Emmanuel Sanders’ taunt comes back to haunt Broncos

first_imgEmmanuel Sanders wagged his right index finger in the face of Rams cornerback Troy Hill. (AP Photo/Joe Mahoney)DENVER (AP) _ First, Emmanuel Sanders wagged his right index finger in the face of Rams cornerback Troy Hill . Now, he’s pointing it right at himself after Denver’s fourth consecutive loss.After his taunt came back to haunt the Broncos, Sanders accepted the blame for Denver’s latest loss in a monthlong tailspin that has fans in the Rocky Mountains bracing for back-to-back losing seasons for the first time since 1971-72.“I guess this loss is on me,” Sanders said after the Rams escaped frigid Denver as the league’s lone unbeaten team following a 23-20 win Sunday over the Broncos (2-4), who became the first team in NFL history to allow a 200-yard rusher in back-to-back games.Sanders thought he had a 44-yard TD catch from Case Keenum as he tumbled into the end zone in the first quarter. He sprung to his feet and wagged a finger at Hill.Side judge Brad Freeman threw the flag, calling a personal foul on Sanders for taunting.Ordinarily, the flag wouldn’t have mattered much because the 15-yard penalty would have been enforced on the ensuing kickoff and Brandon McManus, after giving Denver a 7-6 lead with an extra point, undoubtedly would still have booted the ball out of the end zone for a touchback.Upon review, however, it turned out Hill had the last laugh, having touched Sanders before he crossed the goal line.That put the ball at the 1.The penalty pushed them back to the 16.After runs of 1 and 5 yards, Keenum’s throwaway on third-and-4 brought in McManus for a field goal instead of an extra point and his 28-yarder cut Denver’s deficit to 6-3.They never did get the lead and those four points would have made the difference in a three-point loss.“Me, honestly, I feel like the league is getting soft,” Sanders said. “I’m having fun. I didn’t do anything crazy to the guy besides say, `Hey, I got you on that play.’ I pointed my finger at him. And they threw the flag.”Sanders said he’s done that his whole career and has never been flagged for it.“It was a great throw by Case, I came down with it, big play, emotions are high. It’s not like I walked up to him and head-butted him or something,” Sanders said. “But it cost my team. We lost by three points. I feel like we could have easily punched that ball in and gotten four (more) points. I guess this loss is on me.”Vance Joseph, who fell to 7-15 as head coach, talked to Sanders on the sideline.“He can’t do that,” Joseph said. “He knows that.”Well, he does now.“I don’t think I did anything too crazy besides point a finger and tell the guy, `Hey I got you on that play.’ I don’t see the penalty in that,” Sanders said. “But I learned from it and like I said, it cost my team. I’ve just got to keep chugging along and don’t do it again.”The costly foul from a nine-year veteran came one week after Sanders’ fellow SMU alum, rookie receiver Courtland Sutton , chased down Marcus Maye at the 1 following a 104-yard interception return at game’s end, leaving the Jets safety with the longest such play without a score in NFL history.“We played two of the best teams in the league, the Chiefs and the Rams, and the games came down to crunch time. And that just shows you what kind of team that we are,” linebacker Shane Ray declared. “We’re a great football team.”Not at 2-4 they aren’t.Even Fox play-by-play man Dick Stockton dissed the Broncos by beginning the telecast saying, “the undefeated Rams take on the Denver Nuggets.”Other takeaways from Week 6 included:CUTTING OUT COLINThe 49ers posted dozens of photos on its website of past games against the Packers in advance of their Monday night game without at first including any of Colin Kaepernick, who set an NFL record for QBs by rushing for 181 yards in a playoff win against Green Bay on Jan. 12, 2013, threw for 413 yards in a season-opening win against the Packers in 2013, and led a winning drive in a playoff game in Green Bay on Jan. 5, 2014.“We have fond memories of those games and that should have been displayed on our website,” the team said in a statement after adding images of Kaepernick. “This oversight does not properly reflect the appreciation our ownership and this team have for Colin.”GRONK HONKTom Brady made light of yelling at Rob Gronkowski in an Instagram post following the Patriots’ 43-40 win over Patrick Mahomes and the Chiefs.In the second quarter, the sideline microphones picked up Brady yelling at Gronkowski to stand up out of his stance, and Brady ended up calling a timeout on the play.Gronk came up big in the fourth quarter with a stiff-arm that helped him gain 42 yards and set up a field goal that gave New England a 40-33 lead.“Gronk, you can line up however you want if you keep stiff-arming people like that,” Brady said.MISSED CALLSAl Riveron, the NFL’s senior vice president of officiating, acknowledged for a second straight week that officials goofed in not calling a running back for lowering his head and barreling into a defender.In his weekly video, Riveron said Patriots rookie Sony Michel should have been flagged for lowering his head to initiate contact with Colts safety Clayton Geathers in Week 5.A week earlier, Riveron noted that Chiefs running back Kareem Hunt should have been flagged for doing the same thing to Broncos safety Justin Simmons.Although Hunt got away without a penalty, his illegal hit did result in a $26,739 fine.NO EXCEPTIONSRiveron defended referee Clete Blakeman’s crew, which didn’t flag Steelers receiver Justin Hunter for blocking Bengals DB Tony McRae beyond 1 yard past the line of scrimmage on Antonio Brown’s 31-yard TD catch from Ben Roethlisberger with 10 seconds left that gave Pittsburgh a 28-21 win on Sunday.“The contact is initiated by the defender,” Riveron said on Twitter , “and therefore the receiver is not responsible for this contact.”NFL rule 8, Section 5, Article 4 states: “Blocking more than 1 yard beyond the line of scrimmage by an offensive player prior to a pass being thrown is offensive pass interference.”The rule book, however, doesn’t specify an exception for defenders initiating contact.___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/tag/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL___Follow Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapletonlast_img

