4 sperm whales dead after mass stranding in Sumatra

first_imgAnimal Rescue, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Activism, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Whales, Wildilfe, Wildlife Rescues Article published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img A pod of 10 sperm whales beached earlier this week in shallow waters in western Indonesia.Despite attempts by authorities and residents to push the animals back out into deeper water, four of the whales died after being stranded overnight.Experts are looking into what caused the whales to swim so close to shore. Four sperm whales were reported to have died Tuesday following a mass stranding on a beach on the northwestern tip of Sumatra, Indonesia.A group of 10 sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was spotted on Ujong Kareung beach in Aceh province on Monday morning, according to WWF-Indonesia, which has been monitoring attempts to rescue the animals.Officials from the Navy, fisheries ministry and local government deployed teams and worked with residents and NGOs to try to push and tow the stranded whales back out into deeper water.Two of the whales were reportedly injured, while the others risked suffocation and organ failure from being stuck in shallow waters for too long, according to Arman, a veterinarian from the Center for Wildlife Studies at the Syiah Kuala University in Banda Aceh, the provincial capital.Four of the stranded sperm whales died after being stuck for several hours in the shallow waters off the beach. Photo courtesy of WWF-Indonesia.Seven whales were pushed back out into deeper water between Monday evening and early Tuesday morning, according to Whale Stranding Indonesia, a marine mammal conservation organization based in Jakarta, which has also been monitoring the rescue. However, one of them returned to the beach.By Tuesday afternoon, the four stranded whales were dead, according to WWF-Indonesia.“We are coordinating with veterinarians to conduct a necropsy on the dead four whales,” the NGO said. “We are also using drones to monitor the six whales that survived.”It is not yet clear why the whales swam so close to the shore, as the species is known to prefer open ocean with waters deeper than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet).One theory is that the whales, which navigate by echolocation, were disoriented by seismic surveying activity, an offshore oil-and-gas exploration technique in which sound waves are blasted down to the seabed and the reflected waves used to provide information about the geology.Three seismic surveys were reported to have taken place near the site where the whales were stranded, according to Stranded No More, a watchdog group with an interest in marine mammals.The beaching of some 100 melon-headed whales in northwest Madagascar in 2008 was attributed in a 2013 report to acoustic stimuli from a survey vessel contracted by ExxonMobil.The sound waves involved are typically 100,000 times more intense than a jet engine and can severely impact fish, dolphins, whales and sea turtles, causing temporary and permanent hearing loss, disrupting mating, and driving the animals into shallower water, where they risk getting stranded, according to oceans conservancy NGO Oceana.A group of 10 sperm whales was stranded on Nov. 13 on a beach in Sumatra’s Aceh province. Photo courtesy of WWF-Indonesia.The Jakarta Animal Aid Network (JAAN) acknowledged the possibility that a seismic survey may have been a factor in the stranding, but said there was little chance that this was the case in Aceh.Another possibility, said Amang Raga of JAAN, involves the injured whales. He said sperm whales travel as a group, with the leader swimming out in front, and pod members were unlikely to abandon one another.“So if one of the whales in the front becomes ill, the others will follow wherever it goes, and possibly [in this case it] swam close to the shore,” Amang said.Sperm whales, which can grow to up to 20.5 meters (67 feet) in length, are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Forests and forest communities critical to climate change solutions

