Pesticide deaths: five shopkeepers booked

first_imgNAGPUR: The Yavatmal district police have booked five Krishi Kendra owners for allegedly selling unauthorised products to farmers. Over the past month, 19 farmers and farm labourers have died owing to improper spraying of insecticides on Bt cotton plantations in Yavatmal district. Over 600 cases of insecticide infection have been reported and hundreds of farmers are being treated in hospitals in the district for visual impairment, nausea and other health complications. Authorities said indiscriminate use of wrong combinations of insecticides, and lack of protective gear were to blame.In a press statement, the Yavatmal district police said, “Since August this year, 19 people died have died owing to infection contracted after spraying pesticides in Yavatmal. The police department registered cases of sudden death and began an investigation. The Agriculture Department inspected Krishi Kendras and found that in five cases, farmers and farm labourers died as they used pesticides that are not permitted to be sold in the market. FIRs have been registered against five Krishi Kendra owners.” The owners who have been booked include Pravin Bhelonde of Agro Krishi Kendra in Darhava town, Pritam Rathi of Ankita Krishi Kendra in Ladkhed village, Sanjay Raja of Jalaram Krishi Kendra in Kalamb town, Dilip Dhondopant of Vaibhav Krishi Kendra, and Ashok Bhavare of Pragati Krishi Kendra in Vadgoan town. All five have been booked under Section 304 (A) of the Indian Penal Code and Section 29 of the Insecticide Act, 1968. Suresh Chavhan, Agriculture Officer, Pandharakwada Panchayat Samiti, has recommended action against Krishi Vaibhav Kendra in Pandharkwada town and its owner Deepak Papatriwar for selling unauthorised pesticides.last_img read more

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Football: Sunil Chhetri On Japan, ‘Japan, you were brilliant tonight.’

first_imgAdvertisement(Image Courtesy: Standard)It was end of the road for Blue Samurais as Chadli’s goal sent Belgium through to the quarterfinals and Japan home.Japanese, who went 2-0 up with goals by Genki Haraguchi and Takashi Inui early in the second half, were sobbing on the ground after Chadli slotted ball home from Thomas Meunier’s cross four minutes into injury time at the Rostov Arena. Belgium were back into the competition thanks to the goals coming from Jan Vertonghen and Maroune Fellaini who ensured that the Red Devils are back into the game.However, in the ending moments of the game, Chadli gifted Belgium their lifeline as he scored from a spectacular cross making it 3-2 for Belgium. The European Giants will now face South American Giants Brazil as they look forward to qualifying for the semi-finals.The social media was in full praise of the Blue Samurais and so was our Indian Football Team captain Sunil Chhetri who praised the fellow Asian nation for their performances at the World Cup.Japan, you were brilliant tonight. You filled every Asian with hope and left us with something to be proud about.— Sunil Chhetri (@chetrisunil11) July 2, 2018Also Read: Football: Clubs Placed On Alert As Barcelona Are Ready To Sell Their Star PlayerAdvertisementlast_img read more

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4 Signs You Are Ready to Add Author to Your Resume

first_imgThese days it’s easier than ever to publish a book. With the advent of self-publishing, almost anyone with the dedication to commit fifty-thousand words to paper can add “Published Author” to their list of credentials, and there’s no denying the impact that a book can have on your career. When was the last time you saw an expert interviewed on TV whose name wasn’t listed alongside their book title? The book is often one of the final steps in establishing your position as an expert in your field, as a place where you’ve compiled your knowledge and research into one package that will hopefully help others. But with more books in the market than ever before, it’s important to make sure that you’re not writing the book for the sake of writing a book. A clear understanding of your goals for writing the book, as well as a strong author platform, will increase your chances of the book positively impacting your career. Think you’re ready to take the leap? Read on to be sure.1. You’re already contributing content. If you aren’t already speaking regularly or writing articles on a given topic, it’s going to be an uphill battle to find the content to fill an entire book. More importantly, the demand for your content remains untested. Whether you’re recording a podcast, writing blog posts, or building a social media following, it’s important to pay attention to the kind of content that your followers respond positively to before putting pen to paper.  Which topics get the most shares, the most listens, the most downloads, etc.? Without that knowledge, you’re taking a bigger gamble on your book than you need to. Adulting 101: How To Create A Grown-Up Personal Brand2. You understand your audience. Knowing your audience goes hand-in-hand with the testing of your content. Take advantage of whatever analytics you have access to. Pull demographic information from your social media accounts or through Google Analytics on your website to get a general idea of who is consuming your content. Take it a step further by surveying attendees at speaking events, responding to comments, or A/B testing content. What are the pain points your audience is experiencing? How are you helping them? A book is a large investment of time, and without really understanding what makes your audience tick, you can’t guarantee they’ll make the jump from short-form posts to buying and reading your book.3. You can answer 3 critical questions. Before you start writing, take some time to reflect. Thoughtful answers to these questions will not only motivate you to finish the book but will also make the outlining and writing process much easier, as you can always refer back to them. What would I write about? If an answer doesn’t immediately come to mind, refer back to the content you’re contributing. What gets the most traction? How can you expand upon that topic? Is that also the area that you are most passionate about? Without an authentic enthusiasm for the topic, it will be difficult to reach your word count goal. The topic should be both something you feel passionate about and something your audience is asking for.Why am I qualified to write about it? The simple answer here may be passion. You love the topic, you’ve researched it thoroughly, and you’ve been writing about it for years. However, most skeptical readers will also be looking for some sort of credential to back up your book. Are you writing a book about developing a successful company culture? If so, readers will expect that you’ve actively developed one in the past and that your strategies have been tested. Beware crossing into fields that are tangentially related to your own. If you’re a fitness instructor, your audience may also be craving information on nutrition. But if you don’t have the credentials to back it up, either partner with someone who does or steer clear.  Why do I need to write it now? This is often the hardest question for potential authors to answer, but it is critical to the promotion of your book once it’s written. If the book is not grounded in the present day, it becomes harder to pitch your book for media coverage or reviews because the content isn’t timely. There’s also less of an incentive for readers to purchase the book if they aren’t experiencing an urgent need for it. If you struggle with this question, check back with your audience and ask about their pain points. What’s causing them that pain? And how can you help? 5 Techniques To Stop Dreaming And Start Doing4. You have a clear goal for the book. With all of these building blocks in place, the last step is to objectively identify your goal for writing a book. Yes, it’s nice to have a book on your resume, but how specifically will you leverage it? Are you hoping to charge more for speaking engagements? Do you want to get those coveted television interviews? Are you an entrepreneur, hoping the book will grow your business? Do you want to make an impact on people’s lives? Writing the book is only half the battle. Publishing and promoting your book well require time, dedication, and research. Clearly identifying your goal for the book should inform all your choices going forward, and there are going to be a lot of them. From which publisher to work with to your launch strategy, keep this goal front of mind to ensure everything ties back to supporting it.  As CEO of Greenleaf Book Group, Tanya Hall drives the company’s growth efforts and fosters a culture built around serving authors. Learn more about Greenleaf Book Group at www.greenleafbookgroup.com and connect on Twitter (@GreenleafBookGr & @TanyaHall) and Facebook.last_img read more

