Camera traps capture elusive ocelots in Peru’s Madre de Dios

first_imgThe ocelot is a particularly important part of the Amazonian ecosystem because it’s a dominant species in the food chain, especially at the mesopredator level.Between 1960 and 1970, Peru’s population of ocelots went through a crisis known as a population bottleneck. Even today, they are sometimes kept as pets or killed for their fur.In addition to the hunting of ocelots, the study highlights the vulnerability of Peru’s Las Piedras District. Although it has some of the most remote forests in Peru, the district is at risk of deforestation and degradation due to the human pressures like logging. MADRE DE DIOS, Peru — It’s opportunistic, it usually doesn’t let itself be seen, and it’s not easy prey for those who hunt it. It is famous for its appearance, and it plays an important role in Amazon ecology. It is the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), also known as the “painted leopard.” Because of its aloof behavior, it is a little-known feline within Peru. However, geographer Romina Castagnino has been able to identify the ecosystems it prefers, its diet, its role in nature, and its ecological value for tourism.Castagnino, who is also part of Mongabay’s Latam team, was able to collect this information thanks to the use of multiple camera traps. Her study was published in the journal Espacio y Desarrollo.The scientific study using camera traps took place between August 2012 and February 2013 in an 11,000-hectare area within the conservation and ecotourism area of the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC). The center is located in the Las Piedras District in northern Tambopata Province, in Peru’s Madre de Dios region.Las Piedras District lies in within the Madre de Dios region of southern Peru. Photo courtesy of Castagnino, 2017. The ARCC refuge sits on the shores of Lake Soledad in Las Piedras, Madre de Dios. Photo by Romina Castagnino.The investigation was able to confirm the presence of 70 ocelots per 100 square kilometers in the area of investigation. This means that the Las Piedras District has the third-highest density of ocelots registered with camera traps in the entire world. “The first place is Barro Colorado Island, a reserve in Panama with 100 ocelots per 100 square kilometers. The second is Manú National Park in Peru, with 80 ocelots per 100 square kilometers. However, we have to remember that the refuge where we did our study isn’t a protected area like Barro Colorado or Manú, so this really brings to the global stage the importance of its conservation,” Castagnino explained.The ocelot is the size of a large dog, with short, soft fur that’s yellow, gold, and gray. Every ocelot has a unique and unrepeated pattern of spots. Ocelots can live in savannahs, swamps, marshes, coniferous forests, and areas with thorny shrubs, Castagnino said. The geographer added that the ocelot’s distribution spans from North America (Texas) through part of Central America, and extends all the way to northern Argentina.A photo of an ocelot, taken at night by a camera trap used in the study.The attitude of a kingCastagnino, along with University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologist Scott Lutz, used 73 Bushnell Trophy Cam camera traps to identify eight individual ocelots. They were able to determine that, although the ocelot does not occupy a specific habitat, a primary requirement for its survival is that it finds an elevation lower than 1,000 meters above sea level. Such areas include tropical and humid forests, which make up part of the area of investigation.The investigation found that most of the ocelots in the Las Piedras refuge are mobilized by the tourist routes in the area, using trails made by humans to facilitate their travel. They also prefer alluvial plains close to riverbanks and lagoons, but they avoid marshes.Castagnino explained that the ocelot is a particularly important part of the Amazonian ecosystem because it’s a dominant species in the food chain, especially at the meso—or “middle”—predator level. “The ocelot feeds on everything: rodents, birds, snakes, lizards, and even small mammals like monkeys. Its presence helps balance the populations of these species. On the other hand, the ocelot is prey to pumas, jaguars, harpy eagles, and anacondas — but these species don’t catch the ocelot very often because it’s a very stealthy animal. That’s why it’s so abundant in the jungle,” Castagnino explained.The researchers placed the camera traps like this at each monitoring site. Photo by Cristina Hara.Locations of camera traps in the study area. Photo courtesy of Casatagnino, 2017.Because of the ocelot’s abundance, added Castagnino, it sometimes affects other mesopredators’ feeding habits, such as those of the jaguarundi (also called the “eyra cat”) and the margay, which both feed on rodents and small mammals.