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Mining, Biodiversity, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Deforestation, Earth Science, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Gold Mining, Green, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, IPCC, Land Rights, Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Traditional People, Tribal Groups, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlights the importance of land use in addressing climate change.The restoration and protection of forests could be a critical component in strategies to mitigate climate change, say experts, but governments must halt deforestation and forest degradation to make way for farms and ranches.The IPCC report also acknowledges the role that indigenous communities could play.The forests under indigenous management often have lower deforestation and emit less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. How we use the planet’s land, including forests, will make a huge difference in determining the path of climate change in the future, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC.The IPCC released a summary of its special report on climate change and land on Aug. 8. Experts say the report reinforces the importance of taking land use into account as a front-line strategy for dealing with rising global temperatures as a result of increased carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.“Our options in terms of protecting, restoring and expanding forests are immediately available, proven at scale, and often very cost-effective, while also providing benefits for clean air, water, biodiversity, soil health, climate resilience — you name it,” Katharine Mach, a climate researcher and associate professor at the University of Miami, said in a press briefing on Aug. 1.Forest and terraced hillsides in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Forests collectively pull out roughly a third of global CO2 emissions, and the potential for keeping a lid on climate change is even higher with the right restoration and protection plans in place, Mach said. That emphasis on keeping forests standing and bringing them back in places where they once stood dovetails with the need to cut the amount of fossil fuels we burn for energy.“This relationship between fossil fuels and forests is a ‘yes-and’ relationship,” she added.A banana plantation in the village of San Jose in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.But holding back the tide of deforestation against interests intent on short-term financial gains has proven difficult.“That is why we need to ensure tropical forests are worth more standing than when they are cut down for grazing livestock, growing crops or harvesting timber,” David Festa, senior vice president for ecosystems with the Environmental Defense Fund, said in a statement.The sentiment echoes a remark from noted biologist E.O. Wilson during an interview with the BBC: “Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.”Residents playing basketball in the village of San Jose in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.That’s particularly true in the Brazilian Amazon, Carlos Nobre, a senior climate scientist at Brazil’s University of São Paolo, said at the briefing. The push for timber, agriculture, ranching and mining in the largest block of rainforest left on Earth has led to a surge in deforestation rates of 40 percent in the past three years.“That’s very worrying,” Nobre said. He added that continued deforestation in the Amazon could permanently turn the rainforest into a savanna that releases tens of billions of tons of CO2 into the atmosphere.“The Amazon forest may be closer to a tipping point than we assumed before,” Nobre said.Protecting forests because of their potential to mitigate climate change can have other positive effects, such as protecting biodiversity. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Part of the solution could come from overhauling the way we produce food, Charlotte Streck, founder of the think tank Climate Focus, said during the briefing. Streck pointed out that raising livestock to satisfy the global appetite for meat accounts for 15 percent of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions, as well as the majority of emissions from the global agricultural sector.“All this means that one of the most effective climate actions that we can take as individuals is to improve our diets,” she said. “The good news is that we are already seeing diet changes in the United States and Europe. The consumption of red meat is falling, in particular, in urban centers.”But for lasting changes to protect forests, we must take into account — and indeed, enlist the experience, knowledge and expertise — of the people who call them home, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the U.N. special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, said at the briefing.A local farmer in the Philippines. Image by Jeoffrey Maitem/Global Witness.“No one understands the value of forests better than indigenous and local communities,” she said. “As experts, often guided by hundreds of years of knowledge, we are uniquely suited to manage, protect and restore the world’s forests.”Research has shown that forests managed by indigenous communities have lower deforestation rates and release less CO2 than those managed by governments, and the new IPCC report recognizes for the first time the role these peoples could play in addressing climate change.“Finally, the world’s top scientists recognize what we have always known,” a group of community and indigenous organizations from 42 countries said in their response to the report released on Aug. 8.A member of a group resisting a hydropower dam in Guatemala. Image by James Rodriguez/Global Witness.But critical to nurturing that beneficial relationship is acknowledging indigenous land rights around the world. The statement’s authors point out that these communities customarily take care of more than half the world’s surface. But governments only recognize their ownership of about a tenth of global land. Furthermore, the signatories to the response argue, these groups must be involved in decision-making processes about what happens to the land they hold — what’s known as free, prior and informed consent, or FPIC.But standing up for the right to have a say over what happens to a piece of land is often contentious and dangerous. On July 30, Global Witness released a report documenting the deaths of 164 “land and environmental defenders” in 2018 — an average of more than three a week.Another study, published Aug. 5 in the journal Nature Sustainability, found that more than one-third of killings between 2014 and 2017 over natural resources involved either agriculture or mining interests.“No one knows the conflicts playing out among food, fuel and forests better than indigenous peoples and local communities,” Tauli-Corpuz said. “We’re often in the cross-hairs of conflicts over land, especially forests.”The number of environmental and land defenders killed by country in 2018. Image courtesy of Global Witness.Banner image of a farmer looking over the new oil palm plantation abutting his land in Peru, by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitation:Butt, N., Lambrick, F., Menton, M., & Renwick, A. (2019). The supply chain of violence. Nature Sustainability, 2(8), 742-747. doi:10.1038/s41893-019-0349-4FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Community conservation agreements a lifeline for Uganda’s grey crowned cranes

