Displaced by Brazil’s giant Belo Monte hydroelectric dam, ‘river people’ reoccupy reservoir

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Amazon Rainforest, Dams, Energy, Forests, Hydropower, Indigenous Peoples, Rivers Thousands who once lived near the Xingu River have been mostly relocated and compensated, but some refuse to go and have taken back territory by reoccupying the Belo Monte Dam reservoir.Overall, tens of thousands of people have been displaced by the dam, which was finished in 2015.Locals known as ‘river people’ are in the process of resettling the area near the reservoir, with over 100 people currently living there. ALTAMIRA, Brazil – All is not quiet on Brazil’s western frontier. Families that were displaced from their homes on the Xingu River, which was blocked to make way for the controversial Belo Monte dam, are undertaking an audacious step to restore their way of life: They are reoccupying the riverbanks along the dam’s 200-square-mile reservoir. Belo Monte is the third largest hydroelectric project in the world.As of February 2017, there were over 100 people occupying the reservoir. They have publicly declared that they are in the process of resettling the area.The Xingu River is a 1,200-mile tributary of the Amazon River and is at the heart of the lives and homes of thousands of indigenous and various forest-dwelling communities.The reoccupation action started after a November 2016 meeting when hundreds of locals assembled in the northern Amazonian city of Altamira (news is often slow to travel outside of Brazil). Altamira served as a staging area during the dam’s construction. At the meeting, local fisherman known as “river people” (ribeirinhos) and indigenous communities condemned Norte Energia, the consortium behind the multibillion-dollar dam project for what they claim is an unsuccessful compensation scheme and a failure to listen to their concerns.Norte Energia has strenuously denied claims of a failed compensation scheme, as previously reported by Mongabay.The Belo Monte megadam, Pará state, northwestern Brazil. The dam cut off the Xingu River and reduced its flow by 80 per cent, December 2016. Photo by Maximo Anderson for MongabayCrews finished construction of the dam and filled the reservoir in 2015, though turbines are still being built. In total, the Belo Monte complex has displaced about 20,000 people, according to estimates by global nonprofits such as International Rivers. The Brazilian advocacy group Xingu Vivo has put the number much higher, at over 50,000.In the first two years of construction Altamira’s population surged to well over 100,000 and millions of dollars poured into the city, but the city now has seen a spike in joblessness and violence. A month after construction ended, 20,000 workers were laid off, and the economy in Altamira fell 52 percent, according to local reports on the news site Amazonia.More than 800 people attended the November public assembly, organized by the public prosecutor’s office of Altamira, which addressed the social and environmental impacts of the 11,000-megawatt dam.Representatives of Norte Energia and IBAMA were present. IBAMA is Brazil’s environmental authority and the licensing body of the project. It maintains a permanent channel of conversation with FUNAI (Brazil’s Indian Affairs Department) for any matters related to indigenous people.There were also organizations supporting communities adversely affected by the dam. They included the Socio-Environmental Institute (ISA), the local advocacy group Xingu Vivo, and the Brazilian Society for the Progress of Science (SBPC), among others. The ISA is a Brazilian nonprofit civil society organization that works on socially responsible solutions to environmental challenges.During the meeting, a group representing over 300 families of ribeirinhos (river people) displaced by Belo Monte announced that its members intended to resettle along the shores of the reservoir. They also announced the formation of a “river peoples’ committee” to fight against Norte Energia and lobby for adequate compensation.“Norte Energia will try and divide us, but we must resist,” said Gilmar Gomes, a representative of the ribeirinhos’ committee.Change in statureLocal ribeirinho families, some of which now occupy the Belo Monte reservoir, are known as “river people” because they live along the rivers and survive largely by fishing.They have a shared history going back more than 100 years when the rubber boom opened up Brazil’s Amazonian interior to settlers that included their parents and grandparents. Over time, they have developed their own unique customs and means of living. Until recently, being called a ribeirinho was a pejorative term, and it was used as a slur.The Ribeirinhos’ Committee selects its representatives at its first official meeting in the city of Altamira, December 2016. Photo by Maximo Anderson for MongabayCrucially, they are now recognized as a social group with a specific way of life. Before, they were simply seen as fishermen, explains Ana de Francisco, 34, an anthropologist contracted by ISA who researches ribeirinho communities.“[Now] that is just an economic term,” de Francisco said. She explained that reducing them to mere “fishermen” is a way to deny their history. “It says nothing about their way of life,” she added. Now, ribeirinhos are working to reclaim the term, as well as the river, rebuilding homes along the shores of the reservoir.Compensation claims and future plansThousands of families affected by the dam have been compensated and relocated. But many – including anthropologists, health experts and lawyers who have accompanied the process – argue that compensation was incomplete or non-existent.There have also issues at the federal level with the basic functions of the project. Since 2014, Belo Monte has had its operating license suspended several times by Brazil’s environmental authority, IBAMA, for failing to comply with its agreed-to compensation scheme.Norte Energia has been accused of using only 28 percent of the resources set aside to compensate those affected by the dam, according to the ISA.In response to a request for comment on the ribeirinho committee and resettlement process Norte Energia said it remains in contact with community leaders.“On a semi-annual basis, the company reports its activities in the socio-environmental area to IBAMA,” the company said in an emailed statement. However, Norte Energia did not comment specifically on the reoccupation or the ribeirinhos’ committee.For the ribeirinhos, returning to their old way of life will present huge challenges; since the river was dammed, fish stocks have plummeted.“This is going to take years, many years,” ISA’s de Francisco said. “It will take at least five years for the fish to come back … they are going back to a lake, to a totally new environment. So they will have to adapt. The question of how they will divide themselves on the land, how they will reconnect as neighbors and they will produce is a big question.”Hydropower’s impactHydropower makes up about 80 percent of Brazil’s energy production, according to the International Energy Agency. Though it is often touted as a green solution to energy concerns, the scientific community largely sees it as an environmentally and socially damaging way to generate energy. It can significantly impact natural habitats, land use and homes in the area of the dam. Though the number displaced by Belo Monte pales in comparison to the Three Gorges Dam in China, the world’s largest – which displaced over 1.2 million people – it has had a devastating impact on the local ecosystem of this remote jungle region and the people that depend on it.The construction of the dam has also come at a time when changing weather patterns appear to be impinging on the livelihoods of people in the region. Ribeirinhos report hotter and drier seasons, which affect the river’s fish populations they rely on.Brazil’s hydropower accounts for about 80 percent of its energy production. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2016Recent scientific research on the Xingu River points to climate change as a possible cause. Brazil-based biologist Cristian Costa Carneira confirmed the changes in a recent interview. Carneira, who researches aquatic fauna, is part of an ongoing study under the auspices of the Federal University of Pará that measures the effects of manmade climate change on the Xingu River in Pará.“We are seeing extremes in weather that are very abnormal,” said Carneira.Separately, Norte Energia is in the first year of a required six-year study to measure the environmental and social impacts of Belo Monte and to determine if indigenous and fishing communities can continue to live downriver from the dam. There isn’t any published research yet because it is an ongoing study.Lives forever changedAt the November ribeirinho meeting in Altamira, the scientific advocacy organization SBPC gave a 400-page report they produced on the dam’s social impact to the public prosecutor. Though the report is not available online, Mongabay has obtained a copy. Based on three months of field research, it claims that Norte Energia has effectively ended the ribeirinhos’ way of life and means of subsistence.The report states: “With the forced displacement of the ribeirinho communities, they lost their territory, access to the natural environment and resources that they relied on for their livelihood and income, which means that they were robbed of the conditions that guaranteed their social and cultural reproduction … When they were displaced they began to buy practically all foodstuffs, living in a situation (of) food insecurity.”The report also points out that the ribeirinhos were dealt a first blow when their homes were destroyed and then a second one with the chaotic implementation of its compensation scheme. The report called on the company to immediately change its course and implement a compensation scheme that follows the report’s guidelines.A flooded forest in the reservoir of the Belo Monte dam, December 2016. Photo by Maximo Anderson for MongabayA major issue stressed in the guidelines for the company to respect is the International Labour Organisation’s convention of “self-recognition” of traditional peoples, of which Brazil is a signatory.Norte Energia was accused of using a “divide and conquer” strategy to move them out of their homes before they were flooded. They were dealt with individually and given “all or nothing” ultimatums before being resettled to neighborhoods on the outskirts of Altamira or onto inadequate alternative land, according to the study. Others were moved onto their neighbors’ land, or next to mega-ranches, which could sow conflict in a region that is already beset with land-related violence and land theft. Land rights in Brazil’s interior have often been acquired through “grilhagem” – the falsification of land titles.Meanwhile others that were displaced did not have the necessary documentation to receive any compensation at all.The report also called on the company to provide the financial means for them to rebuild their homes in order to return to their way of life, while assuring they have access to essential public services.“This council should have been formed years ago, even before Belo Monte was built,” said Thais Santi of the public prosecutor’s office in Altamira, who is providing legal assistance for the case. One of the first steps necessary to move things forward, Santi explained, is for IBAMA to recognize the council.Banner image: The Belo Monte megadam, Pará state, northwestern Brazil. The dam cut off the Xingu River and reduced its flow by 80 per cent, December 2016. Photo by Maximo Anderson for MongabayMaximo Anderson is a freelance journalist and photographer currently based in Colombia. You can find him on Twitter at @MaximoLamarFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Background:Fearnside, Philip M. (2017). Brazil’s Belo Monte Dam: Lessons of an Amazonian resource struggle. Die Erde. Geographical Society of Berlin.International Energy Outlook 2016. U.S. Energy Information Administration.End of Belo Monte works highlights unemployment in southwestern Pará, Amazonia, June 30, 2016Belo Monte becomes reality, but chaos in the city of the plant is forever, Folha de S.Paulo, March 20, 2016Juruna block Transamazon to collect projects for Belo Monte, Amazonia, June 30, 2016Documentary shows impacts of Belo Monte Hydroelectric plant for local population, Agência Brasil, October 10, 2016Murder of Brazil official marks new low in war on Amazon environmentalists, The Guardian, October 24, 2016center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Fighting climate change with compassion, one letter at a time

