What the geckos are telling us: new species point to conservation needs

first_imgBiodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Herps, Interns, New Species, Reptiles, Species Discovery, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Ishan Agarwal describes the Bangalore geckoella and the Rishi Valley geckoella.Discovery expands the C. collegalensis complex from 3 to 5 species.Geckos are found in small areas, including forest reserves which provide little protection. Within the seemingly boundless Mysore Plateau of southern India, the newly-discovered Bangalore geckoella (Cyrtodactylus srilekhae) and Rishi Valley geckoella (Cyrtodactylus rishivalleyensis) pace – centred, unhurried, and only prone to flurries of action when strictly needed.These two nocturnal, ground-dwelling geckos, described in Zootaxa by Dr. Ishan Agarwal, are members of the Cyrtodactylus collegalensis complex – a group of five species that inhabit seasonal forests across southern and western India. Members of this group are small, rarely measuring more than 60 millimetres (about two and a half inches) from snout to vent, and have smooth scales down their backs. The two new species, however, are unique in colour pattern, mitochondrial DNA and morphometric ratios (the ratios of one body measurement to another).The Forest Spotted Gecko/Kollegal Ground Gecko (Cyrtodactylus collegalensis), a member of the Cyrtodactylus collegalensis complex. Species in this complex rarely measure more than 60 millimetres from snout to vent. Photo credit: ISHAN AGARWAL.Agarwal, a biologist at Villanova University, Pennsylvania, first spotted the Bangalore geckoella in 2007. His mother, Srilekha Agarwal, was the inspiration behind its name.“[Her] influence on me ranged from reading me My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell and encouraging (allowing?) me to bring snails from the garden home, to holidays exploring wild places together,” he wrote in an email. “This definitely contributed to my becoming a biologist, and I wanted to honour her with something special.”Aptly, the Bangalore geckoella is found near his mother’s home.When he first spotted the gecko, Agarwal grew excited. But at the time the prevailing belief was that Cyrtodactylus collegalensis was a single widespread species distributed from Mumbai to Southern India, instead of five separate species.The Bangalore geckoella (Cyrtodactylus srilekhae), named after Agarwal’s mother. Her influence contributed greatly to his pursuit of biology. Photo credit: ISHAN AGARWAL.Agarwal also hadn’t begun studying geckos specifically. Many more years of work would follow.In 2010, Agarwal’s colleagues spotted the Rishi Valley geckoella during a weekend trip near Rishi Valley. The location eventually gave the new species its name. But the name is also an homage to Agarwal’s alma mater, Rishi Valley School.Agarwal remains mildly piqued he was not the one to spot the species first, having explored the Rishi Valley before.The process of collecting specimens is rarely a straightforward feat anywhere, and India is no exception. Here, scientists intending to collect specimens are first required to glean various permits from state Forest Departments. Agarwal and his team eventually managed to obtain permits from the Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh Forest Departments – perhaps reflecting the growing inclination of state governments to view scientific research as a key source to how the country manages and conserves its forests.India’s forests are broadly classified into three groups – biosphere reserves, wildlife sanctuaries or national parks, and reserve forests. The British first introduced the concept of reserve forests via the Indian Forest Act of 1878. A complicated process of reservation followed, involving the compensation of pre-existing rights over the proposed reserve forests. To this day, reserve forests are still accorded less protection than their counterparts.Considering that the two newly-discovered gecko species are endemic to extremely small areas – the Rishi Valley geckoella is known from only a single site in reserve forests, while the Bangalore gecko is known from private land and reserve forests – the conservation implications are stark. The discovery of these new gecko species indicates that peninsular India’s reserve forests may be harboring legions of other species endemic to small areas, a vast majority of which could be completely unknown to science.“If a single hill or patch of forest is destroyed by quarrying or development,” Agarwal warned, “we may lose a unique species, found nowhere else.”The Rishi Valley geckoella (Cyrtodactylus rishivalleyensis) is endemic to a single locality, signifying that there may be other undiscovered species, similarly endemic to very small areas in India, which could be wiped out by developmental activity. Photo credit: ISHAN AGARWAL.Citations:Agarwal, I. (2016). Two new species of ground-dwelling Cyrtodactylus (Geckoella) from the Mysore Plateau, south India. Zootaxa, 4193(2), 228. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4193.2.2Macura, B., Zorondo-Rodríguez, F., Grau-Satorras, M., Demps, K., Laval, M., Garcia, C. A., & Reyes-García, V. (2011). Local Community Attitudes toward Forests Outside Protected Areas in India. Impact of Legal Awareness, Trust, and Participation. Ecology and Society, 16(3). doi:10.5751/es-04242-160310center_img Article published by Maria Salazarlast_img read more