first_imgUganda’s grey crowned crane has been in sharp decline due to loss of habitat and poaching.Across its range in East and Southern Africa, grey crowned crane populations fell by more than half between 1995 and 2005.Uganda’s National Environment Management Authority has acted to reclaim and restore wetland habitat vital to the cranes’ breeding.The Cranes and Wetlands initiative is creating self-sustaining incentives for communities living around wetlands to rehabilitate and protect wetlands areas. KABALE DISTRICT, Uganda — Ten years ago, grey crowned cranes (Balearica regulorum) had become a rare sight along the highway connecting the Ugandan capital, Kampala, to Rwanda. Across the birds’ entire range in East and Southern Africa, the cranes’ populations had declined steeply. But efforts to restore their wetland habitats in Uganda are succeeding, and birds and local communities alike are benefiting.Jimmy Muhozi Muhebwa first surveyed Uganda’s grey crowned crane population between 2001 and 2003 as research for his Masters thesis.“We found out in 2003, through counting and then using computer modeling, that Uganda had 10,000, plus or minus 500, grey crowned cranes — but reducing,” Muhebwa told Mongabay.A subsequent study in 2007 estimated that the population had fallen by 14% — to around 8,600. When Muhebwa and his team surveyed the population in 2013, the numbers seemed to have stabilized.The cranes are Uganda’s national bird, appearing on the country’s flag and the coat of arms, and Muhebwa’s surveys coincided with a dawning realization of the threat to the species across its whole range.There are two sub-species of grey crowned cranes, also known as crested cranes: Balearica regulorum gibbericeps is found across East Africa, and B. r. regulorum in Southern Africa. These beautiful birds, with their distinctive golden crowns, make their homes in a range of habitats including marshes, temporary pools, and pans or dams with tall vegetation. They prefer wetland areas with open grasslands or farmland nearby where they can forage for seed heads, tender new grass, or grains and pulses. The cranes also eat insects, frogs, crabs, and lizards.Potato field in the Mugandu-Buramba wetland. Uganda’s wetlands have been heavily encroached upon for farms, grazing, and settlement. Image by Fredrick Mugira for Mongabay.Arresting the declineB. regulorum was listed as a species of “least concern” right into the mid-2000s, when a reassessment of its abundance found its numbers had fallen by more than half in the preceding 20 years.Their steep decline is linked to the loss of wetland breeding areas as growing human populations sought out new farmland and pastures for cattle. Elsewhere wetlands were affected by drought or the construction of dams, or polluted by pesticide run-off.Jeconious Musingwire, an environmental scientist with Uganda’s National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA), says Muhebwa’s findings matched a massive loss of crane habitat across the country. Uganda has lost over 40% of its wetlands since 1994, according to the ministry of water and environment.“Loss and degradation of wetlands, climate change and altering of landscapes for human settlement destroyed habitats for their breeding,” said Musingwire.Population growth also mean cranes are living closer to settlements, facing more frequent disturbances and more vulnerable to hunting. In some places, cranes are targeted because the birds can damage crops such as young maize.Bashir Hangi, spokesperson for the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA), says poaching for illegal wildlife trade, is also an important factor in Uganda.“Crested crane is one the birds that people do sell at the international level. For instance last year we arrested people with three of them,” he told Mongabay. Grey crowned cranes are in demand as domestic birds in Asia and the Middle East. Within Uganda, they are also sought after for traditional medicine.“They had disappeared because farmers destroyed the wetland,” said Vincent Namara, “but when they were chased away from it, cranes came back.”For the past 20 years, Namara has been harvesting grass from the Rucece wetland to sell as mulch to farmers in the southwestern district of Mbarara.All wetlands in Uganda are protected by government, although people often illegally occupy them, draining portions to make way for gardens, farms and settlements. Rucece is part of 202 hectares (500 acres) of wetlands restored by NEMA in this part of the country. The authority evicted encroachers and left the wetlands to regenerate.NEMA has also encouraged farmers to plant millions of calliandra trees (Calliandra calothyrsus) on their own land. Musingwire explains that these trees help farmland retain water, enrich the soil, and provide fodder, reducing pressure on wetlands.last_img read more

