Cambodia’s Sambor Dam plans cause controversy as public left in the dark

first_imgA recent social media posting by a government spokesman indicates that the Sambor Dam is a priority project for the Cambodian government, to be completed by 2027 with an output of 1,800 megawatts.The developer that originally planned to build the dam, China Southern Power Grid, pulled out of the project after villagers protested the dam’s potential impact on fisheries. Studies indicate the dam could reduce yields of fish and aquatic animals by as much as 30 percent.China Southern Power Grid’s feasibility studies also indicated that 19,000 people would have to be relocated for the dam.In 2013, the Cambodian government hired the US-based National Heritage Institute to review options for the project. The report prepared by NHI has not been made public, which has drawn criticism from civil society groups. KRATIE PROVINCE, Cambodia — “If the dam is built, it will be like before, in the time of the Khmer Rouge when we all had to move,” said Plau Saret, 44, of Domrae Village on the Mekong River island of Koh Tnaot, right next to the proposed Sambor Dam site. In 2011, she and her husband built a new house. Then, a few years ago, she saw Chinese surveyors digging in the river.The Sambor Dam is one of Cambodia’s priority energy projects, according to the country’s “Master plan for the development of energy generation.” This plan was a well-kept secret until two pages from it appeared Feb. 17 in a snapshot posted on the Facebook page of Phay Siphan, a government spokesman.The plan posted by Siphan states the Sambor Dam will be completed in three stages from 2025-2027, with a total power output of 1,800 megawatts. Attempts by Mongabay to get government comments on the plan were not answered and few details are yet known about the proposed scheme.The dam, in Kratie province, is the biggest of Cambodia’s two proposed mainstream Mekong dams. It has been on the drawing board for over a decade, but final plans do not yet appear to be in place. Last month, the Cambodia Daily reported that in October 2016 the cabinet greenlighted feasibility studies for the Sambor and two other proposed dams, but as yet there has been no confirmation that the Ministry of Mines and Energy has signed on.It’s unclear who will undertake construction work, but Cambodian business tycoon Kith Meng, chairman of The Royal Group, was in February announced as the Cambodian partner. According to rights group Global Witness, Meng is, “known for involvement in land grabbing and illegal logging.” Global Witness also found that the Prime Minister’s daughter, Hun Mana “is a director and shareholder in Royal Group Investment Company.”last_img read more

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One of the last three rhinos in Malaysia is critically ill

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Sumatran Rhino Article published by Isabel Esterman Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Wildlife officials fear Puntung, one of the last three rhinos known to survive in Malaysia, is on the brink of death due to an abscess in her jaw.The abscess has not responded to veterinary treatment provided at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary in the Tabin Wildlife Reserve in Sabah, where Puntung lives with the other two surviving rhinos in Malaysia.The Sumatran rhino was declared extinct in the wild in Malaysia in 2015. Fewer than 100 are believed to remain, mostly in Indonesia. UPDATE: Rare Malaysian rhino still sick, but showing signs of improvementPuntung, one of the last three Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) known to survive in Malaysia, is critically ill with an abscess deep inside her upper jaw.Wildlife officials in Malaysian Borneo’s Sabah State fear the rhino, one of the few remaining representatives of a critically endangered species, is on the brink of death.The infection has not responded to drainage and antibiotic treatment, Sabah Wildlife Department Director Augustine Tuuga said in an April 5 press statement. “We are worried about sepsis, an infection that can spread quickly through the body and rapidly cause death,” he said.The life-threatening abscess in Puntung’s jaw. Photo courtesy of the Sabah Wildlife Department.Puntung is receiving 24-hour veterinary care at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary in Tabin Wildlife Reserve in Sabah, a fenced-in facility managed by the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA) where she lives in captivity along with Malaysia’s two other surviving rhinos.“All of us here at BORA, are very much affected by this and are desperately doing everything we can to treat her. We want to hope for the best, but the situation does not look good,” BORA said on its Facebook page today.  “We are working round the clock to save one of the world’s rarest and most lovable animals, and we will not give up.”The Sumatran rhino was declared extinct in the wild in Malaysia in 2015. Between 50 and 100 are believed to survive in Indonesia, including seven at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park in southern Sumatra.Puntung, who is believed to be around 25 years old, was captured in 2011 and brought to the sanctuary. Prior to her capture — likely in infancy — Puntung lost her front left foot, probably to a poacher’s snare. Hence the name “Puntung,” which means “stub” in Malaysian.According to BORA, Puntung is “perhaps the most endearing” of the rhinos at the sanctuary “due to her disability and her gentle nature.”Puntung’s arrival at the sanctuary in late 2011 brought hope that she could provide a mate for Tam, the sanctuary’s middle-aged male rhino. With a small, dwindling population separated into isolated pockets, many rhino experts believe a captive breeding program is the only hope for the species’ survival.However, Puntung was found to have asevere array of uterine cysts, making her unable to bear a pregnancy. A second female rhino, Iman, who was captured and brought to the Tabin facility in 2014, also has reproductive pathologies. Meanwhile Tam, although still producing some viable sperm, is past his reproductive prime.Since 2014, BORA turned its focus to assisted reproductive technology, specifically in vitro fertilization (IVF) in order to produce a viable embryo — an effort that has so far been unsuccessful.“Loss of Puntung now would be a tragedy, because she potentially has quite a few years of egg production left,” said BORA Executive Director John Payne in a press statement.Banner Image courtesy of the Sabah Wildlife Department.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Pygmy death shows need for land reform, group says

