Jose Mourinho’s charm offensive at Spurs is nauseating and will end in tears

first_imgDele Alli slams ‘arrogant’ Spurs as Marcus Rashford ruins Jose Mourinho’s Manchester United return SO MANY Tottenham supporters have bought into the Jose Mourinho hype.The soundbites, the suits, the ballboy. The Special One is on the charm offensive and most fans have been lapping it up.3 Jose Mourinho endured his first defeat as Spurs manager at Old TraffordCredit: Getty – ContributorBut not me.The appointment of Mourinho has driven me largely toward apathy and disillusionment with my club.I have to be fair – he is without doubt one of the top three Premier League managers of all time, only Sir Alex Ferguson, and possibly Arsene Wenger, can be considered more accomplished in this division.But the game moves on.People talk of what a coup it is for Tottenham to have secured a manager of Mourinho’s “calibre” and standing within the game – but ultimately, his reputation has taken a battering and he is just as desperate as Spurs are.It’s a marriage of “convenience”, and Jose has instantly gone on the charm offensive.And it’s nauseating.Lines like “back me and I’ll make you winners”, and “are you Dele or Dele’s brother” – they are fantastic soundbites, but they are also empty statements.3When Mourinho arrived back at Chelsea in 2013, he called himself the Happy One.Well, that didn’t last long.He was acrimoniously sacked by the Blues when things had gotten toxic in 2015 and then rocked up at United with a reputation bruised, but his ego remained.He again went on the charm offensive, saying: “There is a mystique and a romance about it [Manchester United] which no other club can match.”This is the sort of “nice” albeit empty line that he has already often peddled so far at Spurs.But the truth is, his United side played dire football and in the end he appeared to alienate just about everyone at the club.Mourinho is not the manager he once was, but Spurs fans are so desperate for trophies after agonisingly falling short under Mauricio Pochettino, that they are blinded by the lustre of Jose’s past achievements.It’s not about spitting the dummy out after only four games in charge, it’s about believing from the start that Jose is not the man to lead the team forward.Already in his first four games in charge, you can see that Spurs have begun to play more long balls.3 Dele Alli has played well under Mourinho so far, unlike many othersCredit: AFP or licensorsAdmittedly, the high energy press that characterised the Pochettino era had not been seen for a while – but it seems likely to disappear forever under the new regime.And while fans will tolerate long-ball, counter-attacking football at home to the likes of Bournemouth while there is a novelty factor and optimism – when that starts to fade, it will not be accepted at Spurs.This is a club that has prided itself on its rich traditions for decades.Of playing with style and panache, doing things with flair.Even at his most successful, days that feel long behind him, Mourinho’s teams did not match these values of doing things in the “right way”.Mauricio Pochettino made Spurs fans believe in their team again, he reminded them of everything that is wonderful about supporting this club.LATEST TOTTENHAM NEWSHARRY ALL FOUR ITKane admits Spurs must win EIGHT games to rise into Champions League spotGossipALL GONE PETE TONGVertonghen wanted by host of Italian clubs as long Spurs spell nears endBELOW PARRSpurs suffer blow with Parrott to miss Prem restart after appendix operationPicturedSHIRT STORMNew Spurs 2020/21 home top leaked but angry fans slam silver design as ‘awful”STEP BY STEP’Jose fears for players’ welfare during restart as stars begin ‘pre-season’KAN’T HAVE THATVictor Osimhen keen on Spurs move but only if they sell Kane this summerYOU KAN DO ITKlinsmann quit Spurs to win trophies but says Kane’s better off stayingTURBULENT PAIRINGDrogba and Mido had mid-flight brawl after stewardess prank went wrongGossipSPURRED ONTottenham table contract offer for Bayern Munich’s teenage starlet Taylor BoothExclusivePASS THE TESTEngland’s NRL-based stars urge bosses to make room for a Test this yearHiring Mourinho, however, seems a step in the direction of abandoning the traditions of the club in the desperate pursuit of short-term success – a pursuit that will ultimately drive fans mad and suck all of the fun out of it.Which sounds rather a lot like what has happened down the road at Arsenal.It’s important that football remains something to be enjoyed, and when it inevitably ends in tears, Spurs will find themselves back at square one.last_img read more

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Meet the 2017 ‘Green Oscars’ winners

