Investigation reveals slave labor conditions in Brazil’s timber industry

first_imgThe report was the culmination of an investigation into slave labor practices in the state of Pará’s timber industry led by the Integrated Action Network to Combat Slavery (RAICE).The investigation found several conditions used by Brazilian law to define slave labor were occurring at logging camps, including forced work, debt bondage, isolation, exhausting working hours and life-threatening activities.According to the report, workers at the camp often felt forced into illegal logging because of dire economic circumstances. This story is the first in a four-part series on slave labor practices at logging camps in Pará, Brazil, produced by Repórter Brasil; their Portuguese version of this story can be found here. Click the following links to access the second, third, and fourth parts in English on Mongabay. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis The dictionary definition of a settler, “one who emigrates to populate and/or exploit a foreign land,” does not just apply to the Brazilian colonial period. Even in the 21st century, the term settler is alive and well for families that have migrated from the south and northeast to the Brazilian Amazon, in the state of Pará. Lured by the promise of a prosperous life in agriculture made by the government during a period of military dictatorship, settlers arrived in droves in the 1970s. Nearly fifty years later, many of the descendants of these settlers have become hostages to working conditions analogous to slave labor.This is one of the conclusions of the report “Underneath the Forest: Pará’s Amazon plundered by slave labor” produced by Brazil’s Pastoral Land Commission (CPT) and the Carmen Bascarán Center for the Defense of Life and Human Rights. The culmination of an investigation into slave labor practices in Pará’s timber industry led by the Integrated Action Network to Combat Slavery (RAICE), the report’s findings show how the federal government played a role in pushing generations of workers into the trade of logging forests under conditions that align with slave labor practices as defined by Brazilian law.“The promise was as great as the abandonment,” says social scientist Maurício Torres, who took part in the research for the report.After being “abandoned” by the Brazilian government in a region surrounded by rainforest and lacking social support, these workers were thrown into a world without prospects, according to the investigation. Their only option was to accept the first offers that came in. In a place where the law at times goes unenforced, they became easy targets in the networks that exploit slave labor.“The law of silence rules here,” said Egidio Alves Sampaio, of the Pastoral Earth Commission. “The peasant knows about this situation [of slave labor practices], but is afraid of reporting it for fear of consequences.”According to testimony documented in the report, workers allege that logging camp bosses would hire gunmen to intimidate them into not demanding the payment they were owed.Life in a forest under destructionData on settlers that work cutting down trees in the Amazon is limited. What little is known comes from federal labor inspectors and non-governmental institutions. According to data from the Pastoral Land Commission (CPT), Federal Public Ministry and Ministry of Labor, 931 workers recruited to cut down trees have been rescued in the state of Pará since 2003 – just a bit more than one-fifth of total Brazilian rescues in the sector. The majority were between 15 and 30 years old, according to the inspectors’ records, but the elderly and children were also found to be taking part in this activity.Lack of payment was a common element uncovered by investigations of sawmill sites. During one of the rescue operations conducted by the Ministry of Labor, inspectors asked the workers what they thought were the worst things that could happen to them while on the job. They expected to hear about fears of accidents or death, but most the workers replied they were most worried about not getting paid.Investigators found it was common for workers to go through months of arduous and dangerous labor without receiving any wage. If the wood was not sold at the rate expected by the employers, their loss in profits was often recouped by not paying workers. Since the business was operating illegally, there was no one to whom the workers could turn for help.In Pará, the mission of these timber operations is not to cut down large numbers of trees. Instead, their focus is on specific species that appeal to the international market – like ipê, or Brazilian walnut, a dark hardwood used for flooring, decks and veneers. When they no longer can support themselves from the land, the report found, settlers began to accept offers to make a living cutting down trees in protected areas. The work offers tended to come from neighbors, generally ex-employees of the loggers locally called “toreiros.”Without workers’ rights, the settlers-turned-loggers remained out of contact inside the forest for weeks to months on end, according to the investigation. The sun sets the workday. As long as it is light out, which is the case from 4:30 am to 6:30 pm, the chainsaws were running.The risks inside the forest were significant due to poor working conditions, the researchers found. Logging was done without any type of protection, such as safety glasses, utility uniforms, helmets, work boots or insect repellent. This equipment is regarded as essential for protection, not just from accidents, but from poisonous animals.“It happens a lot that any kind of jerky movement on the log or tractor can cut off the helper’s fingers or hand. Logs roll over and crush guys,” said one rescued worker quoted in the investigation’s report.The most shocking scene for workers, said researcher Torres, were the makeshift structures used for housing. Lacking walls and built from small logs, they covered the workers with only a tarp. The stove was often a campfire made in a paint can or old cooking pot. The meat, caught or brought by the employees themselves, rested unprotected on string clotheslines. Hammocks hung from the tree trunks – often fewer in number than the workers, so for some, there was only the ground. Water, often captured from rainfall, was stored in improvised containers without a lid or treatment. After getting a layer of sludge in the first few days, it was used for quenching thirst and cooking during the long months of work.Forced work, debt bondage, isolation, exhausting working hours and life-threatening conditions defined workers’ lives at many of the sawmill sites investigated by RAICE. These elements are included the Brazilian Penal Code and used by inspectors from the Ministry of Labor to define slave labor.The beginnings of colonizationIn the 1970s, families settled on tracts of land of up to 100 hectares, near recently constructed highways – the first ones in the region and by which the dreamed-of progress was to arrive. Over time, new migrants showed up, colonizing the forest yet remaining isolated within it.Aggravating the situation was a lack of unawareness of the environmental conditions of the Amazon, both on the part of the settlers and of the government that divided the land among them. The farming experience they brought with them from northeastern Brazil did not bear fruit in Pará. To make matters worse, according to the report, lots were drawn up from the map in equal, rectangular shapes that did not take into account soil quality.Without expansion of roads, schools, medical facilities, credit systems and technical assistance, the settlers became vulnerable, according to Larisa Bombardi of the São Paulo University Laboratory of Agrarian Geography. Bombardi said that in order to remain in the places they were living, the majority stripped themselves of dignity without noticing. It was under these circumstances that the logging companies showed up in the 1970s.The loggers built roads out to the settlers and offered others small favors – like money to take the bus, Torres said. Under what the investigation’s researchers describe as an exploitative relationship disguised as benevolence, settlers came to see the logging companies as friends. Since then the cycle has repeated itself.Today, the settlers live in small communities with little infrastructure, such as schools, access to health, basic sanitation and electricity.“What chances do they have for not starving if they do not rely on the loggers’ favors, which makes them slaves?” Torres said.This story was produced by Thais Lazzeri for Repórter Brasil, with translation by Benjamin Blocksom. Banner image of a jaguar by Rhett A. Butler, English video subtitle placement by Mike DiGirolamoFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Featured, Forced labor, Forest Destruction, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Law, Law Enforcement, Logging, Modern-day slavery, Rainforests, Slavery, Timber, Trees, Tropical Forests last_img read more

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Papua New Guinea moves to launch new coal mining industry