first_imgThe shooting death of a Pygmy native in the Democratic Republic of Congo is putting park rangers there under the microscope.The rangers in the country’s protected areas are employed by a semi-government entity in charge of protected areas, the ICCN.Local Pygmy groups and some advocacy organizations say the shooting proves that proper access to the forest is crucial to their way of life and safety. An organization that advocates on behalf of forests and forest peoples, Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), says that a key land reform issue is to blame for the August 26 death of a Pygmy native.Christian Mbone Nakulire and his father Munganga Nakulire were looking for medicinal herbs in the forests of Kahuzi-Biega National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). According to FPP, Christian was shot and killed by armed park rangers who patrol the area for the regional conservation authority. His father suffered a gunshot wound to the right arm.The rangers were reportedly guards for the ICCN (Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature), the semi-governmental organization that oversees the management of DRC’s protected areas. Neither the ICCN for the FPP could be reached for comment.Organizations that work with the Pygmy communities in the area, including The Indigenous Peoples and Vulnerable Minority Indigenous Peoples’ Centre, have condemned the killing and called for an investigation.Local Pygmy response has also been strong, including a sit-in protest they staged a few days after the incident.“We have never killed a gorilla, let alone an eco-guard or a tourist, so why are we killed in this way?” said Ntavuna, a Pygmy native and head of the Buyungule village, in the Miti group, according to a press release from FPP.The organization also said that proper recognition of the land rights of the Pygmy indigenous people, the Batwa, is crucial. Had a planned land management road map been followed, FPP says that the Batwa would currently be living in three forest pilot areas with safe access to the forest and would be able to practice their ecological knowledge on their customary lands.Such a neat solution would be difficult to achieve in Kahuzi-Biega.The region is fraught with violence and the park is home to thousands of hectares of favored grounds for gorilla poachers and other armed groups, including bandits. More than one ranger has been killed there, the most recent victim was killed by gunfire in an ambush in October 2016.Kahuzi-Biega covers more than 2,300 square miles and is patrolled constantly by guards who earn about $45 per month.Banner image: Park rangers in Kahuzi-Biega National Park in DRC. Photo by Thomas Nicolon for Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Forests, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Rights, Rainforests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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A healthy and productive Amazon is the foundation of Brazil’s sovereignty (commentary)