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – Wednesday December 16, 2015

first_imgFINISH LINES: Santa Anita will once again give away its popular Wall Calendar free on opening day to all fans at the track with paid admission while supplies last. The theme of the 2016 calendar is “What’s in a name,” describing how Thoroughbreds come by their monikers . . . The first 20,000 paid attendees will receive a $100 Mathis Brothers Furniture gift certificate and the first 5,000 kids 17 and under will get a plush, mini-Thoroughbred toy, courtesy of Mathis Brothers . . . Agent Brad Pegram has booked Hall of Fame jockey Mike Smith on multiple graded stakes winner El Kabeir for owner Ahmed Zayat and trainer John Terranova II in the Malibu. El Kabeir’s sire is Scat Daddy, who died Monday at the age of 11, young for a stallion.The son of Johannesburg stood at Coolmore Ashford Stud in Versailles, Ky. Also coming in for the Malibu is Zia Park Derby runner-up Pain and Misery for trainer Henry Dominguez . . . Abel Lezcano, a 24-year-old native of Panama, will be a regular at Santa Anita, according to his agent, Nelson Arroyo. “Lezcano has been riding for five years, mainly in Kentucky and New York. I came out to Del Mar with Stuart Elliott last year but he got hurt early in the meet after winning the Best Pal Stakes for Mark Casse,” Arroyo said. “I was so impressed with the treatment I received and the racing here, I fell in love with Southern California.” . . . Jockey Matt Garcia hopes to make a comeback soon. Injured in a riding mishap at Ferndale on Aug. 18, 2013, the 45-year-old rider suffered fractures in his neck and back when he was stepped on by a horse. He is exercising horses now and “hopes to ride again if I get the opportunity. Doctors inserted a plate and six screws, but I’m in no pain. I’m going one day at a time. Getting on a horse is everything to me. It’s my life.” . . . Agent Vince DeGregory has taken the book of jockey Tiago Pereira, currently in his native Brazil, but due to return to the states Dec. 22 in time to ride opening day . . . Agent Vic Lipton will represent apprentice Brayan Pena, who has 25 wins and presently carries a seven-pound weight allowance. According to California Horse Racing Board rule 1619, Pena will ride with the “bug” until he reaches 40 victories or until October, 2016, whichever comes first . . . Trainer Dan Hendricks has multiple stakes winner Om set for the Grade II, $200,000 Mathis Brothers Mile (turf) for three-year-olds on opening day. With Gary Stevens aboard, Om worked six furlongs on the main track Wednesday in 1:14.40. “He galloped out real strong,” Hendricks said. “We’re all set.” . . . San Pasqual Stakes winner Hoppertunity worked five furlongs for Bob Baffert in 1:00.40 . . . Stormy Lucy, who pulled a 65-1 upset in Del Mar’s Matriarch under Kent Desormeaux to give Ed Moger Jr. his first Grade I win in 40 years as a trainer, is ticketed for the Grade III Robert J. Frankel Stakes at 1 1/8 miles on turf Dec. 27, as is Grade I winner Warren’s Veneda, who worked six furlongs on the main track Saturday in 1:13.80 for Craig Lewis with Tyler Baze up . . . Retired turf writer and handicapper for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner & Orange County Register Jerry Antonucci will be Tom Quigley‘s seminar guest on opening day, 10:50 a.m. in the East Paddock Gardens. On Sunday, 2015 NHC Tour champion Jonathan Kinchen will do the honors starting at 11:20 a.m. . . .Happiness is just a thing called “Joe.” Los Angeles Turf Club Chairman Keith Brackpool announced today that all visitors to Clockers’ Corner throughout the meet will receive their first cup of coffee free.  Decaf or regular, your choice. FOUR CHAMPS EYE RETURN DURING SANTA ANITA MEET Champions Beholder, California Chrome, Nyquist and Songbird could showcase their Eclipse Award talents at Santa Anita’s Winter Meet that begins its 79th season of world-class racing on Saturday, Dec. 26 with a 12 noon first post time. Admission gates open at 10 a.m.Beholder’s next race is at least two months away. The two-time Eclipse Award championcurrently is enjoying R&R in a grass paddock at Peacefield Farm in Temecula “and she’ll be back in” to Santa Anita around Jan. 1, trainer Richard Mandella said.“It’s just life,” Mandella reasoned philosophically about the daughter of Henny Hughes,who missed the Breeders’ Cup Classic on Oct. 31 due to a fever, but owns a remarkable 11 wins from 12 starts at Santa Anita.California Chrome, 2014 Horse of the Year but unraced since finishing second in the Dubai World Cup last March, has been compiling frequent flier mileage since, but is “doing great” now at his Los Alamitos headquarters.“He’s working every Saturday and getting stronger and stronger,” trainer Art Sherman said of the California-bred son of Lucky Pulpit. “We have the San Pasqual Stakes on Jan. 9 scheduled as his comeback race.”Unbeaten Breeders’ Cup Juvenile winner Nyquist has the Grade II, $200,000 San Vicente Stakes at seven furlongs on Feb. 15 ticketed for his three-year-old debut.“It all depends on how he looks and feels,” trainer Doug O’Neill said of the Uncle Mo colt owned by Reddam Racing, a slam-dunk to be named champion male two-year-old of 2015.“Right now the San Vicente is under strong consideration.”            