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Success of Microsoft’s ‘moonshot’ climate pledge hinges on forest conservation

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer One mechanism by which the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement incentivizes greenhouse gas reductions is via carbon offsets, payments that compensate nations, states and private landowners who agree to keep forests intact in order to preserve carbon storage capacity and biodiversity.But problems exist with forest carbon offset initiatives: corrupt landowners, lack of carbon accounting transparency, and low carbon pricing have caused wariness among investors, and failed to spur forest preservation.Now, in a landmark move, Microsoft has pledged to go “carbon negative” by 2030, and erase all the company’s greenhouse gas emissions back to its founding in 1975 by 2050. A big part of achieving that goal will come via the carbon storage provided by verified global forest conservation and reforestation projects around the globe.To achieve its goal, Microsoft has teamed with Pachama, a Silicon Valley startup, that seeks to accurately track forest carbon stocks in projects in the Brazilian and Peruvian Amazon, the U.S. and elsewhere using groundbreaking advanced remote-sensing technology including LiDAR, artificial intelligence and satellite imaging. Diego Saez-Gil, a native Argentinian with a graduate degree from Stanford, is a serial Silicon Valley entrepreneur. Pachama is his third company. He got the idea while touring the Peruvian Amazon with his two brothers and witnessing massive deforestation from illegal gold mining. “We all wanted to do something about it,” he said. Image courtesy of Pachama.Microsoft made global headlines in January when it announced that it will become “carbon negative” by 2030, erasing all the company’s greenhouse gas emissions since its founding in 1975 — a move, the tech firm deemed “a bold bet and moonshot” for climate mitigation that in part requires the conservation and restoration of vast swaths of carbon-storing forests.Behind those headlines is a little-known Silicon Valley startup that will be tracking forest carbon stocks in projects around the globe on behalf of Microsoft, using a pioneering array of advanced remote-sensing technology including LiDAR, artificial intelligence and satellite imaging.Pachama, with $4.1 million in early investor backing, will closely monitor verified carbon offset projects to ensure Microsoft’s investment in the global carbon market is actually achieving forest preservation and emission reductions critical to slowing the rate of climate change.“Our goal is to put this technology to the service of making faster, cheaper, and the more reliable issuance of carbon credits involving forests,” said Argentina native Diego Saez-Gil, 37, a serial entrepreneur, environmentalist and Pachama’s founding CEO. “Companies such as Microsoft and many others have been buying other carbon credits. But they stay away from forests because of questions around [project] permanence,” whether actual forest is being preserved, “and lack of trust regarding projects over time.”Saez-Gil, in an exclusive interview with Mongabay, said Microsoft will soon announce its partnership with Pachama. In the meantime, he said the startup is lining up certified forest projects in North and South America that will go toward Microsoft’s initial goal of absorbing part of the 16 million metric tons of carbon it says it will emit in 2020 across its 12-country footprint.“There are a lot of things we’re going to do together with Microsoft,” Saez-Gil said, including monitoring 60,000 hectares (148,263 acres) of intact rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon state of Pará, and an additional 20,000 hectares (49,421 acres) in approved U.S. forest projects across Vermont, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Tennessee and California.“Right now, the bigger ambition with Microsoft is that we can bring them more [forest] projects,” Saez-Gil added. “They have a big volume of carbon offsets that they want to purchase, but there aren’t that many projects, right? So hopefully, we can monitor and onboard new projects. We are a small company, but we have big ambitions to help this large corporation meet its goals and see that the money goes to the right conservation projects.”New England forests in-total, and a small area seen close up. Pachama will be focusing its work for Microsoft at first in the forests of New England, Brazil and Peru. Image courtesy of Pachama.Paris and carbon offsetsA primary mechanism for achieving carbon reduction pledges under the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement is the use of carbon offsets to compensate nations, states and private landowners who agree to keep forests intact in order to preserve their biodiversity and carbon storage capacity. But problems with corrupt landowners, lack of transparency in carbon accounting and meager carbon pricing have kept carbon offsetting — and its broad potential to incentivize forest preservation — from taking off with would-be investors.But the Paris accord recognizes that energy and transportation sector emission reductions will be insufficient for holding global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above a 1900 baseline; the earth has already warmed 1o C (1.8o F). So, to meet Paris commitments, climate action will also require “negative emissions” from