first_imgDearTomorrow cofounders hope to inspire climate action today by having people write letters their children will open in 2050.The initiative seeks to make climate change more pressing by imagining what the world will be like in three decades.Anyone can write a letter – and Kubit and Shrum have made sure their program accepts people with different political, religious or cultural beliefs. What can you do that transcends climate policy and unites us all in a better, more resilient future? Imagine writing a letter to your children about climate change that they’ll open in the year 2050. What would you want them to know about this pivotal moment in history?Jill Kubit and Trisha Shrum are moms, environmentalists, and cofounders of DearTomorrow, a project that invites people to compose letters, photos, or videos to the children in their lives, to be made available for them to read when they grow up. Anyone can participate.As Kubit says, “I like to think that in 2050 the world looks very different, but it’s not just negative, it’s also positive in terms of better health outcomes, switching away from fossil fuels, livable cities…” In addition to letters written to kids and grandkids, they have letters that are written to “future selves” and also sometimes to nieces, nephews, students, future generations, communities, and more (see Jill’s TED Talk here).Shrum and Kubit co-founded DearTomorrow with the goal of engaging people on the topic of climate change through the universal values of family, love, and legacy, and hope to generate 10,000 messages that reach more than 20 million people.AN INTERVIEW WITH TRISHA SHRUM AND JILL KUBITKayla Walsh for Mongabay: What motivated you to start DearTomorrow?Trisha Shrum: Two and a half years ago, I went to a climate and energy conference in Iceland to give a talk on how to leverage insights from behavioral economics to broaden support for climate change policies: how do we get beyond the idea that climate change is distant, vague, and unconnected with our day-to-day lives?With those ideas swimming in my head, the words from another talk sparked the idea of DearTomorrow. Christiana Figueres, the head of the UNFCCC climate negotiations, ended her speech with a powerful story of a dream she had where the children of the future look at her and ask, “You knew about climate change. What did you do about it?” On the plane ride home, I wondered what I would someday tell my own daughter, who was ten.Jill Kubit, cofounder and director of DearTomorrow (left) and cofounder Trisha Shrum (right). Photo Credits: Mustafa Onder and Matt Nager respectively.On the flight home, this question echoed in my mind. I wanted my daughter to know what I did. And how I felt. And what I had not yet done. So I opened my laptop and wrote her a letter. When I wrote that letter, I realized that to my daughter, I am not small and powerless. To her, I am the most powerful person in the world and it is my job to protect her. While I wrote, it hit me. This could be the answer to my question I explored in my talk. Looking back from the future might reduce our problem of global procrastination. Parental love is a universal value with a uniquely empowering frame. Writing and sharing letters like these could reach and activate millions.When I got back home, I met Jill Kubit and together we created DearTomorrow. We’ve gained amazing traction as people feel the unique power of this project.Jill Kubit: I’ve been working on climate change since around 2006 and for the first seven or eight years I basically worked in the trade union movement on climate change… A lot of the work was around building bridges between organizations, doing coalition building…. I’ve always had this sort of people-centered understanding of climate change. I would hear that we need to make this [energy] transition by the year 2020 or 2030 or 2050 but I always thought those years or timeframes were really far in the future – until I had my own kids.I have a son; he was born in 2013 and when I had him I really started to think about those years and the transitions we have to make in a much more personal way. I got involved in [DearTomorrow] at the end of 2014 and I wrote my letter to my son in the spring of 2015.  In 2020 he would be in first grade. In 2030 he would graduate high school and then in 2050 he would be about the age that I was when I started this project. I thought about the types of changes we needed to make and the short timescale in which we needed to make them…In thinking about climate change through my own son’s life and what his life was going to look like when he grew up, I had a different experience in terms of how I thought about the issue…I really started to think about if other people who were parents and grandparents and teachers, or people who had nieces and nephews, and if they started thinking about the issue in terms of people who they loved who were younger than them – could that motivate them to be more engaged and take more action on the issue?Trisha Shrum at a demonstration in Paris during the Paris Climate Talks in December 2015.Mongabay: How many letters have you received? Jill: We have 609 messages published, including 453 letters, 144 photos, and 12 videos.The archive is a very important part of the project and we want to make the entire collection of letters, photos and videos publicly available in the years 2030 and 2050. But, since we don’t know how people will receive and share information during those years and what kind of technology will be available, we are working with archivists to think through how we are going to store the data and transition it from now until 2050. We are also working to identify an institution or multiple institutions that are interested in holding the collection, as we believe it will be a historical documentation of how people thought about climate change during this important period of time (2015-2020). We want to preserve this collection for the year 2050 and beyond.Mongabay: Why are you concerned about climate change, personally? Trisha: One of the most terrifying courses you can take in college is Introduction to Environmental Science. It is eye-opening and frankly quite depressing to learn about the massive impact we are having on the planet that is here to support the only future we have. So I am concerned because I’ve spent the last 15 years studying climate change and I know that literally everything is at stake.Now that I am a parent, this concern is crystallized: my daughters will inherit that future. I want to give them the best possible chance at a happy, healthy life. I hope they can someday snorkel in vibrant coral reefs and not worry about how the air they are breathing might be harming their unborn child. But at a minimum, I want them to have the resources they need to live.Jill: I understand where we’re headed. I’m not a scientist, but I’ve worked in the field long enough to understand what kinds of negative implications are happening, actually right now in places, but are also projected to happen in the future. Understanding that through the lens of my own kids has been very personally motivating for me. Having my own child and thinking about it through his life, moves thinking about the problem in an intellectual way to thinking about it in an emotional way and that’s very