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Real Madrid legend Luis Figo: Too difficult for Ronaldo to leave

first_imgReal Madrid legend Luis Figo can’t see Cristiano Ronaldo leaving this summer.Figo believes there’s too much that needs to happen for Ronaldo to leave.”A lot of things would have to happen for him to leave,” Figo told Gol’s ‘Directo Gol Tarde’ programme.”It is a personal decision and if a person really wants something to happen then it will end up happening, but I see it as unlikely.”Even if the forward does leave, Figo is confident that Los Blancos could cope without him.”I hold the opinion that nobody is indispensable, not just Cristiano Ronaldo,” he said.”Clubs can’t depend on anybody.”The history of these clubs is above everyone, even the president or whoever.”last_img read more

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Neymar appeals to new Barcelona coach Valverde: Call me!

first_imgNeymar insists he is only thinking of success with Barcelona.The Brazil international has also revealed to Diario Gol that he’s yet to hear from new Barca coach Ernesto Valverde.”I do not want to leave Barcelona, I have four more years of my contract and it has always been my dream since I was a child (to play for Barca),” declared Neymar.”I’ve been very fortunate to share a dressing room and to learn from Leo Messi.”On Valverde, he added: “I feel like talking to Valverde.”We have not even spoken on the phone!”last_img read more

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More clutter-free marketing

first_imgYesterday, I posted on techniques for cutting through communications clutter as part of a nonprofit marketing carnival. Check out the full carnival here – it’s full of posts with great ideas and inspiration!I especially agree with these folks:R. Craig Lefebvre: “It’s no longer about getting attention, it’s about earning it. Once they find you, you have three seconds to engage them, or they’re lost – maybe forever.” Nonprofits should be communicating with, rather than at, audiences, says Allison Fine. Focus on participation, not dissemination.last_img read more