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Two years ago, the Papua New Guinea government allocated $3 million for research into the viability of coal extraction.An Australian company plans to build three mixed coal power generation plants in the country.Proponents argue affordable and reliable electricity is needed to boost economic growth, while opponents cite environmental risks including the threat of climate change and rising sea levels.Analysts also question how much urban-based power plants will raise electrification rates, since most un-electrified households are in rural areas that cannot easily be connected to electrical grids. The Papua New Guinea (PNG) government is actively pursuing the potential of developing a coal mining industry for the first time in the country’s history. Two years ago, it channeled 10 million kina (US$3million) to its Mineral Resources Authority for research into the viability of coal extraction. Now, an Australian company engaged in exploration is proposing to build three mixed coal power generation plants in the cities of Port Moresby, Lae and Madang, citing the need for affordable and reliable electricity to boost economic growth.But environmental science experts and civil society groups are concerned about the potential environmental and climate impacts of developing a domestic coal industry, and the risk of undermining the country’s commitments to climate change action and leadership.“It is no secret that the first ever climate change refugees in the world are from Papua New Guinea,” declared Dagia Aka, member of the youth climate change movement, 350 PNG.In 2009 residents of the Carteret Islands in the far east of Papua New Guinea were forced to begin migration to nearby Bougainville Island after rising sea levels and the contamination of crops and freshwater sources rendered their island homes uninhabitable.In the 2006 image, a young girl walks between coconut palms on the coastline of Puil Island, part of the Carteret Islands, where rising sea levels eroded much of the coastlines and contaminated crops and freshwater. In 2009, evacuation began to nearby Bougainville Island. Photo by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/Greenpeace.“Mining ventures in Papua New Guinea have a dark history of destroying the environment around them and there has been a failure to put measures in place to avoid such [damage],” Aka continued.“Given the overall assessment of PNG’s energy policy and its natural resources, it is important not to develop the coal mining industry,” Chalapan Kaluwin, head of environmental science and geography and director of the Centre for Climate Change and Sustainable Development at the University of Papua New Guinea, told Mongabay. “The sustainability of other energy sources, such as geothermal and renewable energy, including wind, solar and waves in the country, is significant. Coal mining has far more adverse negative impacts on the overall sustainability of PNG, its landowners and long-term health of its communities.”Exploration underwayWhile three international companies — Waterford, Pacific Mining Partners and Mayur Resources — are currently engaged in coal exploration in PNG, the Department of Petroleum and Energy has yet to report the granting of any coal mining leases.But Brisbane-based Mayur Resources, which is exploring for coal in the southern Gulf Province and claims to have discovered extensive reserves, is already planning to build three urban-based mixed coal electricity generation plants.“The first project to build an Enviro Energy Park (EEP) at Lae with 2MW solar and 2x 30MW conventional generation fueled by domestic coal and PNG renewable biomass is in a very advanced stage waiting only the conclusion of a Power Purchase Agreement with PNG Power,” Paul Mulder, Managing Director of Mayur Resources told Mongabay.He said the project already had environmental approval from the government’s Conservation and Environment Protection Authority (CEPA), which was granted in June last year.While Papua New Guinea does not yet have coal mines, it has already faced severe environmental impacts from mines, such as this open-pit gold mine in the country’s Western Province. Photo by Glen Barry/Greenpeace.PNG’s extractive industries: costs and benefitsPNG, with major reserves of gold, copper, nickel, silver, oil and gas, has been a natural resources-dependent economy since Independence from Australia in 1975. The mineral resources sector alone accounts for more than one-third of government tax revenue. In 2013, taxes on the extractive industry amounted to US$292 million. From 2011-2013, it contributed an average 15.6 percent annually to the country’s GDP.Coal, which remains one of the cheapest available sources of energy and fuel, drove industrialization and modernization in Europe and North America. But the environmental impacts of coal mining include the depletion of forest cover, air and water pollution, and contribution to global warming through the release of methane, a greenhouse gas, from natural coal seams. Burning coal to generate electricity produces carbon dioxide and oxides of sulfur and nitrogen, further contributing to the greenhouse effect.This is a major concern for small Pacific Island developing states which are disproportionately exposed to climate change, whether in the form of extreme weather or rising sea levels.In April last year, in line with the forceful advocacy by many Pacific Island leaders for industrialized nations to reduce their carbon footprint, Charles Lepani, PNG’s High Commissioner to Australia, publicly called on the Australian Government to downsize its coal mining industry in light of the Paris Climate Agreement and its goals.Australia produced an estimated 16.3 metric tons of carbon emissions per capita in 2013, compared to 0.8 tons per capita in PNG, the most populous Pacific Island nation of 7.6 million people.Forest lining the Bairaman River in PNG. New Guinea Island has some of the world’s largest and most biodiverse remaining tropical forests. Photo by Paul Hilton/Greenpeace.“To cry foul to the major contributors to the fossil fuel industry and climate change, yet participate in something that will only make matters worse for us definitely does not paint a good picture,” Dagia Aka responded. “Pacific Island countries have a moral responsibility to take a lead with the Paris agreement simply because we are the ones facing the worst effects of climate change at this point in time.”Other regional governments have also expressed concerns about coal mining. In 2015 leaders of Pacific Smaller Island States — comprising the Cook Islands, Kiribati, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Nauru, Niue, Palau and Tuvalu — issued the Port Moresby Declaration on Climate Change which calls for “a global moratorium on all new coal mines.”In countries across the region, higher sea levels and temperatures have led to the flooding of villages, coastal erosion, deteriorating crop yields and freshwater supplies. Affected communities have been forced to relocate in the Carteret Islands in PNG, Nuatamba and Nararo Islands in the Solomon Islands and Vanua Levu in Fiji.Internal migration is a very expensive undertaking for Pacific Island governments presiding over small economies and restricted budgets already over-stretched with a wide range of human and socioeconomic development goals.And the burden of adapting to climate change is only forecast to increase.  In PNG alone, annual mean and extremely high daily temperatures, ocean acidification and sea levels are all predicted to rise this century, reports the Pacific Climate Change Science Program (pdf). Under a high emissions scenario, annual surface air temperatures could rise between 2.1-4.2 degrees Celsius and sea levels by 0.87 meters by 2090.Aerial view of a coal mining operation in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, illustrating the damage coal mining causes forests. Photo by Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace.Future plansThe global pact reached at the COP21 United Nations Climate Change Conference held in Paris two years ago does not contain an explicit anti-fossil fuel stance. However, it does state “the need to promote universal access to sustainable energy in developing countries …. through the enhanced deployment of renewable energy” as part of the overall ambition of ensuring the global average temperature increase does not reach or exceed 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.In March 2016, PNG, the first nation to submit its national plan for climate action following ratification of the Paris climate agreement, stated “the main mitigation contribution for PNG would be in terms of an indicative replacement of fossil fueled electricity generation with renewable energy sources” with a target of employing “100 percent renewable energy by 2030, contingent on funding being made available.”Mayur Resources, developer of the Lae energy park, is keen to promote its support of the country’s transition to low carbon energy. It claims that its plants, by combining coal with renewable energy sources and employing state of the art clean emissions technology, will only result in PNG using coal for 10-20 percent of its power generation, in contrast to 71 percent in Australia. The company also argues the facilities will not increase emissions and comply with the nation’s commitment to the Paris climate agreement.“The proposed [Enviro Energy Park] project will maintain the same level of carbon dioxide as the current level from the power generation sector, as nearly 40-50 percent of current power is being generated through diesel and heavy fuel oil. However, the EEP will bring in substantial environmental benefits to the ambient air quality [in Lae] by massively reducing the acid rain-causing gases, like oxides of sulfur, potentially 8-14 times less, and oxides of nitrogen, about 12 times reduced,” Mulder said.However, while Mayur resources classes biomass as a carbon-reducing element of the project, many researchers question the tendency to classify biomass as a carbon-neutral energy source.London-based Chatham House reports that “while some instances of biomass energy use may result in lower lifecycle emissions than fossil fuels, in most circumstances, comparing technologies of similar ages, the use of woody biomass for energy will release higher levels of emissions than coal and considerably higher levels than gas.”Rounded white stones line the Bairaman river in West Pomio district. Photo by Paul Hilton/Greenpeace. Mayur Resources further says its planned coal mines will result in minimal land disturbance mainly due to “the scale of these operations being very small compared to most other mines globally…..being in the bottom 1 percent of the smallest mines.”But the University of Papua New Guinea’s Kaluwin claims the full potential impacts of the company’s planned operations are still to be thoroughly assessed.“The impacts on the environment, destruction of land, atmospheric pollution, water, livelihoods, health, housing, education, culture and traditions, economic benefit sharing and most importantly governance, have not been properly evaluated for such a project to be implemented in PNG,” he said.Businesses and the government also make an economic argument for coal. Mayur Resources believes that low electricity generation costs of about $0.10 per kilowatt hour, about 35-40 percent lower than the average wholesale cost of power in the local area, will boost business and industrial growth in the eastern coastal city of Lae. The urban center is strategically located between a major cargo shipping port and the Highlands Highway, the only overland transport network into the country’s heavily populated interior.However, these urban-based plants will contribute little to increasing electricity coverage in rural and remote areas of the country where more than 80 percent of PNG’s population resides and energy deprivation is the greatest.In this 2003 image, Melanie John, Lulu John, Aebi Sakas and Warume Sakas walk along a logging road in Western Province. The majority of PNG’s population continues to live in rural areas, which are nearly impossible to connect to a national electrical grid. Photo by Sandy Scheltema/Greenpeace.Energy poverty is a major development challenge in the region.  Only 20 percent of households across the Pacific Islands region, and 12 percent in PNG, have access to electricity, hindering human and socioeconomic development.  An estimated 40 percent of PNG’s population live in hardship, only 63 percent are literate and only 40 percent have access to clean water.Geographical barriers, such as arduous mountain terrain, dense forest and scattered islands, separated by the sea, make a national power grid virtually impossible. In this context, energy experts recommend greater investment in off-grid and standalone power systems, especially those compatible with renewable technologies, to achieve a substantial improvement in rural and, therefore, national electrification.“Papua New Guinea, being a tropical island state, is a prime area for solar and hydro clean energy,” Dagia Aka emphasized.Catherine Wilson is a journalist and correspondent reporting on the Pacific Islands region. Find her on LinkedIn.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Alternative Energy, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Coal, Energy, Environment, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Impact Of Climate Change, Infrastructure, Mining center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

