Toss up the ball, college hoops ready for early start date

first_imgIn this Sunday, April 1, 2018 file photo,Notre Dame’s Arike Ogunbowale holds the trophy after defeating Mississippi State in the final of the women’s NCAA Final Four college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio. Notre Dame won 61-58. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File) NEW YORK (AP) — College basketball season begins Tuesday — the earliest it’s ever started. Muffet McGraw and Geno Auriemma aren’t thrilled about that, either.A sport that used to start official practice around Oct. 15 and have its first games at Thanksgiving is now beginning nearly three weeks sooner. Add that to the summer and preseason workouts that are allowed, and it’s nearly a year-round sport.Tuesday will feature almost 100 women’s games and 150 for the men.“I think the season is way too long,” said McGraw, the coach for defending women’s national champion Notre Dame. “Basketball has more practice before its first game than any other sport.” By today This March 31, 2018, file photo shows Notre Dame head coach Muffet McGraw responding to a question during a news conference for the women’s NCAA Final Four college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File) With the Final Four taking place on April 5 and the title game on April 7, the season is nearly 200 days long.“I don’t like it. I don’t like anything about it,” said Auriemma, who has won 11 national titles as the women’s coach at UConn. “I don’t care what kind of players you have. I remember the days when you couldn’t talk to your players about basketball until Oct. 15. We had some pretty good teams back then.”Connecticut head coach Geno Auriemma, right, jokes with Katie Lou Samuelson, left, Napheesa Collier, second from left, and Gabby Williams as the clock winds down on their 90-52 win over Oregon in a regional final game in the NCAA women’s college basketball tournament, Monday, March 27, 2017, in Bridgeport, Conn. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)This year the NCAA moved up the start date a few days to Tuesday to try and create more buzz for the beginning of the season. It gets the opening night of games away from college and pro football, which dominates weekends in the fall.“Saturday and Sunday is football in this country. It’s college football on Saturday and the NFL on Sunday,” NCAA vice president of men’s basketball Dan Gavitt said. “You start the season Friday and basically they are dark for two days until you start up again on Monday. Starting on Tuesday, we can hopefully get a few days before you get to the weekend where people talk about the season.”The only flaw in that this year is the new start date falls on Election Day, which will dominate news cycles. Gavitt said the NCAA might look at that in the future.The midweek start date does help alleviate a few scheduling conflicts for gyms, because volleyball is still going on and many schools use the same building for both sports.With the new opening date, practice could officially start the last week of September — the NCAA allowed women’s teams to begin 42 days before their first game. The men have had that in place since 2013. Teams are still only permitted to have 30 practices during that stretch, just as it’s been since 2010. Until this season, schools were allowed 40 days to get those practices in.Women’s basketball coaches weren’t in favor of adding the extra two days.“Our WBCA board voted against 42 going forward. We were all opposed,” McGraw said. “The NCAA passed it anyway. The men are doing it and we have to have equality. We weren’t in favor of moving the season up, either.”The NCAA also gave coaches more time with their players once school started. Teams are now allowed to use four hours a week for on-court basketball activities in the preseason — double what it previously had been.Each school is different in how it uses those days. A young team with many new players or a new coach could benefit from the earlier start date. A team expecting to go deep into the NCAA Tournament might wait a little longer to start so as to avoid burnout when the games matter most.Most coaches give their teams weekends off during September and October knowing that during the season they won’t be able to do that.McGraw started late with her top-ranked team knowing the ultimate goal was to play until early April. The Irish began on Oct. 4 and McGraw gave her players five days off for fall break.Auriemma had his team start even later, with its first practice coming in the second week of October.He also took it a step further. Auriemma decided after last season that Huskies coaches wouldn’t schedule offseason workouts during the spring and summer anymore. It was up to the players. If they wanted to work out, they’d have to reach out to the coaches.Auriemma thought that would bring back the joy of playing and the anticipation of practice. He figured it also would help develop the upperclassmen into leaders, making them organize the workouts and take more ownership.___Follow Doug on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/dougfeinberg___More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25last_img read more

Brazil slashes environment budget by 43%

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Brazil accounts for nearly two-thirds of the Amazon rainforest, the world’s largest tropical forest.After several years of decline, deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon is on the rise again.Environmentalists say that the budget cut will “profoundly [impact] deforestation — and, consequently, Brazil’s climate targets.” Last week the Brazilian government reduced the budget for the Ministry of the Environment by 43 percent. The ministry now has a budget of 446 million Brazilian reals ($141 million).The federal science budget has also been cut by 44 percent, making it the lowest budget in at least 12 years, Nature reported.Scientists and environmental groups fear that these budget cuts could hinder efforts to stem deforestation, which has been on the rise in the country.Alfredo Sirkis, the executive secretary of the Brazilian Forum on Climate Change, told Observatório do Clima that the cut was “very serious” and will “profoundly [impact] deforestation — and, consequently, Brazil’s climate targets.”Brazil accounts for nearly two-thirds of the Amazon rainforest, the world’s largest tropical forest. After several years of decline, deforestation — driven by beef, soy and timber industries — appears to be increasing again. Between August 2015 and July 2016, for example, deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon increased by 29 percent over the previous year, making it the highest deforestation level recorded in the region since 2008. Forest area about 135 times the size of Manhattan was cut down in just one year.Brazil recently announced its plans of restoring 12 million hectares (~30 million acres) of deforested and degraded forest land by 2030 at the 13th Conference of the Parties on Biological Diversity (COP13) in December 2016. But the Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA), Brazil’s Environmental Protection Agency, which works to prevent deforestation of the Amazon, is already severely cash-strapped. And the budget cut is likely to exacerbate the problem.“In case of deforestation, the combination of budget cuts and other management decisions, especially with reducing protected areas, it’s likely to increase deforestation,” Paulo Barreto, a senior researcher with environmental monitoring group Imazon, told Climate Wire.Forest fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon. Photo courtesy of NASAcenter_img Amazon Conservation, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Deforestation has become big business in the Brazilian Amazon