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The winners include Purnima Barman from India, Sanjay Gubbi from India, Alexander Blanco from Venezuela, Indira Lacerna-Widmann from Philippines, Ian Little from South Africa and Ximena Velez-Liendo from Bolivia.At an awards ceremony held last evening at the Royal Geographic Society in London, each of the six winners received £35,000 (~$46,000) in project funding to help scale up their work.Zafer Kizilkaya, a 2013 Whitley Award winner from Turkey, received this year’s Gold Award (£50,000) for his conservation project “Guardians of the sea: securing and expanding marine reserves along the Turkish coastline”. The “Green Oscars” are back.Every year since 1994, the Whitley Fund for Nature, a UK-based charity, has been presenting the Whitley Award — popularly called the Green Oscars — to individuals in recognition of “their achievements in nature conservation.”This year, the award recipients include six conservationists chosen from a pool of over 166 applicants from all over the world. Each of these conservationists have spent years trying to devise innovative ways of protecting species at risk of extinction and securing critical habitats.At an awards ceremony held last evening at the Royal Geographic Society in London, each of the six winners received £35,000 (~$46,000) in project funding to help scale up their work.“I never imagined I would receive such an honour,” award finalist Ximena Velez-Liendo, Chester Zoo Conservation Fellow and Research Associate of WildCRU, said in a statement. “The Whitley Awards are very prestigious and only the best of the best of conservation scientists receive them. It’s a dream come true! Thanks to the Whitley Award, the funding will help us to get the research equipment we need to improve our understanding of the bears’ distribution and we will be able to work with more communities and expand our project.”Zafer Kizilkaya, a 2013 Whitley Award winner from Turkey, received this year’s Whitley Gold Award for his conservation project “Guardians of the sea: securing and expanding marine reserves along the Turkish coastline”. The Whitley Gold Award is given to an “exceptional Whitley Award alumnus for outstanding contribution”. The Gold Award includes £50,000 (~$65,000) in project funding, donated by the Friends and Scottish Friends of the Whitley Fund for Nature.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Gold Award recipient Zafer Kizilkaya, Turkey, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Kizilkaya works with local fishing communities, coastguards and government to protect oceans and conserve marine biodiversity. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Meet the 2017 Whitley Award winners:Purnima Barman – IndiaPurnima Barman of NGO Aaranyak based in Assam, India, has launched a one-woman campaign to protect the Greater Adjutant stork (Leptoptilos dubius) — a giant bird that feeds on carrion, is frequently spotted on garbage dumps in Assam, and is often considered “ugly”. She works with local communities in Assam to inject a sense of pride and “ownership” in the once-common, but now endangered storks.Read Mongabay’s coverage of Barman’s work here.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Purnima Barman, India, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Greater Adjutant stork is endangered due to habitat loss. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Sanjay Gubbi – IndiaSanjay Gubbi, a scientist with the Nature Conservation Foundation in India, has helped expand the protected area network in Karnataka, India, a state that is home to the highest number of Royal Bengal Tigers in India. He has also worked with the Forest Department to reduce habitat fragmentation and increase connectivity between forests, and has helped institute social security and welfare measures for forest watchers and guards.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Sanjay Gubbi, India, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Sanjay Gubbi has worked to expand protected areas in Karnataka, India. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Alexander Blanco – VenezuelaBlanco is a wildlife scientist and veterinarian who has been working to protect one of the world’s largest and fiercest eagles — the Harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja) — in Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela since 1996. Harpy eagle were once widespread, but are now declining, primarily due to habitat loss from logging, agriculture and livestock grazing.Read Mongabay’s interview with Blanco here.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Alexander Blanco, Venezuela, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Harpy eagle is one of the largest and most powerful eagles in the world. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Indira Lacerna-Widmann – PhilippinesIndira Lacerna-Widmann, the Chief Operating Officer of the Katala Foundation, a Philippines-based organisation, works to protect the Critically Endangered Philippine cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia). The bird nests within the grounds of Iwahig Prison and Penal Farm in Puerto Princesa City, and Lacerna-Widmann has successfully implemented the Philippine Cockatoo Conservation Programme (PCCP) that involves educating and training prisoners to act as wildlife wardens for the birds.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Indira Lacerna-Widmann, Philippines, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.The Philippine cockatoo is critically endangered. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Ian Little – South AfricaIan Little of the Endangered Wildlife Trust works with farmers and tribal leaders in South Africa to protect grasslands, one of the most threatened habitats in the country. He has been involved in introducing simple changes in management practices, such as altering burning and livestock grazing regimes to decrease pressure on grasslands.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Ian Little, South Africa, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Grasslands are one of the most threatened habitats in South Africa. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.Ximena Velez-Liendo – BoliviaXimena Velez-Liendo, a Chester Zoo Conservation Fellow and Research Associate of WildCRU, works to help Bolivia’s communities co-exist with the Andean or Spectacles bear (Tremarctos ornatus), the only bear native to South America. Velez-Liendo’s project is introducing interventions to reduce conflict, developing alternate livelihoods to local communities, and monitoring the Andean bear populations in the region.Read Mongabay’s coverage of Velez-Liendo’s work here.The Princess Royal and 2017 Whitley Awards recipient Ximena Velez-Liendo, Bolivia, at The Royal Geographical Society, London, 18th May 2017. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.The Andean bear is the only native bear in South America. Photo courtesy of Whitley Fund for Nature.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Heroes, Forests, Grasslands, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Protected Areas, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Corridors last_img read more

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Trump’s policies could put Cambodia’s environment on chopping block