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Military base-building destroys coral reefs in the South China Sea

first_imgBiodiversity, Conservation Technology, Coral Reefs, Dredging, Environment, Exclusive, Featured, Fish, Fishing, Islands, Oceans, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Sharks Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored 123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536 read more

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Rwanda welcomes 20 black rhinos to Akagera National Park

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon The 20 black rhinos are of the eastern subspecies (Diceros bicornis michaeli).African Parks, the NGO that manages Akagera National Park in cooperation with the government of Rwanda, says that it has rhino trackers, canine patrols and a helicopter to protect the rhinos from poaching.Fewer than 5,000 black rhinos exist in Africa. Their numbers have been decimated by poaching for their horns, which fetch high prices for use in traditional Chinese medicine.Officials hope that the new rhino population will boost Akagera National Park’s visibility as a ecotourism destination. Twenty rhinos are moving to a new home in Rwanda from South Africa over the next two weeks.The reintroduction will bring the eastern black rhinos (Diceros bicornis michaeli), a subspecies of the IUCN-listed Critically Endangered black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), back to the savannas of Akagera National Park in the eastern part of the African country. There are around 1,000 eastern black rhinos left, according to African Parks, most of which live in Kenya.A female black rhino in East Africa. Photo by Rhett A. Butler“The rhino’s return to this country … is a testament to Rwanda’s extraordinary commitment to conservation and is another milestone in the restoration of Akagera’s natural diversity,” said Peter Fearnhead, the CEO of the nonprofit organization African Parks, in a statement. African Parks manages 10 parks in cooperation with seven countries on the continent.Fewer than 4,900 black rhinos of all subspecies are thought to roam Africa’s plains today, according to IUCN data from 2010. That’s only about 10 percent of what numbers were just a few decades ago. Black rhinos, and their Near-Threatened cousin, the white rhino (Ceratotherium simum), have been hit hard by poachers eager to harvest their valuable horns.Vets shorten the horn of a darted rhino to prevent injury in the translocation. Photo © African ParksA 2013 study in the journal Science cited information showing that the price per kilogram of rhino horn hit $65,000 ($29,545 per pound) in 2012 – or about 60 percent higher than the current price of gold. Made of keratin, the same compound in our hair and fingernails, rhino horn has a long history of usage in traditional Chinese medicine, and growing Asian economies have been blamed for the surge in prices, and as a result, poaching.“Rhinos are one of the great symbols of Africa,” Fearnhead said, “yet they are severely threatened and are on the decline in many places across the continent due to the extremely lucrative and illegal rhino horn trade.”At one time, Akagera supported some 50 black rhinos, but as in many other parts of Africa, their numbers dwindled as poaching increased in subsequent decades. A 2007 sighting marks the last time a rhino was seen in the park.Heartened by the success of the reintroduction of seven African lions (Panthera leo) to Akagera in 2015, park managers and funders of the relocation saw an opportunity for the park to become a sanctuary for one of the continent’s most beleaguered animals.“Several years ago, as we were struggling to have success combating rhino poaching in other parts of Africa, I made a commitment to President [Paul] Kagame [of Rwanda] that we would support the reintroduction of rhinos in Rwanda because we knew this country would protect them,” said Howard Buffett, CEO of the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, in the African Parks statement. The foundation has provided financial backing for the project, as have the government of the Netherlands and the People’s Postcode Lottery based in the UK, which raises money for causes and charities.African Parks says that the measures to counter poaching they have introduced since taking over management of the park in 2010 have cut poaching to “an all-time low.” The lion population is now more than twice what it was in 2015. To keep the new tenants of Akagera safe, they have a helicopter, a canine unit and rhino trackers.With the addition of the rhino, visitors to Akagera National Park now have the chance to see all of Africa’s “big five” game animals, including elephants, pictured here in Akagera in 2014. Photo by John C. Cannon“We are fully prepared to welcome them and ensure their safety for the benefit of our tourism industry and the community at large,” said Clare Akamanzi, the CEO of the Rwanda Development Board, in the release. The Rwanda Development Board shares the management of Akagera with African Parks.With the addition of the rhinoceros, the park now offers visitors the chance to see all “big five” game animals, which also include elephants (Loxodonta africana), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), leopards (Panthera pardus pardus) and lions, in a relatively small area.Akagera National Park is 1,200 square kilometers (463.3 square miles). By contrast, Serengeti National Park in neighboring Tanzania comprises 14,763 square kilometers (5,700 square miles).“The return of the rhinos to Rwanda’s Akagera National Park opens a new chapter in our conservation journey,” Akamanzi said, “and we are grateful to all our partners that contributed to this achievement.”The capture team assists in navigating a tranquilized rhino towards the crate for transport. Photo © African ParksCITATIONBiggs, D., Courchamp, F., Martin, R., & Possingham, H. P. (2013). Legal trade of Africa’s rhino horns. Science, 339(6123), 1038-1039.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Anti-poaching, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Cats, Conservation, Dry Forests, Ecotourism, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Grasslands, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Hunting, Lions, Mammals, Megafauna, Parks, Poaching, Rhinos, Savannas, Tourism, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Camera traps capture elusive ocelots in Peru’s Madre de Dios