“The ocelot is very opportunistic; it will eat whatever is easiest. If it finds lots of rodents, it will eat them, although there are also other animals that eat them. This negative effect on the feeding habits of other species even has a name in honor of the ocelot: ‘the pardalis effect’,” Castagnino said. A species under threatEven if the ocelot is abundant in the Las Piedras District in Madre de Dios, on a global level it’s listed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Its current conservation status is listed as Least Concern.According to the study, between 1960 and 1970, Peru’s population of ocelots went through a crisis known as a population bottleneck.“It’s called that because the population drastically reduced due to the ocelot fur trade. Even nowadays, people sell their fur and they’re kept as pets. Sometimes they’re even killed because they attack livestock, without a doubt because [some] ranchers raise small mammals, which are what the ocelot eats,” Castagnino said.In addition to the hunting of the ocelot, the study highlights the vulnerability of the Las Piedras District. Although it has one of the most remote forests in Peru, the district is at risk of deforestation and degradation due to the pressure that human activity puts on its ecosystems — such as logging. The researchers found that the biggest threat to the Las Piedras ocelots currently is the destruction of their habitat. An ocelot eats a snake on a path. Photo by Leo Plunkett for Fauna Forever.Another photo of an ocelot taken with a camera trap. Photo courtesy Castagnino, 2017.This study highlights a key aspect of the ocelot’s protection: if its behavior and travel patterns are known, it’s easier to implement better conservation programs.“One of those programs could be animal-watching. These cats are really remarkable. It’s an incredible opportunity. It generates profit for the refuge and helps conserve the ecosystem — everyone wins,” Castagnino said.Camera traps and their role in the studyIn order to conduct the study, Castagnino collaborated with Chris Kirby, Executive Director of Fauna Forever, a non-profit organization that works with the ARCC refuge in Las Piedras.A camera trap used for the study. Photo by Romina Castagnino.“For eight months, we worked on putting the camera traps throughout the area. We had six workers, at best, because the rest were volunteers. There were times, especially when there were untraveled routes or when it rained, when only my teammate Lucy Dablin and I went out to install the camera traps, because then it was harder to explore. It was such an adventure,” Castagnino said.As part of the process, before setting up the camera traps, Castagnino also developed a survey for the visitors of the ARCC refuge to learn which species most interested the tourists.“Those who were able to see an ocelot on their trips were astonished; those who weren’t said they wish they had seen one. I really like wild cats because they’re magnificent — they make their presence known, just like the ocelot. As they say, it’s the king of the jungle,” Castagnino said.Camera traps are ideal for studying wild cats, the study explains, because they’re equipped with an infrared sensor that is activated when an animal passes it. In that instant, the camera trap takes a photo.The researchers set up two camera traps at each sampling point, at a distance of 20 centimeters from the ground. The cameras were placed in a converging position so they could take photos and record video over as much area as possible. In the duration of the study, the researchers made nine rounds to set up the camera traps. They set up an average of eight cameras each time.“During our time in the field, we installed the eight cameras and left them for eight to nine days. Later, we would go collect them, transfer the information to laptops, and recharge the batteries. After that, we would go back out to the field for the next round,” Castagnino said. “What’s great is that the cameras can take photos and videos during the day and at night. The ocelot is most active during the day, but it goes out at night to hunt because it’s much easier then — the nighttime turns the ocelot into a covert hunter.”Lucy Dablin installs a camera trap. Photo by Romina Castagnino.Researchers Romina Castagnino (in turquoise jacket) and Lucy Dablin (dark green jacket), crossing a lake to install camera traps. Photo by Cristina Hara.Citation:Castagnino Vera, R. (2017). ESTUDIO ECOLÓGICO DEL OCELOTE (LEOPARDUS PARDALIS) UTILIZANDO EL MÉTODO DE CÁMARAS TRAMPA EN EL DISTRITO DE LAS PIEDRAS, MADRE DE DIOS, PERÚ. Espacio y Desarrollo, (29).Disclaimer: Study author Romina Castagnino is a Mongabay staff member. This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on June 1, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Camera Trapping, Cats, Ecotourism, Environment, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Logging, Mammals, Predators, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Research, Timber, Tourism, Tropical Forests, Wildlife last_img read more