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Road projects threaten Sumatra’s last great rainforests

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Infrastructure, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Rhinos, Roads, Sumatran Rhino, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Fragmented forest in Indonesia. Research shows that more highly fragmented habitats increase the likelihood species will go extinct. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Arguments for road developmentJohn Abernethy, a doctoral student in conservation biology at Liverpool John Moores University, studied how changes in forest structure influence Sumatran orangutans at Sikundur research site in the eastern lowland forest of the Leuser Ecosystem.His work had him going back and forth from cities to villages located in the Leuser Ecosystem.“Just going from Medan, the capital of North Sumatra province, to the village where I conduct my field study took four hours in the bumpiest road,” Abernethy told Mongabay on the sideline of the 28th International Congress for Conservation Biology (ICCB) conference in Cartagena, Colombia.Even moving around within the forests posed a tremendous challenge.“I try to get between these two villages which are just 10 kilometers in a straight line, but to get there I had to travel like two hours on a motorbike all the way around. It should be easier to get to,” said Abernethy.This lack of connectivity is prevalent throughout the TRHS.In his 2014 paper, Bettinger cited the example of Kerinci district in Jambi province, a densely populated enclave completely surrounded by Kerinci Seblat National Park.The district is only accessible via three roads, adding to travel times and increasing the cost of consumer goods.People from Kerinci district have to travel for at least 12 hours by road just to reach the provincial capital, Jambi City, and seven hours to reach the nearest port, Padang.Therefore, many stakeholders, including local communities, argue that roads lead to an economic advantage by providing shorter routes to existing markets and additional routes to new markets. For farmers in the mostly agricultural communities surrounding the park, new, shorter, and better roads decrease transportation time and costs.“Most of the districts around the park argue that it is an obstacle to development. Not only can they not benefit from the timber, ore, and land sequestered within the park, but the ban on existing roads serves as an enforced isolation that puts them at an unfair disadvantage in relation to other districts,” said Bettinger.Furthermore, local stakeholders also presented other arguments to push for the road developments.“Another main reason is to ensure evacuation routes if there are tsunamis along the west coast of Sumatra or if active volcanoes [like Mount Kerinci] erupt,” the UNESCO report explained.Arguments against road developmentThe main argument against the road development plans is that their construction would have enormous ecological consequences.A 2016 ecological study undertaken by consulting firm Remark Asia concluded that the planned road construction in Kerinci Seblat would deforest 14,595.27 hectares of rainforest.The report noted that such massive deforestation would lead to forest fragmentation and decrease the habitats of key species such as elephants, tigers, tapirs, rhinoceros, orangutans and rafflesia, the world’s largest flower.According to the study, the park’s tapirs would suffer the greatest amount of habitat loss, followed by rafflesia, tiger and elephant.Abernethy, meanwhile, voiced his concern over the threat that the road development posed for the Sumatran rhino, which currently competes with the Javan rhino for the unenviable title of the world’s most endangered rhino species.With an estimated total population of fewer than 100, the Sumatran rhino has been pushed to the edge of extinction by forest conversion for agriculture and human settlements.Once roaming in many parts of Southeast Asia, they can now only be found in small populations in Indonesia, which are in some cases too small to sustain breeding. These scattered populations are mainly confined to Sumatra’s national parks, with a few still living in Indonesia’s part of Borneo Island as well.“Just by the location, I’m going to say Sumatran rhinos are going to be the first one [to be affected] because Kerinci is the last big habitat,” said Abernathy. He explained that the Kerinci Seblat National Park has a very small corridor that allows rhinos to move from one side of the park to the other. “If that gets cut off, then they’re not going to move there. Compared to other species, they seem to be the most affected since they’re the shyest.”Abernethy also voiced concerns over the fate of orangutans in the site.“Orangutans are going to be pretty affected as well, just because they don’t really cross the roads. If you got a gap that is more than four meters, they don’t really want to come to the ground. Even if they cross the road, they got extra danger in the form of cars and traffic,” he said.Besides increasing fragmented habitats, conservationists and park officials also point to the secondary effects of road construction. Roads create easy access to previously unexploited forest, leading to a sharp increase in forest conversion, illegal logging, hunting and trade in wildlife and forest products.“There’s a problem as a conservationist where you’d want to help the locals but you know that when the development comes, so does exploitation. Once you got a road going through national park, then people would start coming in and people going to utilize it. You can’t really control what’s going to happen and who’s coming in. It’s difficult,” said Abernathy.A baby orangutan in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Along with habitat loss due to mining, orangutans in both Sumatra and Borneo are threatened by fires and deforestation for oil palm and pulp plantations. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Government responsesThe Indonesian government has addressed the concerns of existing and new road development plans through its routine reports submitted to the UNESCO’S World Heritage Committee.“The State Party would like to reiterate that there are currently no new road developments nor any requests for the development inside the property,” the latest report said.The report details the progress of the government’s five-year action plan to remove the TRHS from UNESCO’s List of World Heritage in Danger, which the site has been inscribed on since 2011.That said, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry’s director of conservation areas, Suyatno Sukandar, believes that completely abandoning any road development in the site would hamper the nation’s effort to improve the livelihoods of people living in the area.“We have explained that if we build the roads, it is for the interest of local people. We have to open up their isolation … The point is the road development should proceed if possible,” he told Mongabay. “The solution is by negotiating. We will strengthen [our negotiation] by asking for support from the World Heritage Committee’s members in the form of intervention.”Sukandar also said the government might focus on lobbying the committee to allow the development of roads that are deemed to be urgent — the UNESCO report indicated some routes could still be developed as long as they were done carefully, such as those designed to serve as evacuation routes during natural disasters.“From the 12 road channels [proposed in Kerinci Seblat], there are indeed some that are urgent to be developed, while others are not really necessary. So Indonesia has to keep developing. The roads are still needed, but which roads we will build? We will keep going on, focusing on the routes which we deem to be safe,” he explained. “We will look for a middle ground where everyone benefits and none is harmed.”Meanwhile, Kerinci Seblat National Park head Muslim Arief Tongkagie said the government could focus on improving existing roads in the three national parks, instead of building new ones.“It’s a win-win solution because improving existing roads is necessary to shorten traveling time, opening up access to local people. So the solution is to widen, improve and fix existing roads,” he told Mongabay.Shahbaz Khan, the director of the UNESCO Regional Science Bureau for Asia and the Pacific, declined to comment on the ministry’s responses. “It’s a very sensitive matter. Every road has its own special [characteristics]. The best is to read the report because it’s not a blanket kind of statement,” he told Mongabay.”Red and pink ginger flower in Mount Leuser National Park. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Critiques from civil societyA coalition of NGOs including the Sumatran Orangutan Society and green group Forest, Nature and Environment of Aceh  (Haka) has criticized the Indonesian government’s response to UNESCO.