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Made to Stick

first_imgBy Jono SmithA few weeks ago, Katya hosted “Sticky Week” in honor of the book Made to Stick.  I thought I would end my week of guest-blogging by interviewing someone who has spent much of his career helping nonprofits make and tell stories that stick.  Kile Ozier has created communications & development campaigns for a litany of nonprofits across the globe, having worked on everything from the 1992 Candle Light Vigil for the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt in DC to landmark fundraising campaigns for Stanford University.Four Questions for Kile Ozier 1. What are the most rewarding aspects of your job? Frankly, it is the absorbing of the culture of the agency or institution with successive projects; learning and discerning what sets each apart.  Colleges and universities, for instance, are surely one of the three most pivotal moments in the lives of probably 95% of those who attend…but, each institution does this in a different way, with a unique ethos and culture that is reflected in the student bodies and the experience of that institution.  Immersing myself in the culture, learning it and perceiving ways to articulate that to an audience in such a way as to re-ignite the energy of First Experience and avoid the “running of old tapes” is the challenge and the reward. 2. What are the most challenging aspects of your job? Helping non-profits through transition from grassroots to mainstream.  It is almost inevitable that the Original Visionaries become Obstructive Dinosaurs, as an agency grows.  The opportunity is to help these individuals see the value and to be come Resource rather than Management; and to open the door/pave the way for those who are adept at management of what the Visionaries have built to step in and do that very thing.   Visionary Leadership is very different from Managing or Directing Leadership.  Both are critical at different junctures; rarely at the same time. That, and getting agencies or institutions to make the appropriate investment in articulating the message so that the message can be effective.  The ability to “do things on a nickel” is a greatly overrated “skill.”  What usually results is an experience, a piece of video, a marketing or mission document that delivers less than it could.  No one likes to spend money; but what I hate is to spend less to less effect.  I don’t support extravagant budgets (and I never get them, either!), I do find myself spending a lot of time, enlightening clients to what things actually cost; and if one wants a message communicated compellingly, it’s going to take time, and cost something. Lastly, time.  All too often, agencies wait far too long to initiate the research and creative process as these projects encroach.  Eighteen months prior to launch is a reasonable time to begin exploring possibility.  That offers time to discover if a certain approach is valid, or is even the best approach to deliver a given message.  Often, I enter a project with a client thinking they want an “event,” and what we ultimately deliver is something quite different, but that reflects the persona of the institution and delivers the message better; a dvd, a performance, a print piece… 3. What are the most common marketing and communication mistakes you see nonprofits make? In creating the experience that is going to communicate the agency to the audience, it is the assuming of a level of connection that is truly no longer there.  Any emotional connection, I believe, becomes intellectualized, over time.  The quality of the original experience is remembered, rather than re-experienced.  Thus, I further believe it is our job to circumvent preconception and “surprise” the audience (whether live, through media or in print) with the visceral thrill of reconnection…of actually re-experiencing what was experienced at first exposure.   This re-enlivening of the original experience – or, in the case of cause-related non-profits, the connection of that agency’s mission to a personal experience of each individual being exposed to this message – is what makes the difference between giving out of perceived duty versus giving MORE out of being moved to deepen one’s commitment to institution or cause. This also works in marketing; but that’s for another conversation… Another key error I see agencies and institutions making in crafting their messages is the omission of what I call the “shepherds of the mission” from the mix when canvassing, interviewing, and pulling together data and background in the process.  I always include the secretaries, custodians, clerks…the myriad, disparate personnel of the infrastructure, many of whom have been in place far longer than any of the principals of an organization, are often the most articulate when it comes to divining what keeps people in their jobs, doing what they do for the little they are usually paid.  It is a great method for discovering new ways to articulate a message that has been previously communicated…thus resonating more compellingly. 4. What big problem in the nonprofit community would you most like to see fixed in the next 5 years? Assumption and Acceptance.  The level of assumption of effectiveness of the status quo is, across the board, far higher than most seem to think.  I believe that all of us in the community can be served with regular “objectivity sessions,” in-house or at conferences.  Truly stepping back and examining what might be being assumed in organization, messaging, appeals, communications will undoubtedly serve to surprise and enlighten even the most accomplished and successful of individuals and agencies.  It will keep our messaging fresh and the connection with our audiences evolving. Transparency.  As technology supports greater access to information, the institutions and agencies that step up to that and keep their integrity unimpeded will be the most successful.  I would like to see ambiguous terms like “proceeds” and “net proceeds” be banned from the lexicon.  What IS a “proceed,” anyway?  Is it profit?  Is it a portion of the profit?  What is “a portion of the proceeds”?  This sort of ambiguity will, ultimately, serve only to lower the trust of a sophisticated audience in a given institution, agency, event or producer. >> Thanks, Kile!last_img read more

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Attention Global Maternal Health Conference Participants: Join the Global Team of Guest Bloggers!

first_imgPosted on July 21, 2010July 14, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Blogging is an effective communications strategy for sharing information in real time and fueling dialogue around key maternal health issues. With the Global Maternal Health Conference 2010 right around the corner, our team is looking forward to a lively online discussion around the happenings of the conference. In an effort to fuel a robust dialogue with a variety of global perspectives, we are connecting with global health and development bloggers around the world.At this time, we are in the process of identifying a cohort of articulate guest bloggers to convey the important activities happening at the conference. If you are attending the conference (either as a presenter or a participant, either in India or remotely via live webcast) and would like to guest blog about the work you are presenting or the sessions you attend, please submit a brief statement of interest or a sample blog post of less than 300 words to Kate Mitchell (kmitchell@engenderhealth.org).Guest blog posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and will be cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.If you plan to blog about the conference on your own blog, please let us know! We would love to discuss linking to your posts and possibly cross-posting.For more information, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchell@engenderhealth.org). Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Call for Abstracts for 2013 International Family Planning Conference

first_imgShare this: Posted on February 19, 2013November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Federal Ministry of Health of Ethiopia and the Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have issued a call for  abstracts for the Third International Conference on Family Planning, which will be held in Addis Ababa, November 12-15, 2013.  The deadline for abstract submissions is May 1, 2013.From the call:The Conference organizers invite abstracts on cutting edge research and program results directed at enabling individuals in the world, especially in low-income areas, to achieve their contraceptive and reproductive intentions.  Of particular interest are abstracts on research demonstrating how family planning benefits and advances the health and wealth of people and nations and on high impact or best practices of family planning programs and service delivery models.  Abstracts using strong scientific/evaluation methods will be given priority in the review and acceptance process.Click here to submit individual abstracts, or here to submit a preformed panel for review. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Calling All Technical Experts in Maternal Newborn Health Measurement: Two Ways to Get Involved