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Indonesian palm oil firm hit with $1.8m fine for 2015 fires

first_imgDeforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Environmental Crime, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Law, Law Enforcement, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Peatlands, Plantations, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Banner image: Fires raze Jambi’s protected peat forest Londerang. Image by Elviza Diana/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia’s environment ministry has won a long-awaited court judgment and $1.8 million fine from a palm oil company that experienced fires on its concession in 2015.The company, PT Kaswari Unggul, had challenged the initial administrative sanctions issued in the wake of the burning, and continued to stonewall against the ministry’s efforts to hold it responsible for the burning.Ironically, the company’s resistance to the sanctions, which would have compelled it to introduce fire-prevention measures on its land, may have contributed to fires flaring up on the same concession again this year.The ministry has welcomed the recent judgment, but has yet to collect on any of the combined $224 million it’s been awarded in similar cases, thanks to legal stonewalling and a Byzantine court bureaucracy. JAKARTA — An Indonesian court has fined an palm oil company $1.8 million for fires that occurred on its concession in 2015, capping a four-year ordeal by the government to bring the firm to justice.The South Jakarta District Court ruled on Dec. 10 that PT Kaswari Unggul, a subsidiary of Jakarta-listed Bakrie Sumatera Plantations, was responsible for the fires that burned 129 hectares (319 acres) of its land in Sumatra’s Jambi province in 2015, and ordered it to pay a fine of 25.5 billion rupiah.“We see the verdict as evidence that land and forest fires constitute an extraordinary crime,” said Rasio Ridho Sani, the head of law enforcement at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, which brought the case against the company.The ruling and fine mark the latest chapter in a long-running battle between the ministry and Kaswari. Shortly after the 2015 fires, the ministry imposed administrative sanctions on the company and several others. But Kaswari challenged the sanctions by reporting the ministry to various government agencies, including the national ombudsman and the office of the president, according to Jasmin Ragil Utomo, the ministry’s director of civil litigation.“Kaswari is a company that’s naughty,” Jasmin said. “Instead of carrying out the administrative sanction, they reported [us] everywhere.”The company’s resistance culminated with a complaint filed at the State Administrative Court in May 2017, seeking to nullify the administrative sanctions. Kaswari argued that it was the victim of the 2015 fires, which it said had started in an unlicensed forest area more than a mile from its plantation and had spread out of control.“There’s no reason whatsoever for PT Kaswari Unggul to burn its oil palm plantation that’s still very productive,” the company said in a statement in 2016. “In fact, PT Kaswari Unggul suffered a lot because of the fires that destroyed oil palm trees that were still very productive. There’s no economic benefit at all, such as insurance claim, because [the plantation] wasn’t insured.”The administrative court rejected the company’s complaint in October 2017.For flouting the administrative sanctions, the environment ministry proceeded to bring a civil lawsuit against the company, as well as a criminal complaint. The criminal case is currently being heard at court.“If they had just complied with the administrative sanctions [in 2015], they wouldn’t be facing these heavier [fines],” Jasmin said.Burning in Jambi’s protected peat forest Lorendang where restoration efforts by WWF-Indonesia and the Peat Restoration Agency take place. Image by Elviza Diana/Mongabay Indonesia.Burning againThose initial sanctions, which called for, among other things, rehabilitation of the burned area and introduction of fire-prevention measures, could also have prevented a repeat of the disaster.Instead, the same concession experienced fires across 11.6 ha (29 acres) this year, prompting the environment ministry to seal off parts of the concession and put Kaswari on a list of repeat offenders.As it did with the earlier fires, Kaswari blamed this year’s burning on fires that spread from outside its concession. Sugeng Rahayu, the company’s head of agronomy, said the fires originated from the nearby Londerang protected peat forest, where WWF and the government’s Peatland Restoration Agency (BRG) have been working to restore degraded peat areas.The Londerang peat forest is surrounded by five oil palm plantations and two logging concessions.Rasio said all concession holders in Indonesia, including Kaswari, are liable for fires in their concessions, regardless of where the burning started. That same concept was adopted by the Jakarta court in its recent ruling against Kaswari.Rasio said the environment ministry would continue going after companies with fires on their land, regardless of how long ago the burning occurred.“We can trace trails and evidence of previous fires with the support of experts and technology,” he said. “Land and forest fires are a serious crime because they directly affect the public health, economy, ecosystem degradation over a long period of time.”The ministry has to date taken 17 companies to court over fires, winning judgments against nine of them with combined fines of 3.15 trillion rupiah ($224 million), Jasmin said. He added more lawsuits were planned in 2020 over this year’s fires, which were the worst since 2015.However, the government has yet to collect any of the fines, thanks to a combination of legal stonewalling by the companies and a Byzantine court bureaucracy that renders rulings practically unenforceable.last_img read more

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New hospital for Mitchell’s Plain

first_imgMitchell’s Plain residents currently use a local community health centre, which sees only walk-in cases. Emergency cases are stabilised and sent to hospitals like Groote Schuur and GF Jooste Hospital. Western Cape health minister Thuns Botha said the government had decided to speed up construction of the hospital, which is expected to cater for more than 430 000 people from a mix of different communities and socio-economic circumstances. SAinfo reporter and BuaNews The hospital will have a total of 230 beds, and the design will allow for future expansion to 300 beds. In-patient services will include 60 medical adult beds, 60 surgical adult beds, 60 obstetrics beds, 30 paediatrics beds, 20 overnight beds, an accident and emergency unit, and a general out-patients facility. 25 September 2009 The monthly attendance at the emergency centre ranges from 3 000 people in summer to 4 500 people in winter, and approximately 1 200 of these patients are admitted on a monthly basis. GF Jooste Hospital also carryies a disproportionately large burden of HIV, TB and trauma cases. “[This] is a demonstration that this Cabinet recognises the community’s dire need for a hospital in Mitchell’s Plain and the need to lighten the load on GF Jooste Hospital,” Botha said. Construction of a R540-million district hospital in Mitchell’s Plain in Cape Town is expected to start in January 2010 and be completed by December 2012. The hospital will cater for residents living in the Mitchell’s Plain, Philippi and Mandalay areas. “We inherited a legacy which I refer to as ‘apartheid’s vacuum’, a space that left the whole of the Cape Flats without infrastructure. Now it’s our opportunity, and our responsibility, to fill that vacuum.” Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Johns and Jones to Play in Touch Football Charity Match at Auckland Nines

