Pirates decline option on 2B Harrison, 3B Kang

first_imgJOSH HARRISON is a fan favorite for the Bucs. But will he be traded away from the Pirates at the trade deadline? (AP PHOTO File)PITTSBURGH (AP) _ Josh Harrison’s tenure at second base for the Pittsburgh Pirates is over.Pittsburgh declined 2019 options for Harrison and third baseman Jung Ho Kang.The Pirates opted to pay Harrison a $1 million buyout rather than the $10.5 million he was scheduled to make next season. The 31-year-old, a key part of Pittsburgh’s run of three straight playoff berths from 2013-15, hit .250 with three home runs and 37 RBIs in 97 games in 2018. His playing time diminished near the end of the season while Pittsburgh gave prospect Kevin Newman a look.FILE – In this Oct. 1, 2016 file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates’ Jung Ho Kang rounds the bases after hitting a three-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the St. Louis Cardinals in St. Louis. Police in South Korea are investigating Pittsburgh Pirates infielder Kang over whether he crashed a luxury car while driving under the influence of alcohol and then left the scene early Friday, Dec. 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)Kang was a star in South Korea when the Pirates signed him to an $11 million, four-year deal in January 2015. He finished third in NL Rookie of the Year balloting in 2015 after hitting 15 homers and driving in 58 runs as Pittsburgh won 98 games. It would be the high point of Kang’s time with the Pirates.The 31-year-old Kang didn’t play in North America between September 2016 and June 2018 because of visa issues connected to three DUI arrests his native South Korea. He made it back to the majors with Pittsburgh in September, collecting two hits in six at bats during the final weekend of the season.Pittsburgh will pay Kang’s $250,000 buyout. He was slated to make $5.5 million next year. Kang’s contract specified he must be released at the end of the deal.___More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more

Chiefs bolter called into All Blacks

first_imgTu’inukuafe will join the squad for next month’s three-test series against France after the Crusaders prop Tim Perry suffered a hamstring strain.Perry will be reviewed by Crusaders medical staff over the next few days, though it leaves them without three All Black props for Friday’s top of the table Super Rugby clash with the Hurricanes in Christchurch, after Owen Franks and Joe Moody were suspended for striking.The All Blacks squad have a camp in Christchurch from Sunday until Tuesday before assembling in Auckland on Sunday June 3rd to prepare for the first Test.The 25-year-old loosehead Tu’inukuafe first came to prominence back in 2010 as part of Auckland’s Wesley College 1st XV, where he propped alongside fellow Chief and All Black Nepo Laulala.Tu’inukuafe made Counties Manukau age-grade teams and then took a couple of seasons off before kick starting his career with North Harbour in 2015.He spent a season in French club rugby before returning home and was called into the Chiefs squad late last year by coach Colin Cooper, initially in a development capacity.But injuries have meant he’s made the matchday squad regularly since round five and he has impressed so far in his debut Super Rugby season.last_img read more

Cádiz helps in the manufacture of protection screens

first_imgIn the fight against the coronavirus, union and solidarity are needed, that’s why Cádiz has joined with different companies to collaborate in the manufacture of protective screens for professionals at the foot of the canyon working for the health and safety of all citizens.A week ago, Cádiz announced that it would provide aid to the European group from Cádiz with a financial contribution. that it facilitate the acquisition of the necessary material for the creation of sanitary material that, ultimately, would be donated to the Puerta del Mar University Hospital. Days after, the cadista club donated to a businessman in the city a total of 60 reels of PLA filament with which 2,500 sanitary protection screens were manufactured that were distributed by different health centers.This afternoon Cádiz has announced through its social networks that they have already received another 50 coils of PLA filament that will be donated to collaborators from Impresiones C3DIZ to continue producing sanitary material that, according to the club, this time will be distributed among health personnel, Police, Civil Protection … in short, the professionals who are on the front line of infections.In addition, the entity is carrying out different initiatives to help in the fight against COVID-19, such as the charity I Carranza eSports Trophy which is still at stake.last_img read more

Low-tech challenges to high-tech forest monitoring: lessons from Ugandan parks