first_imgBrazilian President Jair Bolsonaro likes to assert that foreigners deserve no say over the fate of the Amazon because it is a national sovereignty issue. In making the argument, Bolsonaro at times lays out a grand conspiracy under which a body like the U.N. tries to “internationalize” the Amazon, claiming it as the domain of the world.As fires rage, some on social media are raising the idea of the Amazon being the domain of the world. But this discussion plays directly into Bolsonaro’s narrative, strengthening his hand.Instead, concerned people of the world should talk about how a healthy and productive Amazon actually underpins Brazil’s sovereignty by strengthening food, water, and energy security, while supporting good relations with its neighbors.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro likes to assert that foreigners deserve no say over the fate of the Amazon because it is a national sovereignty issue. His logic: Brazilian Amazon is Brazil’s sovereign territory and therefore it has the right to do what it wants with it, whether that be clearing it for cattle pasture and soy fields or making the decision to conserve it.In making the argument, Bolsonaro at times lays out a grand conspiracy under which a body like the U.N. tries to “internationalize” the Amazon, claiming it as the domain of the world. This conspiracy theory is not new — it was a common refrain under Brazil’s military dictatorship from 1964-1985 and is still frequently used by opponents of Amazon conservation efforts.With worldwide attention now on the fires burning in the Brazilian Amazon, Bolsonaro is again using this rhetoric. For example, today he cited Brazil’s sovereignty (as well as perceived “insults” from French President Emmanuel Macron after Bolsonaro slighted Macron’s wife) as the reason for rejecting a $20 million G7 contribution toward firefighting efforts.Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia on August 23, 2019. (Photo: Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace)As fires rage, some on social media are raising the idea of the Amazon being the domain of the world. But this discussion plays directly into Bolsonaro’s narrative, strengthening his hand. This strategy is the wrong approach for those concerned about the future of the Amazon. Instead, concerned people of the world should talk about how a healthy and productive Amazon actually underpins Brazil’s sovereignty by strengthening food, water, and energy security, while supporting good relations with its neighbors.This argument is straightforward and grounded in good science — science by Brazilian scientists.Water security: Through the process of transpiration, the trees of the Amazon are responsible for generating much of the ecosystem’s rainfall. As a whole, the Amazon rainforest acts as a “water pump” that delivers precipitation across much of South America by creating a cycle that pulls moisture from soils and off the tropical Atlantic and delivers it far inland, beyond the borders of the Amazon. Antonio Donato Nobre, a Brazilian scientist who is famed for talks about the “flying rivers” above the Amazon, says the Amazon keeps southern South America much greener than areas at similar latitudes on other continents and also diminishes hurricane activity along the Brazilian coast. Disrupting this function could be catastrophic for water security in Brazil and beyond. Scientists warn that scarcity of water supplies is a real possibility if the combination of rising temperatures and deforestation push the rainforest ecosystem toward a tipping point where it shifts toward a drier, less-forested landscape similar to the adjacent Cerrado, a woody savanna that covers more than 20 percent of Brazil. Such a transition could even shift the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), which circulates moisture around the world near the equator, exacerbating droughts from the Southern Amazon down to Argentina.A rain storm over the Amazon. There are many other reasons beyond ecosystem services why a healthy and productive Amazon is valuable to Brazil, none the least of which is around a million indigenous peoples live in the Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayFood security: The vast majority of agriculture in Brazil — and South America as a whole — is produced in areas that receive direct rainfall or runoff from the Amazon. South America’s agricultural heartland across Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina is especially dependent on the Amazon. Should the Amazon tip toward a drier savanna-like ecosystem, South America’s agricultural powerhouses would be challenged to identify other viable sources of water.Energy security: More than 70 percent of Brazil’s electricity comes from hydropower. Any extended disruption of rainfall potentially affects the country’s grid with knock-on effects for rural and city dwellers alike. Replacement with other renewables or fossil fuels is a long-term investment. Good relations with neighbors / National security: Brazil’s neighbors benefit from the services afforded by a healthy and productive Amazon. If degradation of the Amazon reaches the point where it starts to affect water availability, drive smoke and haze over population centers, or trigger outflows of refugees, it could become a source of friction between Brazil and its neighbors.In summary, disrupting the ecological function of the Amazon risks disrupting the economic foundation of Brazil. In other words, a healthy and productive Amazon is necessary for a healthy and productive Brazilian economy.Satellite view of the Juruá River as seen via Google Earth using Landsat / Copernicus imagery. This commentary only looks at the value of the Amazon for its water services. It leaves aside carbon storage, biodiversity, and other ecosystem services as well as the fact the biome sustains roughly a million indigenous peoples.When Bolsonaro rallies his base by talking about opening up the Amazon to deforestation, he’s taking a very short-term approach. Farmers and ranchers will be among the biggest losers in the long-run if the Amazon rainforest tips toward something drier.Instead of talking about internationalizing the Amazon, critics of Bolsonaro and his policies would be wise to look for opportunities to find common ground with his supporters. The economic well-being of Brazil seems like a good place to start.Header image: Satellite view of the Amazon Basin as seen via Google Earth using Landsat / Copernicus imagery. Agriculture, Commentary, Conservation, Deforestation, Drought, Ecosystem Services, Editorials, Environmental Economics, Forests, Green, Impact Of Climate Change, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Water Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