powerful. It changes it from something in your head in terms of data, statistics and science to thinking of it in terms of the heart, in terms of emotions and why this is important.Mongabay: How old will you be in 2050 and what do you think the climate will look like? Trisha: In 2050 I will be 68 years old. My daughters will be 36 and 33. Long before 2050, I think any trace of doubt in whether climate change is real will be erased by the world we see around us. But I hope that I’ll live to see the other side: when the climate begins to grow more stable. If we take strong actions today, then we can start to reverse the damage and bring the climate back into a safe zone for our kids and grandkids.Jill: In 2050 I will be 74. It’s hard to predict what the world will look like, because I think we know what it will look like if we continue business as usual. We’re pretty much on course to pass [a two degree Celsius global temperature increase] by 2050. If that happens, scientists predict increased storms, drought, floods, and more severe weather…If people can’t farm and live in the places they currently live in then people will be forced to move to other countries or locations within their countries. People often think one degree or two degrees…that’s not really big, but we’re talking about changing our water systems, the amount of food that’s available, having land where people can no longer live. I think the bigger problems are around water and mass migrations. And that creates bigger questions around political instability.We actually do have the solutions that we can be putting in place to make a transition away from fossil fuels to renewable energy and we’re in a period of time right now where we’re making a choice to either continue business as usual (which we know is kind of scary) or take this amazing opportunity to make a transition and put the policy and practices in place to make this transition.I like to think that in 2050 the world looks very different, but it’s not just negative, it’s also positive in terms of better health outcomes, switching away from fossil fuels, livable cities…We don’t spend enough time really envisioning what a positive 2050 could look like. Part of the [DearTomorrow] project is to get people to put themselves in the year 2050 and to look back on the present and imagine having a conversation with your own child in the year 2050 and having them ask you, “What did you do?” And instead of asking the question, like, “Why didn’t you do anything?” I envision my own child would ask me: “What was it like in a world where there was fossil fuels? What was it like to live before this massive transition that we took and what role did you play in making this happen?” or “What did the world look like when people used gasoline and what did a gas station look like?”Mongabay: Do you feel that since you’ve started this project you’ve had a more hopeful outlook on where we could be in 2050?Jill: It has changed my perspective in terms of meeting so many interesting and engaged people who are not only leading organizations, but I’ve met so many people who have day jobs who volunteer their time on climate change. They’re so passionate about the issue… They’ve opened up and expressed in a very personal way how they feel and that’s kind of what keeps me very hopeful – the depth that people feel when they really understand the choices that we’re making now… It really motivates me to continue this project. I think I’ve been most surprised by the relationships I’ve formed with people who’ve participated.Screenshots of letters posted at DearTomorrowMongabay: Trisha, you told Grist, “When people write to their own children, instead of envisioning the apocalypse, they envision a better path – a future I would want to leave for my kids.” Why is this positivity important? What can it do for the climate movement? Trisha: If you want to grab someone’s attention, fear works. But if you want to hold someone’s attention, you must also have hope. When we build a tangible vision from today’s polluted world run by fossil fuels to a future run by clean energy, then we can get people to walk down that path with hope and an understanding that they are fighting a winnable fight.Mongabay: How can DearTomorrow reach people who aren’t impacted by climate change or don’t perceive themselves to be impacted by climate change? Jill: There are people currently impacted by fossil fuel development or by climate change and those people have important stories to tell – either about living in areas that have drought, or living on coasts that are impacted by storms, or living next to a fossil fuel plant, or in Appalachia by mountaintop removal. Those stories are all very important. But, I think it’s important for us to understand that we can’t wait for everybody to be impacted before we take action. It’s really important to address this distance that most people feel around climate change. Most people in the U.S. understand it as an issue that is happening, but happening somewhere else in another place or in the future. It’s hard to connect their everyday actions and political beliefs to something that feels very distant from them.The DearTomorrow project is trying to address this distance that people feel by getting people to think about it in terms about their own children and grandchildren. I think the power of the project is not to necessarily ask people to become environmentalists, but to ask people to build off the beliefs and values they already have. People care about their children, families, legacy and climate change is part of that. We’re trying to connect the values of protecting your family, protecting their kids, and protecting their future (and their future is really at risk because of climate change). Therefore, part of protecting the people that we love – that are younger than us – is putting in place the policies and practices that provide for a safe and stable future for them, and that’s the value that DearTomorrow has.Mongabay: Let’s get political – How does the Trump Administration – particularly pulling out of the Paris Climate Accord – inform your work at DearTomorrow? Jill: It doesn’t have an impact on the day to day of DearTomorrow because we’re not a political organization that’s responding to policies that are being passed. But, it does point to the need for us to have a conversation about why climate change is important and to get past the political divide that we’ve created in this country. We support the Paris Agreement, but our project is trying to address the underlying problem – that this issue has been politicized and that we continue to argue about whether or not this is a problem. The Paris Agreement is important because it recognizes the need to make a transition away from fossil fuels and to keep [global] warming well below two degrees. The decision made by President Trump to withdraw the U.S. from the Agreement is only possible because the issue of climate change has become so polarized that it is often still seen as a liberal issue.For me, this decision underscores the need to reframe climate change not as a political issue, but as a personal one. We think our project can help tell the story about why climate change is important for people regardless of ideology or political affiliation, because ultimately we