Undefeated Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies winner Songbird, who should be a unanimous choice as champion two-year-old filly of 2015, is galloping at Santa Anita with no announced date for her first breeze back, but the Grade II, $300,000 Las Virgenes Stakes at one mile on Feb. 6 is a long-range goal, according to Jerry Hollendorfer assistant Dan Ward.As previously stated, Beholder has won 11 of 12 starts at Santa Anita; California Chrome three of five; Nyquist two of two; and Songbird one of one, giving the four horses a combined record of 17 victories from 20 starts at Santa Anita, an astounding 85 percent. STEPHEN/SANTIAGO: A MATCH MADE IN OVERNIGHT HEAVENOn arguably one of the most competitive circuits in the land, jockey Santiago Gonzalez remains below the radar among mainstream race goers, but not with blue chip bettors, who recognize that the 32-year-old native of Maracaibo, Venezuela, offers value on almost any horse he rides.Gonzalez was second to perennial Southern California riding king Rafael Bejarano at the recent Del Mar meet, 20-18, and currently is vying for leading rider honors at Los Alamitos.Asked if he envisioned this kind of success when he teamed up with Gonzalez a year ago, agent Craig Stephen said, “Not a chance. It all came to pass through hard work. My car was brand new with 100 miles on it when we began, and now it’s got 28,000 miles on it, so that shows how much running around we did working horses.“We’d go to Santa Anita, San Luis Rey, Los Al, back and forth. I mean, it was no holds barred. On Dec. 12, 2014, I picked him up 11:30 at night at LAX; he rode his first race Dec. 26 at Santa Anita and was second in a photo finish on a 40-1 shot named Life’s Journey for (trainer) Marsha Schwizer.“I couldn’t tell you how many thousands of horses he’s worked from then until now to get to where he’s at, and it’s due to hard work by both of us, but mostly Santiago, because he’s the one getting on the horses.”Stephen, a 52-year-old who is Boston born and raised and still has a noticeable “pack the cah” accent, trained for a dozen years before becoming an agent for the second time.“Being an agent is the easiest thing in the world,” said Stephen, whose boisterous mirth is as recognizable as his girth. “I was a jock’s agent before and another time (I was) agent for a van company. The difference between being an agent for a van company and a jockey is basically the same sell: ‘Can I move a horse for you, can I ride a horse for you?’ The check is certainly greater as a jock’s agent.“My friends have helped me out. (Trainer) Jim Cassidy was huge in making this kid successful. He was the first guy to give Santiago a shot in stakes. Eric Guillot gave us a shot in the Santa Anita Handicap on Moreno when he ran second to Shared Belief (last March 7).“The funny thing was, the day after the race, on the radio they were talking about how Santiago rode Moreno so well from the five-eighths pole to the wire to finish second. They forgot all about the winner. It was so weird. Shared Belief might be the greatest horse of all time, and they’re talking about Moreno and the ride Santiago put up.”Stephen is a race track lifer.“My dad was dragging me out to the track when I was in a carriage,” Stephen recalled. “I remember going to the Marshfield Fair. My dad (Mike), who’s 88 now, owned horses and trained horses for a stint. He always had two or three horses. My uncle, Rick Stephen, had a bunch of great horses, including Windsharp, a multiple graded stakes-winning mare trained by the late Wally Dollase.“My whole family’s been in the sport forever.”Windsharp became the first female ever to capture the San Luis Rey Stakes in 1996 when it was a Grade I race, coming from dead last on the far turn to win the mile and a half marathon by a neck under Eddie Delahoussaye.Added Cassidy: “I have a lot of confidence in Santiago when he rides a horse for me. I liked him right from the start. I watched him in the mornings and that’s when I started using him, and we’ve had a lot of success.“He’s got a good head; we don’t converse very much because his English is kind of lacking, but he knows what’s going on, and I think he’s getting better and better.” FLAVIEN PRAT RETURNS OPENING DAY AT SANTA ANITA            Flavien Prat, one of the most surprising gifts from France since the Statue of Liberty, will resume riding at Santa Anita on opening day after recovering from injuries suffered in a riding mishap at Los Alamitos on Sept. 17.“He’s nearly fully recovered, but doctors have given him the OK to ride,” said his agent, Derek Lawson. “He’s been getting on horses the last week-and-a-half and undergoing physical therapy the last two weeks.“He had seven fractures and a (right) lung that kind of blew up on him, and he spent close to two-and-a-quarter months in a body brace, but he’s completely healed and he’s ready to go; he’s chomping at the bit.”center_img BREEDERS’ CUP KING RUNHAPPY INVADES FOR MALIBU            Breeders’ Cup Sprint winner Runhappy, who set a Keeneland record of 1:08.58 for six furlongs in winning that rich race on Oct. 31, worked seven furlongs under Gary Stevens Tuesday morning in 1:25.40 for the Grade I Malibu Stakes on opening day.“It was a nice, steady, pretty even kind of work,” said Stevens, who rides the son of 2010 Kentucky Derby winner Super Saver for the first time in the seven furlong Malibu. “He finished up good and strong, was very balanced, and I love what I felt.”Owned by James McIngvale and trained by Laura Wohlers, Runhappy has won six of seven career starts and had a palpable excuse in his lone loss and lone route race, the Grade III LeComte Stakes at a mile and 70 yards at the Fair Grounds last Jan. 15. He finished ninth by 21 ½ lengths after he was bumped hard at the break and again at the 7 ½ furlong marker.“I feel like he went well in the work,” said Wohlers, who has been at Santa Anita before, having trained at San Luis Rey Downs in 2006 and 2007.“It’s been a slow-playing track this week, and despite all the moisture on it, I think he finished up pretty good. I’m happy with the work. He’ll probably do a little something down the lane before the race.“We like to work at intervals of about every seven days, but we’ll probably do a quarter down the lane next Tuesday.” SANTA ANITA’S ‘MEET OF CHAMPIONS’ BEGINS ON DEC. 26BC SPRINT WINNER RUNHAPPY SET FOR GRADE I MALIBUPRAT RESUMES RIDING ON OPENING DAY AT SANTA ANITAHARD WORK PAYS FOR AGENT STEPHEN, JOCKEY GONZALEZPOPULAR WALL CALENDAR GIVEAWAY ON OPENING DAYFREE COFFEE TO WARM YOUR HEART AT CLOCKERS’ CORNERlast_img read more