first_imgThe ocelot is a particularly important part of the Amazonian ecosystem because it’s a dominant species in the food chain, especially at the mesopredator level.Between 1960 and 1970, Peru’s population of ocelots went through a crisis known as a population bottleneck. Even today, they are sometimes kept as pets or killed for their fur.In addition to the hunting of ocelots, the study highlights the vulnerability of Peru’s Las Piedras District. Although it has some of the most remote forests in Peru, the district is at risk of deforestation and degradation due to the human pressures like logging. MADRE DE DIOS, Peru — It’s opportunistic, it usually doesn’t let itself be seen, and it’s not easy prey for those who hunt it. It is famous for its appearance, and it plays an important role in Amazon ecology. It is the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), also known as the “painted leopard.” Because of its aloof behavior, it is a little-known feline within Peru. However, geographer Romina Castagnino has been able to identify the ecosystems it prefers, its diet, its role in nature, and its ecological value for tourism.Castagnino, who is also part of Mongabay’s Latam team, was able to collect this information thanks to the use of multiple camera traps. Her study was published in the journal Espacio y Desarrollo.The scientific study using camera traps took place between August 2012 and February 2013 in an 11,000-hectare area within the conservation and ecotourism area of the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC). The center is located in the Las Piedras District in northern Tambopata Province, in Peru’s Madre de Dios region.Las Piedras District lies in within the Madre de Dios region of southern Peru. Photo courtesy of Castagnino, 2017. The ARCC refuge sits on the shores of Lake Soledad in Las Piedras, Madre de Dios. Photo by Romina Castagnino.The investigation was able to confirm the presence of 70 ocelots per 100 square kilometers in the area of investigation. This means that the Las Piedras District has the third-highest density of ocelots registered with camera traps in the entire world. “The first place is Barro Colorado Island, a reserve in Panama with 100 ocelots per 100 square kilometers. The second is Manú National Park in Peru, with 80 ocelots per 100 square kilometers. However, we have to remember that the refuge where we did our study isn’t a protected area like Barro Colorado or Manú, so this really brings to the global stage the importance of its conservation,” Castagnino explained.The ocelot is the size of a large dog, with short, soft fur that’s yellow, gold, and gray. Every ocelot has a unique and unrepeated pattern of spots. Ocelots can live in savannahs, swamps, marshes, coniferous forests, and areas with thorny shrubs, Castagnino said. The geographer added that the ocelot’s distribution spans from North America (Texas) through part of Central America, and extends all the way to northern Argentina.A photo of an ocelot, taken at night by a camera trap used in the study.The attitude of a kingCastagnino, along with University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologist Scott Lutz, used 73 Bushnell Trophy Cam camera traps to identify eight individual ocelots. They were able to determine that, although the ocelot does not occupy a specific habitat, a primary requirement for its survival is that it finds an elevation lower than 1,000 meters above sea level. Such areas include tropical and humid forests, which make up part of the area of investigation.The investigation found that most of the ocelots in the Las Piedras refuge are mobilized by the tourist routes in the area, using trails made by humans to facilitate their travel. They also prefer alluvial plains close to riverbanks and lagoons, but they avoid marshes.Castagnino explained that the ocelot is a particularly important part of the Amazonian ecosystem because it’s a dominant species in the food chain, especially at the meso—or “middle”—predator level. “The ocelot feeds on everything: rodents, birds, snakes, lizards, and even small mammals like monkeys. Its presence helps balance the populations of these species. On the other hand, the ocelot is prey to pumas, jaguars, harpy eagles, and anacondas — but these species don’t catch the ocelot very often because it’s a very stealthy animal. That’s why it’s so abundant in the jungle,” Castagnino explained.The researchers placed the camera traps like this at each monitoring site. Photo by Cristina Hara.Locations of camera traps in the study area. Photo courtesy of Casatagnino, 2017.Because of the ocelot’s abundance, added Castagnino, it sometimes affects other mesopredators’ feeding habits, such as those of the jaguarundi (also called the “eyra cat”) and the margay, which both feed on rodents and small mammals.