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 23, 2016September 26, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM) Public Comment Period: August 22 – September 2, 2016The Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) is hosting a request for public comments on a draft set of indicators that will contribute to a comprehensive monitoring framework designed to measure global progress towards ending preventable maternal mortality (EPMM). The EPMM Phase II monitoring framework has been developed through an iterative process to identify, evaluate and prioritize indicators on key social, political and economic determinants of maternal health and survival highlighted in the 2015 report, “Strategies toward ending preventable maternal mortality (EPMM)” (EPMM Strategies).This process has included an extensive indicator mapping exercise and multiple rounds of expert discussion and review. Now, a request for public comments asks stakeholders with knowledge of and interest in maternal health measurement to review the outcomes of this process and weigh in on the importance of the proposed indicators in order to help consolidate consensus on a core set of EPMM Phase II indicators that will be finalized at a consensus meeting in late September 2016.Access the survey here. Submissions will be accepted from August 22, 2016 until September 2, 2016.On behalf of the EPMM Working Group, the MHTF has been partnering with leaders in global health to develop a comprehensive monitoring framework addressing both the proximal and distal causes of maternal health and survival worldwide. Guided by the priority recommendations in the EPMM Strategies report, this work has been conducted in two phases. Phase I, which was completed in October 2015, identified a core set of proximal maternal health indicators for global monitoring and reporting by all countries. Along with indicators from the Every Newborn Action Plan, those indicators fed into the development of the Global Strategy Indicator and Monitoring Framework. Phase II, which is the subject of this request for public comment, is focused on indicators for the distal (i.e. social, political and economic) determinants of maternal health and survival. Read more about the development of the EPMM monitoring framework and how it contributes to other global monitoring frameworks such as the SDGs and the Global Strategy.Call for Nominations: Mother and Newborn Information Tracking Outcomes and Results (MONITOR) Technical Advisory GroupThe World Health Organization (WHO) is seeking nominations for the Mother and Newborn Information for Tracking Outcomes and Results (MONITOR) technical advisory group, which seeks to convene independent experts with extensive experience in measurement, monitoring and evaluation in the field of maternal and newborn health. The group will comprise up to 12 individuals, taking account of geographical and gender balance and technical expertise, who will meet at least once per year to develop guidance, norms and systems for monitoring maternal and newborn health.Please see the terms of reference and call for nominations for more details. The closing date for nominations is September 12, 2016.—Learn more about EPMM and its connection to the SDG agenda on the MHTF blog.Share this:last_img read more

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Cloud for flat-panel controllers and RFID readers

first_imgThe first cloud for flat-panel controllers offers full connectivity to enable central parameterization and constant monitoring of the operational status of displays. This brings two clear advantages: higher ease of use and lower maintenance costs. Figure 1. Thanks to the eCOUNT eCLOUD for flatpanel controllers, there’s no more need to climb ladders to configure your monitors. You can simply use your smartphone instead. By Dirk Fistel, eCount embedded                        Download PDF version of this article Industrial-grade OEM flat panels are used in many types of implementations, from large-scale digital signage solutions to medical monitors that hang over operating tables to embedded displays in many other industrial devices, machines and systems. That’s why every OEM needs an application-specific controller that provides the necessary intelligence to process the respective video signals. It further supports display peripherals, such as the provision of sound and touchscreen functions and RFID readers, as well as the definition and storage of user-specific parameters such as brightness, contrast, gamma correction and color representation.Wherever much configuration and parameterization is required, a user-friendly interface is highly welcome. Parameterizing a monitor via an on-screen display is only the minimum requirement in such cases. These days, OEMs and users want a lot more. The operator of a system catering menu board does not want to climb up a ladder to manually optimize the settings. He prefers a contactless method. A remote control would work, but it is all too easily lost, especially if used only sporadically. A better solution would be to provide an app for smartphones and tablets with a local WLAN or Bluetooth connection, similar to modern state-of-the-art TV sets. However, for the operator of several branches such a solution is not good enough. He wants to be able to distribute the settings to all stores with a few clicks. It goes without saying that it is not only the operators who demand this; OEMs from many other sectors also appreciate the same level of comfort. They too want to be able to centrally monitor and conveniently configure their settings, such as the luminosity of the display when a set threshold is exceeded or undercut, and parameterize alarm scenarios, for example, to send an SMS to a service technician if the image source fails.Today, the use of proprietary programming devices that require special cables for the connection of devices and costly on-site service is an unpopular solution. Instead, users and OEMs want to be able to leverage clouds and navigate a monitor via IP addresses to centrally manage and maintain their displays. Ideally, the cloud provides an HTML-based, responsive interface so you can use any client that supports a browser, from smartphones to tablets to desktop PCs. Everything can then be connected to this central cloud – from new displays in a wide variety of locations, alarm management systems with escalation routines and acknowledgment functions, to the integration of back office, ERP and CRM systems as well as content delivery platforms.Figure 2. The eCOUNT eCLOUD offers comprehensive dashboards and a management system with which distributed flat screens can be administered centrally. For this purpose, eCOUNT embedded has developed a device-independent cloud solution with HTML interface for intelligent flat panel display controllers. This solution is first made available for the new CRTtoLCD-91 flat panel controller with 4K UHD support. As an industry first, the solution also integrates an optional RFID reader, making it possible for the display controller, and therefore also the flat screen of a system, to assume a central role in authorization management. Since device, machine and system functions are nowadays almost exclusively accessed via touch displays and their peripherals, this is a highly efficient solution. For example, systems can be configured to boot by default with the screen off, and only turn on the display and/or touch function when an approved tag is detected. Once it is possible to centrally monitor the display usage or to manage authorization and user-dependent configurations centrally via clouds, even payment systems for pay-per-use applications can be connected. But OEMs do not have to go all that far in order to profit from the easy connection of display controllers to the cloud.For example, the ability to track display temperature to avoid damage from overheating by proactively dimming the display is a very efficient way to make predictive maintenance even more effective. If the GPIOs that are part of the flat screen can also be configured and/or reset remotely, installation becomes more efficient as well: all that’s needed is an on-site mechanic. The system can be conveniently configured from a cloud workstation anywhere in the world. By tracking switch operation and other analog inputs, it is also possible to gain valuable insights into the usage of the flat screens and their applications, plus the systems can always be kept up to date via remote firmware updates. By tracking operating times along with temperatures, predictive maintenance can be planned much more precisely with the help of MTBF calculations. The more distributed systems are installed, the more OEMs and operators benefit from a central cloud as it simply provides more convenience and services at more affordable prices.When the optional RFID reader for the display controller is also connected to the cloud, there are many more benefits. The use of specific RFID tags can then be authorized or denied from a central location, which makes authentication and authorization management highly efficient – for example, by grading into categories of simple users, experts and maintenance personnel. When RFID tag usage is tracked, OEMs can also develop completely new deployment scenarios, such as the mentioned pay-per-use model. However, the RFID reader can also be used to simply call up a by user-preconfigured personal monitor settings, for example by selecting the desired settings from a step-by-step questionnaire via a cloud interface. Such individual settings are particularly popular in the medical field, because colour perception differs from person to person, so that one doctor may prefer a completely different configuration than the other. It is also easy to activate a DICOM Part 14 compliant display, for example to detect a carcinoma beyond doubt. When such configurations can be managed centrally, it becomes possible to assign them to specific endoscopic devices or even diagnostic situations. Being able to centrally manage and distribute such settings opens up potential for new services.So there are many OEM-specific uses for cloud-connected display controllers. A flat screen could even be used to log production data from customer projects, which could then be visualized via the cloud and passed on to ERP systems. A cloud-connected flat screen can be so much more than a touch-based graphics interface for man-machine communication. Providers of cloud-connected display controllers are therefore opening up entirely new, purely software-based sales opportunities for OEMs.Figure 3. The first intelligent flat-panel controller with eCLOUD support is the new 4K CRTtoLCD-91 board. Version 1.0 of the eCOUNT eCLOUD for flat-panel controllers supports the 30 most popular features. These include input selection, mode, temperature, operating hour counter, power-on and, of course, all API functions such as backlight, brightness, contrast and audio volume as well as panel info and reset. When the RFID reader is integrated, the scope of functions expands to include additional RFID reader specific commands that can be triggered from the IoT platform. In the future, the cloud will be extended in version 2.0 and 3.0 to include further functions. Scheduled for release by the middle or end of 2018, version 2.0 will provide full support of all display controller and RFID reader APIs along with campaign management for the distribution of new settings or firmware. 2G/3G/4G interfaces will be supported, as well as a software development kit for the cloud gateway with integrated rule engine. As a result, this version will support all functions required for first field deployments. Version 3, which will go into development from the second half of 2018, will include interfaces to ERP solutions such as SAP or SQL, as well as dedicated apps for iOS and Android. At that point, the extended management portal with customizable dashboards and widgets will also become available.The new eCLOUD for intelligent display controllers can be used with private or public clouds. Interfaces to all leading common cloud platforms such as Amazon, Google or Microsoft Azure are being added step by step. Upon request, the manufacturer can also provide additional, customer-specific cloud interfaces, so OEMs can always use their own specific cloud environment. The roadmap already includes solutions from embedded computing vendors such the WISE-PaaS Edge Intelligence Platform from Advantech, or the embedded cloud from S&T and Kontron. This paves the way for rapid deployment of these display controllers to the cloud environments of leading embedded and automation vendors.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Boards & Modules Continue Reading Previous Getting the right Linux distribution for your embedded applicationNext QorIQ processor integrates four technologies needed for Industry 4.0last_img read more

