Tickets for the Copa del Rey final: prices, how to buy, distribution …

first_imgBoth Athletic and Real Sociedad will have around 22,000 tickets available each Meanwhile, about 11,000 will be left by the Federation. In the aforementioned meeting the official price of the banknotes (Last year at Benito Villamarín they ranged between 55 euros the cheapest and 180, the most expensive) and it will be raffled which team occupies each area of ​​the stadium.Where is the final stadium?The stadium of La Cartuja It is located in the so-called Cartuja Island. One of the main venues of the 1992 Universal Expo. It opened in May 1999 and is the second largest stadium in Andalusia and the fifth in Spain. La Cartuja was built to host the 1999 World Athletics Championships (it has an athletic tartan) and was the cornerstone of the Olympic nominations in Seville in 2004 and 2008. It is located on the outskirts of the Andalusian city, close to the municipal terms of Santiponce Y Beds. Specifically, it is six kilometers away from the central and well-known Plaza de España. Another option is to move to the capital of Spain and decide to travel to Andalusian lands by AVE. Even for the bravest, there is the option of the car or coach with movements that revolve around the 9 hours of travel either from Bilbao or from La Concha beach itself.Accommodation and hotel bedsIt is important to have a large and varied hotel offer in order to receive both fans. According to the national statistical study (INE), lThe city of Seville has about 25,000 places in different establishments and categories.As usual prices have already skyrocketed. And at the moment a hotel night on the day of the final can vary from 200 euros per person in a shared room. Up to 1,000 euros for a double suite in a five-star downtown hotel.Date, time and TV of the finalThe match will be played on Saturday, April 18. Athletic Bilbao will have a hard commitment the previous weekend (day 31) with the visit to Camp Nou to measure yourself to Barcelona. While the Real Sociedad receives in Anoeta al Celta.There is no confirmed schedule but presumably the match is disputed at 9:00 p.m. and be televised by Four, like the previous semifinal matches. On March 12th both Real society how Athletic are summoned at the headquarters of the RFEF in Las Rozas (Madrid) to finish giving the last strokes to the organization of the final of the Copa del Rey. This final will be played Saturday, April 18 in the stadium of La Cartuja (Seville). The Federation itself has granted the Sevilla stadium the headquarters of the Copa final during this and the next three seasons (until 2023).How many tickets will each team have in the final?In this meeting, the distribution of tickets that each set will have in the final will be dictated, as well as the security measures for each hobby and the ‘fan zone’ that each Basque hobby will occupy. The stadium of La Cartuja can host about 57,000 spectators but for security reasons you will see your capacity reduced to about 55,000 people of regular capacity. In the absence of officiality, generally 40% of the total allowed will be allocated to the fans of each classified team. While, the remaining 20% ​​will be kept by the Federation to distribute it among your sponsors or, if you consider it appropriate, you will reserve a small percentage for direct sale at the box office for the general public of the city of Seville.center_img The stadium is very well connected And it can be reached by public transport. In front of the field, the C1 and C2 bus lines stop to which you have to add the C-2 Cercanías train line.Displacements of hobbies in SevilleAthletic Bilbao fans will have a priori more facilities to attend the Cup final the same day of the gameor. Although the stadium of La Cartuja is at 835 kilometers from the city of Bilbao, while, from San Sebastián there is a little more distance: 900 kilometers. Athletic fans also They have direct flights to Seville from the city of Guggenheim. An airline operates flights that in barely an hour and a half land in Seville for about 350 euros round trip. Meanwhile, txuri-urdin fans are not so lucky, since that there are no direct connections from San Sebastián and stops must be made in Madrid or even Barcelona.last_img read more

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Skin slime of Indian frog can kill flu virus

first_imgA team of researchers jolted some of the recently discovered Hydrophylax bahuvistara with mild electricity, collected their skin secretions, and then returned them to their natural habitat in India.Then, from the secretions, the team identified and isolated 32 peptides (building blocks of proteins).One of these peptides can attach itself to the surface of some strains of influenza viruses (such as the H1 strains of flu) and destroy them, the researchers observed. Scientists have discovered anti-flu molecules in an Indian frog’s skin secretions.The slimy mucus of the brightly colored wide-spread Fungoid Frog (Hydrophylax bahuvistara) contains molecules that normally protect the frogs against pathogens. These same molecules can also kill some strains of influenza viruses affecting humans, scientists report in a new study published in the journal Immunity.A team of researchers jolted these recently discovered frogs with mild electricity, collected their skin secretions, and then returned them to their natural habitat in India. Then, from the secretions, the team identified and isolated 32 peptides (building blocks of proteins).One of these peptides can attach itself to the surface of some strains of influenza viruses (such as the H1 strains of flu) and destroy them, the researchers observed.  In fact, when the peptide was introduced into unvaccinated mice, delivered through their nose, it managed to protect the animals against a lethal dose of some flu viruses.“The frogs secrete this peptide almost certainly to combat some pathogen in [their] niche,” co-author of the study Joshy Jacob, an associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Emory Vaccine Center and Emory University School of Medicine, told Gizmodo. “The flu virus most likely shares a common motif with whatever the peptide is targeted to.”The researchers have named the peptide urumin, after “urumi”, a sword with a whip-like blade that was once used in southern India.Urumin can be chemically synthesized in the lab, researchers say. But the team is still figuring out the mechanism by which urumin kills flu viruses, and it will likely take a while before the peptide is developed into a powerful anti-viral drug that remains stable in the human body.“Anti-flu peptides could become handy when vaccines are unavailable, in the case of a new pandemic strain, or when circulating strains become resistant to current drugs,” Jacob said in a statement.Mucus produced by the skin of Indian frog Hydrophylax bahuvistara contains a flu virus-fighting peptide. Photo by Sanil George, Jessica Shartouny.Citation:David J. Holthausen et al. An Amphibian Host Defense Peptide Is Virucidal for Human H1 Hemagglutinin-Bearing Influenza Viruses. Immunity, April 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.immuni.2017.03.018 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amphibians, Animals, Environment, Frogs, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Research, Science, Species Discovery center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