“The ocelot is very opportunistic; it will eat whatever is easiest. If it finds lots of rodents, it will eat them, although there are also other animals that eat them. This negative effect on the feeding habits of other species even has a name in honor of the ocelot: ‘the pardalis effect’,” Castagnino said. A species under threatEven if the ocelot is abundant in the Las Piedras District in Madre de Dios, on a global level it’s listed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Its current conservation status is listed as Least Concern.According to the study, between 1960 and 1970, Peru’s population of ocelots went through a crisis known as a population bottleneck.“It’s called that because the population drastically reduced due to the ocelot fur trade. Even nowadays, people sell their fur and they’re kept as pets. Sometimes they’re even killed because they attack livestock, without a doubt because [some] ranchers raise small mammals, which are what the ocelot eats,” Castagnino said.In addition to the hunting of the ocelot, the study highlights the vulnerability of the Las Piedras District. Although it has one of the most remote forests in Peru, the district is at risk of deforestation and degradation due to the pressure that human activity puts on its ecosystems — such as logging. The researchers found that the biggest threat to the Las Piedras ocelots currently is the destruction of their habitat. An ocelot eats a snake on a path. Photo by Leo Plunkett for Fauna Forever.Another photo of an ocelot taken with a camera trap. Photo courtesy Castagnino, 2017.This study highlights a key aspect of the ocelot’s protection: if its behavior and travel patterns are known, it’s easier to implement better conservation programs.“One of those programs could be animal-watching. These cats are really remarkable. It’s an incredible opportunity. It generates profit for the refuge and helps conserve the ecosystem — everyone wins,” Castagnino said.Camera traps and their role in the studyIn order to conduct the study, Castagnino collaborated with Chris Kirby, Executive Director of Fauna Forever, a non-profit organization that works with the ARCC refuge in Las Piedras.A camera trap used for the study. Photo by Romina Castagnino.“For eight months, we worked on putting the camera traps throughout the area. We had six workers, at best, because the rest were volunteers. There were times, especially when there were untraveled routes or when it rained, when only my teammate Lucy Dablin and I went out to install the camera traps, because then it was harder to explore. It was such an adventure,” Castagnino said.As part of the process, before setting up the camera traps, Castagnino also developed a survey for the visitors of the ARCC refuge to learn which species most interested the tourists.“Those who were able to see an ocelot on their trips were astonished; those who weren’t said they wish they had seen one. I really like wild cats because they’re magnificent — they make their presence known, just like the ocelot. As they say, it’s the king of the jungle,” Castagnino said.Camera traps are ideal for studying wild cats, the study explains, because they’re equipped with an infrared sensor that is activated when an animal passes it. In that instant, the camera trap takes a photo.The researchers set up two camera traps at each sampling point, at a distance of 20 centimeters from the ground. The cameras were placed in a converging position so they could take photos and record video over as much area as possible. In the duration of the study, the researchers made nine rounds to set up the camera traps. They set up an average of eight cameras each time.“During our time in the field, we installed the eight cameras and left them for eight to nine days. Later, we would go collect them, transfer the information to laptops, and recharge the batteries. After that, we would go back out to the field for the next round,” Castagnino said. “What’s great is that the cameras can take photos and videos during the day and at night. The ocelot is most active during the day, but it goes out at night to hunt because it’s much easier then — the nighttime turns the ocelot into a covert hunter.”Lucy Dablin installs a camera trap. Photo by Romina Castagnino.Researchers Romina Castagnino (in turquoise jacket) and Lucy Dablin (dark green jacket), crossing a lake to install camera traps. Photo by Cristina Hara.Citation:Castagnino Vera, R. (2017). ESTUDIO ECOLÓGICO DEL OCELOTE (LEOPARDUS PARDALIS) UTILIZANDO EL MÉTODO DE CÁMARAS TRAMPA EN EL DISTRITO DE LAS PIEDRAS, MADRE DE DIOS, PERÚ. Espacio y Desarrollo, (29).Disclaimer: Study author Romina Castagnino is a Mongabay staff member. This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on June 1, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Camera Trapping, Cats, Ecotourism, Environment, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Logging, Mammals, Predators, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Research, Timber, Tourism, Tropical Forests, Wildlife last_img read more