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Asian Games 2018: Iraq not sending team to Jakarta for football event

first_imgIraq have withdrawn from the football tournament of this month’s Asian Games in Jakarta, potentially throwing the competition into turmoil less than two weeks before kickoff.The Iraq Olympic Committee have pulled the team from the event, according to a source in Baghdad, and the decision will leave officials needing to address an imbalance in the opening phase of the tournament.Last week the Asian Football Confederation conducted a redraw of the competition’s group stage to add Palestine and the United Arab Emirates after the pair had been left off the original entry list.That meant two of the six groups swelled from four teams to five, but Iraq’s withdrawal now means one group – containing China, Timor Leste and Syria – will feature just three countries.The Olympic Council of Asia, the organisers of the Asian Games, have yet to respond to a request from Reuters for comment.A source at the Iraq Football Association had initially denied reports the team would be removed from the competition and that the squad’s preparations were being finalised following the completion of a training camp in the northern city of Erbil.Earlier this week, football officials were reported to have been fired over their involvement in the selection of overage players for the nation’s under-16 team after they were stopped at passport control on their way to participate in a regional tournament.The withdrawal of Iraq’s footballers follows a decision by the Philippines not to send the nation’s basketball team to Jakarta in the aftermath of their on-court brawl with Australia during a recent World Cup qualifier.advertisementThe football tournament at the Asian Games begins on August 10 and features teams made up of players 23 years of age and under. Coaches are permitted to select three overage players.The final will be played on Sept. 1.(With Reuters inputs)last_img read more

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Kapil Dev turns 60: Celebrating the man who changed Indian cricket forever