first_img(Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.In the past, it was cattle ranchers who were notorious for clearing Amazon rainforest. Today, in a process known as “speculative clearance” land thieves lay claim to public land, clear it of trees, then sell it to ranchers. While the transaction process has altered, the end result is the same: the loss of major tracts of rainforest, along with plummeting biodiversity. Photo by Rhett A. Butler Agamenom da Silva Menezes, is typical of modern Amazonian real estate operators: he is a wealthy individual who openly works with those who make a living by illegally laying claim to, deforesting and selling public lands for a high price. Lawlessness in the region means such land theft is rarely punished.Agamenom and others like him use militias, hired thugs, to intimidate landless peasant farmers as well as less powerful land thieves who try to claim Amazonian forests. The land is then deforested and sold to cattle ranchers, with each tract of stolen federal land bringing in an estimated R$20 million (US$6.4 million) on average.In March, the Temer government slashed by over 50 percent the budget of the Ministry of the Environment, responsible for both IBAMA, the federal environmental agency, and the Chico Mendes Institute of Biodiversity Conservation (ICMBio), which oversees Brazil’s conservation units.As a result, land thieves are likely to get bolder in their theft, deforestation and sale of public lands to cattle ranchers and others. Without a major shift in federal forestry policy and a dramatic improvement in enforcement, land theft and deforestation are likely to worsen across the Amazon basin. (Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil)The Tapajós River Basin lies at the heart of the Amazon, and at the heart of an exploding controversy: whether to build 40+ large dams, a railway, and highways, turning the Basin into a vast industrialized commodities export corridor; or to curb this development impulse and conserve one of the most biologically and culturally rich regions on the planet.Those struggling to shape the Basin’s fate hold conflicting opinions, but because the Tapajós is an isolated region, few of these views get aired in the media. Journalist Sue Branford and social scientist Mauricio Torres travelled there recently for Mongabay, and over coming weeks hope to shed some light on the heated debate that will shape the future of the Amazon. This is the thirteenth of their reports.The landless peasant occupation at KM Mil, a settlement located near the Thousand Kilometer marker on highway BR 163 near the town of Novo Progresso in Pará state, Brazil. Photo by Thais BorgesOn the Amazon frontier, where many people operate outside the law, you often hear locals speak in code — something journalists learn to listen for. So our ears pricked up as we prepared to film an interview in the office of Agamenom da Silva Menezes, president of the Novo Progresso Rural Farmers’ Union in Pará state.A man had rushed in, speaking urgently to Agamenom without a glance at us: “They’re taking over the area. We need to do something. Right away.”Agamenom raised a hand to silence the messenger and responded calmly: “OK. Don’t worry. We’ll talk later.” Then he turned to us and said abruptly: “Shall we begin?”It was only later, when Agamenom described the activities of his union during the interview, that the penny dropped: the “something” the man mentioned was likely code for an illegal violent act; the forced eviction of “they” — settlers in the midst of a land occupation carried out by the Castelo de Sonhos Rural Workers Union, at a location known as “KM Mil.”Agamenom da Silva Menezes: “If they [the settlers] leave on their own accord, fine. If they won’t go, we make them. We do what it takes. If they use clubs against us, we use clubs. If they use knives, we use knives. If they use dogs, we use dogs … the way it is done depends on them … but in the end we get them out.” Photo by Thais BorgesShowdown at KM MilCoincidentally, it was this landless peasant occupation that we’d come to talk with Agamemnon about. The so-called “KM Mil” settlement was located near the Thousand Kilometer marker on highway BR 163, a spot 1,000 kilometers from Cuiabá, the capital of Mato Grosso state.Two days earlier we had visited the 80 families taking part in the occupation. They were living in rough shacks, with roofs covered in black plastic sheeting to keep out the rain.Those shacks resembled hundreds of other temporary lean-tos that have sprung up across Brazil in the last 30 years as part of Brazil’s Landless Workers Movement (MST), and of other social movements trying to force authorities to carry out much-needed agrarian reform.Alenquer, the trade unionist occupation leader with peasant farmers at KM Mil. Shortly after this photo was taken, armed thugs raided the camp, warning the settlers that if that didn’t give up their claim to the land, threats would soon turn to violence. Photo by Thais BorgesThe KM Mil settlement, about 10 miles from the highway, was situated at the extreme edge of a large area of slashed-and-burned forest. The peasants had built their shacks right where the forest began and had started the hard work of clearing dense undergrowth and trees.We’d arrived with Aloisio Sampaio, a trade unionist known as Alenquer, the primary leader of the occupation, so the settlers didn’t treat us with mistrust but spoke freely.One settler explained why the community was moving into the forest: “Of course, we’d have like to have occupied the [already] cleared area, but it’s far too dangerous. It’s valuable land. People will fight tooth and nail to keep hold of it. People aren’t so interested in the forest.”On examination, this may sound like bizarre logic, with deforested land and denuded soil deemed to be worth far more than exuberant, life-packed primary Amazon forest. But this is the way it is on the Amazon frontier, where cleared land, which can be sold to ranchers and farmers, is far more valuable (in dollars) than rainforest.Until it is reversed, this way of thinking and acting will make it impossible to end the rampant forest destruction happening all over the region.Land speculators are doing a brisk trade in the Amazon basin. In a process known as “speculative clearance,” land thieves, backed by violent militias, lay claim to public lands covered in rainforest. That land is then deforested and illegally sold to cattle ranchers. Each tract of stolen federal land can bring in an estimated R$20 million (US$6.4 million). Photo by Rhett A. ButlerLandless peasants vs. land thievesThe settlers told us they would never think of moving into large, deforested areas. To do so would almost assuredly draw violence against them. So these landless Brazilians — whether part of official land colonization projects, or informal land occupations organized by social movements — are continually pushed deeper into the Amazon rainforest.It is wealthy land operators who do the pushing. These politically connected land thieves, backed up by their violent “militias,” turn large stolen tracts into no-go areas — even when the land claimed and deforested is publicly owned (which it often is). The state rarely ever reclaims it, meaning that crime pays on the Amazon frontier.This leaves landless peasants with little choice. If they wish to survive economically, they must clear virgin forest. But even that act benefits the land thieves: they use their influence to get officials from IBAMA, the federal environmental agency, to inspect the modest damage the settlers do to the forest, drawing attention away from the much greater harm the land thieves are causing with their own illegal land grabsIn the end, the big land thieves often win; they kick the hard-working peasant farmers off the land they’ve cleared, forcing them deeper into the forest. And so the cycle begins again.A shack at KM Mil near the forest edge. If the landless peasants tried to claim the large tracts of already cleared land, they would likely be subjected to violence inflicted by militias, armed thugs in the employ of wealthy land thieves and speculators. Photo by Thais BorgesThough far from being the main cause of Amazonian deforestation, this dynamic provides a graphic example of how life on the frontier typically works, with the wealthy dominating and exploiting the poor.It is an upside-down world, argue many social critics: studies show that ironically the only legitimate claimants to Amazon public lands are the peasant families. This is because in the 1970s and 1980s large areas of the Amazon, including those currently in dispute, were set aside by the federal government specifically for the purpose of carrying out agrarian reform — but the program was never properly implemented.Smoke and mirrors on the Amazon frontierWhen we arrived at the KM Mil settlement, a woman was cooking lunch for a dozen people, some of whom had been clearing forest. She invited us to join them. While we ate, settler Ivanor da Silva Felizardo told us about his life: “I left Sinop [a town in Mato Grosso state on the BR-163] for lack of prospects. There was no way of getting on. Here everything is more raw; it’s possible to make something of your life. My luck was to get 100 hectares [247 acres] through the trade union.”With the rural workers’ trade union organizing the landless occupation, the peasants felt they had some legitimacy and protection from violence: “The union is a legal organ,” Ivanor told us. “We have been here for about 90 days, and everything has gone well so far.” Even so, tension hung in the air. There were few women or children at the site, and some settlers admitted to often feeling afraid.