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Trade in wild birds going ‘unchecked’ in Vietnam: new report

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Pet Trade, Research, Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The number of species and volume of birds being sold in Vietnam’s cities has increased since 2008, a new report by TRAFFIC has found.Nearly all the birds that the team recorded were native to Vietnam, and have no regulations governing their trade under Vietnamese legislation.This lack of protection is worrying, researchers say, because it could mean that large numbers of birds are being extracted from the wild with no knowledge about how severely it will impact wild populations. Thousands of birds, suspected to have been caught from the wild, are being sold openly in Vietnam, according to a new report by TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network.Many of the species on sale are threatened with extinction, warns the report.In April 2016, researchers from TRAFFIC surveyed bird vendors — both shops and mobile sellers on motorcycles — in Ha Noi and Ho Chi Minh City, two of Vietnam’s largest cities. Over just a period of three days, they recorded more than 8,000 birds of 115 species for sale.Mobile sellers on motorcycles peddling birds. Photo by James Eaton / TRAFFIC.Of these, the scaly-breasted munia (Lonchura punctulata) and red-whiskered bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus) were the most common birds on display. The researchers also recorded nearly 500 birds of nine species that are currently listed as threatened or near threatened on the IUCN Red List.The red-breasted parakeet (Psittacula alexandri), for example, was the fourth most common species on display during the survey. Until 2012, this bird was considered to be under no immediate risk of extinction (listed as Least Concern), but its populations have suffered “moderately rapid decline” due to trapping for the bird trade, according to the IUCN, raising its threat levels to “near threatened” on the Red List. Other threatened birds that were on sale included the endangered sun parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis), the chattering lory (Lorius garrulus avopalliatus) and the Java sparrow (Lonchura oryzivora).The report also found that the number of species and volume of birds for sale has increased since 2008. Songbirds are particularly popular, the researchers noted, their trade likely driven by songbird competitions that are popular across several countries in Southeast Asia.Juvenile red breasted parakeet for sale in Ha Noi, Vietnam. Photo by James Eaton / TRAFFIC.Nearly all the birds that the team recorded were native to Vietnam. About 90 percent of these birds have no regulations governing their trade under Vietnamese legislation, suggesting that the trade is going unchecked, the report noted.“The survey findings are consistent with a thriving demand for native birds within Vietnam,” Kanitha Krishnasamy, Acting Regional Director for TRAFFIC in Southeast Asia, said in a statement. “However, as trade in most of the species seen is not regulated by law, it means large numbers of birds are being extracted with no oversight of sustainability or how severely it will impact wild populations.”Even when a species is protected under the national law, enforcement remains weak, the researchers write, largely because law enforcement officers lack the skills to identify bird species correctly.To ensure that the bird trade does not harm wild populations, monitoring and regulation of the trade needs to improve, the researchers add. This would include strengthening the current Vietnamese legislation, as well as updating and reassessing the country’s protected species list. In particular, the report calls for including species that are at risk of extinction, including those listed as threatened in the IUCN Red List, to be added to Vietnam’s protected species list.“TRAFFIC stands ready to support Vietnamese authorities in any effort to review and strengthen current regulations,” said Madelon Willemsen, Head of TRAFFIC’s Viet Nam Office. “We will continue to provide information on the levels of bird trade in Viet Nam. This critical knowledge will help to identify the need and urgency to adjust policies and regulations so that Viet Nam meets its international commitments on conserving biodiversity.”Silver eared mesias for sale in Ha Noi. Photo by James Eaton / TRAFFIC.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Flying Miracle to rebound

first_imgWith the fancied horses having held their own at Caymanas Park last Saturday, both the Pick-9 and Super-6s start anew with guaranteed minimums of $1 million and $750,000 respectively.The Pick-9 will embrace all nine races on the card, the first Super-6 from race two to seven, the late Super-6 from race four to nine.We look at the first Super-6 which gets under way with a maiden special weight over 1500 metres for native-bred three-year-olds which should see PIANO MAN, PROUD PRESIDENT and MCCALLAN in serious contention at the end. The latter caught the eye when finishing a close second (running on) to VISION OF GOLD over 1200 metres on his debut last Saturday and will be better for the experience.Preference, however, is for the Philip Feanny-trained colt PIANO MAN, who was all the rage (4-5) on his debut in October, but dissipated his chances by rearing badly at the start, finishing 16 lengths fifth to the impressive fast-time winner DREAMING THE CODE over 1100 metres. Having impressed at exercise coming into this race, PIANO MAN should recoup losses with Orlando Foster now called up for the ride.DREALINLER, one of the top two-year-olds last season by virtue of winning the $2.95 million Cash Pot Only One For Me Trophy at 1200 metres on October 19, gets the nod over the speedy pair of BUBBLING KITTEN and ZUGULU in the next race for three-year-olds and up over 1100 metres.ABOVE THE RADAR and PERFECT FLYER, both runaway winners over 1820 metres in recent weeks, should fight out the finish of the fourth race over the same distance for $250,000 claimers.With ABOVE THE RADAR having achieved his win on a $325,000 claiming tag, the seven-year-old gelding (Walker up) from the stables of Lawrence Freemantle gets the nod over PERFECT FLYER and WATER WAVE.STrong runFLYING MIRACLE, who ran on very strongly to win over 1400 metres on Boxing Day, this on a $450,000 claiming tag, should resume winning ways with the improving apprentice Dane Dawkins aboard in the fifth race (fourth in Super-6) over 1500 metres for $350,000- $300,000 claimers.Trained by Victor Williams, the six-year-old gelding wasn’t disgraced in better company when finishing third to out of class BOLD AVIATOR over a mile on a $450,000 claiming tag on New Year’s Day and should rebound in this easier spot ahead of BRAVE PROSPECT and DOC HOLIDAY.FIRST SUPER-6 FANCIES(2) PIANO MAN/MACALLAN(3) DREAMLINER/BUBBLING KITTEN(4) ABOVE THE RADAR/PERFECT FLYER(5) FLYING MIRACLE(6) SPEEDY PROCESS/GENUINE FRIEND(7) STERRI’S CHOICE/ROSY PARKSlast_img read more