landscape-based solutions including carbon sequestration via forest preservation and restoration, to agroforestry, a highly climate- and biodiversity-positive form of agriculture that is estimated to currently sequester 45 gigatons of carbon from the atmosphere, a figure which grows by .75 a year while feeding communities.Pachama works closely with four organizations that certify legitimate forest-based carbon offset projects: the American Carbon Registry, Climate Action Reserve, Verified Carbon Standard, and Gold Standard. A key Pachama goal: enable smaller, private landowners to participate in carbon offsetting to preserve their forests rather than selling off their trees as timber and wood pellets, or allowing forestlands to be used for farming or mineral extraction.Saez-Gil asserts that Pachama’s comprehensive monitoring will be both monthly and rigorous, a standard critical to Microsoft, as the high tech firm has pledged regular reporting and transparency in its carbon offset investments.Pachama will use high tech innovations to meticulously ground-truth forest carbon and monitor verification goals. Drone-mounted LiDAR technology will scan forests in 3-D, from the canopy to the ground, to precisely estimate carbon density per tree. NASA satellite imagery will reveal any major deforestation and other drastic landscape changes. Artificial intelligence and machine learning will be used to analyze satellite images to further estimate carbon storage.If fire, logging or other deforestation reduces the carbon capacity of a particular project, Pachama will report the change immediately to protect Microsoft’s investment and to make sure emission shifts are accurately counted.The company will also work actively to connect verified carbon sequestration projects with corporate carbon investors, and help assure a good carbon price.Microsoft, for example, will pay forest protection projects at the rate of $15 per ton of carbon stored — better than the current global average of about $10 a ton, but a price that will need to rise for greater participation, observers say. Pachama will collect payments from Microsoft and other investors, pay the forest project holder and retain a commission.LiDAR, an aerial forest monitoring technology that uses lasers reflecting on targets, can measure tree height and size, capturing the canopy in incredible detail and converting it to data that can be analyzed for carbon storage. Image courtesy of Pachama.Independent experts cautiously optimisticExperts in carbon accounting and remote sensing voiced cautious optimism about this new private-sector model in which one company makes carbon reduction commitments, then contracts with a second company to assure accurate carbon reporting. Ideally, this results in the slowing of devastating deforestation, especially in critically important tropical and boreal forests.Bill Moomaw, professor emeritus at Tufts University and a global expert in carbon accounting and sustainable development, is especially impressed with Pachama’s use of LiDAR: “It is the eye in the sky that can actually determine not just the actual canopy cover, but also the density of the wood beneath the canopy. This can all be translated into tons of carbon.”While applauding Microsoft’s plan, Moomaw worries that $15 per ton for carbon may not be sufficient as an incentive, except perhaps in poorer regions, like rural Brazil. He also stressed that project selection is key, conserving forests truly threatened with commercial deforestation.“I don’t want to get carried away with [applauding] what this company [Pachama] is trying to do,” Moomaw said. “But the news on climate is so bad every day, and this sounds like a really astounding thing.”Sassan Saatchi, a senior scientist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, is an expert on satellite imaging of global tree cover and carbon stocks. He warned that transparency and verification in reporting will be crucial for Pachama.If it achieves that, Saatchi concluded, the benefits could be worthwhile: “The private sector… can be fast in making observations more accessible to other companies that want to reduce their carbon footprints and mitigate climate impacts. This is Pachama’s role to play and they can play it well.”Banner image caption: A small section of New England forest analyzed using photogrammetry, the science of making reliable measurements via the use of photographs and especially aerial photographs. Image courtesy of Pachama.Justin Catanoso, a regular contributor to Mongabay, is a professor of journalism at Wake Forest University. Follow him on Twitter @jcatanosoFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agroforestry, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Rainforest, Artificial Intelligence, carbon, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Credits, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Finance, Carbon Footprint, Carbon Market, Carbon Offsets, Carbon Sequestration, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, climate finance, Climate Science, data collection, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Carbon, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Land Use Change, LiDAR, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforests, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Saving Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Temperate Forests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests last_img read more