Newly discovered Tanzanian frog already facing extinction

first_imgCitations: Barratt, C. D., Lawson, L. P., Bittencourt-Silva, G. B., Doggart, N., Morgan-Brown, T., Nagel, P., & Loader, S. P. (2017). A new, narrowly distributed, and critically endangered species of spiny-throated reed frog (Anura: Hyperoliidae) from a highly threatened coastal forest reserve in Tanzania. Herpetological Journal, 27, 13-24.Hansen, M. C., P. V. Potapov, R. Moore, M. Hancher, S. A. Turubanova, A. Tyukavina, D. Thau, S. V. Stehman, S. J. Goetz, T. R. Loveland, A. Kommareddy, A. Egorov, L. Chini, C. O. Justice, and J. R. G. Townshend. 2013. “High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change.” Science 342 (15 November): 850–53. Data available on-line from:http://earthenginepartners.appspot.com/science-2013-global-forest. Accessed through Global Forest Watch on March 02, 2017. www.globalforestwatch.orgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Amphibians, charcoal, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Frogs, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, New Species, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis The new frog was collected in 2001 from Ruvu South Forest Reserve in Tanzania, in habitat atypical for spiny reed frogs.The scientists who collected it couldn’t identify it in the field. Fourteen years later, they sequenced the frog’s DNA, which revealed that it was a species previously unknown to science.The new species is represented by just one museum specimen. Recent attempts to find more in Ruvu South Forest Reserve failed to turn up the sought-after frogs, leaving researchers worried the species is being wiped out by dramatic deforestation affecting the reserve and surrounding areas. You don’t have to travel far to discover a new species – just head to the natural history museum.At least that’s how Chris Barratt, a doctoral student at the University of Basel in Switzerland, discovered Hyperolius ruvuensis, the newest species to be named in the clad of so-called spiny-throated reed frogs. The species has been preserved in the Museum of Natural History in London for more than a decade, but was never properly examined and described, Barrett says. That is, until now.“It sat in the museum for 14 years before we took it out,” Barratt told Mongabay. “We were hoping it would still have DNA [needed for identification], and it did.”Barratt and his colleague had a hunch that the museum specimen of now-named H. ruvuensis – then listed as another species in the spiny-throated clad – was indeed a new frog. The unusual pattern of the frog’s spines was the first clue, which prompted Barratt to analyze specimen’s DNA and morphology. Published last month in the Herpetological Journal, his analysis revealed that the specimen is in fact a new species of spiny-throated reed frog, a clade of seven species named for what he describes as a “beard” of spines, which serve a purpose still unknown.The “new” species was collected more than 15 years ago in Ruvu South Forest Reserve, a small protected area just outside of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. At the time, David Emmett – then a wildlife biologist with the NGO The Society for Environmental Exploration – was surveying the reserve.The newly discovered Ruvu spiny reed frog (Hyperolius ruvuensis)from Ruvu South Forest Reserve has never been photographed in the wild and is only known from museum specimens collected in 2001. Photo by Chris Barret“One evening I could hear this reed frog calling,” he told Mongabay. “And I remember thinking: ‘Well, that’s strange. They shouldn’t be here’.”That’s because reed frogs hadn’t been known to inhabit lowland, coastal forests – the very landscape that typified Ruvu South Forest Reserve. This piqued Emmett’s interest, so he waded into the reeds, where he found several frogs that he’d never seen before.Like any wildlife biologist would do, he turned to field guides for answers, he said.“Every time you find anything, you look at the books,” Emmett said. “Normally, you can identify something straight away, but when you’ve gone through to the last page of the book and the frog is still not there, you start to get excited.”He reached the last page, but still couldn’t find a match. Sensing a possible species discovery, he collected a few of the frogs and sent them off to London, where they would later be identified.Ruvu South Forest Reserve is an unusual place to discover a new species, the authors say. Indeed, scientists typically find new species in unexplored, intact, and isolated habitats – and none of these terms describe the reserve. According to Barratt, that’s part of what makes this discovery especially exciting.“This discovery shows us that even a small forest reserve right next to a busy city that’s been surveyed quite a lot can yield new species,” he said. “For me, that’s really exciting.”But it’s alarming as well, the researchers write. That’s because H. ruvuensis is likely “microendemic” to the reserve, meaning it’s found nowhere else on the planet, according to the study. In other words: if habitat in the reserve is wiped out, the species will be, too.And habitat loss is already well underway. Tree cover data from the University of Maryland reveals that more than 3,000 hectares – or 13 percent – of the reserve’s forests were cleared between 2000 and 2014. Research by the Tanzania Forest Conservation Group (TFCG), a local NGO, points to fire and illegal charcoal production as the primary drivers.Around 13 percent of the tree cover in Ruvu South Forest Reserve was lost between 2001 and 2014. Currently, forests remain in around 66 percent of the reserve.Hyperolius ruvuensis hasn’t been seen in the wild since it was first found by Emmett’s team in 2001, despite recent attempts to track it down.But that doesn’t mean the species is extinct, the researchers say – more research is needed to make that determination. For now, the authors recommend that H. ruvuensis be classified as Critically Endangered by The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), a category saved for species that are facing a high risk of extinction in the wild, like the Sumatran orangutan.The future of H. ruvuensis – and other species in the reserve – relies on stronger enforcement of protected area laws, Barratt says. And it’s now or never, he adds.“There has to be something done in a way to mitigate people going into the forest and cutting a trees down,” he said. “It’s really at the stage now where it’s completely critical that they do something.”Emmett, now a Senior Vice President at Conservation International, agrees on the state of urgency.“To me this species being discovered and potentially disappearing is a rallying cry to the urgency of the need [for] better protected nature because we don’t know what we’ve got until it’s gone,” he said. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Greenpeace to take Indonesian forestry ministry to Supreme Court over environmental data

first_imgActivism, Conservation Technology, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Forestry, Forests, Freedom of Information, Governance, Mapping, Rainforests, Technology, Technology And Conservation, Transparency, Tropical Forests Article published by mongabayauthor Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Greenpeace wants the ministry to release seven different geospatial maps of Indonesia in the shapefile format.The ministry is willing to publish PDF and JPEG versions of the maps, but it says shapefiles can’t be reliably authenticated and could therefore be altered by third parties.Greenpeace contends the shapefiles could quite simply be digitally signed. Greenpeace will appeal a Jakarta court’s ruling against its freedom of information request directed at the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry, setting up an encounter between the NGO and President Joko Widodo’s administration in the nation’s highest court.Greenpeace wants the ministry to release a range of data pertaining to the management of the country’s natural resources, especially in the forestry, agribusiness and mining sectors. Much of the data is already available as PDF and JPEG files, but Greenpeace is specifically seeking it in the shapefile (SHP) format. Shapefiles allow for much more sophisticated analysis and watchdogs say it is crucial that they have it if they are to play a monitoring role in the world’s third-largest democracy. Indonesia is less than two decades removed from a military dictatorship historians describe as one of the modern era’s most rapacious and corrupt.Last October, Greenpeace won round one in the case at the Central Information Commission. But the ministry appealed the commission’s decision to the Jakarta State Administrative Court, and the verdict last month went the other way.Oil palm plantations border a rainforest in Borneo, a giant island shared by Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerAt the heart of the dispute is whether it is possible to reliably authenticate a shapefile. The ministry argues that because it cannot watermark a shapefile in ink as it would a JPEG or PDF, the data must remain confidential, lest some rogue actor pass off a doctored version as the real thing.Greenpeace counters it is quite simple to digitally sign a shapefile using the Kleopatra certificate manager. The ministry could certify and timestamp a document in such as way that any forgery could be easily debunked. “Even if someone fakes the signature, it can still be detected,” said Greenpeace information technologist Yudho, who demonstrated the process in court. “It’s really impossible to fake.”He pointed to the 2008 Information Law, which says, “Electronic Signatures have an equal position to manual signatures in general, with legal force and legal effect.”The ministry has meanwhile referred to the 2011 Geospatial Law, which stipulates that bureaucrats can only release officially legitimate geospatial information to prevent misuse or alteration.Agribusinesses and extractive companies generally resist disclosure of such data on the grounds that it would disadvantage them vis-a-vis their competitors.Banner image: Fires burn on a peat swamp planted with oil palm on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra during the 2015 Southeast Asian haze crisis. Plantation companies are legally obliged to prevent fires on their land, but observers often struggle to determine whose land is burning because of a lack of transparency in the way of licensing data and concession maps. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerA previous version of this article identified the Greenpeace information technologist by his nickname, Iyoet.last_img read more