first_imgKapil Dev, one of India’s most successful captains, was born on this day 60 years ago. Kapil Dev was the captain of India’s first world cup-winning team in 1983, when they defeated West Indies in the final at Lord’s.Kapil Dev, one of the greatest all-rounder’s in the history of cricket, made his India debut on October 16 in the year 1978. A 19-year-old Kapil played his first Test match against arch-rivals Pakistan at Faisalabad. Kapil scored just 8 runs and picked up just 1 wicket as India drew the Test match.Kapil went on to represent India in 131 Test matches over a career spanning 16 years, in which time he took a total of 434 wickets at an average of 29.64 along with 23 five-wicket hauls. Kapil went onto to score 5248 runs in Tests, at an average of 31.05, including 8 hundreds and 27 fifties.In one day internationals as well, Kapil Dev amassed 3783 runs from 225 matches at an average of 23.79, including one hundred and 14 half-centuries. He also took a total of 253 wickets at an average of 27.45 and one five-wicket haul.Kapil Dev led India to their first World Cup triumph in England and his 175 against Zimbabwe is regarded as an all-time classic.Former skipper and teammate Sunil Gavaskar at the Agenda Aaj Tak in December 2018 said it was the greatest knock he had ever seen in one-day internationals.”That 175 is the greatest knock in ODI history I have seen as a player and as a commentator… I have never seen a better inning. The situation we were in…We were 17 for 5. It was cold and the ball was moving. It looked like we would be bowled out for 70 or 80..,” Sunil Gavaskar said.advertisementGavaskar also said that Kapil would have fetched the big bucks had he put his name for the Indian Premier League auction.”Kapil did not play any lofted drives till he reached 80. It was amazing to see him those sixes. He would have gone for Rs 25 crore in the IPL today,” Gavaskar said.”I think the bowling revolution was started by Kapil Dev. He showed everyone that pace bowling could survive in pitches in India as well. After him came the likes of Javagal Srinath, Venaktesh Pradesh and Zaheer khan. But it was Kapil Dev who started it all,” Sunil Gavaskar was quoted as saying recently.Kapil Dev, also speaking at Agenda Aaj Tak 2018, promised to follow the lead of Team India captain Virat Kohli down Oxford street shirtless if India win the World Cup in England 2019.”I will run shirtless if India win the World Cup. Just like Kohli said that he will run shirtless if India win, I will too,” Kapil Dev said at Agenda Aaj Tak 2018.”I can do anything for my country,” he said.Also Read | Kapil Dev on the perils of giving too much power to players: They will do what they feel likeAlso Read | Kapil Dev would have gone for Rs 25 crore in IPL auctions: Sunil GavaskarAlso Read | Just like Kohli, I will run shirtless if India win 2019 World Cup: Kapil Devlast_img read more

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How to Write a Nonprofit News Release

first_imgDuring 20 years as a journalist, Jerry Brown worked for The Associated Press (he was assignment editor for AP’s Washington bureau during Watergate); daily newspapers in Little Rock, Fort Worth and Denver; the U.S. Information Agency; and two trade publications. Jerry’s been practicing public relations for the past two decades and is an accredited member (APR) of the Public Relations Society of America and a former board member of PRSA’s Colorado chapter. You can contact Jerry at jerry@pr-impact.com or visit his Web site at pr-impact.com.Visit the Nonprofit Toolkit today and receive a waived annual membership ($195 value) and more than $2,000 in discounts and free services. Article provided by PR Newswire’s Nonprofit Toolkit, an educational resource devoted to Non Profit public relations. Visit the Nonprofit Toolkit today and receive a waived annual membership ($195 value) and more than $2,000 in discounts and free services.Develop your agenda.Start with your objective. Why do you want to tell your story? Getting a “positive story” isn’t specific enough.Identify your audience.The first three steps are easy most of the time. Now it gets harder.Prepare your message. You need a primary message, the one thing you want to be sure reporters and your audience hear, understand and remember. You can include up to two other messages, but one message is usually better than two and two are usually better than three. If you have more than three messages for a single release, you aren’t focused enough. You should be able to state your message(s) in 10 to 15 seconds. If you can’t, it isn’t clear enough for reporters to understand it and get it right when they put it into their stories. And your audience won’t remember it. Sometimes stating your message in 15 seconds or less will be easy, but often it won’t be. Take the time to get this step right. It’s important. Develop messages that address your audience’s wants / needs. And target reporters who write for your audience.Gather the information for your story before you start writing.Write your release. Be brief, clear and above all interesting. You’re competing for the attention of people with a lot to do other than read your release. Focus on your message. People often leave their message out of their news releases. Avoid jargon, buzzwords and phrases only you understand.What to include in your press release:Headline. Goes at the top of the release, tells readers what it’s about and why they’ll care. Serves the same purpose as the headline of a newspaper or magazine article – attract interest. It may be all that editors or other readers see when reviewing a newsfeed. Give them a reason in your headline to open yours. Often the last thing I write.Lead paragraph. Like your headline, it should grab the attention of the reader. If you haven’t interested a reporter or editor by the time s/he reads your lead, your release is probably headed for the trash. The purpose of this paragraph is to interest reporters, editors and others enough to keep reading.Nut paragraph. Use a nut paragraph to frame your story. This is where you tell us the essence of your story. It’s often the second paragraph of your release, but not always. It can be your lead. It can be even be more than one paragraph. If you were writing a movie, this is where the plot thickens and the audience learns the basics of your story.Quote(s). Reporters love good quotes. I like to include one or two quotes in news releases. Make them quotable, if you want them to be used. Some organizations only quote executives. I like to quote whoever I want reporters to talk to if they call. That may be a subject-matter expert instead of an executive. With a few exceptions, reporters want to talk to someone who can help them with their story – not someone with a suit and a title. Make your quotes sound like quotes; i.e., like someone spoke them. Use contractions, slang and other conversational language.Background information. Once you’ve grabbed our attention, framed your story and added a quote or two, fill in the detail of your story. I like to limit news releases to two pages whenever possible. It’s not a rule, just a preference. If you need more space than that, consider putting some information into a fact sheet or separate sidebar releases that cover specific aspects of your story.Boilerplate. A closing paragraph describing the organization issuing the release. Tell us who you are and what you do. Skip the sales pitch. Reporters and others who see your release won’t like the sales pitch.last_img read more