first_imgRemote sensing technology can provide useful intelligence to park managers but must be combined with an understanding of its limitations, as well as the tools and training needed for its use.An assessment by park rangers in Uganda of satellite image-based deforestation alerts found that the alert locations at 30 m x 30 m resolution were sufficiently accurate to support reserve management.The near real-time alerts of likely deforestation could make forest patrols more efficient and effective, but rangers must still have proper training, incentives, and resources to properly integrate alerts into their regular functions. A pair of NGOs teamed up with rangers in four parks in Uganda to assess the potential for cutting-edge forest monitoring technology to support protected area management through early detection of deforestation.The Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) and World Resources Institute (WRI) partnered with the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) to train protected areas rangers in the Kibale Conservation Area in western Uganda on how to assess forest threats using a new system of near real-time alerts of deforestation events. The partners hope to determine how the information from these alerts can help slow deforestation within and surrounding protected areas (PAs). In an email exchange with Mongabay-Wildtech, they shared some of the surprisingly low-tech challenges and lessons they learned in rolling out new technologies in the field. Forests of the Kibale region are home to Eastern chimpanzees and 12 other primate species. Photo credit: Jane Goodall InstituteKibale National Park also supports more than 375 bird species, including the emerald cuckoo Photo credit: George Powell Article published by Sue Palminteri A JGI team trained over 50 protection staff in workshops conducted between November 2016 and May 2017 to use the online deforestation alerts, called GLAD alerts, produced by the University of Maryland and Global Forest Watch (GFW). The automated, weekly-updated GLAD alert system identifies likely sites of tree cover loss.Bringing automated satellite image technology to the fieldKibale Conservation Area includes Kibale National Park, Toro Semliki Wildlife Reserve, Katonga Wildlife Reserve and Semuliki National Park. Kibale National Park alone supports 350 bird and 70 mammal species, including 13 primates, within more than 75,000 hectares of deciduous and evergreen forest.It is one of Uganda’s most important forests for biodiversity, yet park rangers must constantly monitor the forest to address threats from poachers, loggers, and others illegally harvesting forest resources.Deforestation along the boundary of Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda. Photo credit: Rhett A. Butler Researchers have used satellite technology previously to detect forest loss on the outskirts of Kibale National Park and found that the growing human population around the park potentially threatened its integrity.However, remote sensing technology that could help monitor the forest has not reached rangers in the Kibale protected areas (PAs).Like managers of many of the world’s PAs, Kibale forest managers have lacked the capacity and timely intelligence to most effectively patrol and enforce the reserves’ boundaries.During the training, the UWA ranger and monitoring teams tested the potential of the GLAD alerts to make the patrolling of large, often remote forested areas more efficient and effective. They first learned how to assess tree cover loss for their target areas using the GFW platforms, as well as interpret and manage the GLAD alerts and other types of forest loss GFW data.The patrol and monitoring teams also learned how to collect evidence of forest change in the field to verify the alerts and the incorporate the alert and field validation data into an ecological monitoring program.Challenges for deploying technology in the fieldDuring the exercises designed to assess the technology’s utility for PA management, JGI and UWA identified several challenges to and conditions for successful use of the various forest monitoring tools in the field.Training lead Lilian Pintea of Jane Goodall Institute explains to UWA staff how to access tree cover loss data in Global Forest Watch during a training workshop. Photo credit: Jane Goodall Institute1: Limitations of technology “One of the first questions that arises when applying remote sensing technology to support conservation action is, ‘Is it accurate enough to inform local action?’” Rachael Petersen, Impacts Manager for WRI’s Global Forest Watch, said.To help assess this question with respect to the GLAD alerts, the UWA staff headed to the field to investigate 214 recent GLAD alerts indicating tree cover loss inside and just outside the boundaries of the four PAs. There, trainees learned how to use a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit to locate the sites of GLAD alerts and then to use the Open Data Kit (ODK) mobile app to collect and report field data to validate the forest clearing identified by the alerts.Brenda Mirembe of JGI-Uganda instructs UWA rangers during a training in Kibale National