Antarctica’s Larsen C calves giant 5,800 square kilometer iceberg

first_imgClimate, Climate Change, Climate Science, Earth Science, Ice Shelves, Impact Of Climate Change, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Sea Ice Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img On Wednesday, a 5,800 square kilometer (2,239 square mile) section of Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice shelf, an area nearly the size of the U.S. state of Delaware, broke free and fell into the Southern Ocean.Scientists had been watching a lengthening and widening rift in the ice and expecting the separation since last December, though complex ice dynamics prevented them from knowing the exact day of separation.Researchers, including Dan McGrath, a geophysicist with the United States Geological Survey, have been watching the event with great interest.The resulting gigantic iceberg will not raise sea level, since the ice was already floating. However, researchers are concerned that the loss may weaken the remaining ice, leading to the collapse of the entire Larsen C Ice Shelf. The widening rift that opened in the Larsen C Ice Shelf as seen from an aircraft. Photo by the British Antarctic SurveyOn Wednesday, all eyes were on Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf as a long-awaited one-trillion tonne iceberg, the size of the U.S. state of Delaware, was found to have finally broken loose, floating off into the Southern Ocean — and into the record books.Scientists had been closely monitoring the ice shelf, the continent’s fourth largest, since last December, when they observed the then-90-mile long rift suddenly surge forward 11 miles.Unable to put boots on the ground due to the ice shelf’s remote location, harsh weather and safety concerns, scientists relied on satellite imagery and the occasional fly-over to survey the rift in the months leading up to the calving. The lack of up-close surveillance, along with complex ice shelf dynamics, didn’t allow researchers to pinpoint the precise calving date, with Wednesday’s event very much expected, but coming as a bit of a surprise.Larsen C rift and locater map. Map created by Project Midas, A. Luckman, Swansea University“It’s kind of like predicting earthquakes. There’s a lot of chaotic science,” says Dan McGrath, a geophysicist at the United States Geological Survey.Though the break-off was ultimately sooner than anyone anticipated, scientists weren’t expecting the last stretch of the iceberg to hang on so long.“We have been anticipating this event for months, and have been surprised how long it took for the rift to break through the final few kilometers of ice,” says Adrian Luckman, lead investigator of the Project MIDAS monitoring project.Though few scientists have ever visited Larsen C, McGrath was lucky enough to spend three field seasons camped out on the ice shelf — in some cases, “really darn close” to the eventual rift — between 2009 and 2012.Following the collapse of Larsen A and Larsen B in 1995 and 2002, respectively, McGrath decided to assess the stability of Larsen C in a warming climate for his PhD dissertation.Sunset from McGrath’s former camp on Larsen C. Today, the ice in the direction of the sun is drifting free, out into the Antarctic Ocean. “I believe [we’re] looking in a [north-northeast] direction of the soon to calve section,” says McGrath. Photo courtesy of the United States Geological SurveyAt this point, the calving event can’t be directly tied to climate change, he says. Between the 1950s and 2000s, the Antarctica Peninsula was one of the fastest warming locations on the planet. Lately, though, temperatures have been more variable, leading to an overall cooling in recent years, something that scientists can’t precisely explain.For up to six weeks at a time, McGrath was stationed on the ice shelf, occupying a series of polar pyramids and dome tents. Temperatures hovered around −35 degrees Celsius (-31 Fahrenheit), with the warmest days reaching a balmy −5 degrees Celsius (23 Fahrenheit) during fieldwork.When the weather was nice and the days were long, McGrath would power up his snow machine and travel tens of kilometers across the ice shelf to conduct radar surveys.For weeks, researcher Dan McGrath would traverse the Larsen C Ice Shelf by snow machine conducting radar surveys. Photo courtesy of the United States Geological SurveyMcGrath’s colleague Tom Weston drills a shallow core (~8 cm in diameter) from the upper layers of the Larsen C Ice Shelf. Ice cores are used to measure density and the history of melt events. Photo courtesy of the United States Geological Survey“We’d get up in the morning and go out, then come back to camp at 8 p.m., make a pot of espresso, grab some Snickers, and go back out again.” The skies never darkened past dusk. But in bad weather, McGrath would be unable to leave the tent for days at a time — and in one year, the entire field season was called off due to bad weather which prevented planes from getting over the infamous Drake Passage.“When it’s nice, it’s a pretty spectacular place to be — you’re on this huge floating pancake of ice. But it’s a cloudy, stormy place, and those days are pretty few and far between.”During his time on the ice, McGrath says the rift wasn’t a primary concern. “These rifts are common features of ice shelves,” he says. Many are visible in some of the earliest aerial photos of the region taken in the 1960s. Despite some warning signs, like significant surface melt and thinning ice, he and his colleagues ultimately believed the Larsen C shelf would be stable into the foreseeable future.Dan McGrath installs a new GPS antenna on top of an automatic weather station on the Larsen C Ice sShelf. Photo courtesy of the United States Geological SurveyBut now, with roughly 12 percent of the ice shelf broken off, scientists have changed their view, and believe the rest could go quickly. It’s possible that more rifts could form, leading to more calving. If this calving reaches the compressive arch — the equivalent of the keystone that supports an igloo — the whole shelf will collapse soon after. Following the break-off, we’re now roughly 15 to 45 miles from reaching that keystone.With the sudden and rapid changes occurring on Larsen C, getting back to what remains of the ice shelf will be difficult, says McGrath. Prior to the iceberg’s calving, he had submitted two proposals to go down and study the rift by placing instruments into the ice to survey how much the rift had propagated. Unfortunately, funding didn’t come through in time, and all future work will likely be plagued and maybe prevented by safety concerns.Thus far, the collaborative, UK-based Project Midas has provided the most secure vantage point. Project Midas first began monitoring the rift back in 2014 via satellite imagery, but this proved difficult. Skies over Larsen C are very cloudy, and months sometimes passed before satellites were able to pick up the advancing rift tip. Rather, researchers had to combine sequential pairs of advanced satellite images via interferometry to be able to see any changes at the tip of the rift.On Wednesday, the final break-off was detected by NASA’s Aqua MODIS satellite instrument, which uses thermal infrared imaging, and later confirmed by NASA’s Suomi VIIRS radiometer instrument. The majority of monitoring over the last seven months, however, was done via the upgraded European Space Agency Sentinel-1 satellites which are able to penetrate through cloud cover and polar darkness. Research planes had already departed the region in preparation for the coming winter.The record-breaking iceberg, twice the volume of Lake Erie, won’t contribute to sea level rise — ice shelves are already floating, much like ice cubes in a glass of water, meaning no seawater is displaced when an shelf breaks off. However, the calving could have consequences if it leads to the entire Larsen C ice shelf collapsing — then on-shore Antarctic glaciers could begin to flow more quickly to the sea, and raise ocean levels.“Ice shelves are like the cork in the wine bottle,” explains McGrath. “They resist the flow of upstream glaciers. If you weaken or remove the ice shelf, those glaciers respond by flowing faster.”In a blog post in January 2017, Project Midas wrote: “This event will fundamentally change landscape of the Antarctic Peninsula… The new configuration will be less stable than it was prior to the rift, and Larsen C may eventually follow the example of its neighbor Larsen B, which disintegrated in 2002 following a similar rift-induced calving event.”For now, the immense iceberg will be closely monitored by scientists as it floats off into the ocean.“The iceberg is one of the largest recorded and its future progress is difficult to predict,” says Luckman. “It may remain in one piece but is more likely to break into fragments. Some of the ice may remain in the area for decades, while parts of the iceberg may drift north into warmer waters.”Correction: This article was updated to include more precise data plus quotes from the 12 July Project MIDAS press release.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.During three field seasons spent on Larsen C, researcher Dan McGrath lived in a small tent village consisting of dome and polar pyramid shelters. The vast stretch of ice seen here is now drifting northward as part of a massive iceberg. Photo courtesy of the United States Geological Surveylast_img read more