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer Adaptation To Climate Change, China And Energy, China’s Demand For Resources, Clean Energy, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change and Dams, Climate Change Denial, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Dams, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Featured, Foreign Aid, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Green Energy, Illegal Logging, Mekong Dams, Rainforest Logging, Renewable Energy, Rivers, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Traditional People, Tropical Rivers center_img Under President Donald Trump’s proposed 2018 budget, Cambodia could experience a 70 percent cut in aid from the United States.For Cambodia, this would mean a combined cut of $11.7 million from the budgets of the U.S. State Department and USAID, with the latter involved in a host of projects meant to help sustain and protect the Cambodian environment and help curb and adapt to climate change.Trump’s isolationism and “America First” policies could create a political vacuum in Southeast Asia, with China stepping in to replace the U.S., with major repercussions. China has historically been less transparent and less concerned about environmental impacts in nations where its government and corporations are at work.Trump’s authoritarian and anti-environmental policies are possibly being interpreted as a green light by autocratic leaders in the developing world. Cambodia, for example, has lately stepped up dissident arrests and sought transnational corporate partnerships to build large infrastructure projects — such projects often see high levels of corruption and do major environmental harm. Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump rally in Washington, D.C. against the Paris Climate Agreement. Trump’s drastic cuts to USAID in Cambodia and other countries, if approved by Congress, would end projects aimed at increasing carbon sequestration and decreasing deforestation, contributing to a rise in global carbon emissions. Photo by Stephen D. Melkisethian via Visualhunt“I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris,” U.S. President Donald Trump declared during a speech announcing his decision to pull the United States out of the Paris Climate Agreement.In so doing, Trump sent a message to the world: that his administration — as promised during his campaign — was putting America first, and prioritizing American economic prosperity over everything, including the collective environmental preservation efforts of nearly the entire planet.But the U.S. remains — at least for now — the world’s foremost power, so the economic impacts of Trump’s policies will reverberate around the globe, affecting nations big and small, such as the burgeoning Southeast Asian nation of Cambodia.Though the six month old Trump administration has barely begun engaging Southeast Asia even on a nominal level — with Trump speaking to leaders of the Philippines, Thailand and Singapore in recent months — Cambodia is already preparing itself for the environmental ramifications of the U.S. leader’s isolationist agenda.A village meeting in Takeo Province, Cambodia. Rural populations could be hurt by deep USAID and U.S. State Department cuts, and by an influx of large infrastructure projects including dams, roads and mining operations that may be financed and implemented by China rather than the United States. Photo by Brett Matthews under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic licenseForeign aid to take a hitIn late April, Foreign Policy reported that Cambodia could experience a 70 percent cut in aid from the U.S. in 2018 as part of the Trump administration’s proposed plan to cut aid to developing countries by more than a third overall.Proposed budget cuts to the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), if approved by Congress, would eliminate an estimated 30-35 field missions worldwide, while slashing the agency’s regional bureaus by roughly 65 percent, according to a 15-page State Department budget document that Foreign Policy had obtained.For Cambodia, this would mean a combined cut of $11.7 million from the budgets of the U.S. State Department and USAID, with the latter involved in a host of projects meant to help sustain the Cambodian environment.In February and March 2017, USAID Cambodia Mission Director Polly Dunford conducted a four-day site visit to Eastern Plain Landscape in Mondulkiri Province, to see how the Supporting Forests and Biodiversity project is helping Cambodians protect rich natural resources. A loss of funding could end such projects. Photo courtesy of USAID CambodiaCambodian rainforest at dawn. Though economically poor, Cambodia is rich in natural resources, forests and biodiversity. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerUSAID’s efforts in Cambodia include support for entrepreneurs who make and market non-timber forest products, as well as projects that help the Cambodian government and local communities source financial opportunities created by forest carbon sequestration and the avoidance of carbon emissions as the result of deforestation.USAID also works to strengthen Cambodian legislation and policies aimed at improving the implementation, enforcement and compliance with the country’s international environmental commitments — efforts critical to preserving forests and areas of significant biodiversity, of which Cambodia has many. The organization has worked to provide sustainable development in Cambodia’s Prey Lang Forest and has supported local community government negotiations in the Kompong Phluk commune within Siem Reap Province, to name a few examples.Cambodia has one of the world’s highest rates of deforestation, and widespread corruption has allowed an illegal logging industry to flourish. Sand dredging, illegal fishing and other harmful practices also wreak environmental havoc, and the country’s poverty makes U.S. financial assistance crucial to environmental protection.The costs to the worldSince Foreign Policy published their initial report in April, Trump’s detailed budget has been released to the public. Cambodia’s aid numbers for 2018, though slightly different than those detailed last spring, still paint the same grim picture: with aid at just a fraction of past years.While Trump’s budget could still face bipartisan opposition in Congress — as politicians on both sides of the aisle oppose the president’s proposed draconian cuts to foreign aid — experts have said that the president’s budget still sends a strong and disruptive message to the world: that the U.S. no longer cares about any other nation beyond itself.When Foreign Policy’s report was released, one government careerist publically lambasted the cuts as a death knell for positive U.S. influence abroad: “What you’re basically doing is eviscerating the most important tool of American influence in the developing world, which is our development program,” Andrew Natsios, a former USAID administrator under the Bush administration told Foreign Policy when the budget document was leaked. “I don’t think they understand what the role of USAID is, what USAID’s mission directors are. USAID’s mission directors are among the most influential foreigners in the country.”The Angkor Centre for Conservation of Biodiversity (ACCB) provides education activities in local Cambodian schools. The organization says that foreign assistance is still crucially needed to protect Cambodia’s environment. Photo courtesy of ACCBA tiger in Cambodia. The withdrawal of the majority of USAID funding from this Southeast Asian nation could do lasting harm to the country’s sustainability and climate change adaptation projects. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerWhen Mongabay reached out to USAID’s Cambodia mission, Jay Raman, a spokesman for the U.S. embassy in Phnom Penh, said that USAID would be unavailable for an interview and that the State Department was not able to comment on Trump’s proposed budget. Nor did the White House respond to requests for comment. A call to the State Department in Washington, D.C. yielded this email attributed to an anonymous “State Department official”: “The FY 2018 budget request for the State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) supports the President’s commitments to make the U.S. government more efficient by streamlining efforts to ensure effectiveness of U.S. taxpayer dollars.”While the Trump administration has gone virtually silent regarding the impending impacts of its proposed aid cuts, others are more vocal, saying that the people and environment of Cambodia — both heavily reliant on foreign aid — are being put at risk.Michael Meyerhoff, Project Manager at the Angkor Centre for Conservation of Biodiversity in Siem Reap, Cambodia, told Mongabay that foreign donations remain an integral part of keeping Cambodia’s infrastructure growing and its environment safe. “Due to Cambodia’s past [history of conflict], most of the governmental infrastructure and capacities to manage the country’s natural resources effectively were not existent a few years ago,” he explained. “NGOs and funding from foreign countries have helped, and are still supporting the government in the development process with funding, but also with expertise and equipment. This process is by far not completed, and therefore foreign funding is still needed.”Looking to BeijingThe proposed U.S. foreign aid cuts to Cambodia are likely to further strain relations between the two countries. This year, Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen openly criticized Washington’s demands that Cambodia pay back a debt stemming from the 1970’s. Many Cambodians feel that the U.S. claim that Cambodia owes it money is hypocritical and rests on shaky moral ground, especially because the U.S. dropped more bombs on Cambodia during the Vietnam War years than the Allies dropped during the entirety of World War II — causing extensive destruction and political instability leading to the rise of the genocidal rule of the Khmer Rouge.The ongoing disputes between Washington and Phnom Penh, have led Hun Sen to reach out to China, which he has dubbed his “most trustworthy friend.” In recent times, China has found Cambodia to be a strategic ally in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and also an important investment partner. Money flowing from Beijing is by far Cambodia’s largest source of Foreign Direct Investment. In turn, Cambodia has become China’s most vocal ASEAN colleague, going against group consensus and supporting Beijing when it comes to issues like China’s claimed dominion over the South China Sea.However, analysts say that fading U.S. influence, and China’s growing influence in Cambodia could spell trouble for the nation’s environment. Beijing in the past has shown a lack of commitment to conservation efforts, especially towards development outside its own borders. Instead, China prioritizes robust economic growth and big-ticket infrastructure projects.Former Secretary of State John Kerry gives a speech at the 9th Lower Mekong Initiative Ministerial Meeting in Vientiane, in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, last July. The LMI has been the United States’ primary environmental spearhead in Southeast Asia. It is expected to vanish under the Trump administration. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of State“I think probably the largest impact on Cambodia’s environment [resulting] from a shift towards China would be… the lack of transparency surrounding projects,” said Courtney Weatherby, a Research Analyst with the Southeast Asia program at the Stimson Center, an international peace and security think tank based in Washington, D.C. “One of the benefits of engaging with either Western countries, or Western investors, is that they tend to have higher standards — environmental and social standards in particular — and they have a more transparent way of operating that allows improvement through critique.“It generally appears that’s not the case with Chinese projects — although there are exceptions, and that’s important to note, and there have been improvements in recent years [concerning] the way that many Chinese investors operate. Still, across the board, they are often criticized for not meeting the same standards.”Weatherby pointed to the Lower Mekong Initiative (LMI) — a U.S.-led organization that includes Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam — as a positive force for environmental protection in Southeast Asia. Though Trump hasn’t yet publicly criticized, or tweeted his disdain for, the LMI, China is ready to step in. It has its own newly-minted organization, the Lancang-Mekong Cooperation Mechanism (LMCM), that could pick up steam in the region in the absence of American money and influence.Cambodia’s forests are highly threatened by illegal logging. USAID cuts could result in China stepping in, a nation not known for its transparency or for environmental sensitivity. Photo by Rhett A. Butler“The United States and China have very different methods and goals in interacting in the region, and also will get different reactions,” she said. “The United States, despite being a major world power, is also not a neighbor for any [Southeast Asian] countries. And, to some extent, [U.S.] engagement in the region — while certainly not selfless — is not viewed as suspiciously as the engagement of China.”“[The LMI and LMCM] serve different purposes,” Weatherby added. But “when you look at the statements that are coming out from China’s LMCM, they really don’t sound all that different from what you hear from “One Belt, One Road,” or its other large infrastructure-focused activities.” The “One Belt, One Road” initiative, by most accounts, is Beijing’s attempt to economically link China to much of the rest of the world — bolstering its position as a global leader through a series of expensive Eurasian infrastructure project.The U.N.’s roleThe United Nations, which has its own environmental protection efforts underway in Cambodia under the aegis of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), is another organization that Trump has spoken out against, with the President once tweeting: “The United Nations has such great potential, but right now it is just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time. So sad!”In Cambodia, UNEP is implementing projects to help reduce the vulnerability of poor urban communities to climate change, is bolstering Cambodia’s protected area system, and is helping reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, among other initiatives.Lumber harvested illegally in Cambodia that was confiscated and stacked at a ranger station. Deforestation is rampant in Cambodia, a problem that could see less oversight by the U.S. during Trump’s tenure as president. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerJonathan Gilman, who works in Strategic Policy and Planning at U.N. Environment Asia Pacific, stressed that Cambodia’s environment and people are at risk because, like so many developing nations, though it has contributed only a small amount to carbon emissions, its poor are largely unable to protect themselves from the onslaught of escalating climate change impacts. Which is why U.N. support and foreign aid are key to helping mitigate ongoing and lasting damage.“The Cambodian people depend heavily on the environment and natural resources for their livelihoods, and environmental sustainability is critical to ensuring sustained and inclusive economic growth and social development in Cambodia,” Gilman said. “The country is highly vulnerable to increased levels of pollution, uncontrolled exploitation of its natural resources and climate change. This vulnerability is most felt by the poorest and most vulnerable.”“The U.N. will support the Royal Government of Cambodia in climate-resilient planning and in its engagement with global initiatives related to climate change,” Gilman asserted.In regards to Trump’s plan to cut aid to Cambodia, Gilman was quick to separate the U.N.’s agenda from that of the U.S. “We are not aware of any cuts, but that’s a decision for the U.S., as to which countries [they want] to prioritize and fund,” he said. “We of course welcome USAID support to [the] environment.”Indochinese lutung (Trachypithecus germaini). Cambodia, its people, forests and wildlife, are still recovering from the ravages of the Vietnam War era, when the U.S. dropped more bombs on the country than were dropped by the Allies during all of World War II. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerThreats from deregulation and big businessTrump has already begun the rollback of environmental regulations in the U.S., repeatedly pushing policies that favor business over environmental protections. While it is still too early to say, those business and industry friendly attitudes and policies could soon begin to be exported to other countries. It seems highly unlikely, for example, that U.S. foreign policy, guided by Secretary of State and ex-EXXON CEO Rex Tillerson, would ever do more than slap a developing nation on the wrist for embarking on large scale infrastructure projects that jeopardize the environment.And Cambodia, in its zealous quest to transform itself from developing to developed nation status, is full of such projects, many of which are already endangering the lives and livelihoods of those living in the countryside. For example, a new “border belt road” linking Cambodia and Vietnam, now under construction in Stung Treng Province, cuts through what is currently a trackless area of Virachey National Park. Such roads often invite exploitation of local populations and forests, with the new highways provide easy access to transnational logging, mining and agribusiness companies.In northeast Cambodia, dams on the Sesan and Srepok Rivers, tributaries to the Mekong River, will displace local communities that fish and otherwise make their livings from those waterways, with illegal logging exacerbating community disruptions. While logging within the proposed reservoir flood zones to be created by the new dams is permitted, logging under the guise of dam construction is allegedly spreading far beyond these zones.The Sambor Dam on the Mekong, which would be Cambodia’s first dam on the river, will likely also wreak havoc on the environment, destroying prime habitat for the Critically Endangered Irrawaddy dolphin, which may number as few as 150 individuals.A floating village on Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia. Upstream dams are impacting the Mekong River, and with it, the lives of those who live downstream. Photo by Jialiang Gao GNU Free Documentation License 1.2 (Wikimedia)Other prioritiesIn the end, Trump’s near-complete disregard for small-ticket countries like Cambodia could create a vacuum that encourages environmental degradation, as aid dollars dry up, and as a lack of U.S. leadership and positive role modeling, combined with weak laws and poor enforcement by Cambodia, lead to environmentally destructive corporate business practices and large scale infrastructure projects, which, with their high cash flow, often invite corruption.Former U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton both pushed a more active U.S. foreign policy in the region under the “Pivot to Asia” initiative. During Obama’s tenure, the United States took a vocal stance on controversial Cambodian policies that U.S. lawmakers said infringed upon human rights, civil discourse and the environment. Members of the U.S. congress often publically expressed their disapproval of Cambodia’s dangerous political climate, and officials made efforts to encourage the Cambodian government to move forward on sustainable environmental development. By some accounts, U.S. engagement in Southeast Asia during the Obama administration was a stabilizing factor in a region rife with divisive politics.Trump has made it clear that he will jettison Obama’s interventionist approach, and will instead focus exclusively on enhancing U.S. “greatness” rather than try to influence the policies of other nations.Cambodia’s Stung Treng Province. A new “border belt road” linking Cambodia and Vietnam that would cut through the province could go through Virachey National Park, one of Cambodia’s largest protected areas. Photo: txikita69 via VisualHuntSome observers worry that this withdrawal of a U.S. moderating influence, and the move by the United States to embrace authoritarian means and anti-environmental policies, could ultimately be music to the ears of strongmen the world over, particularly in Cambodia. Already, Phnom Penh’s authoritarian government has been delighted to use the Trump administration’s attacks on the press as justification to stifle Cambodia’s own outspoken journalists.The government has “pushed further than ever before, jailing 25 political prisoners, several of whom are human rights defenders. It’s been open season in the [Cambodian] pre-election period. It’s no coincidence,” said Sophal Ear, Associate Professor of Diplomacy & World Affairs at Occidental College, Los Angeles. “The lack of interest from the White House has been devastating to human rights defenders. Plus, [President Trump,] the leader of the free world cavorts with authoritarian leaders everywhere. It’s a bad situation.“The silver lining, if one can call it that, is that Trump has not tweeted about Cambodia,” Ear added. “Either it’s not important enough to be worth a tweet or he can’t point to Cambodia on an atlas of the world.”The final decision on the USAID budget has yet to be made, but if Trump’s isolationist, America First, anti-environmental policies continue to sweep the globe, dictators and unscrupulous corporations could be encouraged to follow his lead. Then the Irrawaddy dolphin, the Mekong River, Cambodia’s forests and rural people could all find themselves in a world of hurt.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Forest along the Prek Piphot River. Dam building and illegal logging along Cambodia’s major rivers are creating a serious conservation crisis for ecosystems and riverside communities. Loss of U.S. aid will only worsen these problems. 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Amazon infrastructure EIAs under-assess biodiversity; scientists offer solutions