“We urge the World Heritage Center to directly question the State Party on the extensive infrastructure development plans in the TRHS,” the coalition said in a March 2017 policy paper.The Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s largest environmental pressure group, meanwhile, asked the government to follow the recommendations made by UNESCO’S environmental assessment on the road development plans.The director of Walhi Bengkulu chapter, Beni Ardiansyah, said that the government should move from the road development plans to solving conflicts in the site so that local people could be empowered.“The social forestry program with the partnership scheme could be done by the government to resolve the conflicts and empower local people to improve their livelihoods,” he said.Banner image: a hornbill in the Leuser Ecosystem. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Local officials currently have plans to build roads in Mount Leuser, Bukit Barisan Selatan and Kerinci Seblat National Parks in Indonesia’s Sumatra Island.Conservationists fear these plans could accelerate habitat loss and degradation in this highly biodiverse forest complex, which is home to many endangered species.Proponents of road development cite the need for increased economic opportunities for local people and evacuation routes in case of natural disasters. One of the last and largest remnants of tropical rainforest in Asia is under threat from multiple road development plans.This forest complex, a UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra (TRHS), is located on the spine of the Bukit Barisan Mountain Range in Indonesia’s main western island, Sumatra.Occupying 2.5 million hectares (9,652 square miles), the site comprises three national parks: Mount Leuser, Kerinci Seblat and Bukit Barisan Selatan National Parks.Due to its size and location, the site is hailed as one of the largest conservation areas in Southeast Asia and the last habitat for many endangered animals. It is home to an estimated 10,000 plant species and more than 200 mammal species, including the Critically Endangered Sumatran orangutan, tiger, rhinoceros and elephant.There are currently plans to develop roads in all three national parks, with a particular focus on Kerinci Seblat. The officials backing these projects cite increased economic opportunities for local people, as well as the need for evacuation routes in case of natural disasters.Mount Leuser, Kerinci Seblat and Bukit Barisan Selatan National Parks extend from north to south along the western coast of Sumatra. Red and yellow shading shows areas that lost tree cover between 2000 and 2014, according to data from the Global Land Analysis & Discovery lab.Kerinci Seblat National ParkAt 1.4 million hectares, Kerinci Seblat is larger than the U.S. state of Connecticut and roughly twice the size of Indonesia’s Bali island. It is the second largest terrestrial protected area in Indonesia, stretching for 350 kilometers (217 miles) from northwest to southeast along the Bukit Barisan Mountains.According to a 2014 paper by geographer Keith Bettinger, decentralization reforms that began in the late 1990s led to an increase in proposals to build roads in the districts around Kerinci Seblat.“[T]he districts, now relatively independent from the central government, increasingly began to question the contribution of the park to district coffers and local livelihoods,” Bettinger wrote.A recent strategic environmental assessment report (pdf) coordinated by UNESCO shows that there are currently 12 road corridor plans in the park. These proposals call for a combined total of more than 1,360 kilometers of road development — either the construction of completely new roads or the expansion and paving of existing dirt roads.The 12 road corridor plans are divided into four zones. These proposed roads are said to be for economic purposes, to connect isolated areas or to provide evacuation routes.In the first zone, in the northeast of the park, plans call for an existing 2-meter wide dirt road to be developed into a 6.5-meter wide paved road stretching 60 kilometers.Three separate road expansion projects are planned for Zone 2, which lies to the east of Zone 1. Each will convert an existing dirt road into a four-meter-wide paved road, creating over 90-kilometers of newly surfaced routes.Proposals for Zone 3, in the middle of the park, call for three existing dirt roads ranging from 28.9 to 60 kilometers to be paved and widened. Also planned are two completely new paved roads, 153 kilometers and 744.3 kilometers long and four meters wide.The fourth zone, in the southern part of the park, has three planned projects. One new road is to be built while two existing roads will be developed into seven-meter-wide paved roads.A baby Malayan sun bear (pictured here in Borneo), one of the many highly endangered species found in Kerinci Seblat National Park. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Bukit Barisan Selatan National ParkLocated at the southwestern tip of Sumatra, Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park stretches over 324,000 hectares (1,250 square miles).The UNESCO report highlights two road improvement plans there, both located in Lampung district.“The improvement plans are meant to build paved roads with four to eight meters in width and eight to 11.5 kilometers in length. The functions of the roads are to improve connectivity and economic activities. These routes have obtained permits from the Ministry of Forestry in 1987 and 1993,” the report explained.In addition, a completely new road is proposed to link the Sumberejo subdistrict of Lampung with the villages of Way Heni and Way Haru on the west coast of Lampung.“Accessibility and economy are the main reasons to build this road. Another function given to justify this road is to patrol the national park. The road will have width of four to eight meters and length of 10 kilometers. Legally, the proposal has been approved by the Ministry of Forestry in 2010,” said the report.Rainforest in Mount Leuser National Park, which is facing multiple threats including road projects, a geothermal plant, hydropower development and agricultural encroachment. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Mount Leuser National ParkHundreds of kilometers of roads are planned for Aceh Province’s Mount Leuser National Park and the broader Leuser Ecosystem it is part of. The area is famed as the last place on Earth where tigers, orangutans, elephants and rhinoceros still coexist in the wild. However, many local officials see more and faster roads as a way to connect isolated villages and bring economic growth to the province, which was hard-hit by both the 2004 Tsunami and decades of conflict.Dating back to 2002, a 400-kilometer road network called the Ladia Galaska has been cited as one of the most damaging projects worldwide by William Laurance, a research professor at Australia’s James Cook University. The current Aceh land-use plan contains an expansion of the Ladia Galaska plan, slated to slice through highly sensitive areas of the Leuser Ecosystem and connect the east and west coasts of Aceh.Acehnese conservationist Rudi Putra, who was awarded Goldman Environmental Prize in 2014 for his work in protecting the Leuser ecosystem, said that the Ladia Galaska project is still going strong, with at least 70 percent of the project already completed.“It’s been ongoing since 2002. In the past, it was temporarily halted due to the escalating conflict in Aceh. But after the peace deal was signed [in 2005], the project proceeded,” he told Mongabay. “Now the name of the project is no longer Ladia Galaska because they [the government] have divided the project into small segments and every year the local governments allocate big budgets for the project.”With hundreds of kilometers of paved road having been built, encroachment and habitat loss are inevitable.“Last year, a road to reach a village called Lesten [in Gayo Lues district] was built with a budget of 15 billion rupiah [$1.1 million]. Even before the construction of the road was finished, encroachment already ate up forests on both sides of the road,” Rudi said. “There’s no road built in the Leuser ecosystem that isn’t followed by encroachment.”The new governor of Aceh, Irwandi Yusuf, who was sworn in the office in July, vowed during his campaign to protect the Leuser Ecosystem, saying he would revoke a proposal to drill for geothermal energy in the park.“From his statement, it was clear that he would cancel the geothermal project. But I haven’t heard a single statement from him on whether he would cancel the road development projects or not. Hopefully, he’d think of it,” Rudi said.last_img read more

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Is Cambodia’s plan to reintroduce tigers doomed to fail?