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Hyatt keeping ties with Jamaica table tennis

first_img Table tennis will have a very busy first six months in 2017, which includes the World Championships, and Hyatt wants to ensure they build on the foundation that Lothian’s administration has established. “I look at where my experience could play the biggest factor on or off the table, and my opinion was to step aside now and put more emphasis on helping to get the teams to championships. “We have some compelling events coming up in the next four months, including the world championships and the association even though they are trying very hard and have very good plans the financial climate for all sports is very difficult.. “We qualify the team for division three, and we can’t go because we didn’t have funding. We will be back in division four, so everything we did in Malaysia would count for nothing, so I felt the best of my time was to be as a facilitator for the teams and help the association with funding, not just for this year, but ongoing,” he said. Hyatt has won all national youth titles. He contested eight national finals and won four. He was Caribbean champion in 1996, the same year he and Stephen Hylton took Jamaica to their highest ever world ranking at number 35 playing in division two in 1995 in China. He was also national US collegiate champion in 1991 and played in the 1992 and 1996 Olympics Games. – L.S. Outstanding Jamaican table tennis player, Michael Hyatt, announced his retirement yesterday at a press conference at the Jamaica Table Tennis Association after 31 years in the sport. The former national and regional champion, however, swore to continue his allegiance with the Jamaica Table Tennis Association to assist with the development of the sport as a marketing agent for the Godfrey Lothian administration. Hyatt, who has won all available national youth titles and was four-time senior national champion, told the gathering that being the number-one player for the country at the age of 46 is a burden and he believes his experience will be more useful elsewhere. “It is unusual in any sport for any athlete to play well into their forties. I was very fortunate to play until I was 45, at a high level. But I didn’t stop playing because I wasn’t good enough, but I felt I had other things in the corporate world I wanted to focus on more, and family. “Life changes, and you have different motivations, and if I don’t feel like I can be in my tip-top game in terms of my motivation to give the results Jamaica deserve, then I am not going to do it,” he told The Gleaner. “I felt the time was right. There are some players behind me that just need experience and exposure, and they are definitely capable; they just need help … and the exposure and the opportunity.” BUSY YEARlast_img read more

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Ateneo win, first round loss to NU fuel La Salle’s vengeance

first_imgThere were a couple of things that De La Salle used as motivation when it faced National University in the second round of the UAAP Season 80 women’s volleyball tournament.ADVERTISEMENT Naturally, the Lady Spikers were also eager to get back at the Lady Bulldogs for their first round loss.La Salle lost to the Lady Bulldogs  26-24, 19-25, 22-25, 25-17, 16-14, back on Feb. 18 with NU stretching its win streak to four wins and the Lady Spikers dropping to 3-1.“We had one week to prepare for this so we had this added motivation that we were beaten in our first meeting,” said Kim Dy, who had a game-high 14 points in the second outing, in Filipino. “We told ourselves ‘hey guys we lost to NU in the first round’ and that alone became one of our motivations for this game.”“Of course it has been a trademark of La Salle that we will fight back after we’ve lost against anyone,” added Dy.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew UK plans Brexit celebrations but warns businesses may suffer Carlos defers credit to teammates after taking over for UP Sea turtle trapped in net freed in Legazpi City Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View comments Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Against its fierce rival, La Salle came back from a 21-11 deficit in the third set with a furious 10-0 run, and although the Lady Spikers dropped the period, the sprint unleashed its fighting spirit to grab the match in four.“It was then that we realized that ‘oh my God we can do this and play with the maturity required from us,’” said Baron who had 11 points against the Lady Bulldogs. “We saw that in this game because even though we were down by several points we were able to make a comeback and hold on.”La Salle, despite the commanding third set against NU, had to claw its way in the two sets.NU had a 17-10 lead in the second but the Lady Spikers fought through it with Baron giving them a 21-19 lead off a service ace.Desiree Cheng then finished off the second set with back-to-back kills for La Salle.ADVERTISEMENT Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano GALLERY: Barangay Ginebra back as PBA Governors’ Cup kings Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina LATEST STORIES And those two things made up for one odd combination.The first one was La Salle’s first round victory against Ateneo and the other was the Lady Spikers’ previous loss to the Lady Bulldogs.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkCaptain and reigning league MVP Mary Joy Baron said their win against the Lady Eagles, 25-20, 25-17, 24-26, 25-20, was the game that reminded them why they are worthy of being the UAAP champions.“I think we took the foundation from our great performance against Ateneo because that was when we found out who we are as a team,” said Baron in Filipino Saturday at Filoil Flying V Centre. MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hourslast_img read more