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Dams, Deforestation, DNA, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Politics, Flooding, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Mining, Monitoring, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Rivers, Roads, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img In a new paper, scientists assert that environmental impact assessments (EIAs) for major Brazilian Amazon infrastructure projects often fail in their performance of comprehensive biodiversity evaluations, so underestimate ecosystem risk.Their proposed solution is the development and use within EIAs of multiple, complementary scientific methods they say would be cost effective, and make more comprehensive biodiversity assessments possible.These methods include satellite imaging, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, and DNA metabarcoding to detect a wider range of species. The scientists propose these methods be implemented to improve pre-construction biodiversity surveys and EIAs.A major concern by researchers is that Brazil’s Congress is currently considering legislation that would do away with the existing environmental licensing process, and reduce or eliminate existing EIA requirements. Looking up into the canopy of the Amazon rainforest. Numerous major infrastructure projects are under construction or planned for the Amazon basin. A new study examining the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process for three very large such projects found their EIAs, as conducted, to be inadequate for evaluating biodiversity impacts. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayMany dozens of major infrastructure projects — including highways, dams and mines — have been given the green light in the Brazilian Amazon in recent years, and hundreds more are in the pipeline – but how well do their Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) perform? Are their projections of harm accurate, and do they sufficiently manage risk?Many projects, such as the Tapajós dam complex, have hit the headlines due to their projected social and ecological impacts, which include deforestation, harm to aquatic and terrestrial species, disruption to flood and nutrient cycles, increased carbon emissions, the flooding of sacred lands and the forced relocation of river communities.As a guard against these threats, all major development in the Brazilian Amazon requires that an environmental impact assessment (EIA) be carried out as part of the project licensing process. But a recent paper, examining three large infrastructure projects in the region, has found just how ineffective the existing EIA process can be.As a result, the scientists behind the study are calling for the incorporation of new technology into Brazilian EIAs to more accurately measure biodiversity and habitat quality ahead of construction, allowing a full cost-benefit analysis of development to be carried out.The BR-319 highway, linking the cities of Manaus and Porto Velho, was one of three major Amazon projects examined by scientists. Repaving the highway would open up biologically important areas of remote forest to deforestation, they say, something not adequately taken into account in the project’s EIA. Photo by Agencia CNT de Noticias under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic licenseInadequate EIAsThe research team, led by Camila Ritter of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, looked at an existing highway, hydropower dam, and mine:Paving the BR-319: This Amazon rainforest highway links the cities of Manaus and Porto Velho. Constructed in the 1970s, it fell into disrepair by the late 1980s. An EIA for paving a large, central section was rejected in 2008, but maintenance work — which effectively permits the reconstruction of the BR-319, except for paving itself — was approved in 2016. Although in this case the EIA contributed to the project license being formally rejected (for now) the scientists argue that the assessment fell far short of accurately analyzing the environmental consequences of paving. The improved BR-319 would likely do extensive harm to a highly biodiverse region between the Madeira and Purus rivers, rich in endemic species. Amazon highways, the researchers note, are a key driver of deforestation, with once remote and now newly accessible roadside forests a prime target for exploitation.Building the Belo Monte dam: When fully operational, the Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River will be the third largest in the world with an 11,000 megawatt generating capacity. Dogged by controversy and licensing hold-ups, the reservoir was filled in December 2015. The scientists argue that its EIA overlooked the synergistic effects of the dam in combination with other hydropower dams within the watershed. The EIA, they say, failed to fully evaluate the disruption to natural flood cycles, the carbon emissions caused by the reservoir, and also underestimated the dam’s impetus for a rapid increase in the local human population, which impacted the surrounding forest and wildlife. The Belo Monte EIA “is descriptive rather than predictive, and it falls short of proposing mitigating actions,” said the researchers.The Juruti bauxite mine: In the case of the Juruti bauxite mine, an industrial complex that includes a mine, port and railway on the southern bank of the Amazon River in Pará state, the scientists found that biological sampling for its EIA was inadequate. Not only was biodiversity significantly underestimated, but rare, endemic species were likely to have been missed altogether. This is on top of the “significant and long-lasting environmental changes” that the development is likely to bring to the region.What all three projects share, the scientists say, is a failure in one of the main components of every good EIA: to properly assess biodiversity. “The most important aspect in the discussion of Brazilian Amazonia EIAs is that we need to obtain better estimates of biological diversity, which translate into better predictions of biological and ecological impacts of these large infrastructural projects,” says Ritter.Belo Monte dam under construction in 2015. Large dams obstruct the flow of sediments and nutrients from headwaters to lowland floodplains, disrupt natural flood cycles, impede animal movement and migration along river channels, and drive deforestation. Photo by Pascalg622 used under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported licenseThe satellite solutionThe team recommends that planners look to the skies, and the soil, to get a more complete picture of existing biodiversity, so EIAs can more accurately assess the harm that planned developments might cause.Their proposed solution is the development and use of multiple, complementary scientific methods that they say would be cost effective, and make more comprehensive biodiversity assessments possible.This would include techniques such as remote sensing, where satellite images are used to analyze habitat extent and quality, making it possible to “monitor large areas in a consistent manner.” Another remote sensing method, called near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, offers “enormous but largely unrealized potential” to identify individual tree species from their spectral signature — the way in which they reflect light.Nathalie Pettorelli, who heads the Environmental Monitoring and Conservation Modelling team at the Zoological Society of London, UK, believes that “satellite remote sensing provides a fantastic opportunity to refine the EIA process.”“Importantly, these data could be used to learn about likely environmental impacts of various anthropogenic developments, by monitoring environmental changes in places where such developments have already occurred. This could help improve predictive abilities of future EIAs; and this could be particularly true in areas where these data get to be combined with reliable on the ground information,” added Pettorelli, who was not involved in the study.A bauxite mine in Brazil. Open pit mining, if not properly managed, can pollute the water table, creeks and rivers, and no matter how managed, results in deforestation. Norsk Hydro ASA photo found on flickrDNA analysisOn the ground, it could be the soil itself that holds the key: the third method highlighted by Ritter’s team for improving EIA accuracy is DNA metabarcoding — the sequencing of DNA found in soil to identify species and build up a picture of the biodiversity in a local area. Not only does this method have the potential to identify plants, animals, and microorganisms within a particular habitat without needing individual specimens, it also lends itself to repeatable and comparable analysis of regions and impacts.Douglas Yu, of the University of East Anglia, UK, leads research into metabarcoding methods, and is a co-founder of UK-based NatureMetrics, a company providing metabarcoding services to land managers. He agrees that using multiple methods is the way forward: “I think combining these independent data sources could provide a real boost to informativeness. Earth Observation provides continuous coverage of the environment, and metabarcoding (and other genetic information) could help to interpret those remote images.”Scientific and political obstaclesBut hurdles remain before these methods become mainstream. “The most useful satellite data for biodiversity monitoring in Brazil are not systematically readily available for the moment,” explained Pettorelli. But more important challenges “are linked to capacity, specifically capacity to analyze the available satellite data in a meaningful way,” she said.A red howler monkey howling. According to the study, all three of the project EIAs examined failed to fully assess biodiversity. The scientists suggest that technological advances offer cost-effective ways to improve biodiversity evaluations in the EIA process, including satellite imagery and DNA metabarcoding of soil samples. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayFor metabarcoding, “[t]he main obstacle would be to build a good DNA sequence reference database of all — or as many as possible — organisms in Brazil and the Amazon,” Ritter said. But, in the meantime, a simplified approach could make use of metabarcoding data to measure and compare diversity without knowing the exact species, she explained.There is added urgency for this debate: the legislative framework that defines EIAs in Brazil is under attack from proposed legal amendments that “would essentially abolish environmental licensing by making the mere submission of an environmental impact statement an automatic approval to go ahead with construction of the project in question,” said Philip Fearnside, of the National Institute for Research in Amazonia, and co-author of the new study.Once proposed amendments gutting the environmental licensing process come up for a vote in Brazil’s Congress — something Fearnside says is likely to happen at any time — “their approval is hard to stop due to ruralist control,” he explained, referring to the bancada ruralista, the agribusiness and mining rural lobby that currently wields tremendous power in the legislature and the administration of President Michel Temer.“The battle is focused on keeping the regulations we have from being abolished,” he added.But, Fearnside still sees the adoption of cutting edge EIA data gathering methods as a real possibility. “Technological improvements such as these are much more easily incorporated than are changes that require legislation,” he said, noting that similar changes have been made numerous times in EIA methodology over the past 30 years.Ritter is also optimistic about Brazil’s ability to make these necessary improvements.“I believe it is indeed possible to combine societal progress and large infrastructural projects with a continued high biodiversity. The money is available, as are the scientific expertise and the methodological progress,” concludes Ritter. “What is lacking, I fear, is the will to make this happen.”Citation:Ritter, C. D., McCrate, G., Nilsson, R. H., Fearnside, P. M., Palme, U. and Antonelli, A. 2017. Environmental impact assessment in Brazilian Amazonia: Challenges and prospects to assess biodiversity. Biological Conservation, 206, 161-168FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Videos detail corruption in massive illegal Peruvian timber case