first_imgAs recently as 1999, Cambodia was home to one of the world’s largest tiger populations. Today the Indochinese tiger is considered functionally extinct in the country.Cambodia is now looking to emulate the profitable success of India’s tiger reserves by reintroducing the big cats to its own forestsExperts say poaching, rampant corruption and weak law enforcement could spell disaster for the endangered animals. In 1999, Cambodia had, by some estimates, the world’s second-highest tiger population. Within a decade, the big cats had been all but eliminated from the country due to poaching and habitat loss. In 2007, a lone Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) was captured by camera trap roaming the lush Mondulkiri Province in the country’s east. None have been spotted since.Now, the Cambodian government is looking to change that. The Ministry of Environment announced in late September that it is moving forward with a plan, along with the WWF, to reintroduce tigers to Cambodia — a scheme that has drawn criticism from wildlife experts across the globe due to weak rule of law, rampant poaching and the destruction of Cambodia’s environment through illegal logging and other practices.In a Sept. 25 Facebook post, the Ministry announced that they would bring tigers from India – two males and five to six females, officials said –  to the Srepok Wildlife Sanctuary in Mondulkiri Province, though an official later said that the ministry has not yet confirmed where the tigers will come from.  Seng Teak, country director for WWF Cambodia, told Mongabay the project, with a budget of around $30 million, would have its initial “Tiger Action Plan,” a detailed outline of the project, completed before the end of 2017.The mission to revive the world’s dangerously low tiger population has become a global affair. In 2010, the governments of the world’s 13 tiger range countries committed to doubling the number of tigers worldwide by 2022, the next Chinese year of the tiger. In Cambodia, tigers have also become something of a lofty dream, a symbol of rejuvenation and a return to better times for Cambodia’s environment.A view of the forests within Mondulkiri Province, where tigers are planned to be relocated in Cambodia. Photo by Photasia via VisualHunt.Though the Wildlife Alliance is planning on opening three ranger stations and hiring rangers to protect the tigers, as well as investigating a park in the Cardamom mountains as a potential habitat, some experts are still uncertain if Cambodia can support a thriving tiger population.When the plan was initially introduced last year, K Ullas Karanth, an Indian conservationist, was blunt in his criticism.“I do not think the required 1,000-2,000-square-kilometer area of prey-rich, people-free and livestock-free habitat is available in Cambodia at this time to seed and establish a viable tiger population,” he told Indian news outlet Live Mint.But Thomas Gray, director of science and global development at Wildlife Alliance, said that the chosen Srepok Wildlife Sanctuary is, in fact, a suitable choice for the tiger habitat.“[It’s a] fantastic expanse of extremely good quality habitat that remains relatively remote and of relatively good quality,” Gray said. “The amount of potential tiger prey there, while probably still declining, is higher than anywhere else in the country, and probably higher than most other places in mainland Southeast Asia, including where there still are tigers.“And so the ecological conditions there are pretty good for potential tiger recoveries. The issue, of course, is law enforcement and protected area management.”Cambodian police and wildlife rangers stand next to confiscated banteng skulls near the border of Srepok Wildlife Sanctuary in Mondulkiri Province. Photo courtesy of WWF.Law and OrderThe decline of the tiger was staggering throughout the 20th century. The WWF now estimates that some 3,890 tigers remain in the wild, down from more than 100,000 in 1900. And while the world’s tiger count is said to be rising, Cambodia has not exactly proven itself as a haven for wildlife. In this country, where widespread corruption and endemic poverty can make poaching an attractive means of earning a living, and where record deforestation clears potential tiger habitats, some are skeptical of the country’s ability to keep tigers safe.“If you want to reintroduce any animal, you have to first solve the problem that caused their extirpation or extinction,” said John Goodrich, senior director of the tiger program at Panthera, an organization devoted to wild cat conservation. “In Cambodia, that’s very clearly poaching, poaching of tigers and prey. Clearly they haven’t solved that problem.”Indeed, animals like the pangolin and sun bear still find themselves prone to trafficking and poaching in Cambodia. In an article published last month in Biodiversity and Conservation, 10 wildlife scientists detail the incredible number of homemade snares that still dot the landscape within Southeast Asia. Between 2010 and 2015, more than 200,000 of the cheap and easy-to-make snares were removed from five sites across the region. And upwards of 60 percent of those snares were found in Cambodia, including within the Srepok Wildlife Sanctuary, where Cambodia’s new tigers are planned to be relocated.Sao Sopheap, a spokesperson for Cambodia’s Ministry of Environment, said that the government is implementing a number of measures to combat wildlife degradation in the country, including “law enforcement activities,” more rangers on the ground and a protected area system that now spans more than 28,900 square miles or roughly 41 percent of the entire country. “[We’re sending a] bigger signal to country, to community, to general public that the government is very serious about conservation,” he said.Tiger in Cambodia. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Tiger TourismThe reintroduction of the tiger to Cambodia would certainly signal a step forward in terms of wildlife protection and — for a country that suffered from decades of war— stability. Even the upper echelons of the government, including the country’s notoriously autocratic prime minister, Hun Sen, have expressed their support for the project. At an August conservation forum in Phnom Penh, the premier made a swathe of promises including $1,000 each for more than 300 communities to invest in their local forests, a 20 percent increase in the budget for the Ministry of Environment and a vocal show of support for the tiger plan in Mondulkiri Province.Despite some public proclamations of goodwill, the government has not been shy about some of its more profitable intentions behind the project. While conservation and the preservation of an endangered species is likely important to officials at the Ministry of Environment, there is a considerable amount of money to be made in tourism, which is one of the most lucrative parts of Cambodia’s economy. In addition to the country’s famed Angkor Temple Complex in the north and the pristine beaches on the southern coast, officials hope a wildlife attraction in the eastern provinces would help draw more tourists, especially from nearby China and Malaysia.In early October, Thong Khon, the Minister of Tourism, was blunt about the government’s intentions to monetize Cambodia’s east.“The Ministry of Tourism aims to develop the northeast, especially Mondulkiri, to make it one of the country’s major tourist draws, particularly for ecotourism and wildlife,” he said.The Cambodian government seems to have dollar signs in its eyes when it comes to tiger reintroduction, which worries experts who say that officials may be prioritizing profit over protection. But those involved in the project itself say that without the revenue brought in by tourism, there may not have been a reintroduction plan in the first place.“[W]e talk about conserving tigers, but we have to justify the benefit of tigers for bringing economic benefits for local people and for the nation as well,” said WWF’s Seng Teak.“[I]t is important to be clear,” he added, “that by saving tigers we are saving much more.”Cambodian police investigate illegal timber trafficking within Srepok Wildlife Sanctuary. Photo courtesy of WWF,Moving ForwardPanthera’s Goodrich explained that a tiger tourism scheme might not play out as soon as officials hope. In places like India’s Kanha Tiger Reserve in Madyha Pradesh, where tourists buzzing about in jeeps can catch glimpses of the big cats, it was not an overnight success.“This is something that would be developed over the course of decades,” he said. “You have to build up the tiger numbers and then you have to condition them to tourists. One of the reasons it works in India is there’s been jeeps full of tourists driving around these tiger reserves for decades, and some tigers become conditioned to that and they don’t run away and hide when a jeep approaches.“That’s going to take a long time to develop in Cambodia.”While there is a resounding “no” among an obstinate group of tiger experts as to whether Cambodia is ready to bring the big cats back at the moment, they often say that it doesn’t mean that the country is not up to the task sometime in the future.What then would Cambodia need to make itself ready for a healthy population of tigers?“It isn’t necessarily that complicated,” said Goodrich.“Tigers need three things: they need space with good habitat. Tigers are generalists so good habitat just means some kind of cover that they can hunt in. They need prey. And they need to be left alone. They need protection from people, they need protection from poaching. Those are the conditions that Cambodia needs to create for tigers to thrive.“That’s going to be a huge challenge in Cambodia,” he said, “to this day.”Banner image: an Indochinese tiger, by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Editor’s note: this article was updated Nov. 7 to reflect the fact that officials say the source of tigers for translocation has not yet been confirmed.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Carnivores, Cats, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Tigers, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Isabel Estermancenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Indonesia races against time to save new orangutan species