have shared values – parenting and family – that can reach across political and social boundaries. We think the values we connect to around parenting and family and legacy – those are values that exist in all communities. This is a project that people from all different communities can participate in and connect to.Mongabay: How do we talk about climate change to conservatives, skeptics, or religious groups? Trisha: Traditional environmental messaging about pandas and polar bears has been effective with the small segment of the population that identifies as environmentalists. Fear-based messaging works for a short time to get the rest of the population to pay attention, but eventually that fear turns to denial or apathy unless there is also a pathway of hope.If you try to get people to set aside their deeply held identities and values and take on your own, your outreach will backfire. But if instead you work to understand where they are coming from and understand what motivates them and gives their lives meaning – then you can start to build bridges. DearTomorrow appeals to universal values of legacy, family, and love, those values across social, political and geopolitical boundaries. And the love a parent has for their child is the most powerful force on the planet.The other unique power of DearTomorrow is that it helps to amplify the stories of hundreds of different people who come from a diverse range of backgrounds and belief systems. Those messages resonate with different people for different reasons. But the connection to a trusted messenger helps motivate those who have not yet viewed themselves as the kind of person who takes action on climate change.Jill: I would start by saying that there’s already a lot of great organizations and visionary leaders doing work around climate change in those communities. There’s faith-based efforts, business efforts, Republican efforts [to] change how their communities think about climate change. I think the value of DearTomorrow is not to tell people what the correct way to talk about climate change is, but to give people a platform to create their own narrative and share their own stories within their own communities. We want to provide a place where Catholics, Evangelicals, business leaders, environmentalists, environmental justice people, Republicans and Democrats can create their own stories and share those stories within their own communities – instead of creating a prescriptive narrative for everyone to follow. I think it’s more empowering to give people the tools to create and share their own narrative. I think our project is something that’s very easy for people to use and organizations to use, because it’s an idea and a place where people can write stories, read stories, and post their own. Really anybody with a computer or smartphone can do the project.Mongabay: How does the Voter Pledge Work? Jill: People want to take action. Our basic philosophy is that people should take on a commitment that’s important to them in their own lives, so we don’t have any parameters over what people should do. In the photo part, we ask people to take pictures of themselves, write down one commitment that they’re willing to make – something new for the next year, like installing solar panels, eating less meat, riding your bike more, attending community meetings, or calling representatives. They commit to taking this action by writing it down and they take a picture.Jill makes a pledge for DearTomorrow’s archive.At the same time, the changes that we have to make are profound, so we do need major changes in terms of policy and business practices. So, when we’re offering people one suggested action, we’re saying that voting is actually a really important action to help make these major policy changes.On the site, we identify one thing we think it’s unanimously important for people to do, and that is [to] vote. We partnered with the Environmental Voter Project (EVP) which…gives people information about the elections in their area. It gives reminders for midterm elections and local elections where people might actually be less inclined to vote. The reason why voting is really important is because climate change in the past is considered to be a very low priority voting issue and the EVP has identified that there are 15 million environmentalists out there who don’t vote.Mongabay: What’s on the horizon for DearTomorrow?Jill: Our goal for 2017 is to have 2,000 participants and in 2020 our goal overall is to have 10,000 participants but then to reach more than 20 million people through those 10,000 messages. We’re generating this very rich content that we then want to distribute in a variety of different channels through art, radio, newspapers, public events, and exhibits that get the word out to a larger group of people.Mongabay: What’s one letter that really resonated with you? Trisha: I love this letter because it is so honest and so normal. This guy seems like a great dad. But he isn’t a superhero Nobel Prize-winning climate scientist. He’s a regular guy who has a vision for the future he wants for his kids and he is willing to stand up to do the simple things in his life to make the future a reality.Jill: I read all of the letters and there’s so many of them that are really moving. One of my favorite parts of my job is to actually go through the material and read people’s stories. It’s super motivating to understand the depth of how they care about climate change. One of my new favorite letters was written by a coral reef researcher in Australia…she witnessed all the coral bleaching that’s been taking place and she had this realization that because her son is only three years old – and he has to be ten before he can scuba dive with her – she isn’t sure where she will actually be able to take him SCUBA diving.And so she’s telling me this story – she’s almost crying – and I’m getting emotional because our sons are close to the same age. It’s the idea that this is something in her life that’s so important to her and she doesn’t know if she’ll get to share that with her son because of climate change. I connected with her because both our kids are about the same age, but also with this idea of passing down memories and places and things that we love about life, and there’s a question of if we will be able to do that.The whole point of the project is to get people to think about climate change in a much more emotional and relevant way. I think that there’s a power to if we all have experience growing up and things that we love – and those are things that we want to share with our kids and our grandkids that are disappearing or changing. When we think about climate change in that way, it actually does impact us. And in addition to scary projections of “what the world could look like if we don’t take action,” we’re forgetting about the memories or places we love that potentially are lost or at risk… and I think those things are very important to us as we define our lives.Read messages to the future and submit your own at http://www.deartomorrow.org Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Climate Activism, Climate Change, Conservation, Environment, Extreme Weather, Food, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming, Impact Of Climate Change, Interns, Interviews last_img read more