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Five promising stories for Global Tiger Day

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Since the last Global Tiger Day in 2016, researchers have discovered tiger populations in unexpected areas, such as forested corridors along riverbanks and in areas that recently served as theaters of war.Several countries have worked to protect the tigers that live within their borders, including the creation of a massive national park and taking steps to end tiger farming.Camera trap surveys continue to prove invaluable to wildlife researchers in tracking down tigers and other species that can range over huge areas. Reporting on the plight of wild tigers (Panthera tigris) generally doesn’t lead us down very many pleasant paths. Poaching, habitat loss and the decimation of their natural prey has led to a 95 percent reduction in their numbers worldwide since 1900, and only about 3,900 tigers still live in the wild, according to WWF. But in the past year, Mongabay’s editors, writers and correspondents have managed to find a few stories demonstrating that there’s still some hope for the iconic cat.Here are five upbeat articles to celebrate Global Tiger Day.1. China contemplates, then approves, a massive national park that’s home to tigers and leopards.Most Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), also known as Siberian tigers, live in Russia. But more than 30 live at least part time in China, primarily in Jilin province. The provincial government began a proposal in mid-2016 to connect three protected areas and form a national park with an area of 14,600 square kilometers (5,640 square miles). That’s more than 50 percent larger than Yellowstone National Park in the United States. The park would also protect 42 Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) that inhabit the region.Experts say that such an expanse is necessary to support a growing tiger population. They also hope the park will help protect the tiger’s prey, such as roe deer. Deer and other ungulates compete with cattle for grass and are sometimes killed by herders. As more humans encroach on tiger habitat, the incidence of cattle killed by the big cats has risen.The Huffington Post reported that the Chinese Federal Government approved the park in May 2017.China hosts a growing population of Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica). Photo by S. Taheri, edited by Fir0002 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons.2. Laos pledges to shutter its commercial tiger farms.In September 2016, the Southeast Asian country of Laos, also known as Lao People’s Democratic Republic or Lao PDR, committed to shutting down tiger farms within its borders . Around 200 farms are thought to exist throughout Asia to provide tiger skins and body parts to markets in the region, and they hold perhaps twice as many tigers (or more) as currently live in the wild, according to the London-based Environmental Investigations Agency (EIA). But conservationists contend that these farms keep demand for tiger-related products alive and maintain the incentive to poach wild tigers.The announcement by Laos’ Minister of Natural Resources and Environment came following a call from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) for the closure of tiger farms in several countries throughout the region. The move garnered tepid praise from conservationists, who added that the country still needed to back up its commitment with action. They are also waiting to see if Laos’ decision will influence its neighbors.“All eyes now are on China, Thailand, Vietnam and other countries with tiger farms,” said Debbie Banks, head of EIA’s Tiger Campaign. “Will they follow suit and finally commit to ending tiger farming?”Government officials in Laos have said they will end tiger farming in the country. Photo by Hans, from Pixabay. Public Domain.3. Scientists find evidence that tigers and other animals are using forest corridors in Sumatra.Amid pulpwood plantations on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, protected bands of forest along riverbanks are helping populations of tigers, as well as tapirs, bears, pangolins, and elephants hang on. In a study published in January, camera trap photographs revealed the “significant presence” of these animals. Additionally, such riparian forests help maintain the health and water quality of rivers by locking down sediment and filtering out pollutants.The results prove that these strips of habitat can help wildlife species survive. Importantly, however, they must connect to larger banks of forest, such as Tesso Nilo National Park in Riau province, which is near the study site. And just as in gazetted parks, the animals rely on enforcement of the laws in place to protect them.A Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae). A recent study found that tigers in Riau province are using corridors that connect large swaths of forest. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.4. Scientists find a wildlife treasure trove in Myanmar.Until recently, parts of Myanmar haven’t been accessible to scientists for security or political reasons. But a study that included the use of camera traps published in the journal Oryx revealed tigers and 30 other species of animals living in Karen state, more than half of which are threatened.“It is incredibly rare to find such rich and diverse wildlife anywhere in the world today but certainly in Southeast Asia,” said Clare Campbell, who directs Wildlife Asia, an Australian conservation NGO that coordinates the Karen Wildlife Conservation Initiative (KWCI), in a statement. “Thanks to the long-standing conservation efforts of the Karen people this area is a refuge for the last tigers in the region, Asian elephants and so much more.”However, signs indicate that habitat destruction and poaching — especially for “high-value species” like tigers — may be on the rise, and the researchers argue that formal protection of the area is urgently needed.Camera trap photos revealed the existence of tigers and 30 other species of wildlife in an area previously out of bounds for scientists due to security issues. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.5. A camera trap survey reveals a second breeding population of Indochinese tigers in Thailand.Officials and conservationists released photographs of tiger cubs and adults in Thailand’s Dong-Phayayen Khao Yai Forest Complex in March — confirmation of just the second known breeding population of Indochinese tigers (Panthera tigris corbetti) in the world. By most estimates, the country is home to at most a few hundred tigers.In this forest complex, scientists estimate that there is approximately one tiger in every 159 square kilometers (61 square miles). That density is “exceptionally low,” but Thailand’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation heralded the tigers’ resilience in the face of the poaching and illegal logging that takes place in the forest complex. The agency credited increases in anti-poaching patrols for the continued existence of tigers in this area.“The extraordinary rebound of eastern Thailand’s tigers is nothing short of miraculous,” said conservation biologist John Goodrich of Panthera in a statement.“Thailand’s World Heritage Forest Complex is home to prime forested habitat that, with significant conservation resources, could support eight times as many tigers as it does now,” Goodrich added. “With continued infiltration of rigorous anti-poaching protection, there is no doubt that this population can be fully recovered.”The existence of Indochinese tigers (Panthera tigris corbetti) in Thailand’s Dong-Phayayen Khao Yai Forest Complex was hailed as ‘nothing short of miraculous.’ Camera trap image courtesy of DNP/Freeland/Panthera.A tiger in Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve, in Rajasthan, India. Photo by Koshy Koshy (Flickr: Male Tiger Ranthambhore) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Camera Trapping, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, China wildlife trade, Conservation, Corridors, Elephants, Environment, Forests, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Hunting, Illegal Logging, India-animals, India-wildlife, Iucn, Leopards, Logging, Mammals, Megafauna, Parks, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Tapirs, Temperate Forests, Tigers, trafficking, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Corridors, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

