 Evangelist Roy Kurver shares on the importance of APIs for communications today. Twilio Says, ‘Let’s Keep the Conversation Flowing’ Beth Schultz August 08, 2019 The cloud communications platform company showcases two new APIs aimed at improving conversational engagement for messaging and phone calls. They’re also generally implemented in a specific way. They’re persistent, meaning that they’re presumed to be available all the time, and stateful, meaning that they store information between transactions. The former condition means that they can waste resources in the cloud by being loaded and paid for when not in use, and the latter that you can’t scale performance by creating multiple copies to share the load, because the same information wouldn’t be stored in the copies as in the original. See All in APIs & Embedded Communications » Log in or register to post comments read more

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