“They [the land thieves] want to get rid of me,” said leader Alenquer, who wears a flak jacket all the time. “They make threats against me on television, on radio, in the market, at home. I’ve got used to it. They don’t frighten me. And it won’t help them to kill me. We’ve trained various leaders along the BR-163. If they kill me, someone else will take my place.”After lunch, another settler, who didn’t want to give his name, told us how the occupation had come about: a few years earlier, a man he called “the rightful owner” had been “forced off the land, by brute force” by a certain Tião, a much-feared gunman from the AJ Vilela gang. “After [Tião] took over, hardly anyone who set foot in here returned alive,” he said.Aloisio Sampaio, a trade unionist known as Alenquer, the primary leader of the KM Mil landless peasant occupation: “They [the land thieves] want to get rid of me. They make threats against me on television, on radio, in the market, at home. I’ve got used to it. They don’t frighten me. And it won’t help them to kill me. We’ve trained various leaders along the BR-163. If they kill me, someone else will take my place.” Photo by Thais BorgesThere were many murders, the settler told us. But after the arrest of AJ Vilela in 2016 by federal police, the land’s “rightful owner” reappeared. He was keen to regain control of his land, so came to the rural trade union with a proposal: he would give the peasants some land to keep and clear. The peasants were surprised at this act of generosity, but believed “the rightful owner” was a good man who simply wanted to help them.“We signed a contract, it’s all legalized,” the settler told us. “We are very happy. It’s going to work out well.”However, things were more complicated than first appeared. The settlers learned later that “the rightful owner” wasn’t the only one eying this valuable piece of real estate that had become “available” after of the arrest of the gang. And despite calling himself “the rightful owner,” the man behind the deal was, in fact, just another land thief — the first to occupy the land illegally before being driven off by the more powerful and violent AJ Vilela gang.The “rightful owner” refused to be interviewed, saying that publicity would make it more likely that he would be assassinated, but it became clear to us that he likely planned to use the landless peasants as pawns and a human shield. He knew the settlers were determined to keep their plots and would defend their camp fiercely. This was a good deal for the “owner”: if the peasants drove off the militias hired by other land thieves, then he would get to keep an extremely valuable area of cleared land, while “giving” the settlers a relatively small piece of forest.Agamenom da Silva Menezes, president of the Novo Progresso Rural Farmers’ Union in Pará state. Photo by Thais BorgesEnter AgamenomOur interview with Agamenom signalled to us that the settlers would not find it easy to hang on to the land they’d claimed. To him, the peasant families were “invaders” who had to be be evicted, whatever the cost.Though reluctant to talk about KM Mil specifically, Agamenom spoke frankly about how he used militias made up of hired thugs to resolve situations of this nature: “If they [the settlers] leave on their own accord, fine. If they won’t go, we make them. We do what it takes. If they use clubs against us, we use clubs. If they use knives, we use knives. If they use dogs, we use dogs … the way it is done depends on them … but in the end we get them out.”It was surprising to find that Agamenom was willing to talk so openly on camera about sending in his own militia — utterly illegal in Brazil. But since the fall of President Dilma Rousseff’s government and the rise of the agribusiness-friendly Temer government, land speculators appear emboldened, stating brazenly that they operate above the law.Indeed, Agamenom and his fellow speculators openly revealed their plans in the local media. This is what the local newspaper, sympathetic to Agamenom, wrote at the time:Farmers are preparing to mobilize to defend property rights, which they see as threatened by the ineffectiveness of the federal authorities in the region. Their first action will take place in the next few days when they intend to evict those who have illegally occupied land by KM Mil.The following day, a group of six armed men attacked the camp, firing shots in the air and shouting threats. No one was injured and the settlers believed that the gunmen only intended to intimidate them. Before the men left, they promised to return shortly and told the peasants to prepare for something much worse.But Alenquer, highly experienced in these sorts of clashes, made an unusual move: in January 2017 he published a YouTube video in which he accused Agamenom Menezes and Neri Prazeres, the former mayor of Novo Progresso, of being land thieves and of threatening to kill him. The two denied his charges and have said they will sue him for defamation. But the attacks on the camp have stopped, for now, probably because of the publicity.“Everyone here is a land thief” Conflicts of the kind described here are common today on the Amazon frontier, where land thieving is the easiest, quickest way to make money. Possibly to play down his own land grabbing activities, Agamenom told us: “We are all land thieves here! There is no citizen who is not a land thief, because we are all illegally occupying federal land.”Cattle rancher Lincoln Queiroz Brasil argues otherwise, noting that he is not a land thief. In the late 1970s and 80s, impoverished families, largely from southern Brazil, arrived in Novo Progresso by way of the just opened BR-163. Many signed contracts with INCRA, the land colonization institute, agreeing to pay for land plots in ten annual instalments.Cattle rancher Lincoln Queiroz Brasil came by his Novo Progresso land honestly due to a land purchase legally made by his father. In the late 1970s and 80s, impoverished families, mostly from southern Brazil, arrived in the Amazon by way of the just opened BR-163. Many signed contracts with INCRA, the land colonization institute, agreeing to pay for land plots in annual instalments. Photo by Thais BorgesThe Queiroz were one of those families, and Lincoln told us that he remembers his scrupulously honest father travelling each year to Itaituba on the Tapajós river, at the time a difficult journey, to make the payment. But many families didn’t bother paying.Despite the exceptions, Agamenon is right to suggest that land thieving is very common.The absence of a strong law enforcement presence in the region has resulted in land thieves taking over huge tracts of public land, some covering tens of thousands of acres. Agamenom himself bragged to us of being the “owner” of 70,000 hectares (173,000 acres) in 2004 — even though it’s illegal to claim such vast areas under the Brazilian Constitution, which sets a maximum size for any public land plot held by a private individual at 2,500 hectares (6,177 acres). Anything larger than that requires congressional authorization.A map of the Novo Progresso area in Pará state, showing indigenous lands, federal conservation units and large swaths of deforestation. Map by Mauricio TorresBeating the ConstitutionLand thieves have found a way round the Brazilian Constitution: they divide the tract they want to “own” into subplots, each about 2,500 hectares in size. Then they get another individual — famously called a laranja (an orange), probably because an orange is made up of a number of segments — to register the subplot in his or her name.Queiroz said that you can easily purchase a so-called “Citizen Kit” in Novo Progresso which provides all the required documents to become a laranja — an identity card, electoral registration, and so on.The person named in the kit puts him or herself forward as the “owner” of the land, should IBAMA ever come round asking questions or seeking a fine for deforestation. This “owner” is always a very poor person, who is pleased to earn a pittance for his or her participation in the scheme. That’s why the kits are very cheap: “If you’re a friend of the supplier, you might even be given it for nothing,” laughed Queiroz.A demonstration organized by land thieves in Novo Progresso to protest measures taken by IBAMA to conserve the rainforest and protect federal public lands. Photo by Jorge TadeuOver the last decade, the perpetrators of land theft have changed. In the past, cattle ranchers were likely to grab land for their ranches. Now the name of the game is forest clearance.Queiroz explained to us how “speculative clearance” works — the name given to the illegal practice by IMAZON, the Institute for Man and the Environment in Amazonia. “A person takes over a forested area [usually on public land] and fells the forest. He doesn’t want to produce anything on this land, but merely to get it ready for selling on,” said Queiroz. “And, just by clearing the land, he increases the value of the land 100 or 200 times.”The buyers of this newly cleared land will usually raise cattle. These purchasers range from large landowners coming from Mato Grosso or Goiás, who are fully aware of the illegality of their purchase, to more naïve small-scale farmers who have sold everything they own elsewhere to buy what they falsely believe to be a properly registered property in the Amazon.In the process, the land speculators make huge profits, with each tract of stolen land bringing in, on average, R$20 million (US$6.4 million), according to calculations by the MPF, the independent Public Federal Ministry.And so it is that land theft, once carried out by cattle ranchers or crop growers, has become divorced from farming. It is now through illegal “speculative