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Kenyans fear proposed Trump cuts could threaten elephants, ranger jobs

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In March, President Trump proposed cuts to the 2018 USAID global budget totaling 40 percent, a recommendation Congress isn’t required to follow, but which the legislature won’t likely vote on before October 1st.As a result, nations in the developing world are in limbo over cuts, and worried they’ll lose vital USAID funds. Trump’s budget is only slated to reduce USAID to Kenya by 10 percent, but officials and NGOs there still fear environmental programs will be slashed.They worry USAID funds to protect elephants and curb trafficking, to pay community ranger salaries, and to keep East Africa’s only wildlife forensics lab open will be lost. There are no known plans to cut these programs at present, but rumors abound, with many rangers disheartened and “losing motivation to work” according to one observer.An unnamed U.S. embassy official in Nairobi told Mongabay that the Trump administration has, however, taken one action that could harm environmental research, with 34 visas denied to Kenyan scientists wishing to travel to the United States. A worker at the Kenya Wildlife Service forensics lab. Kenyans fear that USAID cuts could shut the lab down, but there has been no indication so far that these funds will be withdrawn. Photo courtesy of Kenya Wildlife ServicePresident Donald Trump’s “skinny budget,” made public in March, has not yet been approved, and still awaits a response by a Congress highly skeptical of the administration’s proposed draconian U.S. foreign aid reductions.But environmentalists in Kenya are already feeling the heat, with some concerned that successful wildlife protection efforts could be at risk due to potential aid cuts.Paul Gathitu, spokesperson for the government’s Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) said that a lot of gains would be reversed if the funding disappears: “The U.S has been giving Kenya money for many years to help decrease poaching — mostly of elephants. And yes, the numbers of elephants has been increasing over time. A recent census we conducted found that elephant numbers have grown by eight percent over a four-year period to 27,000.”Gathitu emphasizes the stability provided by a cordial long-term relationship between the two nations: “Kenya has been receiving U.S funding for many decades. The relationship between the two countries has [been strong, with the] signing of bilateral agreements to extradite wildlife smugglers, drug traffickers, and other criminals.”While President Trump has proposed slashing the US Agency for International Development (USAID) by up to 40 percent, Kenya looks like it would face only a 10 percent aid cut, if Congress allows it. Most of that reduction — from $711 million to $639 million — would come from ending the USAID Food for Peace Program, with those dollars diverted to other aid. In August, the U.S. announced more than $169 million in additional humanitarian assistance to support Ethiopians and Kenyans suffering from the effects of prolonged severe drought in the region.Despite this current budgetary situation, fears remain strong in Kenya that environmental assistance could get axed.An elephant in Amboseli National Park. According to Clifford Njoroge, a community wildlife ranger, Trump’s threat of USAID cuts has created great concern among his fellow rangers, who worry their “jobs will no longer exist.… Already many are slowly losing motivation to do their work,” he says. Photo courtesy of Kenya Wildlife ServiceThe value of partnershipAccording to Joseph Boinet, the current Kenyan Inspector General of Police, USAID is making a major contribution to the fight against all kinds of trafficking. Kenya has extradited more than 128 drug traffickers and poachers to the United States since 2014, he explained, noting that the illicit profits that such criminals earn from the illegal wildlife trade are believed to be funding regional and international terrorism activities.“In return, the United States has also extradited to Kenya around 50 people involved with poaching,” said Boinet. “Any strained relations [between our nations] could reverse not just the financial [benefits] but partnerships in both countries in reducing international crime.”U.S. aid flowing to Kenya helps finance conservation law enforcement and research; boosts agricultural productivity; and increases resilience to climate shocks. Under President Obama, Kenya received financial support for resources, technical expertise and equipment to combat wildlife trafficking, to improve communication, enhance natural resource management, and aid efforts to promote biodiversity conservation via sustainable economic activities.Most USAID goes to the health sector, according to information provided by the Kenyan Treasury Department. Since 2005, the U.S. has provided funds for the President’s Emergency Plan for Africa (PEPFA), supporting free antiretroviral treatment (ART) for people living with HIV. The program had treated over 7.7 million HIV-infected people across Africa, in resource-limited settings and supported HIV testing and counseling for 56.7 million people as of 2014.Such health programs also indirectly aid conservation efforts, say experts, because healthy people are able to work and so are less likely to rely on poaching and other illegal activities for income. The HIV program also builds stronger communities with better law enforcement, which helps curb trafficking.Kenya’s current Environment Minister Professor Judi Wkhungu. The African nation’s strategic global importance in the fight against terrorism may explain why Trump’s overall 40 percent proposed cuts to the USAID 2018 budget amount to just 10 percent reductions for Kenya. Photo courtesy of Kenya Wildlife ServiceWhat’s at stake While the exact scope and impact of Trump’s proposed budget cuts remains unsure, and won’t be known until October when Congress approves a 2018 budget, many Kenyans continue expressing concern. They say that USAID, maintained at current levels, is urgently needed for environmental conservation and health programs over the next two years.One key project: USAID funding allowed for the opening in 2015 of the Kenyan Wildlife Service (KWS) forensic laboratory, the first of its kind in East Africa. According to a USAID annual report, the lab is “developing a genetic database to identify seized animals and wildlife products to support the prosecution of crimes. In 2015, five Kenyan scientists received research awards to work with their American counterparts to develop innovative responses to reduce wildlife poaching and trafficking. The awards support research on ecosystem management, wildlife law enforcement and innovations such as barcoding DNA.”Gathitu reported that Kenya’s lab, though relatively new, has already helped put poachers behind bars: “Since the lab was commissioned in May 2015, it has tested more than 310 bushmeat samples submitted by investigating officers. It has also tested other samples for disease diagnostics and population genetics.” Gathitu noted that since becoming operational two years ago, more than 250 cases involving forensic evidence have been referred to the courts. Out of those, 30 cases have led to convictions, while the rest are ongoing.