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The climate crisis and the pain of losing what we love (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Birds, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Politics, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Extinction And Climate Change, Extreme Weather, Forgotten Species, Green, Habitat, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Invasive Species, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Research, Sixth Mass Extinction, Tropical Deforestation, Weather, Wildlife World leaders came to the UN last week to decisively tackle climate change again. “This is not a negotiation summit because we don’t negotiate with nature. This is a Climate Action Summit!” declared the UN Secretary-General. But again, global leaders failed and committed to carbon cuts that fall far short of curbing catastrophe.In doing so, our leaders committed us to an escalating global environmental crisis that is already unleashing vast changes across Earth’s ecosystems — with many sweeping alterations charted by our scientists, but many other local shifts and absences only noted by those who observe and cherish wild things.The loss of familiar weather patterns, plants and animals (from monarchs to native bees) and an invasion of opportunistic living things (Japanese knotweed to Asian longhorned ticks) can foster feelings of vertigo — of being a stranger in a strange land — emotions, so personal and rubbing so raw, they can be hard to describe.So I’ve tried to express my own feelings for one place, Vermont, my home, that is today seeing rapid change. At the end of this piece, Mongabay invites you to tally your own natural losses. We’ll share your responses in a later story. This post is a commentary. Views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. A moose in Nulhegan basin, Vermont. Once common in Vermont, moose numbers have fallen. The reason: climate change bringing mild temperatures and a deadly parasite, the winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) that overwhelms the large animals, especially their calves; 50,000 ticks can overwinter on a single moose. Image courtesy of US Fish and Wildlife Service – Northeast Region.No place stays the same forever, and few of us want to live somewhere that is frozen in amber.… We seek the new, and the novel, and welcome improvements… with open arms. But we also need places to anchor us. Novelty is wonderful, but only when balanced with the familiar. And when those familiar [things go], for whatever reason, our reaction also occurs on a human scale. A sigh of resignation. A flood of memories. And sometimes, if you truly loved the place, a sadness so genuine it can trigger tears. — author David SaxThe paragraph quoted above comes from a poignant August 2019 New York Times article by author David Sax and is about losing a local neighborhood record store, “saying goodbye to a beloved brick and mortar business.”But, what is true for music loving urbanites, is becoming even more true for suburbanites and rural dwellers who look out windows not at neighborhoods of changing proprietors and altered store fronts, grieving the loss of book stores and Jewish delis, but rather at a version of Nature — species of trees, birds, butterflies, wildflowers, whole habitats — we knew intimately since youth which are either fading or no more.In this sense I feel deep empathy with Sax. We do need the familiar, places to anchor us. But in the Vermont countryside where I live, those anchors are being ripped away year-by-year by a deepening, ravaging climate crisis — ever escalating as more heat energy is fed by the world’s crazed coal stokers into the fossil fuel furnaces driving the global economy and planetary climate system.And so, the birds arrive in spring to find the insects and blooming plants — needed to nourish their weary feathered bodies after long migrations up coasts and across wide watery bays — either missing or utterly out of sync. Shifting seasonal patterns play havoc, as warm weather comes weeks too early, and autumnal cold comes late. Migraters fail to thrive in the asynchrony, and other native creatures, mostly too small to notice, struggle and sink.Monarch butterfly. Photo: © Derek Ramsey / derekramsey.com.The insects never do appear in numbers anymore. Where uncountable