Park. Photo credit: Jane Goodall InstituteGLAD alerts detect tree cover loss at the individual unit of a 30 x 30 meter satellite image pixel. Most of the alerts the Kibale rangers investigated had evidence of tree cover loss. However, the rangers found that many of the clearings reported in the alerts were not inside the exact forest loss pixel but in close proximity to the alert. Therefore, concluded Lilian Pintea, lead trainer and JGI’s Vice President for conservation science, “Real-time alerts like GLAD should be used as a possible indicator of illegal human activity, but rangers should search for evidence of new threats in the general area, instead of limiting themselves to the confines of the pixel.”Moreover, he added, “some of the clearing identified by the alerts was not anthropogenic (human-caused) but caused by floods or elephants knocking down trees.”Elephants eat and knock down trees, which in some cases may open up vegetation and resemble forest clearing in the small areas of satellite image pixels. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriRegardless, said Petersen, the managers found the information in the alerts useful enough to encourage their rangers to investigate the alerts, even if some damage was not caused by humans.The park managers in Uganda preferred to view all possible areas of forest change, including possible false alarms, before determining how to prioritize resources for field investigations and patrols. This strategy may be practical in large, poorly studied parks. The alerts detected and located two new clearings in Kibale National Park where the UWA rangers were previously unaware of illegal activities, and the rangers used the location data to find these areas and prevent additional deforestation.One of two sites of illegal logging and encroachment in Kibale National Park located with the help of GLAD alerts. The DigitalGlobe 2007 and 2017 satellite images stored in the Open Data Kit data set confirm the location and extent of forest loss from logging and encroachment indicated by the alerts. Image credit: Jane Goodall Institute/World Resources Institute2: Remote study sites with limited resourcesRemaining challenges were strikingly low-tech and could apply to introducing field teams to any new monitoring technology. For example, Petersen said that some ranger outposts lacked functioning solar batteries to charge the mobile devices they would need to view the weekly forest loss alerts.Not surprisingly, these outposts, like those in many PAs, had very limited internet access, which made it difficult to load and take full advantage of the GFW website where the rangers first access the alerts. Once they subscribe, field teams also need email access to receive each new alert.Lastly, some of the sites identified by the alerts occurred in very remote parts of the park that rangers could not access. An inability to get around hinders the effective use of any sensor or other advance warning technology, especially in zones of steep topography or violent conflict.3: Human capacity and interestEffectively integrating the intelligence gained from alerts and other remote sensing technology into standard operating procedures requires that rangers be motivated to try the new tools and receive the training and resources to do so.Uganda Wildlife Authority rangers learning to validate forest loss on the ground using GPS and Open Data Kit technologies. Photo credit: Jane Goodall InstituteFor example, in Kibale, Petersen said, “Trained rangers were often transferred to other parks, requiring a continuous refresher training for their replacements. Some rangers had little interest or incentive to visit alert areas. Others struggled to navigate in the field using GPS devices.”Pintea added, “Some park managers were skeptical of the need for [near real-time alerts] in areas with relatively few threats, [whereas] others felt that habitat loss at any scale must be addressed and that the deforestation alerts could be an important tool to help them do so. As one ranger said, ‘Even if you do not have fires often in your house, you should not throw out your fire-fighting equipment.’”By the end of the training, he continued, the UWA managers were interested in both incorporating the GLAD system into their operations and scaling it up across the country’s protected area network.The JGI-UWA collaboration in the four Kibale protected areas suggests that ensuring adoption requires time to build trust in the accuracy and utility of the alerts, as well as increasing the capacity and resources to use them.A L’hoest’s monkey in Uganda appreciating additional forest protection support. Photo credit: George Powell Citizen Science, Forests, GPS, handheld, Mobile, Monitoring, Technology, Wildtech Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Deforestation in Cambodia linked to ill health in children