‘I’m really sorry for that’, says Chris Gayle

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia (CMC):Under-fire Chris Gayle has apologised for comments made to a female reporter during a live television interview in Australia.Gayle has described his comments to Network Ten’s Mel McLaughlin as “a simple joke”, saying his intention was not to disrespect her.The flamboyant West Indies cricketer, who plays for Melbourne Renegades in Australia’s Big Bash League (BBL), has been fined AUS$10,000 (US$7,200) by the franchise.”If she felt that way, I’m really sorry for that. There wasn’t any harm meant in that particular way, to harm any particular person in any particular way like that,” Gayle told reporters at Melbourne Airport after touching down with his teammates.”It was a simple joke … . I don’t know how it reached this far, to be honest. It is one of those things.”During the interview with McLaughlin after his explosive 41, Gayle said: “Hopefully, we can win and go for a drink after. Don’t blush, baby.”His comments have been heavily criticised, with the BBL blasting them as “disrespectful and simply inappropriate”.Gayle said he has been unsuccessful in his efforts to contact McLaughlin to apologise to her.”It seemed to be blown out of proportion. There wasn’t anything at all meant to be disrespectful to Mel. It was a simple comment, a simple joke,” he insisted.”No, I didn’t get a chance to. I tried to reach out to her last night, but it didn’t happen.”last_img read more