first_imgRugby League greats Andrew Johns and Stacey Jones will come out of ‘retirement’ this weekend in the name of charity at the inaugural 2014 Dick Smith NRL Auckland Nines. Johns and Jones will pull on the boots once again to raise funds for NZ charity, The Rising Foundation, when they line up in the first Beko Media Stars Touch Football match between New Zealand and Australia to be played prior to the Dick Smith NRL Auckland Nines final at Eden Park on Sunday, 16 February. The nine-a-side charity Touch Football match will see a select group of former players now working in the Australian and New Zealand media being joined by print, radio and television reporters. The match will be played over two nine-minute halves in front of a crowd of more than 46,000. Johns will be joined in the Australian side by former Test players Gorden Tallis and Danny Buderus, and ex-premiership winning players Brett Finch (NSW Origin) and Steve Turner.The New Zealand side will feature former Kiwi internationals in Jones, Richie Barnett, Monty Betham and Wairangi Koopu.Home appliance brand, Beko, will sponsor the media match with the aim of trying to raise $20,000 for The Rising Foundation.  Beko will donate $2,000 to The Rising Foundation for each try scored in the media match. The Rising Foundation was established by a group of former South Auckland children with an aim to assisting at-risk-youth to develop to their full potential. Chairman John Bongard said these children in New Zealand are on the verge of being lost to their families, schools and community. “The Foundation does this through developing pathways, involving parents, schools and other agencies using outdoor education programs, one to one mentoring and group therapy,’’ Mr Bongard said.Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs CEO Raelene Castle is on The Rising Foundation Board. Australian team (not in playing numbers)1.      Andrew Johns, Captain, (Rugby League Week ‘Immortal’)2.      Gorden Tallis (Qld Origin, Australia)3.      Brett Finch (NSW Origin)4.      Danny Buderus (NSW Origin, Australia)5.      Steve Turner (ex Melbourne/Bulldogs premiership winning winger)6.      Brent Read (reporter, The Australian)7.      Michael Chammas (reporter, Sydney Morning Herald)8.      Josh Massoud (reporter, The Daily Telegraph)9.      David Riccio (reporter, The Daily Telegraph)10.  Pat Molihan (reporter, Channel 7)11.  Shannon Byrne (reporter, ABC Radio)12.  Steve Hart (reporter, Fox Sports News)13.  Tony Adams (reporter, RLW’s ‘The Mole’)NZ Team List (not in playing numbers)1.      Stacey Jones, Captain, (Sky Sport, ex NZ Test player) 2.      Sam Ackerman (reporter, TV 3 News)3.      Richie Barnett (reporter, NZ Herald/SKY TV, ex NZ Test player)4.      Jenny May Coffin (reporter, TV 1 News, ex Silver Fern netball player)5.      Monty Betham (SKY Sport, ex NZ Test player)6.      Wairangi Koopu (Sky Sport/Maori TV, ex NZ Test player)7.      Karl Te Nana (reporter, SKY TV/ Maori TV, ex NZ Sevens player)8.      Sam Ackerman (reporter, TV 3 News)9.      Nickson Clark (Mai FM breakfast host)10.  Sam Wallace (TV 1 Breakfast)11.  James McConie (Prime TV)12.  Bryce Casey (The Rock Breakfast host)13.  Dominic Harvey (The Edge Breakfast host) Referee: Stephen Killgallon (Fairfax Media, ex Test international referee)To learn more about Beko Home Appliances, click here:http://www.beko.com.au/ To learn more about The Rising Foundation, click here:http://www.therisingfoundation.org.nz/about_us/To keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and results from the Auckland Nines, please click on the link below. http://www.nrl.com/DrawResults/AucklandNines/tabid/11376/Default.aspx  2014 Dick Smith NRL Auckland Nines February 15 – 16, Eden Park, AucklandTwitter/FacebookNRL Nines is on Twitter and Facebook @NRLAkl9s #DickSmith9sDick Smith is on Twitter and Facebook @DickSmithAU #DickSmith9’sRelated LinksAuckland Nines Touchlast_img read more

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Google AdWords for Nonprofits: 10 Tips About Keywords

first_imgWith a content network that reaches over 75% of unique internet users in more than 20 languages and over 100 countries, Google AdWords can be a powerful marketing tool. Though the efficiency of the program continues to be debated, Google Grants could offer your nonprofit free ads and assistance setting up an account! It should be noted, however, that while Google Adwords is one potential source of advertising for nonprofits, the volume of response from its campaigns to date have been lackluster.Google provides the reach, but it is up to you to write an ad that pulls net surfers in. Just how exactly do you go about writing an ad with a low cost and high ROI? An article from SiteProNews, by Leighton James explains 10 costly mistakes to avoid when launching your AdWords campaign.We’ve taken this advice from SiteProNews and added a nonprofit twist. If you need more detail on what not to do, make sure to check out the article. Otherwise, read on for our modified list of the do’s and don’ts of writing an ad for Google AdWords.1. Create a short list of targeted keywords: Generic terms lead to high fees and low ROI. Instead of writing a long list, take time to identify your target group beforehand and think of terms that will appeal directly to them. Online strategist Riche Zamor highlights the importance of conducting keyword research prior to launching an ad. Though you can pay someone to do this for you, MSN and Google offer free tools to do your own research. Cross checking keywords with multiple search engines to see the number of results and types of ads that it generates is also a good idea. Another aspect to consider that may not come to mind is seasonality. Google Trends allows you to see how keywords fare over time and to pinpoint when during the year searches for the keyword are most popular.2. Identify what is unique about your nonprofit: Identify your marketing strategy and highlight what sets you apart in your ad. Conduct a competitive analysis of the organizations you will compete with using the selected keywords, and look into possible variations of your selected keywords until you find a combination that places you in the first several ads that appear. If you need ideas for related keywords, Google’s Keyword Tool allows you to search for synonyms and get new keyword ideas.3. Use keywords in your ad text: Good ads spell out exactly what they are promoting. Well-placed keywords in both the title and body of the ad ensure that when people click they know what they are getting.4. Direct users to the specific area of the site, not the home page: People want to find what they are looking for without hassle. Directing potential donors to your donation landing page makes it that much easier for them to give. Links to your home page can be helpful if you are working on brand name recognition, but otherwise direct people immediately to the relevant page that matches your ad.5. Separate ad groups: Split up your keyword buys into different categories. For example, you could have one ad group devoted to recruiting activists, and another for reaching out to recruit potential donors. This distinction allows you to better track the progress of each campaign.6. Take advantage of single ad groups: Keep everything organized by creating containers to hold related ad groups. Keyword buys that relate to each other can be grouped into logical categories that will help you organize, but more importantly that allow you to track the success of each keyword.7. Use various phrase keyword-match types: Selecting various keyword types allows you to either expand or refine when your ad appears.The negative keyword option lets you select keywords for which you don’t want your ad to appear.The phrase match option allows your ad to appear only when terms are searched in the order you have specified.Broad match is less specific and targeted, and can incorporate related or relevant keywords.8. Use the AdWords ad serving service: This provides a platform that displays ads with highest click-through rates more frequently than ads with lower rates in the same ad group.9. Track your results: Which keywords were successful and which didn’t get results? Take advantage of Google Analytics to get in-depth reports on various aspects of your campaign. Use it to assess and evaluate your performance. Was it successful? Did it meet or fall short of your goals? There are many ways to track success, some more sophisticated than others. Google’s Website Optimizer is a tool used to track your progress.10. Modify bids before entering the contact network: AdWords allows advertisers to set different bids on the content network then appear on the search network. By modifying bids you can potentially pay less per click while still getting the same amount of traffic.Source: Frogloop, Care2’s nonprofit communications and marketing blog: http://www.frogloop.com/last_img read more