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Pas d’indices pour accuser Neymar de viol

first_imgLa police brésilienne estime après enquête qu’il n’existe pas d’indices suffisants pour accuser la star du football Neymar d’avoir violé une jeune Brésilienne en mai à Paris, a annoncé lundi le parquet de Sao Paulo.L’enquête policière, première phase de la procédure, est terminée et doit être remise mardi au parquet, qui aura 15 jours pour décider ou non d’une inculpation, a déclaré une porte-parole du ministère public de Sao Paulo.L’attaquant vedette du Paris Saint-Germain est accusé par Najila Trindade Mendes de Sousa, une jeune mannequin brésilienne, de l’avoir violée le 15 mai dans un hôtel parisien. Neymar se dit innocent et affirme que la relation qu’il a eue avec la jeune femme était consentie. Partager La police de Sao Paulo, où Najila Trindade a porté plainte contre Neymar quinze jours après les faits allégués, considère qu’il n’existe pas d’indices suffisants pour accuser le footballeur d’avoir forcé la jeune femme à avoir une relation sexuelle et de l’avoir physiquement agressée.Le parquet peut à présent demander le classement sans suite du dossier, l’inculpation de Neymar ou un complément d’enquête. La décision finale reviendra aux juges.Neymar a été interrogé le 13 juin dans un commissariat de police de Sao Paulo. Najila Trindade a été entendue deux fois, également à Sao Paulo, les 7 et 18 juin.Le joueur a par ailleurs été entendu par la police une première fois début juin pour avoir diffusé sur les réseaux sociaux, pour prouver son innocence, une vidéo montrant des conversations et des images intimes avec Najila Trindade.Neymar, le footballeur le plus cher de l’histoire, arrivé de Barcelone au PSG à l’été 2017 pour la somme record de 222 millions d’euros, connaît une année compliquée également sur le plan sportif. Il ne cache pas ses envies de retour à Barcelone, et son devenir tient la planète du football en haleine durant le mercato estival, qui se termine le 2 septembre en France et en Espagne.Blessé à une cheville, Neymar n’a pas pu participer en juillet avec l’équipe du Brésil à la Copa America, remportée par la Seleçao.AFPlast_img read more