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Alarm over mass vulture poisoning in South Africa

first_imgFifteen white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus) and a young lappet-faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos) have died after feeding on a poison-laced impala carcass in northern Zululand on 23 Dec — the fourth such incident in the province in 2019.The heads and feet had been removed from 13 of the dead birds, their bodies concealed in thick bush: experts warn that deliberate poisoning of vultures for belief-based use is on the increase in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal province.More than 1,200 vultures were deliberately poisoned across Southern and Eastern Africa this year, according to the Endangered Wildlife Trust. DURBAN, South Africa — Another mass vulture poisoning incident has ended the year on a sour note for Wildlife ACT rangers in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal.Soon after releasing two rehabilitated vultures, rescued from a different poisoning scene earlier this year, WildLife ACT was alerted to another incident on 23 Dec, on Rolling Valley Ranch, located between Pongola and Mkuze in the far north of the province.“Arriving at a scene like this with everything so fresh, but too late to assist in saving any poisoned birds is heartbreaking. Losing one vulture is always a tragedy. Losing at least 16 birds at one feeding is a crisis,” said PJ Roberts, manager of Wildlife ACT’s Emergency Response Team.Wildlife ACT works closely with Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, local farmers and communities, and other conservation groups to protect three endangered vulture species in KwaZulu-Natal.The first bird found, a white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), hinted at Roberts’s worst fears: “It had a full crop (still containing undigested food), contorted feet and many dead flies were scattered around its remains — all clear signs of fast-acting poison.”The team swept the area, but it took an aerial search to locate more victims. “We landed to find the devastating remains of multiple birds hidden at the base of the tree. Included in this discovery was the removed, yellow, wing tags of H065; a young lappet-faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos) tagged in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in October 2017 as a fledgling,” said Roberts.“No more than 30m away, the morbid discovery of 13 processed and harvested white-backed vultures, with their heads and feet removed, were found very purposefully hidden in a thick bush,” added Roberts.Wildlife ACT response team with the bodies of 13 white-backed vultures, poisoned for the traditional medicine trade. Image courtesy Wildlife ACT.Nearby was the body of an impala — snared, killed, and laced with poison. The rangers burned all the contaminated carcasses to ash to remove the poison from the ecosystem.It is the fourth vulture poisoning incident in northern Zululand this year, bringing the total recorded number of vultures harvested for body parts in this region alone to 53. The actual number of birds killed is believed to be much higher as many incidents are never detected.The Endangered WildLife Trust’s (EWT) Vultures for Africa Programme manager, Andre Botha, said it was difficult to quantify how many vultures are deliberately poisoned for body parts.According to records kept by EWT, more than 1,200 vultures have been deliberately poisoned in Southern and Eastern Africa this year. Culprits include poachers who poison the carcasses of elephant and other game in an apparent effort to conceal illegal activities from rangers. These poisonings are referred to as “sentinel poisonings”, as vultures circling over poached animals alert rangers to the killings.Africa’s vulture populations have already declined by an average 62 percent over the past three decades — with seven species crashing by 80 percent. Experts recently warned that the continent’s vulture populations face the prospect of collapsing, in much the same way as vulture species did in Asia thirty years ago.In the early 1990s, millions of Asian vultures died after eating the remains of cows in carcass dumps; India has 500 million cows raised for milk, but not eaten by the majority Hindu population. Scientists identified the culprit: diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory used by vets. Vultures feeding on carcasses containing the drug died swiftly of kidney failure.The reasons for the African vulture crisis are vastly different. They include habitat loss, ingestion of lead ammunition, collisions with power lines, accidental drownings in farm water reservoirs, and the use of poisoned bait by livestock owners to kill predators like jackals. Vultures feeding off the carcasses subsequently die, often in significant numbers.But many more are poisoned deliberately to harvest body parts for belief-based use.“The vultures are killed for their heads and feet and other parts,” said Chris Kelly, a species director at Wildlife ACT. “This is definitely the single biggest threat to diminishing vulture populations in this province,” said Kelly.In many parts of Africa, vultures are believed to have psychic powers, including an ability to see into the future.According to a fact sheet from EWT, the brains of the bird are dried, rolled and smoked as joints or simply burnt and the fumes inhaled. Users believe this improves their odds when they gamble on the lottery or place bets on sport. Students take it when preparing for exams. Other reported uses of vultures include consuming their eyes to improve eyesight, their beaks for protection, or their feet to heal fractured bones or make a person run faster.In 2014, EWT estimated that 130,000 traders, hunters and traditional healers were operating in South Africa. This figure is believed to have increased, sparking calls from conservationists, environmental scientists and wildlife experts at this year’s Conservation Symposium for an awareness-building campaign to reduce this consumption and demand for vulture parts.“Vultures provide critically important ecosystem services by cleaning up carcasses thus reducing the spread of dangerous diseases such as anthrax and rabies and resulting in highly significant economic and human health benefits,” said Brent Coverdale, an animal scientist for Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife at the symposium.  “We really can’t afford to lose them.”As vultures are protected by law, it is illegal to possess or kill any of the six vulture species found in South Africa. Nevertheless, deliberate killings continue.Roberts said the latest poisoning incident had been reported to local police.“We are hoping this leads to an arrest,” said Roberts.  “If the illegal harvest of these birds is not halted, then extinction may be just around the corner and the services that they provide within the ecosystem will be lost forever.”As part of a bid to save vulture populations, managers of conservation areas and private game reserves in South Africa are collaborating to create safe havens for existing vulture populations.— additional reporting, Mlu Mdletshe, Roving Reporters.Poisoned vulture: more than 1,200 vultures have been deliberately poisoned in Southern and Eastern Africa in 2019. Image courtesy Wildlife ACT.CitationOgada, D., Shaw, P., Beyers, R. L., Buij, R., Murn, C., Thiollay, J. M., … Sinclair, A. R. E. (2015). Another continental vulture crisis: Africa’s vultures collapsing toward extinction. Conservation Letters, 9(2), 89-97. doi:10.1111/conl.12182 Animals, Birds, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Poaching, Poisoning, Raptors, Scavengers, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Fred Kockott is the founding director of Roving Reporters, a journalism training agency that focuses on environmental, social and justice issues.Banner image: Burning a poisoned white-backed vulture carcass. Image courtesy Wildlife ACT.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by terna gyuse Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Rare plant species are especially vulnerable to climate change, and rarity is more common than previously understood