“The United States government through Abbot Laboratories, not only provided funding for [our lab’s] construction, but also for the training of personnel both locally and internationally. USAID has funded a project on elephant genetics that is ongoing,” Gathitu added. Thanks to the U.S., the facility had sufficient funds to procure a sophisticated DNA sequencer and analyzer.“Budget cuts by the Trump administration could result in the DNA lab being closed,” Gathitu said. “Conducting forensic work is very expensive. To pay the workers their continued salary [and] to purchase equipment regularly, such as chemicals, requires big money.” To date, the Trump administration has not signaled any cuts to this program.Other USAID backed conservation activities in Kenya in recent years include an increase of grass and vegetation cover on 1.5 million hectares; a reduction of illegally traded ivory and rhino horn; and the moving of 20 black rhinos by the Kenya Wildlife Service, Northern Rangelands Trust and Lewa Wildlife Conservancy into the new USAID-supported Sera Rhino Sanctuary in Samburu County, Kenya.A white rhino in Kenya. USAID backed conservation activities in Kenya in recent years include an increase of grass and vegetation cover on 1.5 million hectares; a reduction of illegally traded ivory and rhino horn; and the moving of 20 black rhinos into the new USAID-supported Sera Rhino Sanctuary in Samburu County, Kenya, according to a USAID annual report. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayRumors of drastic reductions breed despairClifford Njoroge, a community wildlife ranger, urged the U.S. government not to act rashly regarding the budget: “If you want to solve a problem, you do not solve it by making quick unwise decisions. You actually make the problem worse,” he said. “You need to consult people and get good expert advice.”Njoroge said that if Trump cuts USAID environmental programs, then “Yes, the gains we have made in reducing poaching will revert back, as our jobs [as rangers] will no longer exist. Poaching will increase and that is not only my fear, but that of many of my colleagues. Already many are slowly losing motivation to do their work.”He explained that before U.S. funded rangers were hired a few years ago, poaching was rampant: “They prevailed everywhere. There was no one to watch their actions, and it is our fear that with budget cuts, not only the same will return, but worse [criminal] scenarios of poaching.” The U.S has provided funds for community rangers to acquire uniforms, as well as for sophisticated firearms so that the rangers can keep pace with heavily armed poachers.Potential U.S. aid cuts also worry Risky Agwanda, a mammalogist at the National Museums of Kenya: “The U.S is the biggest funder of conservation globally. If cuts happen, for instance, a research project on how to improve breeding habits of elephants to increase their numbers could be at stake. So if poaching increases once again, and elephants breed less, then there is a problem.”Tsavo National Park elephants. Thanks to past USAID assistance, elephant numbers are increasing in Kenya. Photo courtesy of Kenya Wildlife ServiceConserving wildlife, preserving the economyJohn Kaittany, a tourism consultant with Kenlove, an environmental NGO, emphasized what could be at risk economically if USAID is disempowered. “Conservation is vital, especially for elephants. They attract millions of tourists to Kenya every year. They bring a few billions of dollars into the economy. So a lot stands to be lost.”“The conservation of wildlife is vital,” agreed Kamau Mathenge, a resident of Laikipia County in Central Kenya. “The current U.S. president has been raised in a well-to-do family. So he does not understand the needs of poor countries or people. We hope he does not stay true to his word” regarding foreign aid cuts.As poor as Kenya is, it remains one of five countries in Africa with high concentrations of elephant populations. And even though it could have made a good deal of money by selling its confiscated ivory stockpiles, Kenyan conservationists point out, the nation chose instead to burn most of that ivory. Under the U.N Convention for International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES), Kenya has pledged to burn the rest of those stockpiles too.Continued uncertaintyWhile much of the global media is reporting that Kenya will be spared the worst of Trump’s ais reductions, an employee at the American embassy in Nairobi confirmed to Mongabay that the administration is serious about its proposed cuts, and already doing harm. The employee, who asked to remain anonymous, said that visas have already been limited to Kenyan scientists, and that this should be seen as worrying.“Lack of diplomatic experience in the new administration will cause more harm than good,” said the embassy official. “We have already denied more than 34 Kenyan scientists visas to travel to the United States. We give visas out based on instructions from above.” In April, Trump signed an executive order for a review of the H-1B visa program, intended for better educated foreign nationals including computer programmers, engineers and scientists.Dr. Germano Mwabu, a World Bank Economist and an economics professor at the University of Nairobi said that the budget decreases — should they go forward — represent a serious U.S. policy shift. “If you cancel the funds and make the threats true, not only will it affect the economies involved, but also the U.S. It means that countries may also cut trade ties with the United States. So such an action is grave as countries rely on each other,” the professor said.Mwabu will be presenting a paper on the matter at an upcoming African Development Bank conference in Tunis. “Such [aid reductions] may [even] lead to a major global economic recession,” he warned, suggesting that there is an urgent need for increased international funding for environmental conservation, not less.“Nature will make us suffer if we mistreat it,” Mwabu said. “What will our children eat if we play around with nature?FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Animals, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, Drought, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Featured, Foreign Aid, Global Environmental Crisis, Globalization, Green, Mammals, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