clearance” of public lands that the big money is to be made. Thus, deforestation becomes a business in its own right.Queiroz told us that “the largest deforesters in the region do not own a single head of cattle.” His comment is backed up by a recently published study, showing that those clearing forest along the Novo Progresso section of the BR-163 haven’t planted or created anything, except spectacular profits for themselves coming from the huge boom in the value of cleared Amazon real estate.Novo Progresso is a frontier town in northwest Pará state, a region with a long history of violence and lawlessness. Here deforestation due to land theft is rampant. Photo by Jorge TadeuThe Amazon deforestation racket has gained so much momentum, and become so lucrative, that, after engaging in it for over a decade, one famous land speculator, Ezequiel Castanha, brazenly began offering a turnkey operation: he formed a “partnership” with a person who had taken over a large area of forest, providing him with everything he needed to clear the tract — “oranges” with documentation, poor laborers to cut trees and to seed pastures, and much more. At the end, when the land was sold, Castanha took a hefty share of the profits.Eventually, Castanha was arrested in Operation Castanheira (named after him), which was carried out by the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), the Federal Police and IBAMA.Deforestation in the Novo Progresso region is on the rise — as it has been for the last two years throughout the Amazon. And rainforest prospects are not good: at the end of March, the Temer government slashed by over 50 percent the budget of the Ministry of the Environment, which is responsible for both IBAMA and the Chico Mendes Institute of Biodiversity Conservation (ICMBio), which runs the federal government’s conservation units.That means that the already understaffed forces protecting the Amazon will be even smaller in the coming year. For the rainforest and the landless peasants this is likely bad news. For the land thieves, this is very good news. Article published by Glenn Scherer Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Illegal Logging, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Roads, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Documenting the fight to save Borneo’s animals

first_imgAnimal Rescue, Animals, Archive, Conservation, Featured, Interviews, Video, Wildlife Article published by Rhett Butler All images courtesy of scubazooimages.com. After graduating from school, Aaron ‘Bertie’ Gekoski was on a fairly conventional career path for a young businessman.But the more successful his agency became, the more Gekoski felt like something was missing.So he quit the business and embarked on a totally new adventure: wildlife filmmaking.Gekoski spoke about his unusual career path, his passion, and filmmaking during an April 2017 interview with Mongabay.com. After graduating from school, Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski was on a fairly conventional career path for a young businessman, starting out in copyediting for a magazine before launching a modeling agency in London. But the more successful his agency became, the more Gekoski felt like something was missing. So he quit the business and embarked on a totally new adventure: wildlife filmmaking and photojournalism.Today, instead of night clubs and fashion shoots, Gekoski prowls the planet’s oceans and rainforests for wildlife stories for Scubazoo, producing films that highlight the beauty and wonder of nature. His latest project — Borneo Wildlife Warriors — takes him into the rainforests of Borneo with the Sabah Wildlife Department’s Wildlife Rescue Unit, an agency charged with protecting and rehabilitating the Malaysian state’s animals.Gekoski spoke about his unusual career path, his passion, and Borneo Wildlife Warriors during an April 2017 interview with Mongabay.com.Ranger and baby Bornean Elephants, Elephas maximus borneensis, Sepilok, Sabah, Malaysia, Borneo,Bertie holding a baby Pangolin, Manis javanica, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia, Borneo,AN INTERVIEW WITH BERTIE GEKOSKIMongabay.com What is your background and what inspired you to get into wildlife film production?Bertie Gekoski: I studied advertising and worked as a copywriter for publishing houses in London, before starting up a modeling agency with my best mate from school. After a few years doing this, it all got a bit much: tax returns, demanding clients, moaning models, a mortgage. Then I remember playing the ‘Alter Ego Game’ with my family at Christmas. In a parallel universe I would have been David Attenborough, or another of the great explorers. It was a lightbulb moment: why spend your life fantasizing about someone else’s? So I went away and discovered diving, before enlisting in the Wildlife Film Academy in the Kruger Park in 2009. I’ve never looked back.The lifestyle is very seductive and has become something of a drug. The more you travel, the more you learn, the more you realize what a critical point we’re at in history. Our oceans are rising, warming, used as dumping grounds, and catastrophically overfished. Every year we chop down billions of trees and we lose thousands of species due to the activities of mankind. I began traveling extensively in Africa, documenting these issues as a photojournalist. It’s only the last couple of years I’ve stepped in front of the lens, when I was approached by Scubazoo CEO Simon Christopher about coming to Borneo and fronting up shows for SZtv.The camera is one of the most potent weapons ever invented, and wielded correctly can be used as a force for good. Our goal is to take these complex issues, package them up, and make them accessible to global audiences through the media. Many view conservation as depressing or for anoraks – however it can be exciting and even entertaining. We’ve a very talented team here, creating compelling content.Mongabay.com You’ve done a lot of work on marine wildlife and ecosystems. What prompted you to launch this series focusing on terrestrial conservation?Bertie Gekoski: I’ve also done a lot of work on terrestrial conservation, particularly with the African elephant. When shooting our underwater series Borneo from Below, I heard about a mass poisoning event in Borneo back in 2013 that wiped out an entire herd. I started researching the elephant situation here: elephants are losing their homes to deforestation and development, are being shot and poisoned, are dying in manmade quarries, and are leaving behind their young in plantations. This brought me to the work of the Wildlife Rescue Unit (WRU), a team of dedicated vets and rangers who are doing their best to mitigate this conflict in the state of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.However, rather than simply covering the story as a journalist, I wanted to actually get out on the frontline of conservation. So I approached the head of the WRU, Dr. Sen Nathan, about joining his team. Dr Sen agreed and enlisted me in a ‘Boot Camp’ before I was allowed out on proper rescues and relocations. Episodes 1-6 details my time training with the WRU, whereas episodes 7 and onwards are in the field.Preparing a radio collar for an elephantA python being released into the wild after a successful relocationMongabay.com What are the biggest challenges with this kind of filmmaking?Bertie Gekoski: Filming in the jungle is a very different experience to shooting underwater. First of all it is hot, sweaty and full of mosquitoes. Then there’s the WRU’s work, which is exhausting and at times dangerous. Once we were charged by an elephant we’d been trying to catch for a week, and a couple of days later a baby orang-utan tried to attack me. You might work for days on end with very little sleep, yet still have to keep your wits about you if you’re pursuing a two-ton elephant. Then once you’ve caught it you still have to lead it into a cage, load it onto a truck, and transport it to a stretch of jungle far away from human settlements. It’s a little different to cruising around beautiful coral reefs photographing fish!I have so much respect for the WRU who work under very difficult circumstances, trying to protect Borneo’s wildlife. They face many challenges: from deforestation and development, to the traditional medicine trade, the illegal pet trade and more. Dealing with constant conflict takes its toll physically and mentally, but they handle the pressure admirably.Asian Palm Civet, Viverra tangalunga, WRU holding pen, Lok Kawi, Sabah, MalaysiaA Bornean Gibbon, Hylobates muelleri, clinging to a finger, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia, Borneo,Mongabay.com What was the most memorable moment in the making of this series?Bertie Gekoski: So much happens in the series it’s hard to pick one moment! Along with the hairy encounters mentioned above, I learn how to handle pythons and elephants, adopt a sick pangolin, attend a sun bear medical and more. I became very attached to the gibbons, who are victims of the illegal pet trade – in particular