first_imgBiodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Health, Nature And Health, Protected Areas, Public Health, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta A new study has found that the loss of dense forest cover in Cambodia is associated with an increased risk of diarrhea, acute respiratory infection and fever in children younger than five years.Just a 10 percentage increase in the loss of dense forest around Cambodian households was associated with a 14 percent increase in the rate of diarrhea among children, the researchers found.In contrast, a higher coverage of protected areas around the households was linked to a lower incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infection in children. Rapid deforestation in Cambodia is threatening the health of young children, concludes a new study published in the Lancet Planetary Health.Researchers have found that the loss of dense forest cover in Cambodia is associated with an increased risk of diarrhea, acute respiratory infection and fever in children younger than five years.“This is alarming as deforestation has become a contributor to key child mortality factors in Cambodia,” said co-author Roman Carrasco of the National University of Singapore (NUS).This study adds to the growing body of research which shows that clearing large swathes of forests can have serious consequences for human health.When Carrasco’s team analyzed health data from more than 35,000 households collected by the Cambodia Demographic and Health Surveys between 2005 and 2014, they found that loss of dense forest increased rates of diarrhoea, acute respiratory illness, and fever in children. For example, just a 10 percentage point increase in the loss of dense forest near the households was associated with a 14 percent increase in the rate of diarrhea among children. In contrast, a higher coverage of protected areas around the households was linked to a lower incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infection in children.“It was surprising how clear the signal was — all the conditions we were studying that we hypothesized could have a relationship with deforestation (diarrhea, acute respiratory infection, fever) clearly increased after losing dense forests,” Carrasco said.Loss of forests can disrupt water cycle leading to water-borne diseases, and also create conditions conducive for mosquitoes to breed in. Photo of Cambodian rainforest by Rhett A. Butler.The study did not explore how deforestation could be causing higher incidence of diarrhea and other diseases. But previous research has suggested that the loss of forest cover can disrupt the water cycle, changing both the water quality (by increasing the load of diarrhea-causing microbes in water) and water quantity (by reducing the amount of water available for personal hygiene). This can in turn cause diarrhea in downstream communities.The same could be true for Cambodia, the researchers say, especially since a large part of Cambodia’s rural households source their drinking water from unprotected wells, springs, and surface water, and many still don’t use appropriate water-treatment methods before drinking.Deforestation can also create conditions conducive for mosquitoes to breed in (such as a warmer environment), heightening the risk for mosquito-borne diseases and fever, the authors write.But whether conserving forests can reverse the ill effects of deforestation on health, the researchers aren’t sure.“Conservation may play a role in mitigating these threats, but we are still unsure through what mechanisms, or if it a cost-effective way of improving public health compared to traditional measures,” said lead-author Thomas Pienkowski of NUS.“The most important message is that we found a link between tropical deforestation and causes of child mortality, especially diarrhea,” Pienkowski added. “This is very alarming and brings a whole new dimension to what tropical deforestation means to local communities.”Citation:Thomas Pienkowski et al. Empirical evidence of the public health benefits of tropical forest conservation in Cambodia: a generalised linear mixed-effects model analysis, The Lancet Planetary Health (2017). DOI: 10.1016/S2542-5196(17)30081-5.Banner image of rainforest in Cambodia by Rhett A. Butler.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In rural Indonesia, a village learns to embrace its forest through sustainability