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[Tennis] Coupe Davis : le Luxembourg battu par la Grèce

first_imgDans le second simple, Tom Diederich (lui aussi non classé) n’a pas fait le poids face à l’ogre Tsitispas (1-6; 0-6).La rencontre se jouant au meilleur des trois matches, le Luxembourg est donc d’ores et déjà assuré d’essuyer une défaite avant même de disputer le double.L’équipe luxembourgeoise affrontera Monaco jeudi avant de croiser le fer avec la Pologne. Partager [Coupe Davis, groupe III, zone Europe] Mené 2-0 après les deux simples disputés face à la Grèce à Athènes mercredi, le Luxembourg du capitaine Gilles Muller est défait avant même de disputer le double.Pas de miracle pour l’équipe luxembourgeoise de Coupe Davis face à la Grèce du numéro 7 mondial Stefanos Tsitispas.Non classé, Ugo Nastasi n’a pu réaliser l’exploit et s’incline deux sets à 1 (6-7; 3-6; 1-6) face au 462e mondial Michail Pervolarakis.last_img read more

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[Cyclisme] L’équipe de Christine Majerus cherche des repreneurs pour 2021

first_img Partager L’équipe néerlandaise aura en 2020 dix ans d’existence. “Nous discutons déjà avec quelques entreprises et diverses agences de marketing sportif nous ont contactées”, a rappelé jeudi en conférence de presse, Danny Stam, le manager de l’équipe. “Ces dernières années on assiste à un regain de popularité du cyclisme féminin, le nombre de compétitrices augmente, comme le nombre d’épreuves télévisées (…) Notre ambition est non seulement de rester l’équipe féminine numéro un dans le monde, mais également de contribuer au développement futur du cyclisme féminin. Par exemple, nous souhaitons élargir notre équipe de 16 à 18 coureurs pour pouvoir organiser un double programme et donner une chance à plus de jeunes coureurs. Nous voulons également accorder davantage d’attention à l’avenir à la femme qui se cache derrière l’athlète et aux projets sociaux.”Denis Bastien Dans une conférence de presse donnée en marge des Mondiaux, les dirigeants de l’équipe néerlandaise, où évolue Christine Majerus depuis 2014, ont expliqué rechercher de nouveaux partenaires pour 2021.“Après 2020, Boels Rental et Dolmans cesseront d’être le principal sponsor de l’équipe féminine de cyclisme. Nous venons d’annoncer cette nouvelle lors d’une conférence de presse au Royaume-Uni.”Le communiqué de presse de l’équipe néerlandaise n’a pas pris de cours tous ceux qui suivent de près le parcours de l’équipe numéro un du cyclisme féminin, à laquelle appartient Christine Majerus qui sera en lice, samedi, dans la course en ligne des championnats du monde, malgré un refroidissement. Alors que samedi, les dirigeants espèrent qu’une de leur pensionnaire sera habillée d’arc-en-ciel à l’issue de la course élite dames, fêtera un cinquième titre consécutif (Lizzie Deignan en 2015, Amalie Dideriksen en 2016, Chantal Blaak en 2017 et Anna van der Breggen en 2018 s’étaient imposées), ils redoublent d’énergie pour retrouver des partenaires à compter de 2021.last_img read more

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Man, 40, Commits Suicide in Yekepa