first_imgAmazon, Amazon Logging, Forests, Illegal Logging, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img New video shows Peruvian timber executives knew they might be trafficking illegal timber out of the country aboard one of the largest captured shipments of illegal timber in Peru’s history, the Yacu Kallpa.The video, released by NGO Global Witness, shows that despite public claims, exporters often know that documents do not guarantee legal origin of timber.The videos include representatives from three of the exporting companies involved in the Yacu Kallpa case: Corporación Industrial Forestal, Inversiones WCA, and Sico Maderas. New information from undercover video sheds some light on one of the biggest global timber scandals in recent history, the Yacu Kallpa. The 15 video clips, released by NGO Global Witness, show Peruvian timber executives describing how they’ve been willfully complicit in buying and selling illegally-sourced timber, particularly in the Yacu Kallpa case. Much of the timber they describe was obtained in the Peruvian Amazon.The Yacu Kallpa was a massive container ship that moved the largest load of captured illegal timber in the history of Peru. It was over 1,312 cubic meters of illegal wood, according to Peru’s customs and tax enforcer, Sunat. Much of the stolen wood came from indigenous communities, from families of farmers and even from the lands of the Peruvian state itself, and was transported in three trips during 2015. It was enough to the freight capacity of 60 semi-trailers, according to one assessment by Peruvian investigative media outlet OjoPúblico.The timber was sent out in three shipments bound for the US, and was detained and then released in late 2016 despite proof it was illegal, reported OjoPúblico. According to the report, Mexican authorities caved to pressure from the Mexican and Peruvian timber sectors on the third shipment. All of the timber ultimately ended up in Mexico, the United States and the Dominican Republic.Video released by Global Witness shows that some executives involved with the timber on the Yacu Kallpa were aware of the questionable origin of the wood. The NGO notes that it demonstrates that despite public claims, exporters know that documents do not guarantee legal origin of timber.Many of the 15 video clips are of Dante Zevallos, from exporting company Sico Maderas. Zevallos describes the process to illegally launder timber through the sale and purchase of transport permits. Forest owners who are legally allowed to harvest and sell timber from their forests instead sell their permit papers to those logging illegally. “If I go to this same forest and say ‘I am going to get some papers for this timber so I can extract it,’ this tree miraculously becomes legal timber, just because of a piece of paper,” Zevallos said in one video clip. Zevallos was president of the association of Loreto timber operators at the time the videos were made. He said he was scared because he knew he was buying illegal timber. “At any moment they can raid us…I knew!” he said in one video. In another video, William Castro, from Inversiones WCA, describes an agreement he claims to have struck with regional governor Fernando Meléndez, which Castro calls ‘part of the corruption.’ According to Castro, the idea was that he would process some timber for Meléndez and, in exchange, the governor would help release Castro’s timber detained in Mexico. Castro admits that his timber on the Yacu Kallpa in November 2015 was “illegal,” but blames the regional government.Knowingly transporting or exporting the timber in question by any of those who knew the origin was illegal could land offenders in jail for up to seven years, according to Peruvian law.Much of the dialogue in the videos pertains to frustration with permitting processes, land demarcations, corruption, and bureaucracy. The videos were released by Global Witness as part of an undercover investigation alongside their report, Buyers in Good Faith: How Timber Exporters are Complicit in Plundering Peru’s Amazon. All videos (Spanish with English subtitles) can be found here.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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The world’s newest great ape, revealed a month ago, is already nearly extinct: IUCN