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Snow… AYZH… EG… UI… More Snow…

first_imgPosted on February 28, 2011June 20, 2017By: Zubaida Bai, Young Champion of Maternal HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This blog post was contributed by Zubaida Bai, one of the fifteen Young Champions of Maternal Health chosen by Ashoka and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth. She will be blogging about her experience every month, and you can learn more about her, the other Young Champions, and the program here.18 inches – 24 inches – 14 inches… SNOW & MORE SNOW – Is this a sign of things to come?One month has passed in 2011 and, in the midst of all the snow Boston’s been struck with, we at AYZH have been busy like never before:24 JANMA kits have been sent to Rural and Tribal Karnataka, India, thanks to support from Rotary and its members. JANMA is the clean birth kit developed by my organization, AYZH. The vision behind JANMA is that every woman should have a safe, clean, and hygienic delivery whether she delivers at home, at a primary health care center, or in a government hospital. The JANMA kit is intended to give women the right to a clean delivery at a low cost. The kit focuses on “six cleans” recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO): clean hands, clean perineum, clean delivery surface, clean cord cutting and tying instruments, and clean cutting surface. JANMA is sourced and assembled in India by rural women, creating an economic opportunity in the communities we serve. JANMA is distributed through an established network of local pharmacies, clinics, and women-focused nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations.AYZH was short listed for Echoing Green (EG). Of 2,854 applications received only 7% were selected for the semi-final round. Seth Cochran, another Maternal Health Champion, has also been selected for the next round.AYZH has also been selected as a finalist at Unreasonable Institute (UI). Of 300 businesses from over 60 countries, 45 have been selected through an intensive evaluation process. We have an arduous task ahead to raise $8000 at the Unreasonable Marketplace to attend the six week intensive mentoring workshop. The first 25 organizations to raise this money will get to attend the Institute. If we are successful, not only will it help us steer our venture in the right direction, but it will also give us access to investors and mentors in the field. Please help us raise these funds by spreading the word among your networks and contributing anything over 5 dollars.Many great opportunities, like the snow in Boston, have been falling into AYZH’s hands. They will make for a very busy, but exciting year!Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Melinda Gates Answers Your Questions, Ctd.

first_imgInvolving women in decision making:One of the best parts of my job is that I get to travel to places like Bangladesh to talk to women about their lives. I learn so much from them. Some of the most extraordinary innovations in health and development in recent decades have come from simple conversations that start with asking people what they need. I particularly like to ask mothers what they dream about for their children’s futures, and the answer is almost always the same wherever I go. They want their children to grow up healthy, and they want to be able to send them to school. Posted on January 13, 2012August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The second and third installments of Melinda Gates’ answers to reader questions are now available.Topics include access to contraceptives in Bangladesh:Bangladesh has made huge improvements in getting women access to contraceptives since its independence 40 years ago. The program has consistently maintained strong support from the highest levels of government and society, and has had great success tapping into the tremendous amount of latent demand for contraceptives. Nearly half of Bangladeshi women use modern contraceptives today, up from just five percent in 1975. The average number of births per woman has dropped correspondingly, from 6.3 to 2.3 over the same period. We often talk about all the benefits that stem from getting women access to family planning tools, but Bangladesh went to great lengths to prove this hypothesis. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:center_img And dealing with corruption:It’s unfortunate and true that Bangladesh is perceived to be one of the world’s most corrupt countries. The Bangladeshis I have met have told me that they feel this in small ways on a fairly regular basis. Because the problem is systemic, it’s hard for them to go against the tide. One doctor I met with yesterday told me that nobody pays attention to traffic lights since you can buy your way out of a ticket for a small fee and because if you don’t run the red light, “everyone else will and you’ll never get to your destination.” Obviously, these unnecessary surcharges on everyday life and other forms of corruption are a major impediment to faster economic growth and it’s something the government and others must address.Share this:last_img read more

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The MHTF is Looking for a Graphics and Content Producer!

first_imgClick here for more information about the position. Posted on March 1, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Maternal Health Task Force is currently seeking a Graphics and Content Producer. To apply, visit Harvard Aspire and search for “Maternal Health Task Force.”Share this: The Graphics and Content Producer will create and manage all MHTF communications materials produced both digitally and in print. S/he will update the homepage regularly; assist MHTF staff with the production and dissemination of new content; manage technical problems as they arise; produce, test, and deliver HTML email messages; provide support for blogs; manage the MHTF’s presence on Twitter, Facebook, and other social networking services; serve as point of contact for and manage contracts with domain registrars, web hosts, bulk email providers, editorial photo libraries, and other website developers and contractors. The Graphics and Content Producer  will conceptualize, design, create, and build infrastructure for the website; and conduct user needs analysis, product evaluation, selection, customization, testing, implementation, and support. This position is grant-funded through 10/31/2014. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Event: Programmatic and Policy Recommendations for Addressing Obstetric Fistula and Uterine Prolapse