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Colombian president honored in Washington, D.C. for efforts to protect biodiversity

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, Environment, Marine Protected Areas, Protected Areas, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Colombian President Juan Santos was honored by the National Geographic Society last week for his prodigious efforts since taking office in 2010 to expand the protection of Colombia’s biodiversity on both land and sea.Gary E. Knell, president and CEO of the National Geographic Society, praised Santos as “one of the foremost champions of the natural world” in an hour-long ceremony at the Society’s headquarters.Santos has more than doubled the number of hectares under national environmental protection — from 13 million hectares in 2010 to 28.4 million hectares today, including a doubling of Chiribiquete National Park in southern Colombia, one of the world’s most biodiverse places, from 1.29 million hectares to 2.78 million hectares.* WASHINGTON, D.C. – He prowled the stage like a puma moving through Colombia’s rainforest. With a deep knowledge of ecosystems ranging from marine to savanna to high mountains, he spoke clearly about why these wild places are important to his country and the world.He never mentioned jobs, new roads or dams, or leveraging his country’s vast trove of fossil fuels and precious metals for economic development. He was, for an hour on the morning of Sept. 21, a strange international figure in a city whose national leadership on the environment is the polar opposite of his.“We are a powerhouse of biodiversity,” said Juan Santos, the president of Colombia and the sole recipient of the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize for ending his country’s 50-year civil war. “With this power comes responsibility. We have a tremendous responsibility to play a role in the world to … preserve the environment and protect the rich assets of our house.”Santos is said to be more popular abroad than he is at home because of the controversial Peace Agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Yet he came to Washington to be honored by the National Geographic Society for his prodigious efforts since taking office in 2010 to expand the protection of Colombia’s biodiversity on both land and sea.Gary E. Knell, president and CEO of the National Geographic Society, praised Santos as “one of the foremost champions of the natural world” in an hour-long ceremony in Grosvenor Auditorium at the society’s headquarters. All 400 seats were filled, mostly with Colombians working in D.C., including its ambassadors to the U.S. and an array of indigenous leaders from Colombia dressed in traditional garb.Gary E. Knell, president and CEO of the National Geographic Society, praised Colombian President Juan Santos as “one of the foremost champions of the natural world.” Photo by Enrique Ortiz, Andes Amazon Fund.“President Santos is a shining example of everything National Geographic stands for and supports,” Knell said. “He is a bold leader with transformative ideas and a fearless trailblazer who champions policies that will help achieve a planet in balance — and help change the world.”Stark contrastSantos stood in stark contrast in a city where the new administration is dismantling the Environmental Protection Agency, proposing to shrink the size of U.S. national parks to make way for the extraction industry, and pulling out of the United Nations-brokered Paris Agreement to fight climate change.Santos spoke for 45 minutes about how “our treasure is the world’s treasure.” Though one-eighth the size of Brazil, Colombia ranks second behind its Amazonian neighbor in biodiversity worldwide. It’s first in its variety of birds and orchids, second in amphibians and butterflies, third in reptiles and palms, fourth in mammals, and fifth in marine and continental ecosystems.What Santos has done — and pledges to do more of by the time he leaves office in August 2018 — is more than double the number of hectares under national environmental protection — from 13 million hectares in 2010 to 28.4 million hectares today, including a doubling of Chiribiquete National Park in southern Colombia, one of the world’s most biodiverse places, to 2.77 million hectares (10,700 square miles). He has pledged to protect another 1.69 million hectares (6,560 square miles) in less than a year.Common woolly monkey (Lagothrix lagotricha) in Colombia. Photo by Rhett Butler.Offshore, he has ordered the protection of 4.4 million hectares (nearly 17,000 square miles) of Malpelo Flora and Fauna Sanctuary, a UNESCO World Heritage site rich in coral reefs and aquatic life. He is encouraging neighboring Panama and Ecuador to expand their abutting ocean reserves to create a huge Pacific Ocean coastal corridor “for turtles, sharks, and dolphins, which need protection.”“In doing this,” Santos said, “we are honoring the great American marine biologist Sylvia Earle, who said, ‘No water, no life. No blue, no green. No ocean, no us.’ From that I learned an important lesson — protect the coral reefs. This is critical.”Colombia’s environmental challengesWhat went unmentioned during Santos’ celebratory talk were the increasing challenges to his environmental agenda. Deforestation has risen dramatically in the past year. Coca growing for cocaine is increasing rapidly. The extraction industry is eager to get at Colombia’s enormous underground stores of oil, natural gas, coal, and precious metals, especially emeralds.Nor did he mention the recent report “Peace and Environmental Protection in Colombia,” which notes that environmental spending by the Santos Administration is “very low,” well behind other Latin American countries, and a third of what it was in 1998.Colombian President Juan Santos with indigenous leaders from Colombia. Photo by Enrique Ortiz, Andes Amazon Fund.The partial result has been a lack of enforcement in protected areas as illegal miners and ranchers claim rich land where the FARC once hid but is now leaving unoccupied.Instead, Santos, attaching part of his legacy to the unpopular Peace Agreement with the FARC, said last week: “For 50 years, the environment was one of Colombia’s war victims. I called it an ecocide. Drug trafficking fed the war, and the war fed drug trafficking through deforestation. The amount of oil spilled in our rivers and seas was equal to 14 Exxon Valdez (spills). That’s why the environmental dividend of our peace is so big. We are not only stopping this destruction, we’re trying to reverse it.”Much depends on the administration that follows Santos to power in Bogota next summer. His expansion of protected lands cannot be reversed without revising the nation’s constitution. But with poverty rates high and per capita income low, the pressure for economic development in Colombia will be intense.At National Geographic last week, those were worries for another day, as the society lauded an uncommon elected official’s will to protect, not plunder, his nation’s natural resources.In closing the ceremony, Mark Plotkin, the well-known environmentalist who leads the Amazon Conservation Team, praised Santos before adding, “The political leaders who ignore biodiversity will end up where they belong — on the ash heap of history.”*Correction: When originally published, this story misreported the total hectares protected in Colombia in 2010 and today. That error has since been corrected.Chestnut-eared Aracari (Pteroglossus castanotis) in Colombia. Photo by Rhett Butler.Justin Catanoso is a regular contributor to Mongabay and professor of journalism at Wake Forest University in North Carolina. Follow him on Twitter @jcatanoso.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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An Indonesian forest community grapples with the arrival of the outside world