first_imgBanner image: A Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) in Sumatra. Photo by Maxime Aliaga. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored With an estimated population of less than 800, the newly described Tapanuli orangutan is already at risk of extinction due to habitat destruction and fragmentation.The Indonesian government will come up with a strategy to protect the orangutan, including the establishment of protected forest areas and wildlife sanctuaries.The government will also review a plan to build a hydroelectric plant in an area with the highest known density of Tapanuli orangutans. The Indonesian government is rushing to protect the newly described Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis), a species already regarded as the most endangered great ape on the planet.The discovery that this isolated population of an estimated 800 orangutans in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, is a distinct species from both the Sumatran and Bornean orangutans has been hailed as a major breakthrough. The Tapanuli orangutan is the first new great ape species to be described since the bonobo in the Congo Basin in 1929, and its total estimated population makes it the world’s rarest.Despite the initial elation of the new discovery, the Tapanuli orangutan is already in trouble as it is under threat from the expansion of human development, according to a study published in the journal Current Biology, which first described the new orangutan species.Map of the Batang Toru ecosystem, home to the Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) in Sumatra.The species lives in pockets of the 1,338-square-kilometer (516-square-mile) Batang Toru ecosystem, in North Sumatra province. While the mountainous topography of the area makes it unsuitable for farming, large swaths of the orangutans’ habitat are at threat from other forms of exploitation.Chief among these is the development of a 510-megawatt hydroelectric plant in an area with the highest known density of Tapanuli orangutans. The researchers who described the new species say the project could potentially affect 8 percent of the ape’s habitat if completed.More importantly, it will thwart the last chance to build forest corridors connecting the fragmented habitats, which might lead to inbreeding among the isolated groups of orangutans and the eventual extinction of the species.That fragmentation has already cut off a group of around 17 orangutans in a small patch of forest south of the larger eastern and western blocks of the Batang Toru carved up by roads.“These 17 orangutans could go extinct as time goes by,” said Ian Singleton, director of the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program (SOCP) and co-author of the Current Biology paper. “There should be more than 250 orangutans [in a single population] for them to stand a chance to survive in the long run. Less than that, they could go extinct.”The Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry has acknowledged the issues and vowed an assessment of the potential impact from the power plant project on the orangutan habitat. A top official said the ministry would also be more judicious about approving future development projects in the region.Wiratno, the ministry’s director general for ecosystem and natural resource conservation, said that to prevent further defragmentation of the habitat, he would try to ensure there were no more “big-scale investment developments which clear land in a massive way.”As for the power plant, Wiratno said, “We’ll see the impact first, whether there is direct impact or not,” before deciding on whether to allow it to proceed.Baby Tapanuli orangutan in Indonesia. Photo by Maxime Aliaga.The ministry, which oversees conservation efforts nationwide, will review all spatial planning maps in the Batang Toru ecosystem, Wiratno told reporters on the sideline of a press conference in Jakarta. “We will make a very detailed land-use planning there,” he said.The review aims to assess the impact of any economic activities and development projects in order to create a conservation strategy that might include the creation of protected forest areas or wildlife sanctuaries for the Tapanuli orangutan.Some of the orangutans live in areas zoned for conversion, also known as APL. These areas cover 100 to 150 square kilometers (39 to 58 square miles), or 15 percent of the Tapanuli orangutans’ habitat. Because of their APL designation, these areas are not protected and thus are at risk of encroachment or being cleared for industrial purposes.“These habitats are not secure yet because they’re still zoned for conversion,” Singleton said. “So each hectare and each individual is important [to protect].”Wiratno said the ministry was considering whether to convert these areas into either protected forest areas or wildlife sanctuaries to ensure the protection of the orangutans. He added that once protected, they would exempt from any logging activity.Changing the designation would require spatial planning revision, which Wiratno said would be processed soon through meetings between the ministry and the North Sumatra provincial government.A Tapanuli orangutan in Sumatra. Photo by Maxime Aliaga.In addition to a spatial planning overview, the ministry will also come up with a conservation plan that involves all stakeholders in the region. This will include a community patrol to ensure there is no poaching in the habitat, as well as looking at the possibility of implanting tracking chips into the orangutans’ teeth to monitor them, Wiratno said.Singleton agreed that it was important to have a plan in place that all parties could agree on.“The status of the habitat, whether it’s a sanctuary, an APL area or a protected forest, is not that important,” he said. “What’s important is there’s a system that’s supported by all stakeholders.”The provincial government has also chimed in, with North Sumatra Governor Tengku Erry Nuradi saying his administration would soon issue a local regulation for the protection of the Tapanuli orangutan. Animals, Apes, Archive, Conservation, Dams, Deforestation, Energy, Environment, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Habitat Loss, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indonesia, Infrastructure, Logging, Mammals, New Species, Orangutans, Pet Trade, Poaching, Primary Forests, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Research, Roads, Wildlife Article published by Hans Nicholas Jonglast_img read more

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Bloomfield, Shaw head provisional Carifta team

first_imgFOLLOWING last weekend’s Carifta trials, the JAAA has provisionally named 73 athletes to represent the country at the Carifta Games in St Georges, Grenada between March 26 to 28. Defending Under-20 400- metre champion, Akeem Bloomfield of Kingston College , heads the 19 athletes named in this category, while also included here are Jauavney James of St Elizabeth Technical High School (STETHS), impressive winner of the 400 metres hurdles at the Trials, long jumper O’Brien Wasome of Jamaica College and thrower Warren Barrett of Calabar High. Closing off the list are Sean Bailey, Timor Barrett, Nathan Brown, Raheem Chambers, Rohan Cole, Kristoff Darby, Romario Douglas, Nigel Ellis, Garfield Gordon, Sanjae Lawrence, Andel Miller, Kevin Nedrick, Shevon Parkes, Jordan Scott and Lushane Wilson. STETHS’ Junelle Bromfield, an impressive winner in the 800 metres, will lead the girls in the Under 20 category. Joining her are Devia Brown, Rushelle Burton, Nicolee Foster, Janell Fullerton, Monifa Green, Semoy Hemmings, Tissanna Hickling, Kimone Hines, Tiffany James, Shannon Kallawan, Britny Kerr, Shanice Love, Sidney Marshall, Patrice Moody, Jessica Noble, Shanice Reid, Ashanni Robb and Sahjay Stevens. Impressive 100 metres winner, Jhevaughn Matherson, is at the top of Under 18 boys’ list. Others are Phillip Barnett, Zico Campbell, Shakwon Coke, Jon Marc Davis, Rasheeda Downer, Dashinelle Dyer, Nicholas Elliot, Keenon Lawrence, Leonardo Ledgister, Joel Morgan, Dashawn Morris, Kobe Jordan Rhooms, Dejour Russell, Michael Stephens, Roje Stone, Damion Thomas and Javantaye Williams. Seventeen girl’s have been selected for the Under-18 category, led St Jago High sprinter Kimone Shaw, the 100-metre winner at the Trials. Others are Annakay Allen, Brittany Anderson, Annia Ashley, Lamara Distin, Britnie Dixon, Cemore Donald, Shaniel English, Daszay Freeman, Michae Harriott, Aiko Jones, Chrisanni May, Myesha Nott, Shiann Salmon, Sanique Walker and Stacey Ann Williams. Following the conclusion of this week ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships, seven more athletes will be added to the team, including the top girl for the heptathlon and the top boy for the octathlon. The management team is: (chef de mission) Albert Corcho, Principal of Calabar High, (manager) Keith Wellington, Principal of STETHS, (assistant manager) Olive Forrester, Vere Technical, (head coach) Reynaldo Walcott, STETHS, (coaches) Andre Headley, KC, Mark Prince, St Andrew High, Shanieke Osbourne, Papine High and Lorna Vernon, Alpha Academy.last_img read more