first_imgPosted on September 20, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On September 27th, our colleagues at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC will convene an event, Preventing Injuries During Childbirth: Programmatic and Policy Recommendations for Addressing Obstetric Fistula and Uterine Prolapse, featuring several leading experts.Speakers will include Kate Grant (Fistula Foundation), Gillian Slinger (Campaign to End Fistula, UNFPA), Luc de Bernis (United Nations Population Fund), Dr. Lauri Romanzi (New York University Langone Medical Center), and Celia Pett (Fistula Care, EngenderHealth).From our colleagues at the Wilson Center:Obstetric fistula is an injury caused by prolonged labor that creates a hole, or fistula, between a mother’s vagina and the bladder and/or rectum. The result can cause serious pain, stigma, and suffering as well as negative social and economic consequences. According to UNFPA, over two million women worldwide live with the condition and in most cases fistula is preventable and treatable.This event will highlight the prevalence of maternal morbidities in developing countries and share lessons learned in prevention and treatment of fistulas. Panelists will identify key programmatic and policy interventions and make recommendations for moving the campaign to end fistula forward.An art reception will follow and feature two mahilako swastha (“women’s health”) quilts from Nepal. These spectacular quilts are comprised of hand-painted panels that tell the story of uterine prolapse, a condition that affects an estimated 600,000 women in Nepal and is closely associated with poor birthing practices and abuse. The panels were painted by survivors of prolapse in Nepal and assembled into quilts by American quilters from the Faithful Circle Quilting Guild in Columbia, Maryland. The project is managed by the Women’s Reproductive Rights Program in Nepal and the Advocacy Project in Washington, D.C. Iain Guest, executive director of the Advocacy Project, will provide a brief introduction.For more information about the event, click here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Malaria and Maternal Health: Treating Pregnant Women Reveals Need for Integration

first_imgPosted on February 5, 2013March 21, 2017By: Lauren Herzer, Wilson CenterClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is cross-posted on New Security Beat.Ten years ago, a study was conducted in Mozambique to determine the impact of a new medicine for pregnant women with malaria. Over 1,000 women participated in a controlled trial of intermittent preventative treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine – half received a placebo, the other half received the actual drug. All were given an insecticide-treated net.The study found that for those women that received the medicine, there was a 61.3 percent reduction in neonatal mortality; 51 percent reduction in fetal anemia; and 40 percent reduction in the incidences of clinical malaria episodes. The treatment was also found to be highly cost effective, especially after the savings from reduced anemia, oftentimes a result of malaria during pregnancy, were factored in.The infants born to the women who did not receive the treatment experienced a significantly higher death rate.A Compound Global Health ChallengeThe presentation of this study, in the midst of countless technical presentations at the recent Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, prompted a rare emotional response from the audience. One woman asked, “How do you address the ethical implications of the difference in mortality experienced by the placebo group, which experienced a 60 percent increase in mortality?”The presenter and researcher, Clara Menéndez, responded thoughtfully. “Ethical issues are critically important in any research,” she said. But at the time of the study, there was little or no information on the additional effectiveness of intermittent treatment over treated nets to protecting women from malaria during pregnancy.Malaria in pregnancy is a massive and compound global health problem. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that each year, 50 million women become pregnant in malaria-endemic countries around the world and “an estimated 10,000 women and 200,000 of their infants die as a result of malaria infection during pregnancy.” Anemia – a lack of healthy red blood cells that can lead to death – is the biggest risk but low birth rate, neonatal death or stillbirth, and spontaneous abortion are also more likely.The WHO now recommends a combination of intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and insecticide-treated nets as an effective means to preventing and treating malaria in pregnancy.But, Menéndez said, the study was done in 2003:Most countries in Africa weren’t implementing the [World Health Organization’s recommended] policies. …Of course the study went through all of the ethical reviews both within and out of the country, with the Minsters of Health. The neonatal mortality in the placebo group wasn’t higher than the community, just compared to the intervention group.In 2006, after the results the trial, Mozambique did implement the WHO’s policy of intermittent preventative treatment alongside treated nets.Many and Varied Barriers to CareDespite these breakthroughs – and the hard choices made to achieve them – there are still many barriers to the delivery, access, and use of intermittent preventative treatment for both healthcare providers and the millions of pregnant women with malaria today.A recent study conducted by the Malaria in Pregnancy Consortium attempted to do a systematic review of these barriers in sub-Saharan Africa. They found that many pregnant women lacked knowledge of the benefits of intermittent preventative treatment and insecticide-treated nets; had unwarranted fears regarding perceived side effects; and/or did not attend routine antenatal care visits to healthcare providers, which are required for the treatment to be administered. Healthcare providers, on the other hand, were sometimes confused about the timing and dosing of treatments; lacked basic supplies, such as water cups; and/or were sometimes out of stock of the treatment.Understanding this context – one where education is rare, misconceptions common, agency low, and supplies scarce – is key to removing barriers to care. Recognizing this, the WHO has suggested improving integration between reproductive health and malaria programs to concentrate resources and try to create single access points for women’s health.In a presentation on the panel in Arusha, Viviana Mangiaterra of the WHO and Roll Back Malaria, highlighted the importance of this point. “Harmonization of national policies, guidelines and training materials between [reproductive health] and malaria control, as well as strong commitment to national level coordination, can ensure effective implementation of malaria in pregnancy programming,” she said. “This can lead to one point of care which ultimately simplifies care for the patient, minimizes dropout, supports the continuity of care, promotes a comprehensive approach to women’s health, and leads to improved outcomes.”While significant gains in malaria control have been made in the last decade, global funding for malaria prevention and control has leveled off in recent years, sparking a concern that some of the gains made could be lost. According to Mangiaterra, most countries have not achieved country or global targets for intermittent preventative treatment, insecticide-treated nets, or effective case management – the three-pronged approach recommended by the WHO.Indeed, included in the WHO’s latest recommendations is a specific urging to national health authorities in Africa to correct misconceptions and confusion about intermittent preventive treatment in order to reverse slowing efforts to make the treatment more widely available.Knowing what treatments work is a crucial step forward in preventing and treating malaria in pregnancy. But local cultural and social contexts need to be accounted for too. Integrating reproductive health and malaria programs will strengthen the ability of healthcare providers to reach this vulnerable population.Learn more about the conference and access the conference presentations at www.gmhc2013.com.Join the conference conversation on Twitter: #GMHC2013 ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Share this:last_img read more

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