first_imgSiberut Island, part of the Mentawai archipelago in western Indonesia, is recognized as a U.N. Biosphere Reserve due to its outstanding cultural and ecological value.The traditions of the indigenous Mentawai people, including agroforestry and customary land tenure, have allowed the people of the island live off the forest without depleting it.Roughly half of the island is protected as a national park. The rest, however, has been parceled out for timber and biomass plantations, road building, and the development of a special economic zone including a yacht marina and luxury resort. DOROGOT, Indonesia — Toikot rises as the golden light of dawn begins to shine on the heavy mist that cloaks the rainforest canopy outside his home in Indonesia’s Siberut Island. The pigs leave their sleeping place under his traditional uma clan house and set out to forage in the forest. Later they will return to the farmstead to eat sago.An elderly indigenous Mentawai traditional healer, or sekerei, Toikot’s first task of the day is to gather “something beautiful from nature” with which to adorn himself. Today he plucks two red flowers and places one behind each ear. A loincloth, elaborate tattoos and headdress complete the distinctive customary dress for which the sekerei are known.Toikot’s home, the farming community of Dorogot, is a cluster of forest farmsteads on the eastern side of Siberut, around three hours’ walk from the nearest village, mostly through arduous lowland swamp forest.Siberut is the largest island in the Mentawai archipelago, which lies 140 kilometers (87 miles) west of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. The rainforest-swathed island has been isolated from the rest of Indonesia for half a million years, leading to an unusually high level of endemism. Two-thirds of the animals here are thought to be unique to the island.This unique biological and cultural diversity was recognized in 1981 when UNESCO designated the island a Biosphere Reserve. This was consolidated in 1993 when Indonesia’s Ministry of Forestry established Siberut National Park, spanning 1,905 square kilometers (736 square miles) and covering most of the island’s western half.Now, though, both Siberut’s traditional lifestyles and its biodiversity are under pressure from a spate of development projects. While the western half of the island is largely protected, the northeast is already home to a sizable timber concession and a biomass forestry concession. The central government also has big plans to develop a special economic zone in the south, and a highway linking it to the forest concessions in the north. The local government and a private company also plan to bring electricity to villages via a biomass project.last_img read more

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10 noteworthy books on conservation and the environment from 2019