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All set to strike: Students, youths and activists clamor for climate justice

first_imgClimate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Climate Politics, Protests, Social Justice, United Nations Article published by Willie Shubert Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Millions of young people around the world are expected to go on strike to demand immediate and meaningful action by governments and corporations to tackle the climate crisis.Youth activists have gathered in New York ahead of the U.N. climate summit there, where they took part in a people’s summit supported by more than 200 environmental and human rights groups.A key aspect of the climate injustice being highlighted is the fact that people in poorer countries will be hit hardest by the impacts of a changing climate.In the Philippines, one of the countries at greatest risk from those impacts, the government has backed the youth-led climate strike and called on developed countries to step up their climate actions. NEW YORK — Today marks the start of protests across the planet as millions witness the youth-led climate strike demanding governments take urgent and transformative action on climate change.Young climate activists from more than 150 countries are now calling on everyone to join them in the fight for a just, resilient and sustainable future. They draw their inspiration from Swedish student Greta Thunberg, whose refusal to go to school to protest climate inaction has fueled a global movement.“We believe that all struggles are worthwhile. We will continue to push for climate action to protect our nature, our people and our future,” said Bertha Zúñiga Cáceres, an environmental and indigenous rights activist from Honduras.Zúñiga, the daughter of the late environmental defender Berta Cáceres, who was killed for opposing a dam project in 2016, joins Thunberg in the call and dialogue with international leaders for climate action at the United Nations Climate Summit taking place in New York this week.“We have no choice but to fight for our rights. Our proposal is for governments to set high ambitions and how are we going to make radical change. And this is an opportunity for us to clamor [for] climate justice,” said Zúñiga, who, along with more than 200 environmental and human rights groups, took part in a people’s summit that was held ahead of the global climate strike.New era of climate movementThe summit adopted a declaration calling on governments and corporations to urgently tackle the climate emergency and ramp up climate commitments.“This is the moment of urgency. This is the new era of climate movement. And it is time to fight for human rights-centered climate action,” said Kumi Naidoo, secretary-general of Amnesty International. “We need to seize the opportunity to hold governments and corporations alike to be accountable. Nature does not negotiate and we cannot change the science. We need political will because it is our responsibility to rise up for the benefit of the generations to come.”Naidoo said that apart from joining the strike, these organizations plan to pursue more concerted climate litigation efforts, target the financial sector’s funding of fossil fuels, make more effective use of human rights accountability mechanisms, and coordinate more mass mobilization campaigns at national and regional levels.Jennifer Morgan, executive director of Greenpeace International, said the declaration marks a new era of climate activism by putting people and human rights at the core of its solutions.“We will all take action and confront those responsibilities. Weak governments and toxic corporate power will have nowhere to hide as we put people at the center of our demands, and seek climate justice for the communities least responsible but most vulnerable to this climate emergency,” Morgan said.Pointing to the case of people in poorer countries being hit hardest by the impacts of climate change, Greenpeace Southeast Asia executive director Naderev “Yeb” Saño said the global climate strike led by the young has not only created awareness but put pressure on climate policymakers to help people cope with these impacts.In 2013, Yeb Sano was the lead negotiator for the Philippines at COP19 in Warsaw. Image by Push Europe via Flickr (CC BT-NC 2.0).“There is a massive clamor from all sectors at this time of climate emergency. The Philippines, for instance, is a stark example of the gross injustice brought on by climate impacts which infringe on people’s most fundamental rights such as the right to life, shelter, food and livelihood,” Saño said.Saño, who is in New York participating in the global summit on human rights and climate change ahead of the U.N. Climate Summit called by U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres, said the Philippines is currently undertaking a landmark investigation into corporate responsibility for climate action.“If successful, the inquiry could result in the first legal finding of corporate responsibility for human rights violations in the age of climate crisis. This can be a vindication for all climate-impacted communities everywhere,” Saño said.Skipping school for the planetLike many countries, the Philippine government has given the green light to more than 23 million public school students to skip classes on Sept. 20 and join the climate protests calling for immediate action to fight climate change.“Moved by the climate realities faced by the Philippines and inspired by the global youth action, young Filipinos nationwide will take part in the global climate strike,” the Department of Education announced on Sept. 18. “With this the department enjoins school heads and teachers to excuse students who will be joining the localized climate strike provided that parental consent/legal guardian consent is given.”The department has also encouraged schools and offices to conduct climate education and action activities within school grounds, including noise barrage, school or community clean-ups, and educational discussions.Over 500 students and other youth advocates across the Philippines joined today’s global youth climate strike in Manila, Philippines. Image by Leo M. Sabagan courtesy of 350.org“We need to sound the alarm for climate emergency,” said Rodne Galicha, lead convener of the Catholic climate movement Living Laudato Si’ Philippines. “We are one with Pope Francis’ call for urgent action. In solidarity with the young people of the world demanding change and the most vulnerable demanding climate justice, it is our moral duty to be responsible stewards.“We are glad that the Department of Education enjoins students and teachers to participate in the global climate strike. This is indeed intergenerational action,” Galicha said.Thousands of Filipino youths are expected to stage protests in 28 locations demanding the government declare a climate emergency.“Calling for enhanced climate action is not enough anymore,” said Jefferson Estela, convener of the Youth Strike for Climate Philippines. “This is a climate emergency and the government needs to send a clear policy signal about the urgency of this crisis.”Among their demands, the youth activists want an immediate phase-out of coal and other fossil fuels, in keeping with President Rodrigo Duterte’s declaration for the country to fast-track the development of renewable energy sources. They also want the state to safeguard the rights of indigenous peoples and environmental defenders amid the climate crisis, and strengthen climate adaptation and mitigation and disaster risk reduction management policies.“The Filipino youth is ready to break the silence and demand the kind of action necessary to save our future from the climate crisis,” said youth climate activist John Leo Algo, program manager of the Climate Action for Sustainability Initiative. “We join the millions of voices worldwide as we scream in the present and fight for our common future.”Algo emphasized the need for industrialized countries to take more drastic climate action and for developing countries to show stronger political will to properly address climate impacts. He added that there is a need to increase the resilience and adaptive capacity of not only human communities, but also natural ecosystems to adapt to this crisis and achieve true sustainable development.“It is clear that we are already in a climate emergency situation,” said Gerry Arances, executive director of the Center for Energy, Ecology and Development. “It is either we act now or forever perish. For us Filipinos, despite all that we have to endure, we will fight back and fight for our children and the generations to come. And we will start by forcing our government to shift away from coal and fossil fuels as soon as possible.”Arances pointed out that the latest scientific report from the United Nations warned that without urgent action, the world would face worsening flooding, fiercer typhoons, food shortages and other catastrophic effects as a result of climate change as early as 2040.Powerful agents for changeAs young people push for more concrete action from their governments, the Philippine government says it supports the active participation of Filipino youth in the global mobilization for climate action.“As agents of change and progress, the youth is in a unique position to raise awareness on the climate emergency and to inspire tangible actions from the ground up,” said Emmanuel de Guzman, secretary of the Philippine government’s Climate Change Commission. “Climate justice delayed is climate justice denied. To rein global warming to below 1.5C [2.7 degrees Fahrenheit] is a moral imperative. Hence, we reiterate our call to the developed world to step up their climate actions and to deliver on their commitments under the Paris Agreement on climate change.”De Guzman said the commission also supported the call by President Duterte to fast-track the development of renewable energy sources and to reduce dependence on traditional energy sources such as coal. This pronouncement, he said, comes at a crucial time when the country is finalizing its first nationally determined contribution, its climate action commitment under the Paris Agreement.Climate activist Greta Thunberg. Image by stephane_p on Visual Hunt – CC BY-NC-NDBanner image caption:Canberra Climate Strike. September 20, 2019. Image by Stephen Smith via Flickr CC BY 2.0This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.last_img read more