first_imgAgroforestry, Community Development, Community Forestry, Community Forests, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Activism, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Land Reform, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Protected Areas Article published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img In August, the village of Taba Padang in southwest Sumatra was recognized by the Indonesian government for practicing the best community-based forestry management this year.Less than a decade ago, however, many of its residents were being arrested for planting in a nearby forest, deemed off-limits because of its protected status.In 2010, newly elected village chief Yoyon embarked on a years-long process to obtain state approval to allow the farmers to manage nearly 10 square kilometers of land in the forest.In exchange, the farmers are prohibited from creating plantations, must agree to protect the animals that live there, and must guard the land against fire. TABA PADANG, Indonesia — Yoyon remembers being elected head of his village back in 2010, here on the southwestern coast of the Indonesian island of Sumatra, following a spate of arrests of his fellow villagers.Those arrested were accused of farming in Bukit Daun, a protected forest. The last arrests that Yoyon, who goes by one name, can recall came two years before his election, when six villagers were held.“I’ve lost count of how many locals have been detained,” he said in an interview.Yoyon, head of the Taba Padang village, strived for years to obtain state approval allowing his people to farm within a nearby protected forest. Photo by Dedek Hendry/Mongabay-Indonesia.The village of Taba Padang is one of many scattered across Indonesia, where impoverished communities have for generations lived within or nearby forests. Their efforts to make a living from the natural riches around them have often run up against the interests of those with more power, such as the government or private companies.“I became so concerned by the problem and wanted it to end,” Yoyon said. Eventually he was introduced to the government’s “village forest” scheme, known locally as hutan desa.Under the program, each household receives the rights to manage a 1.5-hectare (3.7-acre) plot in the protected forest. They are prohibited from clearing the land for a plantation, but may grow fruit or trees or coffee in the forest’s understory. In exchange, they must agree to protect the animals that live there and guard against fires.The program also provides farming guidance and seed supplies for new farmers. To ensure compliance, officials conduct regular inspections every five years.It took almost four years for Yoyon to obtain the necessary permits granting the village control over 9.95 square kilometers (3.84 square miles) of the protected forest.“We almost gave up,” he said. “Now, the people no longer feel worried about getting arrested when they are working on their farms.”Yoyon said the area was currently managed by 470 households, who grow coffee, pepper, durian, rattan and other produce. He also noted that water supplies now flowed through the forest farms to the people’s houses without any disruption.A farmer in Taba Padang village shows his plot of durian trees. Photo by Dedek Hendry/Mongabay-Indonesia.Fauzi, one of the farmers, said his income had increased significantly since the program was fully implemented.“I can now use a motorbike to carry my harvests and save up money,” he said.Yoyon said the area also had tourism potential, with its four waterfalls, a hot spring, and host of exotic flowering plants such as Hornstedtia rubra, Amorphophallus gigas and Armophophallus titanum.“We’ve stopped cutting down trees, and instead plant new ones,” Yoyon said. “We can now prove that forest conservation equals social welfare.”In August, the village’s success in managing its hutan desa drew praise from the Indonesian government. The Ministry of Environment and Forestry named it the best village forestry management in the country this year.“Hopefully we can continue to increase the people’s welfare and protect the forest,” Yoyon said.Banner image: A farmer from Taba Padang village in Sumatra’s Bengkulu province harvests a torch ginger (Etlingera elatior) plant in the village forest. Photo by Dedek Hendry/Mongabay-Indonesia.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published here and here on our Indonesian site on Aug. 31 and Sept. 5, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Europe-bred rhinos join South African cousins to repopulate Rwanda park

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Five critically endangered eastern black rhinos have been flown from Europe to Akagera National Park in Rwanda.Eastern black rhino populations across the region are small and isolated, with the risk of inbreeding damaging long-term genetic viability.The rhinos come from the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) breeding program and will add vitally needed fresh genetics into Rwanda’s fledgling population, made up of rhinos bred in South Africa. Five eastern black rhinos translocated from European zoos to Rwanda’s Akagera National Park have successfully completed an initial period of acclimatization and been moved into larger, 1-hectare (2.5-acre) enclosures. They will eventually be released into the wider park, joining a group brought over from South Africa in 2017, the first of these critically endangered species to roam in Rwanda since 2005.Since the 1970s, rhino populations have been decimated by a poaching epidemic driven by demand for rhino horn, with a 96 percent decline in the number of black rhinos (Diceros bicornis) from 70,000 to just 2,410 between 1970 and 1995. The