native bees, butterflies and beetles once buzzed, fluttered and hovered among the clovers and foxtails, nothing stirs or nearly nothing. One or two Monarchs a season does not make a migration — but the presence of a few makes me lament the ghosts of the many. Fields of breeze-blown grass wave empty.Likewise I’m missing bloodroot, Dutchman’s breeches and woodland sunflowers that grew in abundant exuberance along the White River. In a mere two decades, they’ve been displaced by an invading army of Japanese knotweed — a once small infestation was aided in its spread tens-of-miles downstream by the raging waters of Tropical Storm Irene in August 2011, and by other deluges since, now common as extreme whiplash weather intensifies.Sure, I know intellectually the Queen Anne’s lace that gives me solace and some sense of permanence was brought to New England in European seed bags centuries ago. But I grew up with those lacy summer crowns, not with the recently introduced poison giant hogweed or waste-place chervil whose white caps crest in monotonous waves along Vermont byways each summer, unwelcomed by those who love black-eyed Susans or New England asters.Sure, in the face of melting glaciers and rising seas, such losses sound like bourgeoise whining. But truly, what to do and how to feel when snarling opossums and aggressive English sparrows move in and the mourning doves, warblers, moose and little brown bats thin, flicker and go?This is our fate now and tomorrow — not just here but across the world, as an unmoored Nature changes character with each year’s surging temperatures and widening extremes of drought and downpour. Change that will only escalate, as greenhouse gases build up in the blue sky and as exotic species travel the globe stowed away on container ships awaiting opportunity. Adding to the insult and atmospheric carbon load are the overladen logging trucks that race past our 1840s farmhouse daily, rattling it to the foundation — rumbling reminders of planetary deforestation.Old Yankee farmers who once complained of my region’s weather vagaries, today would likely feel as if trapped aboard a runaway wagon. The horses taken mad flight across the seasons. Suddenly it seems not farfetched to imagine a year without winter, a time when umbrella magnolias overtake forest oaks, then maples, until all we knew dissembles and shifts north or upslope, as individuals and species flee, out of tune and time.Brook trout swimming in cool water. Climate change is warming mountain streams increasingly putting native trout in peril. Photo credit: USFWS/Southeast on Visualhunt.com / CC BY.Today, when I go out into the North Woods, I grieve most the loss of the familiar, a thing that can “not be made right again,” and am uneasy with the alien — the once cold cobbled streams and brook trout breeding grounds, now without fish, smothered in silt brought by the torrential rains and drenched in invasive rock snot — unwelcome changes that have turned the ancient natural reveries of Henry David Thoreau and John Burroughs into starkly contrasting pictures of the gone world.Here, I feel (maybe wrongly), there is nothing to love.Though perhaps, in some far-off future time, a fondness for what today is alien will come, when the new green exotica grows typical and celebrated by tomorrow’s as yet unborn sons — boys and girls walking barefoot along the oozing beds of muddy brooks amid tropical New England splendor, maybe harking to colorful parrots and howler monkeys, finding comfort in beings adapted to an eternal summer that, even in this moment, begins to unfold — unleashing a sadness in me so genuine it triggers tears.Mongabay invites you to contact us below with your home territory observations — tell us what has changed, gone missing from your backyard, park or stream, and let us know how you feel about it.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Banner image caption: Moose (Alces alces). Photo credit: Thomas Haeusler on Visual hunt/ CC BY-NC-ND.This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.Black-eyed Susans. Native flowers across the US and around the world are increasingly driven out by invasives taking advantage of niches opened up by climate change and other human disruptions. Photo credit: vwcampin on VisualHunt.com / CC BY.center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