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What makes for motivation

first_imgJeremy Gregg at the Raiser’s Razor blog asked me to answer the following question: What drives your philanthropassion? In other words, why have I, like you, chosen to be overworked and underpaid in the third sector?Part of the answer for me is, I spent a number of years working as a journalist in very poor countries. And the poverty and pain I saw on a daily basis was hard to simply witness, over and over. So I stopped reporting and started working to remedy what I was seeing. (This is not to say journalism does not do much to contribute to the social good or to right wrongs – it does. I just wanted to be more involved in the story.)So part of my motivation is based on need.But the bigger part of it is based on change. I saw enough good when I was reporting that I also grew to believe there was hope in most situations. And that, ultimately, is the most motivating thing of all.I started my book this way: We all have moments in life when we happen upon our calling, and mine was when I encountered a giant, smiling condom in Cambodia. I go on to tell the story of being inspired by the ground-breaking work of the nonprofit PSI to make AIDS prevention fun and hopeful (including via a giant condom balloon), to great success. I saw the good in the story and possibility in the future.I think ultimately, what makes for the most powerful motivation (at least for me) is not how bad something is now but rather how much better it could be.last_img read more

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The Coming Transformation of Social Enterprise

first_imgProfessor Kash Rangan is one of the pioneers of Harvard Business School’s Social Enterprise Initiative, now 15 years old. Back in 1993, most people took a “spray and pray” approach to philanthropy—writing checks to charities and hoping something would happen. But Rangan and HBS professor Jim Austin, picked by Dean John McArthur to lead the new initiative, saw the potential for research, curriculum, and career development around the challenges of social enterprises, including both nonprofit and for-profit organizations. Over the ensuing years, the initiative flourished as did the nation’s social enterprise organizations.Today, the United States has more than 1.4 million non-profit organizations, and they account for 5 percent of GDP. Annual contributions have grown faster than the economy for years, and experts predict an avalanche of cash ahead. By 2052, an estimated $6 trillion will flow directly to social enterprise organizations. Concurrently, a new generation of business leaders and philanthropists is experimenting with hybrid forms of social enterprises while demanding more transparency and accountability from the organizations they are funding. In Rangan’s view, the sector is poised on the brink of transformation, a topic he enthusiastically expounded upon during a recent interview in his Morgan Hall office.Roger Thompson: The terms “social enterprise” and “nonprofit” seem to be used interchangeably. Are they synonymous?Kash Rangan: No. There’s an important distinction. Very early in the program we decided that we wouldn’t focus purely on nonprofits. We thought it should be about social enterprise, regardless of whether it’s for-profit or nonprofit. We defined social enterprise as an entity that’s primarily in the business of creating social value. As long as an organization creates significant social value, we don’t care how it sustains itself—with internally generated surplus or with donor funds.Americans give roughly $300 billion a year to nonprofits, yet we really don’t know much about what charitable organizations actually accomplish. Why aren’t nonprofits more accountable and transparent with all this money?That’s a very big issue in this sector because there is no common measure or framework to assess whether these organizations are accomplishing their mission. Even simple measures are not widely reported, like we got X donations, and we took care of 1,000 children at a cost of $80 a child, which is less than $120 a child spent by comparable organizations. Even that amount of reporting would be very useful, but it is not the norm.By and large the reporting focuses on the costs of raising money. The lower the better, with the logic being that more money can then go to actual programs. So an organization might report, “We spend 6 percent on fundraising, whereas the industry average is 12 to 14 percent.” That’s typical, but beyond that, we don’t know how the other 94 percent is used. How many people came into the program, and what benefits did they get? And then the even bigger question beyond cost efficiency and effectiveness is, what impact did the organization have? Granted it is very complex to get all the way to that level, but even signposts along the way could be very useful.Q: Which is harder: raising money, building a successful organization, or achieving real impact?A: They are all interrelated, but raising money is not the hardest of the three. Getting money is hard, but it is not more difficult than the other two. That’s why there are over 1.4 million nonprofits, each with some amount of funding.Putting the money to good use, building a successful organization, showing that you have a demonstrable impact in achieving your mission, and then scaling the organization are the hardest to accomplish. When you show impact, more money will flow in.Q: Given how few nonprofits can document impact, would you say these organizations suffer from a leadership deficit?No, I wouldn’t put it that way. Many nonprofit leaders are fantastic, more than is acknowledged. They work hard, and they are very passionate about what they do. So I wouldn’t call it a leadership deficit. I think there’s an imagination deficit.