eastern black rhino (D. b. michaeli), originally ranging across East Africa, from southern Sudan to northern Tanzania, is the most endangered of the three black rhino subspecies. There are fewer than 1,000 wild individuals left in small isolated populations scattered across Tanzania and Kenya.In a partnership between the government of Rwanda, the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) and African Parks, an international NGO, five rhinos from EAZA’s rhino-breeding program completed an arduous 6,000-kilometer (3,700-mile) journey from Europe to their new home in Akagera National Park in Rwanda.This is the second attempt to establish a population of eastern black rhinos. Rhinos were brought into the park in the 1950s from neighboring Tanzania, growing to a population of more than 50 by the 1970s, before being wiped out by poaching. The last confirmed sighting was in 2007.The rhinos were initially confined in a release boma before being released into a wider enclosure to allow easy monitoring whilst they adapt to their new environment and diet. Photo: Scott Ramsay“They’ve settled in really well and they’re taking well to the local, native vegetation,” says Jes Gruner, Akagera’s park manager, of the European-bred rhinos. “We’ll soon be taking the first steps releasing them into a small enclosure around the boma.”There is an ex situ population of around 90 eastern black rhinos in private reserves in South Africa, grown from nine individuals imported in the 1950s. Eighteen rhinos from this group in South Africa were translocated to Akagera in 2017.The latest additions from EAZA’s eastern black rhino breeding program will strengthen Rwanda’s fledgling rhino population by diversifying the gene pool.“We’ve got really important genetic stock that’s going to help bolster genetic populations,” says Mark Pilgrim, CEO of Chester Zoo, who coordinates EAZA’s eastern black rhino breeding program.EAZA is a membership organization of more than 400 zoos across Europe and the Middle East. One of the conditions of membership is that species that fall under EAZA’s European Endangered species Program (EEP) are managed in a coordinated breeding program across all institutions.EAZA’s eastern black rhino program began with an original population of around 40 individuals that were brought to Europe in the 1950s and ’60s. Today, EAZA’s carefully managed population of nearly 100 rhinos represents around 10 percent of the entire eastern black rhino population on Earth. Pilgrim says the EAZA population will now be able to provide a few individuals to supplement wild populations every five years.“We’ve got some very sophisticated software now that I can look at and see which rhinos need to move to ensure we are keeping the genetic population healthy,” he says. “It’s basically a big rhino dating game.”However, an underlying assumption of the software is that the founding population were unrelated. EAZA are currently conducting research to find out exactly how genetically diverse their population is. Pilgrim says he believes that given the number of different places rhinos were imported from, it is highly likely that they have genes in the population that no longer exist in Africa — and that could be really important for the future of the eastern black rhino.“The good news is that even with very inbred populations, it doesn’t take too many genetically distinct animals entering the population to make a big difference,” Pilgrim says.There are challenges for zoo-bred rhinos embarking on a life in the wild. Their digestive systems need time to adapt to their new diet; tsetse flies need to be controlled around their boma until they have developed some resistance to trypanosomiasis; and they must learn how to interact with the other inhabitants of their new home — especially the rhino bulls already in residence.“The [release] process will be done slowly and monitoring them the entire time,” Gruner says. “It could be a couple of years before they have access to the wider park.”Claudine Uwihirwe, a member of an anti-poaching unit training in Akegara National Park. Reducing the threat of poaching was essential before rhinos could be reintroduced.Photo: Scott RamsayConditions for successRelocating rhinos is an expensive business. Gruner estimates that the project has cost around $1.5 million over the last two years. Critics of ex situ conservation point out that the programs are often expensive, and the history of reintroductions has produced mixed results.In the case of the eastern black rhino, though, the hope that ex situ conservation in zoos could provide a genetic “ark” from which to replenish wild populations appears to be bearing fruit. Pilgrim says he believes one of the important differences is the reason for the rhinos’ decline.“The majority of species are completely at threat because of habitat destruction,” he says. “Until you can remove the reason they’ve become endangered in the first place, reintroduction makes little sense.”By contrast, rhino numbers have been devastated by poaching, leaving large areas of suitable habitat devoid of rhinos, including the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem that once supported large numbers of black rhinos.