one female called Lilo. It’s easy to see why as they’re very affectionate and beyond adorable. However once kept as pets, rehabilitation is difficult as they ‘imprint’ on their owners and become too trusting of humans. That’s why most can’t be released back into the wild.Team ready for medical check on an orang-utanMale orang-utan being given a health check before being releasedMongabay.com You’ve release this as a webisodes freely accessible to everyone. How are you marketing/promoting these and what is your primary target audience for this series?Bertie Gekoski: All of our episodes are released via Facebook and are uploaded to our website via YouTube. Finding funders is a challenge, particularly as our series are high end and not cheap to produce. Borneo Wildlife Warriors was primarily funded in-house and through one donor, an American philanthropist called Damon Copeland. We have just launched an “Executive Producer Experience” to tempt in funders who have the opportunity to attend shoots, get photography/video lessons, and be listed as Executive Producer in our shows. We are also looking to work with brands that want to be associated with SZtv.The feedback we’re getting is that our shows have a very broad appeal – kids love them, as well as older generations (our producer’s great auntie Doreen is one of our biggest fans!). It’s important to reach new audiences as we don’t just want to preach to the converted.Orphaned baby elephants at the rescue centrePreparing a net to capture macaquesMongabay.com What do you hope viewers take away from this project?Bertie Gekoski: We are dealing with some multifaceted and sensitive subjects. It’s not always black and white or a case of good vs bad – there are many shades of grey. So we are trying to provide a balanced viewpoint, without wagging fingers at people. Palm oil, for example, receives terrible press worldwide. However, it’s one of Malaysia’s biggest exports and is a critical part of the economy. It’s unsustainably sourced palm oil that’s the major problem.We also want to bring attention to some of the lesser-known animals. Whilst the flagship species such as orang-utans dominate the precious column inches dedicated to conservation, other creatures are faring just as badly. Pangolins are now the most trafficked mammal in the world and poaching is pushing them to the brink of extinction – yet if you asked the general public, not many would know what a pangolin was. The overall goal of the series is to highlight the problems facing Borneo’s wildlife and showcase the local heroes who dedicate their lives to mitigating these conflicts.Two baby orphaned elephantsBertie with python in an oil palm plantationMongabay.com What’s next for you?Bertie Gekoski: SZtv have rather a lot on at the moment. We’ve just finished a 6-part series for Smithsonian (also covering the work of the WRU) called Borneo Wildlife Rescue. That comes out later this year. We are currently in the middle of shooting a new series, Borneo Jungle Diaries, which looks at the cutting edge scientific work of the Danau Girang Field Centre. This will be released on 5th June, World Environment Day, as part of our global efforts to connect people with nature. We are also editing together a feature documentary on human-elephant conflict for a series called On the Brink, and are shooting episode 2 – on Pacific leatherbacks – one of the last true dinosaurs left on Earth. We plan to tag nesting females with satellite tags later this year and follow them to where they’re still hunted with spears from dug out canoes in remotest Indonesia. With their populations plummeting from around 120,000 individuals just two decades ago to less than 3000 now due to over-fishing and by-catch, Scubazoo’s been chasing this story for almost two decades so it’s hugely exciting!In terms of underwater productions, Next month we start production on Season 1 of Indonesia from Below in May, off the coast of Kalimantan – this includes whale sharks, mantas, and a unique jellyfish lake. We will shoot the rest of the series towards the end of this year. I’m also talking to Sea Shepherd about potentially joining them on one of their shark finning campaigns. My year is jam packed until January…but bring it on!Subscribe to SZtv’s YouTube channel so you never miss an episode. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Leonardo DiCaprio teams up with Mexico’s president and wealthiest individual to save the vaquita

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A report by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita released in February found that there are as few as 30 vaquita left in the Upper Gulf of California, the small marine cetacean species’ only known range.Despite the ban adopted by Mexico two years ago, unlawful use of gillnets remains widespread in the Upper Gulf of California, where they’re used to catch totoaba, a fish whose swim bladder is much prized by practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine.Both the Carlos Slim Foundation and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation will reportedly be backing the agreement by committing funds to local development projects and alternative fishing gear options.In order to further crack down on illegal fishing activities, the agreement also includes a prohibition on night fishing and measures to tighten entry and exit controls in the vaquita reserve, according to the AP. Actor and environmentalist Leonardo DiCaprio has jumped into the fight to save the critically endangered vaquita together with the president of Mexico and the country’s wealthiest individual.An agreement signed Wednesday by DiCaprio, President Enrique Peña Nieto, and billionaire Carlos Slim makes a temporary ban on gillnets adopted by Mexico in 2015 permanent, with the goal of ending use of the fishing gear that has decimated vaquita numbers altogether.A report by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita released in February found that there are as few as 30 vaquita left in the Upper Gulf of California, the small marine cetacean species’ only known range.Despite the ban adopted by Mexico two years ago, unlawful use of gillnets remains widespread in the Upper Gulf of California, where they’re used to catch totoaba, a fish whose swim bladder is much prized by practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine. Though no health benefits have yet been proven by science, it is believed that swim bladders from fish in the family Sciaenidate, which includes totoaba, can be used to cure a number of ailments.Vaquita become ensnared in the gillnets and drown, the chief cause of their precipitous population decline. According to the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita report, vaquita numbers dropped by 90 percent between 2011 and 2016.Honored to work w/ President Nieto (@EPN) & Carlos Slim to ensure the future viability of marine life in the Gulf. https://t.co/QxRoL08Nd8— Leonardo DiCaprio (@LeoDiCaprio) June 7, 2017“Mexico understands its responsibility as one of the countries with greatest biodiversity,” Peña Nieto said, as reported by the AP. “That is why we have implemented an historic effort to avoid the extinction of a unique species in the world and also to protect important ecosystems.”In January, Mexico’s Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) announced an emergency plan to save the vaquita from extinction by capturing the remaining individuals in the Upper Gulf of California and moving them to a protected marine sanctuary.A fisherman hauls up a critically endangered vaquita porpoise accidentally entangled in his net in 2008. Entanglement in fishing gear threatens the species with extinction. Photo credit: Omar Vidal.Both the Carlos Slim Foundation and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation will reportedly be backing the agreement by committing funds to local development projects and alternative fishing gear options. The foundations believe that the permanent gillnet ban, coupled with tougher law enforcement, could help protect not just the vaquita but threatened ecosystems across the region.Researchers have said that, while the gillnet ban and the implementation of alternative fishing gear could take some pressure off of the vaquita in the short-term, creating alternative economic opportunities for locals is key to ensuring the long-term survival of the vaquita, the world’s smallest porpoise.In order to further crack down on illegal fishing activities, the agreement also includes a prohibition on night fishing and measures to tighten entry and exit controls in the vaquita reserve, according to the AP.“This action is a critical step towards ensuring that the Gulf of California continues to be both vibrant and productive, especially for species like the critically endangered vaquita,” DiCaprio said of the agreement. Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Cetaceans, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Fisheries, Fishing, Illegal Fishing, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Vaquita, Wildlife center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Zero tolerance of deforestation likely only way to save Amazon gateway