“I wouldn’t call it a leadership deficit. I think there’s an imagination deficit.”Leaders typically ask, “Am I accomplishing my program?” But that is too narrow a view. Nonprofit leaders need to be more visionary. They need to stretch themselves more and worry about mission impact. I believe nonprofit leaders get too bogged down in operational issues, be it fundraising, or managing the board, or program execution. They need to be more strategic.Q: What role can HBS and other business schools play in helping develop the next generation of social enterprise leaders?A: I don’t think the business schools by themselves are going to solve this problem. Whether it’s HBS or any other business school, ultimately I think students come to learn how to be leaders in the business arena. Right now 5 percent of our graduates go to work in the nonprofit sector. To expect 20 to 30 percent is asking too much. Maybe we could pump the percentage up to 7 to 10 percent. But at the end of the day, even counting graduates from other business schools, if you produce 2,000 to 3,000 MBAs a year to work in a sector with more than 1.4 million nonprofits, it’s just a drop in the bucket. There are huge salary discrepancies as well.Ultimately our impact lies beyond directly producing leaders for nonprofits. At least half of our graduates between ten and fifteen years out are quite involved with nonprofits. They might not be directly engaged as leaders, but they sit on boards, provide donations, and serve as volunteers. And they can influence and bring about change. That’s where the education we impart at HBS is so important. Our approach to social enterprise has broad appeal to students who may not even go to work directly in the sector. Without it, they would always approach nonprofits as philanthropy. I believe our curriculum conditions our graduates to ask the difficult questions on performance, and even go beyond and recall cases, frameworks, and solution approaches. It is quite a different approach to participating in the sector. In a way they become the catalysts for internal change.Q: Many alumni get involved with corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Critics of CSR often cite Milton Friedman, who famously said that “the social responsibility of business is to increase profits.” Do you agree?A: I absolutely think it’s too narrow a view. In the decade of the ’90s, maximizing shareholder value became a corporate mantra. But the notion that the corporation exists only to maximize shareholder value lasted only a decade. It was a historical anomaly. In almost every other decade business leaders have acknowledged that corporations exist within the larger fabric of society. The School’s second dean, Wallace Donham, said that the focus of a business is to make a decent profit decently.Q: Venture philanthropy, which applies principles of venture investing to social enterprises, has become a hot topic lately. Is venture philanthropy a good idea?A: The first generation of venture philanthropy had its roots in the success of venture capital. Investors were carried away by the notion of gaining economic returns on their investments, not huge returns but some returns, as a way of forcing an efficient use of their capital. The shining example was microfinance, which provided attractive returns, so why not otherforms of social enterprise?I don’t think that’s a realistic view of the work of nonprofits in general. If you look at social service organizations working at the cutting edge of where markets have failed, the idea of venture philanthropy clicking is a little hard for me to buy into. Venture philanthropy has to come of age and reorient itself by defining what measures of social return it is looking for. In some instances social and economic returns could be correlated, but in many cases they won’t. If you are looking for a social and not an economic return, then loyalty to the program rather than an exit strategy may be a better use of funds. The venture philanthropy community has some translation work to do. Right now venture philanthropy is only a small part of the landscape.Q: Another hot topic in the nonprofit world is the idea of creating a for-profit business to help underwrite the cost of operations. Is this the way to go to secure a reliable stream of funds?A: I don’t think so. There’s a lot of charitable money available. Family foundations now number more than 34,000, an increase of 22 percent between 2001 and 2005. Big foundations have more money in their endowments than they can give away. And there is an intergenerational transfer estimated at $6 trillion over the next fifty years specifically earmarked for social enterprises. None of these sources of money is actually looking for an economic return. They’re definitely looking for a social return. That being the case, I don’t think that nonprofits should quickly jump at creating for-profit enterprises. In certain segments like health care, and even arts and culture, it might make sense when the for-profit and nonprofit parts are tightly linked by a common purpose or platform. For example, in health care several very successful social entrepreneurs have created a hybrid model where paying clients subsidize the “free” clients. The whole organization, however, is doing only one thing, eye surgery or heart surgery or orthopedic surgery and so on.But to think that an environmental organization could sustain itself by selling mugs and T-shirts is a bit of a stretch. It is not that hard to put together a for-profit arm, but to have it be a significant contributor to the core mission requires considerable strategic work. It may not be possible for a vast majority of organizations in this space. It could be an unnecessary distraction.Q: Where do you see social enterprise heading over the next decade?A: I am an optimist, and I believe we will see refreshing changes in that time frame. The new cadre of donors, the new family foundations, the folks who are involved in venture philanthropy, the new generation of entrepreneurs, and business leaders engaged in corporate social responsibility initiatives all will start attacking social issues in a much more disciplined way. Nonprofits too are very adaptive organizations. I expect to see some common understanding in the sector of what performance means, and how social value creation is measured and reported. From there on it is only a matter of aligning the money with the causes they care about. Perhaps investment intermediaries will emerge to ease the introductions and connections. There may be some consolidation of nonprofits at the top, but the sector will be a lot more vibrant with many new players and actors helping to facilitate the transformation.About the authorRoger Thompson is editor of the HBS Alumni Bulletin.Copyright © 2008 President and Fellows of Harvard Collegelast_img read more