first_imgResearchers from around the world spent 10 years compiling a database that now includes 20 million observational records of plant species occurrence, which they say is the largest dataset on botanical biodiversity ever created.They found that there are about 435,000 unique land plant species on planet Earth, and that a large fraction of them, 36.5% or some 158,535 species, can be considered “exceedingly rare,” meaning that they have only been observed and recorded anywhere in the world up to five times. In fact, 28.3% of the world’s plants, or 123,149 species, have been observed just three times or less, per the study.The research team found that rare species are clustered in a handful of rarity hotspots, and that global warming and the impacts of human land use are already disproportionately impacting the regions that harbor most of these rare plant species. Rare plant species are far more likely to go extinct than common species, yet we know surprisingly little about global species abundance.Most efforts to quantify species abundance focus on local communities, according to the authors of a study published late last year in the journal Science Advances, which limits our ability to accurately assess plant rarity.“Fortunately, with the rapid development of biodiversity databases and networks in the past decade, it is becoming increasingly possible to quantify continental and global patterns of biodiversity and test competing models for the origin and maintenance of these patterns at a global scale,” according to the authors of the study, a research team led by Brian Enquist, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona.The study was published to coincide with the UN climate negotiations that took place in Madrid, Spain last month.Enquist and co-authors from around the world spent 10 years compiling a database that now includes 20 million observational records of plant species occurrence, which they say is the largest dataset on botanical biodiversity ever created. Their goal is for that information to be used to inform conservation strategies that take the effects of climate change into account and help reduce global biodiversity loss.The researchers found that there are about 435,000 unique land plant species on planet Earth, and that a large fraction of them, 36.5% or some 158,535 species, can be considered “exceedingly rare,” meaning that they have only been observed and recorded anywhere in the world up to five times. In fact, 28.3% of the world’s plants, or 123,149 species, have been observed just three times or less, per the study.Credit: Patrick R. Roehrdanz, Moore Center for Science, Conservation International Data. From Enquist et al. (2019). doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaz0414“According to ecological and evolutionary theory, we’d expect many species to be rare, but the actual observed number we found was actually pretty startling,” Enquist said in a statement. “There are many more rare species than we expected.”The research team found that rare species are clustered in a handful of rarity hotspots, including Costa Rica, Madagascar, the Northern Andes in South America, South Africa, and Southeast Asia. From a climatological perspective, these regions remained relatively stable as Earth’s last ice age ended, the researchers found, which is what allowed rare species to survive in those locations.However, a stable climate past is no guarantee of a stable climate future. Enquist and team discovered that global warming and the impacts of human land use are already disproportionately impacting the regions that harbor most of these rare plant species. Thus, their estimates of global species abundance distributions have important implications for assessing extinction risks and planning conservation interventions.“Ultimately, rare species, by definition, are more prone to reductions in population size and extinction and should be high priorities for conservation,” the researchers write in the study. “Our results suggest that redoubling global efforts to conserve rare species is needed and that we have a closing window to do so. The tools to ensure that these rare species are maintained are area-based conservation and solutions to climate change.”Specifically, the researchers suggest that the Convention on Biological Diversity should recognize these areas as critical to conserving all life on Earth and target rarity hotspots for conservation as protected areas are expanded post-2020. They add that, because the UN climate convention “seeks to avoid extinctions due to the exceedance of species’ natural ability to adapt to climate change,” and regions with high numbers of rare species also appear to have “very high future-to-historic velocities of climate change,” conserving rarity hotspots is “yet another reason” we need to aggressively rein in global greenhouse gas emissions.The researchers conclude: “Joint climate and biodiversity efforts should be made to ensure that these numerous but little-known species, living in unusual climatic circumstances, persist into the future.”A hybrid of Encephalartos woodii, a rare species that is extinct in the wild, with E. natalensis. Photo by tato grasso, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5.CITATION• Enquist, B. J., Feng, X., Boyle, B., Maitner, B., Newman, E. A., Jørgensen, P. M., … & Couvreur, T. L. (2019). The commonness of rarity: Global and future distribution of rarity across land plants. Science Advances, 5(11), eaaz0414. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaz0414FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Big Data, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extinction, Environment, Global Warming, Mapping, Plants, Research, Saving Species From Extinction, Technology And Conservation center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