Colombia’s ‘Heart of the World’: Mining, megaprojects overrun indigenous land

first_imgThe Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta is an isolated group of mountains situated along Colombia’s northern coast, which has the unique distinction of harboring more threatened endemic species than anywhere else in the world.Agricultural expansion has come at the expense of vital habitat over the past several decades. Now, resource exploitation and infrastructure projects planned for the region are further threatening the mountains’ ecosystems, according to scientists and local activists.Four indigenous groups inhabit the region: the Kogui, Arhuaco, Wiwa, and Kankuamo. Since 1973, the Colombian government has recognized a ring of sacred sites extending around the base of the mountain range. Collectively known as the “Black Line,” indigenous communities claim them as their ancestral territory.Three years ago, the indigenous councils filed a legal action with the Constitutional Court, arguing that their constitutional rights were violated by legal and illegal mining taking place inside the Black Line. In addition to the mining, the councils denounced large-scale infrastructure projects such as the development of a coal-shipping port, hydroelectric dam, and hotel that had been carried out inside the Black Line without indigenous consent. The court has yet to issue a ruling. Jaime Luis Arias grew up on the southern slopes of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. An isolated coastal pyramid-shaped massif in northern Colombia, the Sierra Nevada is one of the highest coastal mountains on the planet, with the snow-capped peaks rising from the Caribbean Sea to a mystifying 5,800 meters (19,000 feet).The Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta’s dramatic changes in elevation have created a vibrant reflection of Colombia’s many ecosystems — rainforests, savannas, tropical dry forests, tropical alpine tundra, glaciers, deserts and coral reefs — with more threatened endemic species than anywhere else in the world.“I grew up of the Kankuamo people, in the mid-highlands of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta,” Arias said. “For us, growing up there is a great privilege, this is why we call it ‘the heart of the world.’”Glaciers gather like clouds around the peaks of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. Image courtesy of Fundacion Antelopus.Four indigenous groups inhabit the region: the Kogui, Arhuaco, Wiwa, and Kankuamo. In their spiritual beliefs, the Sierra Nevada is considered to be the heart of the world, where every element, object and organism, from the soaring peak to the gentle stream, forms an indispensable part of an interconnected body.“For us, there is life in all the elements. The peaks, rivers, animals, plants, stones and planets are all in constant interaction to achieve harmony and balance in nature and with ourselves,” Arias said. “What affects one, affects the entire ecosystem.”The Sierra Nevada covers some 17,000 square kilometers (6,560 square miles). The remote highlands and midlands are protected by a national park along with three indigenous reserves that overlap and exceed the land covered by the park. The indigenous communities that inhabit the remote mountain region, however, consider themselves defenders of a far more extensive territory than what is officially protected.The Black LineSince 1973, the Colombian government has recognized a ring of sacred sites extending around the base of the mountain range. Collectively known as the “Black Line,” indigenous communities claim them as their ancestral territory.The Territorial Indigenous Council of Governors of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (CTC) describes the Black Line as “a grand system of interconnected land, sea and air nodes. Considered sacred as a whole, it is the space from which the culture of the four indigenous peoples of the Sierra Nevada arises, and where it is recreated.”But with valuable resources underfoot, such as oil and gold, there are competing visions for the future of the Black Line. Arias said pressure from mining interests inside the Black Line escalated 15 years ago under the administration of former President Álvaro Uribe, whose government undertook a series of large-scale infrastructure projects in the region.“There has always been pressure on the Sierra Nevada, but it was under Uribe when the number of mining applications and concessions exploded,” Arias said. “Now, legislative negligence presents us with 132 mining titles and 260 mining applications to exploit minerals and carbon.”The Black Line encircles the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, which has lost nearly all of its lowland primary forest due to agriculture. Satellite data indicate the region’s deforestation rate increased in 2019. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Colombia’s 1991 Constitution guarantees ethnic minorities the right to prior consultation on projects that have an environmental or social impact on collective territories. In 2014, the country’s Constitutional Court ordered the suspension of a mining title inside the Black Line because it had failed to undergo a prior consultation with indigenous communities.Following the court order, the government of former President Juan Manuel Santos cited the indigenous communities with nearly 400 consultation procedures for largely small-scale mining projects. The indigenous communities pushed back, saying the exercise was “exhausting and counterproductive” until clear rules were set to order the process.Three years ago, the indigenous councils filed a legal action known as a tutela with the Constitutional Court, arguing that their constitutional rights were violated by legal and illegal mining taking place inside the Black Line. In addition to the mining, the councils denounced large-scale infrastructure projects such as the coal-shipping port Puerto Brisa, the hydroelectric dam Ranchería, and the hotel Los Ciruelos that had been carried out inside the Black Line without indigenous consent. The court has yet to issue a ruling.After years of waiting for a ruling from the courts, indigenous authorities, known as mamos, descended from high up in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, traveling more than 800 km (500 mi) to the county’s capital, Bogotá, to send a message to the Colombian public and put pressure on the government, calling on the Constitutional Court to protect the Black Line boundary.“The Heart of the World is at risk of physical and cultural extermination,” the CTC said in a press statement. “The extractionist model of development, particularly mining and megaprojects, threatens the survival of the four indigenous peoples, and the unique ecosystem of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta.”The indigenous leaders called on the central government to respect and protect the ancestral territory of the Sierra Nevada, and suspend the mining and megaproject concessions granted inside the Black Line.Private property owners and trade groups have spoken out against the court’s recognition of indigenous ancestral claims to the Black Line. In conversations with local media, the trade groups have said they fear the indigenous groups will create legal obstacles for private property owners, urban expansion, and put the future of infrastructure and development projects in “limbo.”Arias rejected the argument that the indigenous communities pose “an obstacle” to economic development, saying that he envisions a path for regional development in harmony with nature. He said indigenous residents of the area “want to have coexistence with other social sectors, but without losing the fundamental, which is the territory.”Violence past and presentThe Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta has been plagued by hundreds of years of political violence and colonization, presenting an existential threat to indigenous inhabitants’ cultural survival and the region’s fragile ecosystems. The Kogui, Arhauco, Wiwa and Kankuamo are believed to be descendants of the Tairona people who escaped Spanish colonization by moving their settlements to the remote high mountains.By the turn of the 20th century, much of the western side of the Sierra Nevada had been converted for banana plantations by U.S.-based United Fruit Company, which built railways and residential villages, administrative areas, service areas and workers’ camps following American models. Campesinos, farmers who came from Colombia’s interior regions, settled in the mid-highlands to grow commercial crops, especially coffee and cocoa, on rich agricultural lands.last_img read more

Kylian Mbappé (PSG) forfait pour les Bleus et la Ligue des champions

first_imgL’attaquant star du PSG Kylian Mbappé, victime d’une “déchirure musculaire” lors de la victoire contre Toulouse (4-0) dimanche, sera absent “entre trois et quatre semaines” et manquera les deux prochains matches des Bleus voire le premier match de Ligue des champions, indiquent lundi plusieurs médias.Selon Le Parisien, L’Équipe et RMC, les examens médicaux du buteur parisien (20 ans) ont révélé une “déchirure musculaire” à l’arrière de la cuisse gauche, synonyme de “trois semaines à quatre semaines” d’arrêt avant un retour à la compétition. Le PSG a dans la foulée confirmé une absence de “quatre semaines”.Il s’agit du premier pépin physique majeur du prodige français depuis son explosion au plus haut niveau en 2017. Conséquence, Mbappé a déclaré forfait pour les deux matches de rentrée de l’équipe de France, les 7 et 10 septembre contre l’Albanie et Andorre dans le cadre des éliminatoires de l’Euro-2020, alors que Didier Deschamps doit annoncer sa liste jeudi.Le n° 7 parisien devrait manquer également les débuts du PSG en Ligue des champions, objectif majeur du club parisien, dont la première journée est programmée les 17 et 18 septembre.Mbappé rejoint la longue liste de blessés qui ne cessent de s’accumuler au PSG depuis le début de la saison. Outre Ander Herrera (mollet), Thilo Kehrer (pied) et Julian Draxler (voûte plantaire), Abdou Diallo et Edinson Cavani sont également sortis sur blessure dimanche.Conséquence à court terme pour le PSG, la ligne d’attaque de Thomas Tuchel sera complètement décimée vendredi à Metz, alors que Neymar, toujours en instance de départ, ne peut pas être aligné tant que son cas n’est pas réglé.S’il reste à Paris, “Ney” sera suspendu pour les trois premières journées en Ligue des champions en raison de ses insultes sur les réseaux sociaux contre l’arbitre de PSG – Manchester United après le 8e de finale retour de Ligue des champions perdu 3-1, le 6 mars dernier.AFP Partagerlast_img read more