first_imgThis week, the world’s newest great ape Tapanuli orangutan was officially categorized as “Critically Endangered” by the IUCN as the species lost over 80 percent of its global population over generations due to habitat loss.The classification of the orangutan came in conjunction with the conservation union releasing its latest Red List of “Threatened” Species which added thousands of animal and plant species.The list is a mixed bag of good and bad news for conservation. The Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) of Sumatra is both the world’s newest known great ape species and its most threatened, after being officially categorized this week as “Critically Endangered,” or nearly extinct in the wild.Researchers last month declared it the world’s eighth great ape species, distinguishing it from the Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) and the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), both of which are also deemed Critically Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The report concluded there were about 800 Tapanuli orangutans left in the wild, making it the rarest great ape on Earth.“Due to high levels of habitat conversion and fragmentation, and illegal killing, Pongo tapanuliensis is estimated to have experienced a significant population reduction in recent decades,” the IUCN said, noting that the species had lost 83 percent of its population over the course of three generations.The Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) lives in pockets within the Batang Toru forest in North Sumatra province. Photo by Maxime Aliaga.The isolated orangutan lives in fragmented patches of the 1,338-square-kilometer (516-square-mile) Batang Toru ecosystem in North Sumatra province.While the mountainous topography of the area makes it unsuitable for farming, large swaths of the orangutans’ habitat are at threat from other forms of exploitation. The biggest threat comes from the development of a 510-megawatt hydroelectric plant in an area with the highest known density of Tapanuli orangutans. The researchers who described the orangutan suggested that the project could harm 8 percent of the ape’s habitat if completed.“To ensure the long-term survival of Pongo tapanuliensis, conservation measures need to be implemented swiftly,” the IUCN said.The Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry has acknowledged the issues and vowed an assessment of the potential impact from the power plant project on the orangutan habitat. A top official said the ministry would also be more judicious about approving future development projects in the region.The classification of the Tapanuli orangutan, its first by the IUCN, was issued Tuesday as part of an update of the IUCN’s Red List, which saw an additional 1,514 animal and plant species join the “Threatened” categories of “Vulnerable,” “Endangered” or “Critically Endangered.”The update, published in Tokyo, assessed the status of 91,523 species, and found 866 to be extinct.These include three reptile species found only on Australia’s Christmas Island: the Christmas Island whiptail skink (Emoia nativitatas), the blue-tailed skink (Cryptoblepharus egeriae) and the Lister’s gecko (Lepidodactylus listeri).An Irrawaddy dolphin in Cambodia. Unsustainable fishing has driven the species closer to extinction. Photo courtesy of Stefan Brending/Wikimedia Commons licensed under CC-by-sa-3.0 de.“The extinctions of three reptiles on Christmas Island are an intriguing ‘whodunit,’ as their cause remains unclear,” said John Zichy-Woinarski, professor of conservation biology at Charles Darwin University in Australia and an IUCN commission member.“These extinctions remind us how crucial it is to identify the primary causes of species decline, to inform robust monitoring and conservation programs for threatened and declining species. In this case, the extent and severity of decline was revealed too late to save these Christmas Island reptiles.”Australia’s increasingly dry and hot climate has also led to a decline in the population of the western ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus occidentalis) by more than 80 percent over the past 10 years, pushing it two categories up from Vulnerable to Critically Endangered.In Japan, a third of 46 endemic reptiles are under threat of extinction, primarily due to habitat loss, predators and collection for the pet trade.The status of the Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) and finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) have also worsened, both moving from Vulnerable to Endangered after a significant decline in their numbers due to fisheries bycatch and habitat loss.“The Irrawaddy dolphin is revered by many communities and dolphin tourism is an important feature of local economies in parts of India and Cambodia,” says Randall Reeves, chair of the IUCN SSC Cetacean Specialist Group. “While the protected status of both species means that deliberate hunting or capture is rare or non-existent, protection from entanglement and other threats is either lacking entirely or largely ineffective. Without practical solutions to this problem, the declines of dolphins and porpoises are bound to continue for the foreseeable future.”The IUCN also reported that 26 six species of wild wheat, 25 species of wild rice and 44 species of wild yam — hardy variants of some of the most important food crops grown today — have been pushed to the brink of extinction by intensive farming, deforestation and urban sprawl.“Wild crop species, for example, maintain genetic diversity of agricultural crops that can adapt to a changing climate and ensure food and nutritional security,” said IUCN director general Inger Andersen.The update wasn’t all doom and gloom, though. There was good news for the kiwi in New Zealand, where conservation efforts have led to a steady increase in the population of both the Okarito kiwi (Apteryx rowi) and the northern brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli). Both have seen their status improve from Endangered to Vulnerable.“Fortunately, the kiwi downlistings show that there is hope,” said Ian Burfield, global science coordinator at BirdLife International.The northern brown kiwi. Photo courtesy of Neil Robert Hutton for IUCN.Banner image: The newly described Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) in Indonesia. Photo by Maxime Aliaga.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forests, Great Apes, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Mammals, Orangutans, Plants, Reptiles center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Gabonese timber linked to illegal logging seized in Antwerp