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer Agriculture, Agroforestry, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Culture, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Featured, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Meat, Pasture, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Ranching, Saving The Amazon, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Soy, Sustainability, Sustainable Forest Management, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img In a new paper, conservationists urgently call for a policy of zero deforestation and sustainable agroforestry in Maranhão, one of Brazil’s poorest states, before its remaining Amazon forests are lost.The region’s forests are home to unique and endangered species, including the jaguar (Panthera onca), Black bearded saki (Chiropotes satanas), and kaapori capuchin (Cebus kaapori), one of the world’s rarest primates.It is also inhabited by some of the most vulnerable indigenous groups in the world, including uncontacted indigenous communities.Though 70 percent of remaining forest lies within protected areas, illegal logging and slash-and-burn agriculture are persistent problems, threatening already fragmented wildlife habitat and forcing indigenous tribes off ancestral land. An Awá mother and child survey the tree canopy on a foraging expedition in the Maranhão rainforest. Photo copyright Survival InternationalPerched at the easternmost edge of the Amazon rainforest is Maranhão, one of Brazil’s smallest states, and one of its poorest. Originally covered in more than 110,000 square kilometers (42,471 square miles) of forest, more than 75 percent has been logged to make way for roads, croplands and cattle ranches over the last 60 years.Illegal logging continues to be a persistent problem, threatening already fragmented wildlife habitat and forcing indigenous tribes off their land.In a paper published in Land Use Policy this August, the Maranhão Amazon Forest Conservation Network urged the state government to establish a policy of zero deforestation and sustainable agroforestry to safeguard remaining forests and to better protect the states’ 6.9 million residents and improve their livelihoods.The paper’s lead author, Danielle Celentano, admits that “it is very challenging to implement a policy of zero deforestation,” but “it is possible and demonstrably in the public interest.”Tabebuia sp. (Ipê) old tree in a conserved area of the Gurupi Biological Reserve. Photo by Guillaume RousseauA degraded part of the AmazonLarge-scale deforestation in Maranhão began in the 1960s with the construction of new highways, and with government initiatives that incentivized farming projects in the state.Two decades later, the development of the Carajás iron mine in neighboring Pará state led to the construction of a railway through Maranhão. New pig iron processing facilities sprang up across the region, requiring large quantities of charcoal to fuel smelting, and putting further pressure on Maranhão’s dwindling forests.But local people have largely not seen the benefits of this economic development. The state has some of the worst social and economic indicators in Brazil, and rural poverty is strongly associated with land degradation there, say researchers.A large scale charcoal production facility that supplies fuel for the pig iron smelting industry. Photo by Guillaume RousseauRecently deforested land in Maranhão, which will be used for crops or cattle. Photo by Danielle CelentanoThe value that remainsToday, 70 percent of Maranhão’s surviving forest lies in legally protected areas. One of the larger of these is the Gurupi Biological Reserve, covering 270,000 hectares (1,043 square miles) of dense Amazonian forest around the Gurupí and Pindaré rivers. It is home to many protected species, including jaguar (Panthera onca), the Critically Endangered Black Bearded Saki (Chiropotes satanas), and the Kaapori Capuchin (Cebus kaapori), which is listed as one of the world’s 25 most endangered primates.Despite its degradation, Maranhão still boasts a mosaic of varied habitat types, including the unique Maranhão Babaçu Forests — forming a transitional zone between the evergreen Amazonian rainforests to the east, and drier woodlands and savannas that lie to the west.“Gurupi and the surrounding indigenous lands represent the last significant fragment of Amazon” in Maranhão, said Eloisa Mendonça, an environmental analyst at the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (ICMBio), a federal institution responsible for managing Brazil’s two million square kilometers (772,204 square miles) of protected areas.Despite its biological and economic importance, illegal logging in the Gurupi Biological Reserve and in the Awá, Caru, Alto Turiaçu and Araribóia indigenous territories, is common, and indigenous groups say that government enforcement is dangerously lax.Member of the Awá tribe. The Awá have lived in the northeastern Amazon for millennia. Some members of the tribe are still uncontacted, though most now have some contact with mainstream Brazilian society. Photo copyright Survival InternationalIndigenous groups at riskOn August 31st, it was reported that an indigenous group, the Guajajara Guardians, had taken over the local offices of FUNAI, the federal Indian bureau, in the city of Imperatriz, to protest incursions by illegal loggers. “We’re occupying FUNAI to demand our rights to the land, and protection for the environment,” said a protest leader. “We need help, urgently. Our land is being invaded as we speak. The Brazilian government has forgotten us — it’s as if we don’t exist.”“The Guardians are putting their lives on the line … but they desperately need help from the Brazilian authorities – resources for their expeditions and support from government agents who can arrest the loggers”, says Sarah Shenker, senior campaigner for Survival International.Illegal logging comes hand-in-hand with human rights abuses and violent encounters with indigenous people. “In every region of this mosaic of protected areas we have … a history of conflicts,” over land and timber, said Mendonça.Brazil is the deadliest country on Earth for activists protecting land rights and natural resources, and nearly half the victims are indigenous. In 2015, the death of Raimundo dos Santos Rodrigues, a volunteer on the advisory council of the Gurupi Biological Reserve, made headlines round the world.Agents from FUNAI, Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency, handling confiscated logs in the Arariboia indigenous territory, Brazil. Photo copyright Survival InternationalPerhaps the worst of the atrocities have been directed towards the Awá Indians. One of an estimated 240 indigenous tribes in Brazil, the Awá is unusual in that many of its members have never made contact with the outside world. Survival International has listed the Awá as the most threatened indigenous group on Earth. “The uncontacted Awá are one of the most vulnerable peoples on the planet,” says Shenker. “If their land isn’t protected, they face catastrophe”When outsiders first made contact in the 1970s, the meetings were quickly followed by outbreaks of influenza, malaria, pneumonia and other illnesses for which the Awá had no resistance. Entire families were decimated in a matter of weeks, and many of those that survived understandably withdrew from further contact. However, their right to remain undisturbed is being repeatedly violated as loggers encroach on indigenous land and devastate the forest resources they rely upon.Slash-and-burn agriculture is another threat to Maranhão’s forests, says the study. The ancient technique is the main livelihood for many small farm holders, but the fires often burn out of control and spread into protected areas. Loggers also deliberately use fire to force indigenous people from their land. In 2016, over 30,000 separate heat foci were visible in satellite images of Maranhão, according to the government.A logging truck carries fresh timber harvested from Maranhão’s forests. Photo by Danielle CelentanoCurrent forestry laws inadequateAt the COP-21 sustainable innovation forum in Paris in 2015, Brazil made an international commitment to cut illegal deforestation in the Amazon to zero, and to restore 12 million hectares (46,332 square miles) of cleared forest by 2030. Despite these promises, some government representatives in Maranhão have pursued legislation to reduce protection of protected areas and indigenous lands.While most of the states’ remaining forest lies in protected areas, around 20 percent exists as small fragments on privately owned rural properties. These fragments are steadily being degraded and lost, even though the owners of properties in Amazon forest are required under the federal Native Vegetation Protection Law to protect 80 percent of their land as a legal reserve, and are limited as to the area they can legally use for agriculture or cattle ranching.The