Meet the 2017 ‘Green Oscars’ winners

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The winners include Purnima Barman from India, Sanjay Gubbi from India, Alexander Blanco from Venezuela, Indira Lacerna-Widmann from Philippines, Ian Little from South Africa and Ximena Velez-Liendo from Bolivia.At an awards ceremony held last evening at the Royal Geographic Society in London, each of the six winners received £35,000 (~$46,000) in project funding to help scale up their work.Zafer Kizilkaya, a 2013 Whitley Award winner from Turkey, received this year’s Gold Award (£50,000) for his conservation project “Guardians of the sea: securing and expanding marine reserves along the Turkish coastline”. The “Green Oscars” are back.Every year since 1994, the Whitley Fund for Nature, a UK-based charity, has been presenting the Whitley Award — popularly called the Green Oscars — to individuals in recognition of “their achievements in nature conservation.”This year, the award recipients include six conservationists chosen from a pool of over 166 applicants from all over the world. Each of these conservationists have spent years trying to devise innovative ways of protecting species at risk of extinction and securing critical habitats.At an awards ceremony held last evening at the Royal Geographic Society in London, each of the six winners received £35,000 (~$46,000) in project funding to help scale up their work.“I never imagined I would receive such an honour,” award finalist Ximena Velez-Liendo, Chester Zoo Conservation Fellow and Research Associate of WildCRU, said in a statement. “The Whitley Awards are very prestigious and only the best of the best of conservation scientists receive them. It’s a dream come true! Thanks to the Whitley Award, the funding will help us to get the research equipment we need to improve our understanding of the bears’ distribution and we will be able to work with more communities and expand our project.”Zafer Kizilkaya, a 2013 Whitley Award winner from Turkey, received this year’s Whitley Gold Award for his conservation project “Guardians of the sea: securing and expanding marine reserves along the Turkish coastline”. The Whitley Gold Award is given to an “exceptional Whitley Award alumnus for outstanding contribution”. The Gold Award includes £50,000 (~$65,000) in project funding, donated by the Friends and Scottish Friends of the Whitley Fund for Nature.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Gold Award recipient Zafer Kizilkaya, Turkey, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Kizilkaya works with local fishing communities, coastguards and government to protect oceans and conserve marine biodiversity. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Meet the 2017 Whitley Award winners:Purnima Barman – IndiaPurnima Barman of NGO Aaranyak based in Assam, India, has launched a one-woman campaign to protect the Greater Adjutant stork (Leptoptilos dubius) — a giant bird that feeds on carrion, is frequently spotted on garbage dumps in Assam, and is often considered “ugly”. She works with local communities in Assam to inject a sense of pride and “ownership” in the once-common, but now endangered storks.Read Mongabay’s coverage of Barman’s work here.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Purnima Barman, India, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Greater Adjutant stork is endangered due to habitat loss. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Sanjay Gubbi – IndiaSanjay Gubbi, a scientist with the Nature Conservation Foundation in India, has helped expand the protected area network in Karnataka, India, a state that is home to the highest number of Royal Bengal Tigers in India. He has also worked with the Forest Department to reduce habitat fragmentation and increase connectivity between forests, and has helped institute social security and welfare measures for forest watchers and guards.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Sanjay Gubbi, India, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Sanjay Gubbi has worked to expand protected areas in Karnataka, India. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Alexander Blanco – VenezuelaBlanco is a wildlife scientist and veterinarian who has been working to protect one of the world’s largest and fiercest eagles — the Harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja) — in Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela since 1996. Harpy eagle were once widespread, but are now declining, primarily due to habitat loss from logging, agriculture and livestock grazing.Read Mongabay’s interview with Blanco here.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Alexander Blanco, Venezuela, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Harpy eagle is one of the largest and most powerful eagles in the world. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Indira Lacerna-Widmann – PhilippinesIndira Lacerna-Widmann, the Chief Operating Officer of the Katala Foundation, a Philippines-based organisation, works to protect the Critically Endangered Philippine cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia). The bird nests within the grounds of Iwahig Prison and Penal Farm in Puerto Princesa City, and Lacerna-Widmann has successfully implemented the Philippine Cockatoo Conservation Programme (PCCP) that involves educating and training prisoners to act as wildlife wardens for the birds.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Indira Lacerna-Widmann, Philippines, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.The Philippine cockatoo is critically endangered. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Ian Little – South AfricaIan Little of the Endangered Wildlife Trust works with farmers and tribal leaders in South Africa to protect grasslands, one of the most threatened habitats in the country. He has been involved in introducing simple changes in management practices, such as altering burning and livestock grazing regimes to decrease pressure on grasslands.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Ian Little, South Africa, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Grasslands are one of the most threatened habitats in South Africa. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Ximena Velez-Liendo – BoliviaXimena Velez-Liendo, a Chester Zoo Conservation Fellow and Research Associate of WildCRU, works to help Bolivia’s communities co-exist with the Andean or Spectacles bear (Tremarctos ornatus), the only bear native to South America. Velez-Liendo’s project is introducing interventions to reduce conflict, developing alternate livelihoods to local communities, and monitoring the Andean bear populations in the region.Read Mongabay’s coverage of Velez-Liendo’s work here.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Ximena Velez-Liendo, Bolivia, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.The Andean bear is the only native bear in South America. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Heroes, Forests, Grasslands, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Protected Areas, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Corridors last_img read more