first_imgCorruption, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Law, Forest Loss, Forests, Governance, Government, Habitat Loss, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Logging, Rainforests, Timber, Timber Laws, timber trade, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Tropical hardwoods In 2016 and 2017, EIA investigators posed as timber merchants and met with WCTS’s deputy general manager, Chen Wixing. They secretly filmed a series of meetings with Chen and other WCTS employees.“His business model is essentially structural over-harvesting, tax evasion, money laundering and, covering all that, corruption,” Handy said.According to Handy, WCTS was extracting between two and three times its legal quota. When the EIA spoke to Chen in 2016, Handy says WCTS was already cutting down forest in areas it was not supposed to have reached until 2030.In the videos, published by the EIA in May this year, Chen also describes evading tax through transfer pricing and channeling his exports through smaller companies to avoid the attention of the authorities in Gabon.Following the EIA’s exposé, WCTS is now under investigation in Gabon.As part of its commitment to reduce illegal logging, the European Union introduced the EUTR in 2013, making it an offense to import illegally logged timber into the bloc. A key part of the regulation is a requirement that European companies importing timber must conduct thorough due diligence on their timber sources.Guidance documents produced by the European Commission in 2016 to assist timber traders in interpreting the EUTR state, “In cases where the risk of corruption is not negligible, even official documents issued by authorities cannot be considered reliable.” It is on this basis that Greenpeace believes Compagnie de Bois Anvers failed to conduct due diligence.In a statement responding to inquiries from Mongabay, Compagnie du Bois Anvers said, “We were of course shocked to see the set of movies that was released by EIA on 22/5/2019. We have immediately suspended our relationship with WCTS until the outcome of further investigations.”It declined to comment further until the Belgian investigation is complete.Allegations of illegal activities by WCTS have been aired publicly since 2017. WCTS was fined by the Gabonese authorities in 2017 following an investigation. It is also the subject of a civil complaint by Conservation and Justice, a Gabonese NGO. Verbelen said he believes the availability of this information means that Compaigne du Bois Anvers had clearly failed in its due diligence obligation.“There are more than enough indications if you are a timber trader in Belgium that there is a high risk of dealing with illegal timber when you’re buying from this company,” he said. “[Compagnie du Bois Anvers] needs to be investigated and, in our opinion, sanctioned.”Compagnie du Bois Anvers and Greenpeace are now awaiting the outcome of the Belgian government’s investigation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Banner image: Timber exported by Wan Chuan Timber SARL currently blocked at the port of Antwerp, Belgium. Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen/Greenpeace Belgian authorities have blocked a shipment of tropical timber from Gabon after a tip-off by Greenpeace.Under the EU Timber Regulation, European companies have an obligation to conduct proper due diligence on the source of the timber they import.Greenpeace says this due diligence requirement was not met in this case, as the wood was exported by a Chinese logging firm with previous allegations of illegal logging. On July 8, Greenpeace forest campaigner Philippe Verbelen was conducting routine monitoring at the Belgian port of Antwerp when he noticed a familiar name attached to a timber shipment: Wan Chuan Timber SARL (WCTS), a company that has been exposed and fined for a series of grave offenses in Gabon.Verbelen alerted customs officials at the port, who moved quickly moved to block the shipment of padoek, a tropical timber. The Belgian government is now investigating the company receiving the shipment, Antwerp-based Compagnie de Bois Anvers, for a possible breach of the European Union Timber Regulation (EUTR).The shipment in question came from Gabon, a country that currently still has 85 percent coverage of incredibly biodiverse rainforest. In May this year, Pierre Moussavou, Gabon’s then-vice president and minister of state for forests and the environment, was fired in connection with a timber scandal.“[Gabon] is a country with a high level of corruption linked to the forestry sector,” Verbelen said. “European timber companies clearly need to identify companies active in Gabon as a high risk for doing business.”WCTS, which exported the timber, is a Chinese logging company operating in Gabon. Verbelen recognized its name from an undercover probe by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), an NGO based in Washington, D.C. The EIA came across WCTS in 2016 while investigating illegal logging activity in Gabon.“We were asking who the really bad guys were, who were the people or the companies that were just breaking all the rules with no respect,” said Lisa Handy, the EIA’s director of forest campaigns, “and several times everybody was referring back to WCTS.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by terna gyuselast_img read more