[Natation] : Ça part sur d’excellentes bases

first_imgDeux records nationaux en une seule course, les nageurs luxembourgeois n’ont pas amusé le terrain, mercredi lors de la première journée des championnats d’Europe en petit bassin, à Glasgow.Tous les messieurs qualifiés pour le grand rendez-vous de Glasgow étaient sur le pont dès la première journée de compétition, hier en Écosse. Une matinée qu’il a fallu suivre jusqu’au bout puisque le Luxembourg alignait une équipe pour le relais 4×50 m nage libre. Un relais inédit avec, dans l’équipe, les deux jeunes de la bande, Rémi Fabiani et Max Mannes, qui accompagnaient le lanceur Julien Henx et l’inévitable Raphaël Stacchiotti.Je me suis dit : “Ne te pose pas 3 000 questions et fais ce que tu sais faire.” J’avais très envie de nager. C’est passé super viteLe nageur de Talence a mis le relais sur d’excellentes bases, avec un temps canon (21″78), soit treize centièmes de mieux que son précédent record national! «Dans ma course, je savais qu’il y avait des mecs très forts comme le champion du monde du 50 m dos. J’ai pris un super départ, j’étais fort dans la tête. Je me suis dit : “Ne te pose pas 3 000 questions et fais ce que tu sais faire.” J’avais très envie de nager. C’est passé super vite», analyse Julien Henx.Derrière lui, Rémi Fabiani boucle ses deux longueurs en 22″93, Raphaël Stacchiotti en 22″00 et Max Mannes en 22″13 pour signer un nouveau record national de la très jeune discipline en 1’28″84 : «Je suis très content de ce début. C’était trop bien. De bon augure pour le 200 m de demain», se réjouit Max Mannes, qui sera donc en lice demain sur le 200 m nage libre. Distance sur laquelle il vise un meilleur temps.La journée avait déjà commencé avec Julien Henx. Au départ du 100 m pap, le Dudelangeois a fait de son mieux. Il prend la neuvième place de sa série en 53″40, son deuxième meilleur temps sur la distance après ses 52″86, qui datent des championnats de France de 2017. Avec une 49e place au général : «C’était bien pour démarrer les championnats», confiait-il après sa course. Rémi Fabiani part comme une fuséeDe son côté, Pit Brandenburger était au départ du 400 m nage libre. Une course qu’il boucle en 3’51″97, à 5″ de son record (3’46″97) : «Je me sens bien mais je manque un peu de caisse, je pense. Et j’ai voulu trop attaquer le premier 200 m», explique l’Antibois, qu’on attendra à son avantage sur le 200 m nage libre aujourd’hui.Le dernier nageur en lice en individuel était donc le rookie Rémi Fabiani. Aligné sur le 200 m dos, le jeune homme de 18 ans est parti comme une fusée puisqu’il vire à la mi-course en 56″27, soit près d’une seconde plus vite que sa course record (1’56″29) qui avait marqué les championnats nationaux à Differdange il y a un peu plus de deux semaines. Dans la seconde partie de l’épreuve, il a dû ralentir le tempo et a touché la plaque en 1’57″35, ce qui constitue tout de même son deuxième meilleur temps. Le tout, dix minutes avant de s’aligner sur le relais. Vous avez dit première journée chargée…Aujourd’hui, hormis Julien Henx, qui bénéficie d’un jour off, les cinq autres nageurs grand-ducaux seront sur le pont.Avec, on l’espère, de nouvelles perfs du même acabit. Voire encore mieux!Romain Haas Les classements100 m pap : Julien Henx 53″40 (49/61)200 m dos : Rémi Fabiani 1’57″35 (29/36)400 m nage libre : Pit Brandenburger 3’51″97 (39/44)Relais 4×50 m nage libre : Luxembourg 1’28″84 (RN)Henx (21″78 RN), Fabiani (22″93), Stacchiotti (22″00), Mannes (22″13)Aujourd’hui100 m dos : Max Mannes, Rémi Fabiani, Raphaël Stacchiotti100 m nage libre : Monique Olivier200 m nage libre : Rémi Fabiani, Max Mannes, Pit Brandenburger.center_img Partagerlast_img read more

Dasmarinas avoids upset with split draw vs Ghanian foe

first_imgPhoto from Ringstar BoxingReigning IBO bantamweight champion Michael Dasmariñas escaped an upset with a split draw against undefeated Ghanian prospect Manyo Plange in a non-title bout on Saturday in the Roar of Singapore 5 at Marina Bay Sands in Singapore.Dasmariñas got a surprise challenge from the feisty Plange, who was fearless and showed little respect for the champion from the opening bell.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown MOST READ SEA Games 2019: PH’s Aira Villegas boxing bantamweight semi final (HIGHLIGHTS) PLAY LIST 03:00SEA Games 2019: PH’s Aira Villegas boxing bantamweight semi final (HIGHLIGHTS)00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazilcenter_img Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew The 26-year-old Dasmariñas (28-2-1, 19 KOs), who had a two-inch height advantage, tried to use to his jab and keep the right distance but Plange,  (17-0-1, 15 KOs) kept attacking.The judges scored it, 93-97, 95-95, and 96-94.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissIt was Dasmariñas’ third straight fight in Singapore after knocking out Frenchman Karim Guerfi in the fourth round to win the belt five months ago and also scoring a stoppage over Thai boxer Worawatchai Boonjan late last year. Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Topless, singing Serena sparks internet breast cancer stir Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college View commentslast_img read more