“If we can stop poaching and protect them, then there’s plenty of habitat to go back into,” Pilgrim says. “Being a herbivore and having very few natural predators as adults, if any, that gives [reintroduced rhinos] a great chance.”Controlling poaching has been a major focus for African Parks since it assumed management of Akagera National Park in partnership with the Rwanda Development Board in 2010.“Poaching will always be a concern everywhere,” Gruner says. “However, we have hugely reduced bush meat poaching in Akagera over the last decade and put measures in place to ensure the protection of the rhinos.”The existing population of rhinos imported from South Africa have adapted well and are now starting to reproduce. With the vital injection of fresh genetics from the EAZA breeding program, the future looks bright for the rhinos of Akagera National Park.CORRECTION: This story originally stated that the eastern black rhino was not originally native to Rwanda. In fact D. b. michaeli’s historic range did include Rwanda.Banner image: Jasiri was captive bred in Dvur Kralove in the Czech Republic as part of EAZA’s successful eastern black rhino breeding program. Photo: Dvur KraloveFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Anti-poaching, Biodiversity, Conservation, Dry Forests, Ecotourism, Endangered Species, Environment, Grasslands, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Megafauna, Parks, Poaching, Rhinos, Savannas, Wildlife center_img Article published by terna gyuselast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, October 18, 2019

first_imgConservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsResearch links deforestation in the Amazon to higher rates of malaria (Inverse, Sky Statement, Medical Daily) …… While another study connects habitat destruction with the spread of Ebola (New Scientist).Proponents of green bonds argue that financing will protect more than 20,000 square kilometers (7,800 square miles) of forest (Forbes).An illegal logging bust in Colombia has raised the ire of residents (Insight Crime).“Participatory conservation” is helping to protect Ecuador’s Chocóan Rainforest (Pulitzer Center).Selfie-taking plants help scientists keep an eye on changes in the rainforest (The Telegraph).Researchers are using audio recordings and artificial intelligence to count forest elephants in Central Africa (NPR).Other newsQatar struggles with how to keep cool in the face of climate change (The Washington Post).Wild burros in Death Valley may have played a part in creating a new ecosystem, but the U.S. National Park Service wants to get rid of them (Undark).The Trump administration plans to remove a limit on roads and logging in North America’s largest intact temperate rainforest (The New York Times, HuffPost, The Washington Post).A cooperative in Finland has been managing a forest operation for generations (The Economist).New research shows that some types of plastic don’t linger as long as previously thought in the ocean (The New York Times).Climate change plays a larger role in the world’s conflicts (Ensia).Fires are threatening a rare wolf species in Ethiopia (The Guardian).Google has made financial contributions to think tanks that deny the existence of climate change (The Guardian).The Tanzanian government is bringing water to dams to help save hippos during a drought (Xinhua).The International Monetary Fund is calling for a carbon price of $75 per ton implemented in the next decade, which the organization sees as critical to limiting climate change (The Washington Post).Banner image of an Ethiopian wolf by Charles J Sharp via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Crafty Star to atone in race six

first_img SET TO IMPROVE The well-supported 11-race programme offers no carryovers from last Saturday as provision was made by outgoing promoters, Caymanas Track Limited (CTL), to make mandatory payouts on all exotic bets. The Pick-9, which offers a guaranteed minimum of $1 million, will embrace races three to 11, the first Super-6 from race one to six, the late Super-6 from six to 11, both having guaranteed minimums of $750,000. We look at the first Super-6, which commences with a $450,000-$400,000 claiming race over a mile to be contested by eight starters, including the likely favourite, UNBREAKABLE, who steps down in class after finishing 91/4 lengths fifth to ANOTHER FURY over 1300 metres on February 25. That wasn’t a bad run on a $550,000 claiming tag, and reporting under new management for this race (claimed) and the trip more suitable, UNBREAKABLE will not be easily denied. Champion jockey Omar Walker is slated to ride the consistent six-year-old gelding who now takes orders from trainer Johnny Wilmot for high-profile owner Carlton Watson. Incidentally, UNBREAKABLE was the winningest horse