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In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, Feb. 7, 2020

first_imgConservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsMalaysia estimates it will take a decade to build the Trans-Borneo Highway, connecting Malaysian and Indonesian Borneo with Brunei (The Malaysian Insight, The Edge Markets).The NGO African Parks will manage the 150,000-square-kilometer (58,000-square-mile) Iona National Park in Angola (Africa Geographic).Locusts have descended on Kenya, in the country’s worst infestation in 70 years (The Guardian).Malaysian lawmakers are expected to strengthen penalties levied against illegal loggers (Reuters).A dispute over land and resources may have left six indigenous people dead in Nicaragua (BBC News) …… While in Brazil a man was killed during a raid to stamp out illegal deforestation (Reuters).An economic study found that the U.S.’s biofuels policy has had an “insignificant” impact on deforestation in Malaysia and Indonesia (Agrinews).Numbers of the pig-like white-lipped peccary have dropped by as much as 90%, a study has found (ScienceDaily).Other newsBumblebees have lost almost half their habitat in North America (The Washington Post).Some Republican lawmakers in the U.S. see addressing climate change as electorally necessary (The Washington Post).A baboon in South Africa’s Kruger National Park kidnapped, then gently groomed, a lion cub (Africa Geographic).Researchers wonder whether the platypus can withstand the assaults from feral cats, habitat loss and wildfires (The New York Times).The loss of sea ice in northern Japan is both a benefit and a hindrance to spotted seals (The Washington Post).Illegal fishing off the Somali coast is upending the small-scale fisheries on which communities depend (Hakai Magazine).Millions of trees may have died after a tree-planting project in Turkey (The Guardian).Andean condor numbers are dropping due to deaths related to pesticide use (The Revelator).U.S. President Donald Trump didn’t mention climate change in his State of the Union address, but said he has a plan to plant a trillion trees (Undark) …… Even as his administration moves to open up once-protected areas in the western U.S. to grazing, drilling and logging (The Washington Post).Currents are speeding up across more than three-quarters of the world’s oceans as a result of climate change (The Washington Post, The New York Times).Scientists have observed Alaskan brown bears hunting sea otters for the first time (Hakai Magazine).Banner image of brown bears courtesy of Denali National Park and Preserve via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Deforestation in Brazil continues torrid pace into 2020

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon continues to rise, according to data from Brazil’s national space research institute INPE.NPE’s deforestation alert system DETER shows that deforestation during January 2020 amounted to 284 square kilometers (110 square miles), an area 83 times the size of New York’s Central Park. The loss is more than twice that registered in January 2019.January’s numbers put deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon over 9,000 sq km for the past 12 months, an 85% increase over a year ago.The various data points suggest that forest destruction in the Brazilian Amazon is currently pacing about double last year’s rate. Despite global concern over last year’s catastrophic forest destruction and associated fires in Earth’s largest rainforest, deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon continues to rise, according to data from Brazil’s national space research institute INPE.INPE’s deforestation alert system DETER shows that deforestation during January 2020 amounted to 284 square kilometers (110 square miles), an area 83 times the size of New York’s Central Park. The loss is more than twice that registered in January 2019.January’s numbers put deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon over 9,000 sq km for the past 12 months, an 85% increase over a year ago. 4,688 sq km have been cleared since August 1, 2019, the beginning of the “year” Brazil uses for tracking annual deforestation, or 113% higher than the same time last year.The various data points suggest that forest destruction in the Brazilian Amazon is currently pacing about double last year’s rate. Deforestation alert data on a twelve month rolling basis. Blue is INPE’s DETER system, while red is Imazon’s SAD system. Imazon is an independent Brazilian NGO that functions as a check against official Brazilian government data.Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon made global headlines last year when smoke from land-clearing fires blackened the skies above São Paulo, Brazil’s largest city. Although the fires weren’t anywhere near historic records, the Armageddon-like conditions fueled a frenzy of social media activity and protests around the world. The fires brought global attention to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s policies in the Amazon, which scientists and environmentalists say are contributing to the sharp rise in forest destruction. Deforestation last year hit the highest level in at least 12 years.PORTO VELHO, RONDÔNIA, BRAZIL. Aerial view of burned areas in the Amazon rainforest, in the city of Porto Velho, Rondônia state. (Photo: Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace)Header image: Google Earth image of deforestation for soy fields and cattle pasture north of the city of Manaus in the Brazilian Amazon in January 2020. last_img read more

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Bob Jungels frustré à l’arrivée de la 17e étape du Giro à Anterselva

first_img Partager «Je crois chaque jour en moi, parce que je suis le dernier qui va abandonner et qui se laisse aller. Je suis à un point maintenant où je ne sais pas vraiment quoi faire. Si ce n’était pas pour l’équipe, pour le staff, je voudrais probablement quitter le Giro», poursuivait-il en étayant son propos de cette simple constatation : «Oui, nous étions 18 coureurs dans l’échappée et je finis 18e…»Certes, mais au moins aura-t-il eu le grand mérite d’essayer. Et des jours meilleurs viendront fatalement, après ce Giro difficile.C’est le Français Nans Peters (AG2R La Mondiale) qui l’a emporté mercredi, la deuxième victoire d’un coureur français depuis le départ. L’Équatorien Richard Carapaz (Movistar) conserve le maillot rose de leader à quatre jours de l’arrivée.Denis Bastien à Anterselva Le champion national n’a pas ménagé sa peine dans cette 17e étape, mercredi, mais quand ça ne veut pas…Même si ses parents étaient présents pour le réconforter, devant le pullman de son équipe, Deceuninck-Quick Step, Bob Jungels n’avait pas le cœur à sourire. Il s’était démené comme un beau diable toute la journée. En formant cette échappée de 18 coureurs. Il avait été lâché à deux reprises dans les portions dures d’un parcours toboggan. Mais à chaque fois, il avait recollé les morceaux. Mieux, il menait plus qu’à son tour. Comme toujours, lorsqu’il est en tête d’une course, Bob Jungels ne fait pas les choses à moitié.Mais la montée finale vers Anterselva et son magnifique stade de biathlon, fut de trop. «Je ne peux pas dire beaucoup sur ce qui s’est passé. Je sais seulement que c’était une journée de m…. J’ai tout risqué pour rentrer dans cette échappée et cela m’avait déjà coûté beaucoup de force. Mais j’ai remarqué que mes jambes n’étaient pas bonnes. En général, mes jambes ne sont pas au top dans ce Giro. Je ne comprends vraiment pas ce qui se passe, c’est frustrant », déclarait-il.last_img read more

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