first_img2019 produced a number of notable books on the environment, ranging from the memoirs of researchers and journalists to how-to guides and prescient novels.Here’s a sample of what was published in the past year.They cut across a variety of environment-related themes, though climate change is a common point of meditation for many of the authors on the list.Inclusion on this list does not imply Mongabay’s endorsement of a book’s content; the views in the books are those of the authors and not necessarily Mongabay. Grappling with the challenges of minimizing carbon footprints, memoirs of careers spent on the frontlines of conservation and stark warnings about the future inhabitability of our world, the roster of environment-related books published in 2019 covered a wide swath of pressing themes.We’ve included 10 released by mainstream publishing houses that promise to inspire, educate and prepare readers as we head into the third decade of the 21st century. They tackle climate change, altered marine environments and the global loss of species, but of course none of these issues exists in a vacuum. The challenges are all related, and the authors whose books made the list have worked to tease apart that complexity.Image courtesy of Hachette Book Group.1. The Snow Leopard Project And Other Adventures in War Zone ConservationBeginning in 2006, Alex Dehgan spearheaded an effort to create the first national park in Afghanistan. Dehgan, an evolutionary biologist who was working for the Wildlife Conservation Society at the time, brings to life the effort that became a beacon of hope in spite of ongoing conflict.“I felt that there was so much more to Afghanistan than the way it is portrayed on the evening news — a dusty, depressing landscape of pain, conflict, tribalism, and hopelessness,” he told Mongabay in April. “I wanted to show for both conservation, and for Afghanistan, that there could be optimism for the future of the country, for its people, and for its wildlife.”Image courtesy of Columbia University Press.2. Live Sustainably Now: A Low-Carbon Vision of the Good LifePart how-to guide, part entertaining memoir, Karl Coplan’s new book brings readers along for his journey into trimming his own carbon footprint. The Pace University law professor acknowledges the struggles inherent in minimizing one’s own impact in a modern society, but he also demonstrates the fulfillment to be had in meeting those challenges head on and devising creative solutions to address them.Image courtesy of Island Press.3. Rainforest: Dispatches from Earth’s Most Vital FrontlinesLike many of the authors whose books are on this list, Tony Juniper brings firsthand experience to his subject matter — in this case, the world’s rainforests. The outlook for this biome can seem bleak, especially given the recent surge in deforestation in many of the world’s tropical forests, and Juniper’s decades in the field bear out the hurdles conservationists face. But he also lays out the case for using every strategy at our disposal, from high-level agreements to supporting indigenous management, to protect the forests that, he argues — and many agree — are so essential to our own existence.4. The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys across the last untamed frontierInvestigative journalist Ian Urbina spent more than 3 years at sea with fishers all over the world to understand the connection between the epidemic of overfishing across the world’s oceans and the human rights abuses that are all too common in the industry. His reporting, which first appeared as a series in The New York Times, reveals the lawlessness of high seas and that the fates of the people who work it as well as the life that lives beneath are intertwined.“To me, the problem is an out-of-sight, out-of-mind reality that results in an utter lack of governance in a sprawling space that has for too long simply been thought of as a space — rarely a workplace,” Urbina told Conservation International. “There is a long cultural and intellectual history behind thinking of the sea and maritime as another world where things are different.”Image courtesy of Penguin Random House.5. Grinnell: America’s Environmental Pioneer and His Restless Drive to Save the WestGeorge Grinnell’s views on the American West were shaped by the time he spent there, steeped in the landscape and the cultures that precede the United States’ domination of the region. Along the way, biographer John Taliaferro writes, Grinnell also became an advocate for its protection in the face of “progress.” In doing so, he helped ignite a passion for conservation that continues to this day.6. The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After WarmingFrom the first page of his new book, David Wallace-Wells describes a perilous world that we’re striding closer to each day in what reviewers call “terrifying” and “riveting” prose. Wallace-Wells examines the future for humanity as the impacts of climate change deepen, and in his view, few aspects of our lives will remain untouched. There’s room for optimism in the future, but only if we act, and this book tells us why we must. As the reviewer for The Economist wrote, “Some readers will find Mr Wallace-Wells’s outline of possible futures alarmist. He is indeed alarmed. You should be, too.”Image courtesy of Macmillan.7. Losing Earth: A Recent HistoryThis retrospective looks back to the scientists who first alerted humanity to the dangers of climate change in the late 1970s and the 1980s. Journalist Nathaniel Rich first reported the series for The New York Times Magazine. It details how a handful of researchers initially realized our own role in climate change. There were missed opportunities to stave off the coming storm along the way, to be sure. Still unanswered is the question about whether we’ll learn from those missteps, or blindly barrel toward an uncertain and perilous future.Image courtesy of Macmillan.8. Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?In yet another volume to explore humanity’s relationship with Earth’s climate, Bill McKibben — the first popular author to sound the warning on climate change with The End of Nature in 1989 — follows the obstinacy of ideology and how it has precluded meaningful action. The details are frustrating. But McKibben also finds reason to hope, believing that the future of the world and our place depends on how we respond now.Image courtesy of Penguin Random House.9. HorizonBarry Lopez reflects on decades of travel to remote regions, during which he’s see the influence of humanity across the world’s landscapes. In Horizon, he wrestles with our capacity for both cruelty and generosity, and how the destruction and preservation of the earth are related. The depth of his meditations and observations leave few clearcut answers, other than to bring into focus the profound impact that we humans and our environment have on each other.Image courtesy of Faber and Faber Ltd.10. The WallIn the only work of fiction on our list, writer John Lanchester has put together a novel with perhaps the most contemporary of themes. Central to the plot is the wall in the imagined future that projects the United Kingdom from rising sea levels. Seemingly insurmountable political divisiveness conspires to create a world that’s suspiciously familiar in prevailing sentiment if not the details of everyday life, in which outsiders are viewed as enemies and our very existence seems under threat.Banner image of a glacier in Iceland by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Animals, Biodiversity, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Deforestation, Earth Science, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Journalism, Extinction, Fish, Fishing, Forest Carbon, Forest People, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Green, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Illegal Logging, IPCC, Journalism, Logging, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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«Ce groupe est déjà taillé pour la Ligue 1», selon l’entraîneur du FC Metz

first_imgAvant le déplacement à Strasbourg le 11 août pour la reprise de la Ligue 1, l’entraîneur du FC Metz, Vincent Hognon, évoque la préparation estivale, le mercato et ses attentes par rapport à un groupe très jeune qui bénéficiera des acquis d’une saison en commun.Quel bilan tirez-vous de la préparation à ce stade des débats?Vincent Hognon : On a vu contre Amiens un très bon match, avec une bonne intensité déjà. On a voulu des matches amicaux relevés et une préparation consistante parce qu’on va rencontrer une équipe déjà prête, qui aura de l’avance sur nous. Si Strasbourg se qualifie pour le prochain tour préliminaire de Ligue Europa, cette équipe aura déjà disputé trois matches officiels avant de nous recevoir. Chez nous, les entraînements sont de qualité jusqu’ici, même si on n’a pas toujours tout retrouvé en match. C’est normal, on a beaucoup mélangé les joueurs et on ne peut pas tout avoir mais on voit des acquis de la saison passée. Ça avance. Le FC Metz sera-t-il prêt dans les temps?On ne peut jamais être sûr parce que la façon dont on va s’adapter à la Ligue 1 reste incertaine mais, sur le potentiel du groupe, je ne suis pas inquiet.Entendez-vous les réserves autour d’un recrutement jeune avec des garçons qui ont peu d’expérience en Ligue 1?Non. On est jeune, c’est sûr, mais je pense que ce groupe est déjà taillé pour la L1. Seulement, il devra encore progresser pour se hisser à son niveau d’exigence. Cette année d’expérience en commun, dans un groupe qui a peu changé, n’est-elle pas votre meilleur atout finalement?J’espère. Ça doit être un facteur important en tout cas. Quand tu as des automatismes, des gens qui se connaissent et parlent le même langage, c’est plus facile. On gagne du temps. Et si on a voulu prolonger des joueurs, c’est un signe pour eux mais il leur faudra aussi nous montrer qu’on avait raison.Quel genre de milieu offensif attendez-vous encore ?Un milieu un peu plus créatif, pas forcément excentré. Mais il n’y a pas d’urgence, le mercato est encore long.Craignez-vous des offensives sur votre équipe ?C’est possible mais les joueurs sont sous contrat et heureux d’être là. Personne ne nous a demandé à partir.Parlons système maintenant. Vous utilisez toujours le 4-3-3, vous avez testé le 4-2-3-1 contre Seraing. Est-ce que l’option à deux pointes du 4-4-2 est exclue à Metz ?On ne l’a pas travaillée. Il y a toujours des changements possibles, on ne ferme aucune porte, mais avoir une infériorité au milieu de terrain, ce n’est pas ce que je préfère. Après, c’est sûr, le championnat et les performances peuvent toujours nous donner matière à réflexion.Enfin, quel est le discours de Frédéric Antonetti (le manager général) avant la reprise en L1 ?Il nous demande de confirmer ce qu’on a fait, de garder l’enthousiasme d’un promu et le comportement irréprochable de la saison dernière. Parce qu’il sait, lui aussi, que ce groupe a des qualités.Recueilli par Christian Jougleux/Le Républicain lorraincenter_img Partagerlast_img read more