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Pascal Molinari est “tombé amoureux de cette Jeunesse”

first_imgUn peu par hasard. Les dirigeants eschois sont passés par moi pour établir un contact avec Bernard Serin, l’actuel président messin, pour voir quel rapprochement était possible. Ce dernier a décliné, mais j’ai assisté à certaines réunions et j’ai même proposé une possible solution via un ami.Mais là non plus, cela n’a pas abouti. Mais tout cela m’a permis d’entrer d’une certaine façon dans ce club et d’en tomber amoureux, tout en faisant la connaissance des dirigeants eschois. J’ai découvert son président, Jean Cazzaro, et son vice-président, José Gonçalves. Deux personnalités avec une telle envergure qu’ils m’ont donné envie d’effectuer un bout de chemin avec eux…Et ce poste de manager ?Au cours d’une réunion, Jean Cazzaro a voulu que j’expose ma façon de voir les choses. Et apparemment, ce que j’ai dit a dû plaire… D’où cette fonction de manager, puisqu’il y a déjà un directeur sportif en la personne de Patrick Biergen. Ce qu’elle représente ? Un manager est là pour superviser l’ensemble des dossiers touchant au sportif.En gros, je suis là pour “restructurer” le club. Ou plutôt, pour remettre un petit coup de neuf et surtout tenter d’apporter mon vécu, mon expérience (NDLR : il a notamment été 7 ans vice-président de la section amateurs du FC Metz, travaillant aussi 3 ans au scouting). Améliorer les choses. Mais en aucun cas pour tout changer. On ne va pas jeter le bébé avec l’eau du bain.Vous parlez d’essayer de conserver Omar Natami et Momar N’Diaye, qui appartiennent à Dudelange, et de trois recrues, dont les anciens Messins Mehmet Arslan (21 ans) et Vincenzo Callejon (19 ans). Vous avez l’air d’avoir pas mal d’idées en débarquant ici…Oui. Mais j’ai dû mal m’exprimer, ou alors mes propos ont peut-être été mal interprétés. Parce que cela peut donner l’impression que je veux tout changer dans ce groupe, en ne gardant que certains joueurs. Non. J’ai cité beaucoup d’autres éléments, comme Lapierre, Delgado, Er Rafik… Et je vais même plus loin en disant que cette équipe de la Jeunesse est, pour moi, bien construite de A à Z. Elle est bien équilibrée. Tous les gars m’ont fait une bonne impression ! Ils vont dans le même sens, malgré les quelques anicroches vues en cette deuxième partie de saison. Ils ne sont pas troisièmes pour rien.Et j’ai eu le temps d’analyser les choses avant de vous dire tout cela, puisque je suis cette équipe depuis la trêve et le match amical disputé face à Karlsruhe, même si je ne suis vraiment en route que depuis un ou deux mois dans l’optique de cette fonction de manager. On est à l’écoute des joueurs. Mais on sait qu’en foot, il y a toujours des départs et des arrivées à l’été. Et les deux possibles recrues que vous avez citées sont déjà venues en test chez nous, tout comme trois autres. Le contact est là et les deux parties ont l’air intéressées, mais rien n’est encore signé.La Jeunesse est un club avec des traditions. Et votre sortie a forcément fait grincer des dents avant le match de dimanche…Je ne veux froisser personne. Je suis arrivé tardivement ici, donc je dois essayer d’aller vite. Si j’avais du temps, je bosserais sans doute différemment. Je suis conscient que cela peut déranger, mais mon rôle est d’essayer de faire en sorte que, quel que soit ce qui se passe en fin de saison, il y ait une équipe compétitive pour jouer l’Europe dans un gros mois. Et pour cela, je ne peux pas attendre la fin de la saison pour commencer à bosser.Et concernant le poste d’entraîneur ?J’ai eu un très bon feeling avec Sébastien Grandjean. Je pense que c’est un technicien de haut niveau. Et pourtant, je vous assure que j’en connais pas mal, des entraîneurs. Je le compare d’ailleurs à Rudi Garcia. Après, a-t-il envie de rester ? S’il s’en va à la fin du championnat, il faudra faire autrement… Beaucoup m’appellent d’ailleurs et ont l’air intéressé.Vous parlez aussi de Stéphane Bailly, le président de CAR Avenue, comme possible successeur de Jean Cazzaro. Son nom avait déjà été cité voici quelques semaines…Son profil est intéressant mais je ne sais pas du tout où cela en est. Je sais que Jean Cazzaro l’a reçu lors d’un match. Mais depuis, aucune nouvelle. Le président à la Jeunesse reste donc Jean Cazzaro.Recueilli par Julien Carette Partager Pascal Molinari – fils de Carlo, l’ancien emblématique président de Metz – occupe désormais le poste de manager de la Vieille Dame.Ce sont nos confrères du Wort qui ont sorti l’information dans leur édition de vendredi, au travers d’un article qui a fait grincer quelques dents dans les couloirs du stade de la Frontière.photo DRComment êtes-vous arrivé à la Jeunesse ?last_img read more

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[Handball] : Dejan Galic n’est plus l’entraîneur de Kaërjeng

first_img Partager La défaite mercredi à domicile contre Berchem (26-29) a poussé l’entraîneur à la démissionC’est ce jeudi, par un communiqué, que le club de Kaërjeng a officialisé le départ de son entraîneur, Dejan Galic. «Il nous a informé hier soir de la démission avec effet immédiat de son poste.»«Nous sommes à la recherche d’un nouveau candidat pour le poste vacant. Entretemps l’intérim sera assuré par Razvan Cenuza et Chris Auger jusqu’à ce nous trouvions une solution définitive.», expliquent les dirigeants dans un communiqué. «Le Handball Käerjeng remercie Dejan pour le travail qu’il a fait pendant les dernières années au sein du club et pour les titres de champion de Luxembourg qu’il a remportés avec nos deux équipes», concluent-ils.last_img read more

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Knowing Mandela was One Thing; Not Caring for What He Stood for, Another

first_imgThey strapped his arms behind his backAnd lashed his feet to a stick;So he flicked his pick into a stickAnd apartheid’s behind got kicked!Nelson Mandela’s kick—that in his memorable struggle against Apartheid, took the form of passive resistance—spirited (carried) him all the way from Pollsmoor Prison on Robben Island, to Mahlamba Ndlopfu (official residence of the President of South Africa; in the process, he saw ‘white’ South Africa’s apartheid system breathe its final breath and fade into nothingness.For some reason, I am convinced that Nelson Mandela did not give a fig about the racial slurs and other insults the Boers of South Africa hurled at him and his people over the years. If those had bothered him, he would not have turned out the remarkable person we came to know—all in the interest of his beloved South Africa and its people—all of them!But he was not going to accept being deprived of access to his country’s wealth and opportunities—for himself and for the people of South Africa. He was not going to be shut out and shut down by a group that wanted everything they could grab for themselves. His folks did not name him Kolihlahli (Troublemaker) for nothing.I have no problems with people who call themselves “white;” some of the nicest people I know, fall into that category. We cannot forget, though, that members of the same race, the Boers, (people of Dutch descent, living in South Africa) put together (a segregated political system in that country that ran from 1948 to the early 1990s. “Apartheid separated the different peoples living there and gave privileges to those of European origin-Wikipedia).  It was that same clan that would keep Nelson Mandela in prison on Robben Island for a good part of his life. Nelson would languish in jail—standing up for his human rights and those of his people, for 27 years.This brings us to Liberia’s Ambassador, Lafayette Diggs, who, following Mandela’s death late last year, wrote a commentary: “I Knew Mandela.” In that article, Mr. Diggs calls Mr. Mandela his friend. Mr. Diggs informed his readers that quite some time prior to Nelson’s imprisonment, he had come in contact with Madiba.“Lafayette, South Africa is a very beautiful country except for that damned apartheid,” Mr. Diggs says Mandela told him. “I had no idea that he would be in prison in a few months,” he added.Continuing, Ambassador Diggs bragged:“During one of my missions to South Africa, I was given the status: “honorary white” and kept on the “white” side of the fence separating the two races. I still remember the look of consternation (dismay, disquiet) on the faces of two black female sweepers on the other side of the fence when they saw me standing there on the ‘white’ side,” Ambassador Diggs wrote.Obviously, Mr. Diggs was enjoying his “honorary white” status (or we wouldn’t have heard about it) while people that looked like Nelson Mandela, (kaffirs, they were called then,) peered questioningly (in disbelief) through what might have been a gated-community, at their ‘honorary white” guest.It is easy to conclude that the two sweepers might have cynically (contemptuously, mockingly) greeted him as baas? (boss in Afrikaans, the language of white South Africans.)LAFAYETTE DIGGS SHOULD HAVE KNOWN BETTERIt was troubling—listening to Ambassador Diggs of Liberian—a major player in the struggle for independence of almost the entire continent—name-dropping probably the most outstanding human rights leader of the Century  while,  under the same breath, he was patting himself on the back for the privilege of rubbing elbows with people who call themselves ‘white.’(To Be Continued)Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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