Native Vegetation Protection Law came into effect in 2012, replacing the more stringent Forest Code from 1965, but it has been criticized by conservationists for weakening environmental protection, by offering an amnesty on fines due for past violations under the old Forest Code, and by removing protections for some fragile environments such as lakes and periodic springs.The new code also relaxes requirements for land restoration on rural properties with a deficit of legal reserve land, by allowing landowners to compensate with native vegetation on another property. The compensating land could be located in another watershed or even another state, ignoring the impact of the loss of forest on local ecosystem services and on local biodiversity.Cattle ranching, one of the principal industries in Maranhão state. Photo by Guillaume RousseauEucalyptus, as seen here, and soybeans are among the common crops to replace forests in Maranhão. Photo by Guillaume RousseauSensible land management solutionsIn its recent paper, the Maranhão Amazon Forest Conservation Network, a multi-institutional group of researchers, called for a policy of zero deforestation in the state, going well beyond the requirements of the 2012 Native Vegetation Protection Law. The network also called for the enforcement of environmental laws in existing protected areas and for the restoration of damaged forests.The easiest way to restore degraded land, say the researchers, is to remove the cause of degradation — illegal logging and slash-and-burn agriculture — and allow natural succession to replace the original vegetation, a process which can take anywhere from 30 to 80 years.Recovering secondary forests now cover nearly 20,000 square kilometres (7,722 square miles) in the state — 27 percent of the deforested area — and those areas are seen as essential to the recovery of Maranhão‘s forests.Secondary forests also help maintain connectivity between patches of primary forest, offer refuges for wildlife, and provide vital natural services.“In a very degraded and fragmented landscape, [regenerating] secondary forests plays a fundamental role both in conserving biodiversity and in providing ecosystem services,” such as carbon sequestration and water regulation, said Celentano.An Awá tribe member. Brazil’s Maranhão state is inhabited by some of the most vulnerable indigenous groups in the world, including uncontacted indigenous communities. Photo copyright Survival InternationalThe extent of deforestation in Maranhão state. Figure from Celentano et al.However, these secondary forests are currently completely unprotected by law. But in 2015, Pará state instituted a ban on clearing older secondary vegetation in the middle and late stages of restoration, setting a precedent that Celentano hopes can be mirrored in Maranhão.The paper also advocates for the implementation of sustainable agroforestry systems, which pair agricultural plantings with a complementary mixture of local trees, as an alternative to native forest restoration. Such systems employ a mix of fruit and timber trees, along with nitrogen-fixing plants, resulting in a functioning ecosystem that enriches rather than degrades soil, while also producing valuable crops and commodities.Done right, sustainable agroforestry can replace subsistence slash-and-burn methods, and offer alternative livelihoods in rural areas.A combination of approaches is needed, say the scientists, to protect the vulnerable people, wildlife and forest habitat of Maranhão state. Remaining primary forest and indigenous land must be protected from illegal logging, and government incentives are needed that favor agroforestry techniques over slash-and-burn. Secondary forest fragments should be protected, and recovery programs targeted toward creating ecological corridors to connect up large primary forest fragments.Notably, such a proposal goes largely against the policies of large scale agribusiness and cattle ranching presently being applied by the Brazilian government under President Michel Temer. However, agree scientists, a sustainable agroforestry approach — which encourages zero deforestation — could change the lives of some of Brazil’s poorest farmers for the better, and may be the only hope for the Awá and other indigenous groups in Maranhão.Citation:Celentano, D., Rousseau, G. X., Muniz, F. H., van Deursen Varga, I., Martinez, C., Carneiro, M. S., … & Adami, M. (2017). Towards zero deforestation and forest restoration in the Amazon region of Maranhão state, Brazil. Land Use Policy.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The future of the Awá and other indigenous groups remains uncertain, as developmental pressures grow in Maranhão state. Photo copyright Survival Internationallast_img read more

Indonesian court cancels dam project in last stronghold of tigers, rhinos

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Basten Gokkon Alternative Energy, Animals, Conservation, Dams, Energy, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Renewable Energy, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img A court in Indonesia’s Aceh province has ordered an end to a planned hydroelectric project in Sumatra’s unique Leuser Ecosystem.Environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the Aceh government and the dam’s developer earlier this year over potential environmental destruction and violation of zoning laws.The area is the last place on Earth that’s home to wild tigers, rhinos, orangutans and elephants — all critically endangered species whose habitat would be flooded and fragmented by the dam and its roads and power lines.Villagers in the region were also widely opposed to the project, which they say would have dammed up the river on which they depend and forced them to relocate to make way for the reservoir. BANDA ACEH, Indonesia — A court in Indonesia has annulled a permit allowing the development of a $3 billion hydropower plant in a forest that’s home to critically endangered tigers, rhinos and orangutans.The court in Banda Aceh, the capital of Aceh province on the northern tip of Sumatra, issued the ruling Aug. 28, in a lawsuit filed in March by the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s biggest green NGO. The respondents in the suit are the Aceh provincial government, which issued the permit, and PT Kamirzu, the Indonesian subsidiary of Hong Kong-based Prosperity International Holding, the recipient of the permit.Lesten village in Gayo Lues district, part of the planned site of the Tampur dam. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.The ruling orders the developer and the provincial government to stop the project to build a 443-megawatt plant on 4,407 hectares (10,890 acres) straddling the three districts of Gayo Lues, Aceh Tamiang and East Aceh. The Aceh government violated prevailing regulations, the court found, by permitting the development of forest land greater than 5 hectares (12 acres). Earlier during the hearings, the judges visited the site of the planned Tampur hydropower plant.Walhi welcomed the court’s decision.“This means that, besides being objective in assessing and making the decision, the presiding judge has given a new legal lesson for the people of Indonesia,” said Muhammad Reza Maulana, the legal counsel for Walhi’s Aceh chapter.Residents of Aceh Tamiang and East Aceh who would have been affected by the dam also welcomed the ruling. Damming the upstream section of the Tamiang River would have adversely affected the livelihoods of several communities that rely on the river downstream. It would also have forced the relocation of villages in areas set to be flooded by the dam’s reservoir.The project was widely opposed by residents on these grounds, while environmentalists have criticized the lack of nature protection and conservation. They note that the required environmental impact assessment carried out by the developer failed to evaluate natural risks, such as earthquakes and flash floods.The latter is already a serious problem here, where the annual rainfall exceeds 2,300 millimeters (91 inches) — double the amount of precipitation that falls in Portland, Oregon. In 2006, heavy downpours triggered a flash flood in Aceh Tamiang district, killing 28 people and displacing more than 200,000 from their homes. Damming the river could make similar flooding events upstream even more destructive, activists say.One of the villages in the Leuser Ecosystem at risk from the development of Tampur hydropower plant. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.Hornbills flock in the Leuser Ecosystem where the dam was to have been built. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.Critics also highlighted the lack of wildlife protections in the environmental impact analysis — a key oversight, given the dam’s location in the Leuser Ecosystem. The heavily forested region is highly biodiverse, and is the last place on Earth where Sumatran tigers, rhinos, orangutans and elephants — all critically endangered species on the brink of extinction — still coexist. Another criticism of PT Kamirzu’s permit is that it remains unclear whether the developer has finished mapping the forest areas that would be affected by the project.Maksum, a resident of Aceh Tamiang, said he was opposed to the dam because the developer had failed to engage with the community. He also said he was concerned the dam would exacerbate environmental disasters in the region.