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Large quantity of prohibited items discovered in prisons

first_imgAs the Guyana Prison Service continues to rid contraband items in the State’s penitentiaries, a joint operation was conducted on Saturday during which several prohibited items were unearthed. These include cellular phones, phone chargers, cigarette lighters, a quantity of cannabis, cellphone batteries, a quantity of razor blades, metal spoons and forks, nails clips, construction nails, smoking utensils, improvised weapons, playing cards, sandpaper, broken mirrors, copper wires, scissors, tobacco leaves and earpieces.The searches were conducted by in excess of 200 ranks inclusive of senior officers of the Guyana Police Force, Guyana Defence Force and the Guyana Prison Service.According to the Police Force, there were no incidents during the exercises.Contraband smuggling has long been a perennial problem within the prison system and this is compounded by the fact that both Prison and Police Officers are facilitating the illegal trade, which is said to be a “big business”.While the authorities have been struggling to curb the illegal practice, there has been a breakthrough on the apparent network among rogue prison officers. In fact, only in October, four prison officers were arrested after they smuggled a bottle of rum and a pack of cigarettes into the Lusignan Prison the weekend prior. These officers were subsequently charged and interdicted from duty.In addition, another two ranks found themselves in hot water following the discovery of illegal items at two separate prison facilities.In Berbice, 1032 grams of suspected marijuana and 39 packs of cigarettes were found in the New Amsterdam Prison and a prison officer had admitted to conspiring with inmates to hide the contraband that was thrown over the fence.Meanwhile, another prison officer at the Timehri penitentiary was taken into custody after he was implicated by an inmate regarding the presence of 584 grams of marijuana in the compound.Furthermore, five other prison officers were relieved of their duties back in July after they were fingered in an incident whereby a parcel containing cannabis had been thrown into the Lusignan Prison Holding Bay area.Director of Prisons (ag) Gladwin Samuels had disclosed in September that so far for the year, some 28 prison officers had been dismissed; 11 for facilitating or directly smuggling contraband into the prisons system.The Prisons Director added that there are 12 ranks currently interdicted from duty; nine of whom have been charged either departmentally or criminally for trafficking-related activities.last_img read more

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Man jailed for stabbing girlfriend

first_imgA man, who was charged in February and was granted $80,000 bail for stabbing his girlfriend during an argument was on Tuesday sentenced to 12 months in prison.Eon Layne, 21, was sentenced by Magistrate Rondel Weever at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts after the prosecution proved its case.The charge stated that on January 30, 2019, at King Street, Albouystown, he unlawfully and maliciously wounded, Samantha Harris.According to the prosecution’s case, the two parties reside at the same location where the incident took place and on the day in question, they were arguing when Layne stabbed the Virtual Complaint several times.During the trial, Police Prosecutor Richard Harris presented photos showing the injuries to the victim’s back, neck and head.last_img read more