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Forge Stronger Links Between Search Engine Optimization, Social Media and PR

first_imgArticle provided by PR Newswire’s Nonprofit Toolkit, an educational resource devoted to Non Profit public relations. Visit the Nonprofit Toolkit today and receive a waived annual membership ($195 value) and more than $2,000 in discounts and free services. Follow-up: SocializeUsing these tips can help ensure that your release will feature highly in search engine rankings (and links back to your media room or web site). That same release can now be shared beyond these borders using social media. The inclusion of social media elements in a news release is offered by some newswires, as is search engine optimization. But what makes your news worth sharing?Tags. There are more than 300 social bookmarking sites for Internet users out there, and inclusion comes down to presenting people with readily available tags, such as for digg, technorati or del.icio.us. The key, of course, is well-written news: an interesting perspective, an innovative product or a creative article.Include multimedia elements whenever possible. Engaging photos and videos enhance your message, making it more attractive and worthy of sharing with others. Including these elements also goes a long way toward gaining media coverage, as it increases journalists’ options in the ways that they can cover your news.Provide reliable, refreshed information. Whether you maintain a organizational media room or publish a blog, provide the media with one place to find content that is specific, reliable and useful. Develop a regular readership by providing consistent, interesting, reliably refreshed news and information.Use RSS feeds. Utilizing RSS distribution from your company web site and other online content distributors pushes your news automatically to interested parties. It also means that your site will be constantly spidered by search engines, which will in turn improve its ranking in search results. Visit the Nonprofit Toolkit today and receive a waived annual membership ($195 value) and more than $2,000 in discounts and free services. As communicators, our words are our greatest tools. They determine our success in building relationships and positive brand visibility. Nowhere is this more apparent than on the Internet. Online communication is still growing and developing, giving us more opportunities than ever to connect with our stakeholders. But our audience is becoming increasingly fragmented. News sites, search engines, blogs and web sites all vie for attention, making it much more difficult to control our message.So how do we effectively communicate our message to each segment of these many audiences? What line do we take? In the online space, are we spokespeople, publicists, marketers, or a little bit of each? Two audiences: Consumers and the mediaAs public relations professionals, our main responsibility is to provide positive branding for companies and organizations through media coverage and online visibility. The media remain the most important and wide-reaching platform for spreading our message. What has changed with the Internet is that we now have a chance not only to push the message out, but to pull customers and prospects in as well, creating a cycle of communication that links and feeds on itself.Companies on the cusp of the media revolution are taking Web 2.0 and changing internal processes to make the best use of its tools. In particular, marketing and PR departments are coming together to create better communication strategies to target these two audiences: consumers and the media. Tips and tools for optimizing a news releaseNews releases that are search-engine-optimized can establish an online avenue to draw qualified, interested people to information about your organization. Constructing a marketing- and media-friendly release does, however, require internal coordination and planning in order to best use your resources. Here are some tips:Style guides and key messaging. Maintaining messaging consistency across all levels of an organization is always important, but especially when it comes to ratcheting up your online branding. Search engines use specific words and phrases to categorize news and build a relationship between your organizations news releases and its web site. If your news releases reflect words people are using to find information related to your organization, your release will establish a channel leading interested readers to your web site. Develop style guides with your marketing and product teams to make sure your words are consistent.Choose your keywords carefully. Before you write your news release, determine its theme, a list of keywords to represent that theme, and finally two or three keywords or phrases to focus on. Use keyword research tools to determine how your audience searches for news about your industry. These may also indicate the sort of competition that exists in relation to your chosen words. Your marketing team has probably already conducted this research; synchronizing your efforts will save time and establish a uniform company voice. When crafting your release, though, remember to keep your wording natural, so that readers still connect with your message.Place your keywords up front. Specifically, work them into a short (80-character) headline, and repeat them in your lead paragraph. The inverted pyramid of news release writing lends itself well to search engine optimization. Search engines typically scan the title tag of a page, the headline, and the first paragraph of a release, so be sure to include all important information and relevant keywords at the beginning.Distribute your news online. Most newswires post your news releases directly to search engines and relevant industry web sites as a part of the media distribution your organization receives. Be sure to include links in your release that direct Internet users to your organizations site. Inbound links to your organizations website enhance its ranking on search engines, as search engines count each link to your website as a vote for its significance.Use anchor text. In addition to including your organizations URL in a release, use anchor text (terms that appear as hyperlinks leading to pages on your organizations site). Link important keywords to relevant web pages to create a pathway for your readers (and search engines) to easily find information. This drives trafficto your products, creates links back to your web site, and teaches search engines to associate the hyperlinked words with your organizations web site and news releases. All of these add to your site’s search rankings.Link coverage to your media page. This is when your news release stops being a collection of words and facts and becomes part of a larger, cohesive corporate message. For instance, if your organization has an upcoming product launch, start by researching key industry publications’ editorial calendars and develop a pitching timeline. Communicate in advance with your marketing/website team and make sure that when you receive media coverage, your site reflects that coverage. Make full use of your PR success-don’t keep it locked up in a clip book! Integrated communicationConsumersGiven the scope of online communication options available, it is possible to make it easy for the media to report on a company’s or organizations news while increasing visibility to consumers. But it takes internal cooperation. For communication, following up with information is as important as gaining initial interest.In terms of crossover from PR to marketing, consider how your organization handles online leads. Is your marketing department aware of the traffic that your news releases generate when you distribute them online? Do visitors to the organizations web site land on a page that engages them and invites them to learn more about or interact with the organization?The people who seek out your organizations website after reading the news release are highly qualified prospects. Ensuring that the information they find on the site is appealing is critical to converting these prospects, whether they are potential volunteers, donors, or journalists or bloggers looking for a story.The mediaOrganizations that develop visible, organized, easy-to-navigate and highly informative media rooms on their web sites ensure that members of the media are as well taken care of as the consumers who reach the sites.Yet it would be naïve to think that any member of the media relies solely on an organizations web site or media room for information. A recent study of journalists by Fusion PR found that the majority often consult blogs for information. It is increasingly apparent that we need to meet them in the online space of blogs, search engines and news aggregators as well as in the media room, and through traditional news release distribution.Dee Rambeau, product specialist for PR Newswire’s MediaRoom services and managing partner of The Fuel Team, a provider of web-based solutions for the marketing and PR professionals, says that based on their own analysis, clients who have used MediaRoom have “increased their media audience, improved the loyalty of that audience due to the ‘unsubscribe’ feature, increased the specificity of their media audience by offering ‘categories’ of news, and increased the usability of their MediaRoom content by offering multimedia galleries, podcasts, images and videos.”last_img read more