first_imgA 40-year-old man has committed suicide in Yekepa, Nimba County, after experiencing a strange illness for which he had been seeking treatment.The man, on January 17, 2015 at about 8 p.m. local time took his own life with his single barrel gun in his bed room in the area “L” community of Yekepa.The cause of the incident is yet to be established, but an eyewitness said prior to taking his own life, the man wrote a note saying that nobody was responsible for his death.The Liberia National Police in Nimba also confirmed the death of the man, who they also claimed wrote saying in a note, “Nobody was responsible for my death for I am [tired] taking medicine for the yellow jaundice (sickness) I have.”The man, Martin Hugger, was said to have been working for the SEGAL security firm, assigned in Yekepa. He was allegedly suffering from the tropical illness known as “yellow jaundice” for some time.A neighbor, Eric Yarwieh, quoted the boss man of the late Martin as saying that Martin was given two months “leave with pay” so that he could attend to his health and he visited the Jackson F. Doe Memorial Hospital in Tappita as well as other health centers for treatment.A lady only identified as Chris told this newspaper that the late Martin had a fiancée known as Agnes King, but they do not have any children. Both of them migrated to Yekepa from other parts of Liberia before they met in Yekepa.The Security Expert Guard Agency of Liberia (SEGAL) is one of the leading security firms with the highest number of service men and women. They are believed to be one of the security firms providing the highest wages and all necessary safety gears for their employees.Recently, the firm presented a new set of outfits costing over US$ 80,000 to their men and women in Yekepa as well as other safety items for their protection at the job site.Despite the late Martin’s note exempting anyone from causing his death, there is still speculation from within the Area “L” community where he lived  that he shot himself because of ill treatment from his fiancée while he was sick. He has since been buried.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Professionalizing Public Procurement: CIPS Trainings Launched

first_imgIn an effort to enhance capacity building while professionalizing public procurement, the Public Procurement and Concession Commission (PPCC) and its partners have concluded two waves of training in public procurement using the UNDP-CIPS curriculum. The trainings were held from October 20 – 23, and October 26 – 29. PPCC with support from the UNDP’s Strengthening National Capacities for Development (C4DE) Programme and the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning through the multi-donor funded Integrated Public Financial Management Reform Project (IPFMRP) conducted the “Introductory Certificate in Public Procurement – CIPS Accredited Level 2” training for 90 public procurement practitioners representing 33 government agencies and UNDP.The launch of CIPS trainings marked another milestone between Government and development partners in strengthening national institutions and peoples’ capacities to engage, plan, manage and deliver on their own development agenda.The training which was conducted by the UNDP in collaboration with the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply (CIPS), headquartered in the United Kingdom, is a foundation course to prepare participants for increasingly advanced trainings within the field of public procurement. The Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply, UK is one of the leading bodies representing the field of procurement and supply chain management and was jointly awarded with the UNDP the prestigious European Supply Chain Excellence Award 2012/13 for Training and Professional Development.The hosting of this training is a part of the PPCC’s capacity-building initiatives to address the human resource constraints faced by many government institutions as it relates to the administration of procurement, with the view to enhance the levels of efficiency and value for money in facilitating the national development agenda of Liberia.According to the Head of the Commission James Dorbor Jallah, PPCC as an enabling regulator deems the trainings as very pertinent to the professional growth and development of procurement practitioners, as well as to the strengthening of institutional capacity within procuring entities.“The Public Procurement and Concessions Commission envisions providing this training to all qualified public procurement practitioners over the next few years, as the certification to be obtained thereafter will eventually become a requirement for practice within the public sector,” Jallah said. Mr. Jallah noted that following certification from this training, a professional standards body will be established to regulate admission into, and practice within, the public procurement system.“The PPCC remains grateful to the UNDP’s C4DE and the IPFMRP for their continued support to the public procurement reforms in Liberia,” he intimated. Mr. Jallah mentioned that UNDP’s support to this initiative is pursuant to a study conducted in 2012/13 which revealed that there is a huge capacity deficit in the field of public procurement which must be adequately addressed to ensure the effective and efficient administration of procurement across the government.“It is worth noting that as part of UNDP’s efforts toward building public procurement capacity its C4DE Program also provided assistance for the establishment of the Hand-Holding Project, which has significantly increased the PPCC’s opportunities for outreach and capacity-building,” Jallah stressed.He pointed out that similarly, the IPFMRP continues to support the PPCC through both human and institutional capacity-building initiatives, and it has provided several pieces of logistical equipment to facilitate implementation of the Commission’s mandate.As a result of the IPFMRP’s support to the PPCC, according to Mr. Jallah, a state-of-the-art heavy duty printer was acquired to set up a print shop to enhance the PPCC’s operations as well as its upcoming initiative to provide support to procuring entities.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Govt signs US$8M contracts to build 2 new schools

first_imgPlans are currently in the pipeline to upgrade schools across the country to 21st Century standards according to the Education Ministry’s Project Coordinator for Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP), Jimmy Bhojdat, on Monday as the Ministry signed two contracts to facilitate the construction of two secondary schools.An artist’s impression of the Westminster Secondary SchoolThe new schools will be constructed in Good Hope, East Coast Demerara and Westminster, Parfaite Harmonie, West Coast Demerara. These projects will be undertaken by BK International and R Bassoo and Sons Contracting Services to the tune of some US$4,082,506.80 and US$4,795,595.67 respectively.The schools are expected to be completed within 15 months according to the Project Coordinator.The new Westminster Secondary School will be constructed to accommodate 1000 students, and the Good Hope Secondary School will cater for 800 students. These two projects fall under the SEIP and are being funded by the World Bank.It was related by the Ministry’s Permanent Secretary, Adele Clarke that new schools would feature a multi-purpose hall; an administrative building; home economics room; science laboratories for physics, chemistry and biology; library; computer laboratory and an audio-visual room. Provisions will also be made for arts subjects such as music and dance; the building will also include an industrial technology room where wood-working, metalwork and technical drawing will be facilitated.Roy Bassoo of R Bassoo and Sons Contracting Services signing the contract documents along with Permanent Secretary within the Education Ministry, Adele Clarke. Also looking on is Education Minister Nicolette HenryMeanwhile, Education Minister Nicolette Henry addressing the contractors, urged them both to ensure that the schools were built within the standards and expectations of the Education Ministry so that the new facilities could serve the nation’s children.Meanwhile, on the sidelines of the signing, Bhojdat explained that the Ministry was currently in the process of upgrading all secondary schools.“We don’t want to be building the same old models that exist and so we are upgrading the different departments which are going to be of a higher standard to allow students to attain the various certifications,” Bhojdat disclosed.He said it was expected the new structures should be of the standard of Caribbean schools. Asked whether the Ministry was bothered about the inferiority students who do not attend these new schools being built might feel, the Coordinator explained, “This is just one of the many projects that the Ministry is doing. There are other projects that are tackling upgrading.”One of those projects, according to him, which is being funded by the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) will facilitate upgrade works to schools. He was unable to say when the upgrade works would be completed to those schools and would only say that the project was ongoing.last_img read more