of 2016, winning eight races and $3.4 million in stakes. BULLET RAJ, who is also down in class, gets a glorious opportunity to win the second race over 1100 metres confined to conditional $180,000 claimers. The four-year-old son of Blue Pepsi Lodge – Dancing Gold – showed little behind ARGUMENT DONE over the straight when stepping up on a $250,000 tag on February 4, but prior to that, failed by only half a length to catch RUNJOHNNY RUN over the straight. Now dropping down to conditional $180,000 claiming, BULLET RAJ, with Rayan Wilson riding for trainer Tyrone Prince, should win from VALLEY OF QUEENS, with female apprentice Natalie Berger again in the saddle and ALDEBARAN in a nine-horse field. Horse racing at Caymanas Park moves into a new phase tomorrow with Supreme Ventures Limited taking control of the near 200-acre racing complex from the Government through the divestment process. Already, Supreme Ventures Racing and Entertainment Limited (SVERL), the new promoting company, which moved in office on Tuesday, has revealed plans for major infrastructure development of Caymanas Park, a 20 per cent purse increase estimated at $100 million effective in April, upgrading the racing product by writing more suitable conditions for races in line with the horse population, and finding innovative ways to increase revenues in the short term, among other things. FIRST SUPER-6 FANCIES (1) UNBREAKABLE (2) BULLET RAJ/VALLEY OF QUEENS (3) BUBBLING KITTEN/LIKE A LADY (4) LEEKOUT/KUNAMA (5) TWILIGHT DREAMS/ CAPTUREMYSHIP (6) CRAFTY STAR/PROFILE NO CARRYOVERS BUBBLING KITTEN, who chased home the talented three-year-old colt FEARLESS SAMURAI in a fast-run 1100-metre race (1:06.2) recently, is tipped to go one better in the third race over 1200 metres to be contested by nine very fit horses, including the recent winners LORD EQUUS, LOTTERY TICKET, and hat-trick seeker LIKE A LADY, who is coming to run from her convenient mark, with former champion Wesley Henry again in the saddle. All in all, BUBBLING KITTEN, with back-to-form Robert Halledeen riding for trainer Anthony ‘Baba’ Nunes, has kept better company, finishing five lengths fourth to CAMPESINO over this trip in the grade one Caribbean Sprint Championship on November 12 last year. LEEKOUT, who has been a model of consistency, now has the services of three-time champion jockey Dane Nelson, and with his rivals nothing much, should win the fourth race over 1400 metres for maiden four-year-olds and up, giving second-generation trainer Michael Marlowe the second win of his career. KUNAMA, who finished a length third to NINELIFECAT over the straight last Saturday, looks the obvious danger in a field of 11. The last two races in the first Super-6 should be won by the well-forward first-time runner TWILIGHT DREAMS (working very well – 59.1 by 46.3 out of the straight) with Halledeen up, and CRAFTY STAR (Walker up), who lost narrowly to NINELIFECAT last Saturday, to rebound in the sixth over 1200 metres.last_img read more

No resolution: PBA Board leaves LA with league’s fate hanging

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set #KicksStalker: Irving gifts special Kyrie 3, jersey to military personnel LOS ANGELES—The PBA board of governors left this city for Las Vegas on Tuesday morning with nothing resolved, keeping the start of the 43rd Season hanging.ADVERTISEMENT The four nights originally allotted to pencil the path the league will take for the coming season was instead spent on sightseeing and shopping sprees as the board, with four members skipping the trip—including the league chair, never convened.The board remains divided as one group wants the ouster of Chito Narvasa while the other giving full backing to the commissioner.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSBack on the throneAmid the conflict, Kia Picanto board member Bobby Rosales and Phoenix Petroleum’s Raymond Zorilla managed to strike a deal involving disgruntled Picanto star point guard LA Revilla.Rosales is with the pro-Narvasa group while Zorilla, a no-show here, belongs to the seven-team bloc that wants a new commissioner. Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson View comments Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Kia shipped out Revilla for rookie Jason Grimaldo and Phoenix’s second round pick in 2018.“There’s no use making things difficult for him (Revilla),” Rosales said. “And besides, he already apologized for the things he said.”Revilla incurred the ire of Kia management after a controversial tweet last Oct. 27 hinting that the Picanto lied about the real reason behind trading top rookie pick Christian Standhardinger to San Miguel Beer.The next season opens on Dec. 17 and with the Narvasa issue still unresolved, Rosales made light of the impasse.“That’s still subject to the approval of the commissioner, guys,” Rosales said with a laugh. ADVERTISEMENT OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson MOST READ Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’last_img read more