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Road to Anfield tourney moved to March 17 to accommodate Liverpool legend

first_imgThe one-day event gives Standard Chartered Bank clients and media teams a chance to fight for a ticket to Anfield, the home of Liverpool FC as Capital FM seeks to win the local title for the third time in a row.Capital FM team posing for a Photo in Anfield, Liverpool.Grobbelaar is a former Zimbabwe international footballer who played as a goalkeeper, most prominently for Liverpool FC between 1981 and 1994.The original eccentric genius between the sticks, Bruce will be best remembered for the wobbly-legged penalty heroics which brought Liverpool the 1984 European Cup and inspired Jerzy Dudek to the same feat in Istanbul 21 years later.Bruce played 626 matches for the Reds in a glittering 14-year career in which he established himself as one of the Reds’ greatest ever custodians and also returned six First Division titles, three FA cups and three League cups.Bruce played 626 matches for the Reds in a glittering 14-year career in which he established himself as one of the Reds’ greatest ever custodians and also returned six First Division titles, three FA cups and three League cups. Photo/COURTESYHis brand of showmanship, athleticism and unshakeable confidence ensured he kept hold of his first team place while Fagan and Dalglish were in charge of the Reds.After leaving the Reds for Southampton, Bruce represented Plymouth, Bury, Lincoln, Motherwell, Chesham United and Northwich Victoria, as well as trying his hand at coaching Zimbabwe and managing in South Africa.The 60 year old has been the goalkeeper coach for Ottawa Fury FC of the North American Soccer League since 2014.During his two day stay, Bruce will conduct coaching clinics for select age group teams.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Grobbelaar will be in Kenya next week to attend the finals of the Road to Anfield five -aside football tournament. Photo/COURTESYNAIROBI, Kenya, March 7 – The 2018 Standard Chartered Bank Road to Anfield football tournament that was scheduled for Saturday has been moved to March 17 to accommodate Liverpool FC legend, Bruce David Grobbelaar who will grace the tourney.Grobbelaar will be in Kenya next week to attend the finals of the Road to Anfield five -aside football tournament that will be hosted at the St Mary’s School.last_img read more

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Fatah, Hamas fight each other

first_imgGAZA CITY, Gaza Strip – Violent clashes and mass protests erupted Saturday across the West Bank and Gaza Strip between followers of the militant group Hamas and Fatah rivals, after a Hamas leader accused Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas of treachery. The two sides traded gunfire and hurled stones and firebombs, escalating a fierce power struggle between militant and moderate factions focused on control over Palestinian security forces. Abbas said Saturday he would not allow the accusations to plunge the Palestinians into civil war. The unrest followed the president’s recent moves to take control of all six security forces and Hamas’ response that it would form its own shadow army, made up of militants and headed by a top fugitive Israel has been hunting for years. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventAbbas’ prompt veto of that plan provoked a scathing comment late Friday from ruling Hamas party’s political chief, Khaled Mashaal. “We can understand that Israel and America are persecuting us, and seeking ways to besiege and starve us, but what about the sons of our people who are plotting against us, who are following a studied plan to make us fail,” Mashaal said from his base in Syria, without mentioning Abbas by name. Fatah’s senior leaders promptly accused Mashaal of “igniting and preparing for civil war.” Tens of thousands of party loyalists took to the streets of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, protesting Mashaal’s remarks and demanding an apology. Clashes were ugliest Saturday in Gaza City, where Hamas and Fatah followers traded gunfire and hurled grenades and firebombs. Hundreds of university students threw stones over the wall separating Hamas- and Fatah-run schools. Fifteen people were wounded, two seriously. Later Saturday, hundreds of Fatah activists marched to Gaza’s parliament compound, throwing stones and shattering windows in a government building. Elsewhere across Gaza and the West Bank, tens of thousands of Fatah backers marched through the streets of cities, towns and refugee camps, denouncing Mashaal as a “dirty animal,” setting tires ablaze and waving yellow party flags. In Nablus, Fatah-affiliated gunmen stormed a courthouse, ejected dozens of employees, ordered guards to lock up the building and vowed not to reopen it until Mashaal apologized. Abbas, a peace-seeking moderate whose Fatah party was ousted from power in January elections, has been trying to shore up his already considerable powers to better serve as a counterweight to Hamas’ militantly anti-Israel program. He refused to directly address Mashaal’s comments.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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