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Photo Tips for Nonprofits

first_imgCaptionsJust a few words about captions. Every photo and graphic needs a good caption. Captions should be concise and tell a story about the photo. Editors need to understand what’s in the photo and why it is important. Give them some background information on your company and write the caption in newspaper style — describe the who, what, why, when, where and how. In addition to helping editors, all this information will optimize photos for search engine pickup. You should also identify people in the photograph Left to Right. Include the hometowns of the people pictured, to increase interest in your photograph among papers that cover those hometowns. You will want to include as much information in the caption as possible, but try to keep it concise — 80 words is the wire service standard. Article provided by PR Newswire’s Nonprofit Toolkit, an educational resource devoted to Non Profit public relations. Visit the Nonprofit Toolkit today and receive a waived annual membership ($195 value) and more than $2,000 in discounts and free services. Headshots: For personnel announcements, you should include a headshot of the executive. Headshots should be well lit and can be done on a solid background or as an ‘environmental headshot’ where the person is shot in their office or outside.   For environmental headshots, be sure to emphasize the person and not the surroundings.Event Photos: Photos taken at events should highlight the theme of the event including any persons speaking, a rally, group projects, etc. Avoid large staged group shots. General Photo Tips Other IdeasOnce you have a selection of photos you must decide how to distribute them to the media. That is where PR Newswire comes in because that is PR Newswire’s business — distribution of information to the proper media points. Your PR Newswire account executive can help you with distribution suggestions and walk with you through the simple, but effective, technological steps that will get your pictures to the right editors.  To ensure that your photograph can be used by print media, you need to supply a high-resolution photo that looks great when printed in a newspaper or magazine. The standard requirements among the wire services and newspapers are a length of 9 inches on the longest side and 300 dots per inch resolution. If this all sounds like a foreign language to you don’t worry PR Newswire’s Photo Desk is here to help. Additional Tips to RememberKeep a supply of portraits of company officials handy, but do not limit these to only headshots. Action portraits make more of a statement.Do not make 500 prints of your picture and send it out through the mail. Most photo editors at media outlets prefer to receive photos digitally from a distributor like PR Newswire.Forget black and white photos! Color pictures are used almost exclusively on the front pages of newspapers, always on TV and throughout magazines. Using Photos to Convey Your MessagePhotos should be an important part of any organization’s publicity program. Photos help to brand a news release and make it stand out from the crowd.The checklist for any company planning a publicity effort must include an item for photos. The final decision in a given case may be to use a photo element in the publicity program, or it may be to NOT use photos but the issue should be discussed for every publicity effort. Below are some tips to make your photo usage successful. Visit the Nonprofit Toolkit today and receive a waived annual membership ($195 value) and more than $2,000 in discounts and free services. Quality is Key – Hire a PhotographerThe next step is to hire a good photographer. A good photographer may be costly but it is the best money you can spend. If the pictures are not shot correctly, the whole photo effort will be wasted.  To determine the quality of the photographer, ask to see his or her online portfolio. This is a collection of their photographs. You might also ask to see pictures from their last several shoots.   If you believe that the pictures are the kind of pictures that will tell your story, you have your photographer. If you are not pleased, consult another.   Once you have the photographer lined up, spend time explaining just what you expect from the pictures, what story you are trying to tell and what message you want to deliver to readers and others who will see the photos. Too often, photographers are poorly assigned, uninformed and therefore make poor pictures.Need a photographer? PR Newswire has a global network of photographers who can get you that perfect shot.last_img read more

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