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Skoda Tour de Luxembourg : Conter, la belle histoire

first_imgAu sein du centre de formation de l’équipe AG2R La Mondiale, le jeune homme de 19 ans se retrouve seul face à lui-même, mais, surtout, face à un groupe qu’il doit intégrer. «À mon arrivée, explique Ken Conter, il me manquait pas mal de kilomètres au compteur, mon principal objectif était donc de prendre mes marques.» Sur ce Tour de Luxembourg, celui qui se définit comme un «puncheur» jouera les équipiers modèles pour Kévin Geniets, passé professionnel après avoir fréquenté, tout comme Ben Gastauer, les routes savoyardes. «Quand j’y pense, j’ai un peu la pression», s’amuse Ken Conter. Si ça peut le rassurer, l’adage est formel : jamais deux sans trois ! “Partir, c’est mourir un peu”, dit le poème d’Edmond Haraucourt. En juillet 2018, son bac sciences sociales en poche, Ken Conter quitte le nid familial sis à Reckange-sur-Mess, direction Chambéry. Les charmes de la Savoie adoucissent tant bien que mal la brutalité de ce changement de décor. «J’ai découvert une autre vie. Maman n’était plus là pour s’occuper de tout…» Partir, c’est, aussi, grandir un peu. Pour cela, il ne force pas son caractère. «Il n’aime pas être en pleine lumière, d’ailleurs, il ne la recherche pas. Dans un groupe, il est plutôt discret», confie le directeur technique national, Christian Helmig. «J’aime discuter, mais je préfère davantage écouter les autres que de donner mon avis.» «Je suis en progression, les différents tests effectués le montrent», affirme un Ken Conter qui découvre avec plaisir l’aspect tactique. «Avant mon arrivée ici, la stratégie de course se résumait à jouer sa carte personnelle, s’amuse l’intéressé. Or c’est important de savoir ce qu’il faut faire en fonction du déroulement de la course.» Durant plusieurs semaines, au sein d’un centre déserté au rythme du calendrier, le Luxembourgeois côtoie une poignée d’autres coureurs. «Le pire, c’est que la cuisinière était partie avec le reste de l’équipe…» Entre deux popotes, une tournée de linge sale et des cours en langue étrangères appliquées à l’université Savoie Mont-Blanc, l’intéressé enfourche sa monture sur des tracés préalablement définis via son GPS. Parfois au hasard, souvent sur les conseils avisés de son entraîneur, resté au Grand-Duché, un certain… Romain Gastauer. «Quand j’y pense, j’ai un peu la pression»center_img Le Luxembourgeois est réapparu, mercredi soir, pour la première fois sur une course au Grand-Duché depuis son départ, l’été dernier, pour Chambéry. Depuis le début de l’année 2019, Ken Conter a bouclé deux des trois courses UCI auxquelles il a pris part : 37e au Trofeo Piva (1.2U) et 65e du Circuit des Ardennes International (2.2). Mais c’est sur les épreuves nationales que le Luxembourgeois s’est montré le plus fringant. Notamment le 23 mars, lors d’un Grand Prix de Saint-Étienne Loire marqué par des coups de bordure, il réussit à prendre la bonne échappée et prend la 3e place d’un sprint réglé par Jérémy Cabot (Dijon). Un podium sur lequel grimpèrent également des garçons tels que László Bodrogi (1er/1998), Rein Taaramäe (2e/2006) ou plus récemment Romain Bardet (2e/2011). Charles Michel Sa première course, il l’a disputée le 12 août dernier en Italie, lors du Gran Premio Sportivi di Poggiana. Ce jour-là, tout comme une centaine d’autres coureurs, il met le clignotant. «(Il rit) C’était vraiment dur! Une course italienne typique, avec des routes étroites, des cols et où ça frotte…» S’en suivra deux autres épreuves dans la Botte, la 49e Ruota d’Oro (41e) et le 90e Il Piccolo Lombardia (68e). Partagerlast_img read more

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World Cup protesters get 15 days in jail, sports event bans

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next A steward runs after two people that invaded the pitch during the final match between France and Croatia at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, July 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)MOSCOW — The four protesters who barged onto the field at the World Cup final in Moscow have been sentenced to 15 days in jail.The protesters, members of the Pussy Riot punk collective, ran onto the pitch at Luzhniki Stadium dressed as police officers during the second half of Sunday’s match between France and Croatia. They called for the release of political prisoners and for more open political competition.ADVERTISEMENT ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. A court on Monday sentenced them after finding them guilty of violating the law on behavior of sports events spectators. They were also banned from attending sports events for three years.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Report: Disney dropping the ‘Fox’ from movie studio names Take that for data: NBA preps for expanded betting on games Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWscenter_img LATEST STORIES MOST READ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Lacson: Calamity fund cut; where did P4 billion go? View comments Trump assembles a made-for-TV impeachment defense team Putin’s, Xi’s ruler-for-life moves pose challenges to Westlast_img read more