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5 Ways to Win an Employee Referral and Get Hired

first_imgWhen it comes to landing a job fast, it’s all about the people you know — and the people who know you.According to Jobvite, 55 percent of employer referrals get hired faster than candidates from company career sites. In addition, HR professionals rate employee referrals as the No. 1 source for quality hires.Companies use employee referrals because recruiters and hiring managers have found employee referrals to be one of the most effective ways to discover talent and find the best candidates for a position. In fact, 44 percent of new hires are employee referrals.Not only is being an employee referral a great way to discover job openings, but also it’s a great way to secure an interview. Research shows employers prefer hiring employee referrals because it boosts their confidence in the candidate. Plus, as an employee referral, you already have a step in the door of a company.So how does one get hired as an employee referral? Getting referred by an employee greatly depends on networking. In addition, it’s also about targeting employers with whom you already have an inside connection.Here are five tips for getting hired as an employee referral:1. Start checking your LinkedIn connections.LinkedIn serves as a gold mine of opportunities as you search for professionals who can refer you for a job. First, take a look at your connections to find your strongest relationships. These could be people you’ve met at networking events, are previous coworkers, or alumni. Next, see if any of these connections work for a company that’s hiring or one you’d like to work for.Once you locate some LinkedIn connections, it’s time to start reaching out. Depending on the strength of the relationship you have with the person, it’s a good idea to send them a copy of your resume. This allows the individual to review your credentials before they give you the referral.2. Target employers.If there’s a specific company you want to work for, begin networking with employees who work for that organization. It’s important to do some networking first, especially when you don’t have a current connection with the organization.Prior to applying for the job, make sure you ask the person if you can use their name as a referral. It’s also important you explain how you contacted the individual, too.When you ask for the referral, ask the right questions. Instead of asking, “Can you refer me for XYZ position?” ask, “Do you think I’d be a good fit for this position? If so, do you think you could refer me?”3. Connect with the right people.As you continue to network with professionals, make sure you’re connecting with the right people. Although this might be difficult to do when you don’t have many contacts, it can definitely strengthen your referral.For example, if you’re marketing professional, connect with individuals within the organization’s marketing and PR department. This is a great way to target your application and create a stronger referral.4. Join professional organizations.Another great way to find someone to refer you is to get involved with industry and professional organizations. When joining an organization, you’ll have access to professionals in your industry who can connect you to job opportunities. Plus, you’ll discover exclusive job opportunities that were available for organization members, too.5. Schedule informational interviews.Informational interviews are a great way to build stronger relationships and learn more about employers as you search for jobs. Although the purpose of an informational interview is to learn about a company or profession, they’re a great way to build a new contact.When attending informational interviews, be careful with your approach when requesting a referral. If the individual encourages you to check out their job postings, then asking for a referral is welcome. However, if the individual didn’t mention anything about job opportunities, it’s a good idea to maintain a relationship with the person after the interview and follow up in a few weeks about the referral.Employers are more likely to trust candidates who have an inside connection with their company. Anytime you can secure a referral for your job application, you’ll you’ll have a strong advantage when you submit your application.What tips do you have for job seekers looking for job referrals?last_img read more

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