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Doutes sur l’identité d’un joueur gambien de Hambourg

first_imgL’histoire de ce jeune réfugié gambien devenu une petite star du football avait fait les gros titres de certains journaux allemands. Mais Bild affirme qu’il a en réalité joué pour plusieurs clubs en Afrique et également pour l’équipe nationale gambienne des moins de 20 ans.Le journal cite deux entraîneurs qui ont identifié Bakery comme leur ex-joueur, Jatta Daffeh. Bild ajoute que la trace de Daffeh se perd en Afrique en août 2015, exactement la date à laquelle Bakery est arrivé en Allemagne, avec des papiers lui permettant d’évoluer en moins de 17 ans.Début 2016, un examen médical du joueur avait révélé “que son développement biologique était achevé”, avait affirmé à l’époque le directeur sportif de Hambourg, Peter Knäbel. L’âge réel du joueur n’avait cependant pas été remis en cause.À la suite de ces révélations, le HSV a soutenu son joueur : “Nous avons le passeport valide de Bakery Jatta et son permis de séjour”, indique le club, “Bakery a été exemplaire depuis son arrivée chez nous. Il s’est rapidement intégré dans notre équipe, nous l’apprécions comme joueur et comme personne.”L’agent de Jatta, Efe-Firat Aktas, a nié auprès de la presse locale toute falsification–: “Il a un passeport valide, qui a été vérifié. Tout le reste n’a pour nous aucun sens”, a-t-il dit.Si les informations de Bild était avérées, Jatta s’exposerait à une annulation de son permis de séjour, ainsi qu’à une suspension par la DFB.AFP La Fédération allemande de football (DFB) a ouvert mercredi une enquête après des révélations de presse dévoilant qu’un joueur gambien du Hambourg SV, Bakery Jatta, évoluait sous une fausse identité.Selon les documents en possession du HSV (deuxième division), Bakery Jatta a 21 ans, et est arrivé de Gambie en Allemagne en 2015 à l’âge de 16 ans.  Mais selon une enquête du quotidien Sport Bild, citant notamment des entraîneurs en Gambie, le jeune homme aurait par le passé joué en Gambie sous le nom de Bakary Daffeh, et aurait deux ans et demi de plus que ce qu’indiquent ses papiers.Les autorités de Hambourg ont également ouvert une enquête, a appris l’agence sportive SID. Partagerlast_img read more

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Roud Léiwen : Curci arrive, Cabral revient

first_imgPas de surprise majeure dans la liste de Luc Holtz, dévoilée mercredi, pour les matches contre le Portugal (11 octobre) et le Danemark (15 octobre).S’il y en a bien deux qui peuvent se frotter les mains, depuis ce mercredi matin 11h, c’est le polyvalent attaquant de Mayence Alessio Curci, appelé pour la première fois de sa jeune carrière et le portier du Fola, Emmanuel Cabral : tous deux verront le stade Alvalade de Lisbonne pour y défier le Portugal de Cristiano Ronaldo, Joao Félix et Bernardo Silva.Le premier doit “être vu” parce qu’il présente un “profil intéressant”. Le second a du temps de jeu et est particulièrement bon dans les buts eschois alors que Tim Kips (F91) n’est que remplaçant à Dudelange. À noter que Stefano Bensi, touché au pied, n’est lui toujours pas de retour. Pas plus que Christopher Martins, touché au pubis et qui vient de reprendre la course. Pas de miracle pour Aurélien Joachim, qui reste relégué en réserve avec Virton.Julien MollereauLa liste complète des joueurs sélectionnés :Gardiens : Anthony Moris (Virton), Ralph Schon (Strassen), Emmanuel Cabral (Fola).Défenseurs : Laurent Jans (SC Paderborn), Tim Hall (Karpaty Lviv), Dirk Carlson (Karlsruhe SC), Maxime Chanot (New York City), Kevin Malget (Virton), Vahid Selimovic (Apollon Limassol), Lars Gerson (IFK Norrköpping), Marvin Marins (Karpaty Lviv).Milieux de terrain : Vincent Thill (Orléans), Leandro Barreiro (FSV Mayence), Danel Sinani (F91), Olivier Thill (FC Oufa), Florian Bohnert (FSV Mayence), Chris Philipps (Legia Varsovie), Aldin Skenderovic (Progrès).Attaquants : Daniel Da Mota (RFCU), Dave Turpel (Virton), Gerson Rodrigues (Dynamo Kiev), Maurice Deville (Waldhof Mannheim), Alessio Curci (FSV Mayence). Partagerlast_img read more

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