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Wimbledon : le rêve prend fin pour la sensation Cori Gauff

first_imgL’incroyable épopée s’est donc terminée. Logiquement. Après ses trois premiers tours, le public s’était pourtant mis à rêver de voir cette jeune joueuse native d’Atlanta, totalement inconnue avant cette quinzaine, sortie des qualifications, prolonger son aventure. LQ/AFP Mais la marche était trop haute face à une ex-n°1 mondiale, bien plus habituée que la jeune novice à ce stade de la compétition. Plus solide, plus régulière, la Roumaine a parfaitement gêné Coric Gauff, qui s’est retrouvée sans solution. Entrée fracassante Partagercenter_img Mais malgré son élimination, Cori Gauff a réalisé une entrée fracassante sur la scène mondiale, elle qui n’avait jusqu’ici remporté qu’un seul match sur le circuit principal en mars à Miami. Le rêve a pris fin. La jeune Américaine Cori Gauff, 15 ans, n’ira pas plus loin à Wimbledon, battue lundi en 8e de finale par l’ex-n°1 mondiale Simona Halep 6-3, 6-3. Depuis, tout le monde convoite cette jeune prodige. Le Luxembourg Open a notamment fait part de son souhait d’inviter l’Américaine sur une prochaine édition.last_img read more

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Big punchers in big showdown

first_imgTwo hard-hitting Jamaican boxers, Ramel ‘Sub Zero’ Lewis and Michael Gardener, will clash tonight in the first quarter-final bout of the Wray and Nephew 2016 Contender series at the Chinese Benevolent Association auditorium. The tournament that started on March 10 with 16 boxers, has now been whittled down to eight and the winners in this segment will all be guaranteed one of the top financial prizes. These are $2 million to the champion, $500,000 to the runner-up, $250,000 for third place and $200,000 for fourth. Lewis is a veteran of the Contender series and reached the finals as a welterweight in 2012, where he lost to Donovan ‘Police’ Campbell. In his first appearance this year against Fard Muhammad, he showed touches of brilliance, but also the ill effects of a nearly two-year absence from the ring. He won that fight by technical knockout, when Muhammad, a veteran in Mixed Martial Arts, made his debut as a professional boxer. He caught Muhammad with some good punches, but took some himself and was wild at times. He has to improve a lot tonight if he is to win. He acknowledged his weaknesses after that fight and vowed to do better next time around. That next time is tonight and he will be going up against a formidable opponent. In his first fight in the competition, Gardener, who was making his professional debut, was composed going up against American Jose Guzman and his punishing body attacks allowed him to win by knockout in the second round. He is very confident for tonight’s fight and has promised more of what he produced against Guzman. Punching power and stamina will undoubtedly be the two main ingredients tonight and it is obvious that both men are coming into the fight in an attacking mode. It will only be over five rounds, but that will be plenty of time for both men to put their boxing skills and punching power on display. Spectators should therefore have a lot to cheer about, for as long as the fight lasts. The programme starts at 8:30 p.m. and the main bout, which will be broadcast live on TVJ, is scheduled for 9:30.last_img read more

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