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Godfrey Okumu on Lady Maroons tailspin: I believe we still have a fight in us

first_imgPanelo now believes Esperon on Duterte inclusion on NPA ‘kill list’ PLAY LIST 01:36Panelo now believes Esperon on Duterte inclusion on NPA ‘kill list’03:30PH’s Rogen Ladon boxing flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)03:34PH’s Carlo Paalam boxing light flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award LATEST STORIES UP’s loss to the Lady Bulldogs, however, stung harder than anything Okumu has seen this season.The Lady Maroons already held a 14-10 lead in the fifth set, needing just one more good ball to end the affair but NU had other plans and went on a mind-boggling 7-1 run to steal the win.“We’re no longer a team in progress, we’re a team that is strong and a power to be reckoned with, but things do not go as we had planned,” said Okumu.UP has a roster that boasts a veteran core of Ayel Estrañero, Diana Carlos, Isa Molde, Maristela Layug, and Justine Dorog but that experience faltered against the grit of NU’s youngsters.Rookies Jennifer Nierva, Ivy Lacsina, and Princess Robles pulled the rug from underneath the Lady Maroons’ feet.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history The Lady Maroons, who dropped to 3-3, are still in the fifth spot of the standings but University of Santo Tomas, De La Salle, and Far Eastern University are all ahead with an identical record of 4-2.Still, head coach Godfrey Okumu has an unabashed positivity and he vowed that UP will bounce back after their horrendous five-set loss to National University, 25-17, 14-25, 17-25, 25-23, 17-15.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubs“We will. We will. We will,” said Okumu on his team’s chances of recovering from their slump Wednesday. “I believe we still have a fight in us.”The Lady Maroons once shared the top spot with Ateneo just two games prior but their loss to the Lady Eagles and to the Lady Bulldogs saw them drop marginally in the ladder. Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Robles and Lacsina had 17 and 16 points, respectively, while Nierva was an impenetrable defensive force with 26 excellent digs and 29 successful receptions.Nierva’s tally of 29 successful receptions was three more than what the Lady Maroons collectively had.“We had the fourth set and the fifth set but that just didn’t happen, we just lost it.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying PBA D-League: Wangs pounds Marinerong Pilipino for 2nd win Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil MANILA, Philippines—University of the Philippines is in a tailspin, losing two straight in the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

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After running for 8 years, “Jinga Harry” nabbed by Police

first_imgHarilall MotilallA man who was sentenced to spend two years in prison in absentia at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts back in 2016 was on Wednesday apprehended by Police.Fifty-six-year-old Harilall Motilall, called “Jinga Harry”, of Mahaica, East Coast Demerara (ECD), was sentenced to prison after he had discharged a loaded firearm in a public place in July 2014.During a roadblock set up at Cove and John Public Road, ECD on Tuesday, Motilall was discovered in a vehicle and arrested.The fugitive will be escorted to the Camp Street Prison to commence his sentence.last_img read more

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Women can avoid joint aches via exercise, study shows

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Get moving, Grandma! Exercise isn’t just about improving your heart and fighting flab that comes with aging. It might also be the answer to preventing stiff, achy joints that can lead to debilitating arthritis. An Australian study suggests that the more time older women spend exercising, the better their chances are of staying pain-free from one of the biggest chronic conditions plaguing developed countries. Even exercising as little as one hour and 15 minutes a week can make a difference over the next three years, according to findings recently published in the journal Arthritis Research & Therapy. “I don’t think the results are suggesting that you should just become this maniac exerciser,” said lead author Kristiann Heesch from the University of Queensland, Australia. “What it does suggest is that just adding some walking and moderate activity to your life can make a big benefit.” Doctors have long encouraged exercise among aging patients to keep off weight, which is a leading risk factor for arthritis, and to keep joints flexible and muscles strong. This is the first study that focuses specifically on middle-age and older women who did not have a history of stiff and painful joints. It looked solely at pain and symptoms reported by more than 8,700 Australian women over a three-year period and could offer a vital clue about prevention.last_img read more

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