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Coconut vendor robbed by gun-toting bandits

first_imgForty-nine-year-old John McKenzie, a vendor who operates a coconut stand on a 24h basis at Bourda Market, Georgetown, was on Sunday relieved of two gold chains and a sum of cash when two men armed with handguns robbed him as he was sitting at his stand.Police preliminary investigations reveal that McKenzie was sitting at his stand at about 01:10h on Sunday when he was approached by the two armed men. One of the men reportedly pointed a handgun at McKenzie and relieved him of the items, while his accomplice, who also was armed with a handgun, stood guard.After committing the act, the men joined a small silver-grey motorcar which was parked several feet away and made good their escape.Following a Police probe, one of the bandits has been identified as 21-year-old Shane Allison, a miner of Pouderoyen, West Bank Demerara, who eventually was on Sunday morning shot by an armed security officer after he reportedly drew a gun at the officer.On Sunday last, Allison and two other men had been seen acting in a suspicious manner, and when the security officer approached them, Allison pointed a gun in the security guard’s direction. In retaliation, the security officer discharged several rounds, hitting Allision once. His two alleged accomplices were also arrested. Investigations are ongoing.last_img read more

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Guyanese celebrate 181 years of Emancipation

first_imgThere was a kaleidoscope of colours and mixture of people from all walks of life at the National Park on Thursday as Guyanese turned out in their numbers to celebrate 181 years of Emancipation in unity. The blue skies were covered with thick clouds for most of the day which kept locals cool as they flowed into the Park to get a glimpse and taste of the rich African culture.There was obviously the smell of cook-up rice, along with other delicious delicacies.Besides the attractive colours, the flavours brought to Guyana all the way from Africa were widely celebrated by all walks of life.People were seen purchasing and indulging in dishes such as conkie, metemgee, and black and white pudding among a number of others.A few tourists who also visited the park expressed how happy they were to have stopped by with their families. They were seen taking photographs with locals and trying the famous Guyanese cook-up rice with fried fish.Families were all decked out in matching outfits as they picnicked in the warm afternoon sun, which barely peeked from behind the clouds.Guyana Times spoke with a member of an extended family as they picnicked in the Park. Merlin Kellman from Vigilance, East Coast Demerara, said she was having a great time with her relatives.“I’m here with my husband, my daughter-in-law, my son and my mother-in-law. We all came out to have a grand time and so far we are enjoying ourselves,” she said.Kellman said she usually visited the Park for the Emancipation celebration, but enjoyed her own cook-up featuring salted beef, pickled pork and even some chicken.An elderly woman, Pamela Gittens from East Ruimveldt, Georgetown, said she enjoyed herself as she performed a song by the legendary Bob Marley, for the celebratory programme.Shelly-Ann David, of Diamond Housing Scheme, East Bank Demerara, who was at the Park with her family, stated: “I am here with my mother, my grandson and we are having a wonderful time. We come out here every year. I just love Emancipation. So far I am enjoying it, especially the food, I love the pepper pot and fancy African dishes”.While some persons were busy shopping and enjoying the various dishes and items on display, some were busy cooking, as ANSA McAL had its annual cook-up rice competition.The Brand Coordinator for Chief Products at ANSA McAL, Tammy Ramsay, explained that this year, the competition expanded greatly as over 30 competitors participated compared to 13 in their first year.They were competing for $100,000 in cash in each of the two categories – namely vegetarian and ‘obstacles’ cook-up. In the second category, participants were allowed to add whatever their special ingredients were.The competition was judged in the afternoon by three judges: Odessia Primus, Head of Carnegie; Ms Lee and Gordon Moseley.ANSA McAL Managing Director Troy Cadogan said he was extremely proud of the event and the excitement it brought to people from all walks of life.“We are actually part of all the festivals in Guyana, so we teamed up with ACDA (African Cultural and Development Association)…Cook-up is a very widespread thing in the Guyanese culture and we felt that cook-up is good and Chief (company), which is our partner, have a cook-up seasoning and they were willing to partner with us,” Cadogan noted.In another section of the Park was ACDA’s cultural programme during which persons were entertained with songs, dances, poetry and a number of other items.The delegates for the Miss Emancipation Pageant were also present at the event.Emancipation is also referred to as Freedom Day in Guyana.In August 1833, the Slave Emancipation Act was passed, giving all slaves in the British Empire their freedom, albeit after a set period of years. It came into force on August 1, 1834, but it was not until August 1, 1838 after serving a four-year Apprenticeship that enslaved people in the British Caribbean finally gained their freedom.last_img read more

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