“We don’t want it, especially with the dam’s location being very close to people’s settlements,” he said at a discussion with the environmental NGO Forest, Nature and Environment of Aceh (HaKA) in Banda Aceh in late 2017.Officials from the Aceh provincial government visited a village in Gayo Lues on Aug. 19 this year that was expected to be affected by the dam development. During the visit, the officials expressed their support for the project as long as it used the most advanced technology and didn’t damage the environment.“What we must monitor is the methods which [the developer] apply to the project,” said Nova Iriansyah, the interim Aceh governor. “There will be an agency to monitor it. The hydropower plant has more benefits than disadvantages.”Nova said the current electricity supply in Aceh was sufficient to meet demand, but that would increase in the future. “This hydropower plant is important, and the biggest in Sumatra,” Nova said.But the statement met with disappointment from residents of East Aceh district.“The development will damage the environment,” said Mahmud, a resident, adding that he didn’t know of any hydropower project that didn’t harm the environment. “They’re going to build a dam and flood more than 4,000 hectares of forest. That is the problem.”Residents of the region rely on the river for their livelihoods. They say they fear the damming of the river will affect them adversely. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.A hearing in the lawsuit takes place at the site of the planned hydropower plant. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on Aug. 29, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

2019 was second-hottest year on record, 2010s hottest decade

first_imgClimate Change, Environment, Global Warming, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Research, Temperatures Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Global average temperatures on land and at sea in December 2019 were the second-highest recorded in the month of December since record-keeping began in 1880. That capped off a year that will also go down as the second-hottest on record, according to data released by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) today.The average temperature across Earth’s land and ocean surfaces in 2019 was 1.71°Fahrenheit or 0.95°Celsius above the 20th-century average, NOAA reports, just 0.07°F or 0.04°C below the hottest year on record, 2016.A separate analysis by NASA scientists confirmed 2019 as the second-warmest year on record. Earth’s average global surface temperature is now more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit, or slightly more than 1 degree Celsius, higher than it was in the late 19th century, NASA reported. Global average temperatures on land and at sea in December 2019 were the second-highest recorded in the month of December since record-keeping began in 1880. That capped off a year that will also go down as the second-hottest on record, according to data released by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) today.The average temperature across Earth’s land and ocean surfaces in 2019 was 1.71°Fahrenheit or 0.95°Celsius above the 20th-century average, NOAA reports, just 0.07°F or 0.04°C below the hottest year on record, 2016.That makes 2019 the 43rd consecutive year of above-average temperatures, going back to 1977, with the five warmest years all occurring since 2015. Nine of the 10 warmest years on record have all occurred since 2005 — 1998 being the only year among the 10 warmest that didn’t occur in the 21st century.Parts of southern Africa, Asia, Australia, central Europe, Madagascar, New Zealand, North America, and eastern South America all experienced record high annual temperatures over land surfaces in 2019. There were no land areas on Earth that experienced record cold temperatures for the year.Credit: NOAAMeanwhile, record-high annual temperatures were measured in parts of the North and South Atlantic Ocean, the western Indian Ocean, and northern, western, and southwestern Pacific Ocean. No ocean areas experienced record cold temperatures.Across the globe, annual land and ocean temperatures have increased at an average rate of +0.13°F or +0.07°C per decade since 1880, though the average rate of increase has been more than double that rate — +0.32°F or +0.18°C per decade — since 1981.Separate analyses by NASA scientists and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) confirmed that 2019 was the second-warmest year in the 140-year record.“The decade that just ended is clearly the warmest decade on record,” Gavin Schmidt, director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, said in a statement. “Every decade since the 1960s clearly has been warmer than the one before.”Earth’s average global surface temperature is now more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit, or slightly more than 1 degree Celsius, higher than it was in the late 19th century, NASA reported.“We crossed over into more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit warming territory in 2015 and we are unlikely to go back,” Schmidt added. “This shows that what’s happening is persistent, not a fluke due to some weather phenomenon: we know that the long-term trends are being driven by the increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.”Credit: NOAA. Click for larger view.“The average global temperature has risen by about 1.1°C since the pre-industrial era and ocean heat content is at a record level,” WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said in a statement. “On the current path of carbon dioxide emissions, we are heading towards a temperature increase of 3 to 5 degrees Celsius by the end of century.”Unchecked greenhouse gas emissions levels and rising global temperature averages don’t tell the whole story of global climate change, however. As the WMO notes, the past decade has been “characterized by retreating ice, record sea levels, increasing ocean heat and acidification, and extreme weather.”2020 is expected to continue the climatic trends on full display in 2019.“The year 2020 has started out where 2019 left off — with high-impact weather and climate-related events,” Taalas said. “Australia had its hottest, driest year on record in 2019, setting the scene for the massive bushfires which were so devastating to people and property, wildlife, ecosystems and the environment. Unfortunately, we expect to see much extreme weather throughout 2020 and the coming decades, fuelled by record levels of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.”last_img read more

Michel Leflochmoan face à la maladie : «Un match que je ne gagnerai pas»

first_img Partager Oui, enfin, vous serez sur le banc de touche quand même, non ?Oui, je serai le coach du F91 ! Ce sera au stade Louis-Dugauguez et ils attendent tout de même 7 000 à 8 000 personnes dans l’après-midi. Et mes anciens joueurs, je vais les engueuler comme avant, il est hors de question qu’ils perdent ! Non mais, vous rigolez ! J’ai déjà annoncé à mon homologue que malgré Cédric Mionnet, Pius N’Diefi… ils allaient prendre une fessée !Quels anciens joueurs dudelangeois allez-vous retrouver à cette occasion ?Je n’ai plus énormément de contacts avec qui que ce soit, ces derniers mois. Ça devient discret. Hormis quelques coaches comme Pascal Carzaniga, Emilio Lobo ou Michel Lollier. C’est comme ça : chacun suit sa route. Vous aussi d’ailleurs ! Vous étiez parti sur une autre planète ? Bon, depuis que ce match s’est dessiné, j’ai reçu quelques appels d’anciens joueurs et Loïc Mouny m’a déjà dit que certains venaient justement pour moi. Cela fait plaisir. Je retrouverai la défense de Mostar, les Borbiconi, Hug, Mouny, Kabongo… Mais il y aura aussi Gruszczynski, Lukic, Louadj, Antonicelli, Rodrigues, Cicchirillo, Lecomte, Bendaha, Marchal…Vous nous dites que ce n’est pas par considération pour vous que Sedan a invité le F91. C’est donc que le champion du Luxembourg bénéficie d’une certaine image ?Pour faire court, quand je suis parti au F91, personne n’a compris pourquoi. Moi, quand j’ai su que je devais quitter Sedan, j’ai pris un compas pour trouver quelque chose dans un rayon de 150 km autour des Ardennes. Je ne voulais pas d’un lieu exotique et faire mes valises. J’ai choisi le Luxembourg et dans la région, on a commencé à en parler parce que j’y entraînais. Ça manquait de considération – et quand je pense à ce qu’on disait du Grand-Duché en Belgique alors que Virton cartonnait systématiquement les clubs de DN à la fin des années 90… –, mais c’est compréhensible. Depuis, ça a bien changé et il y a carrément un autre regard et le président sedanais a tressé des louanges à ce club du F91. C’est pour ça que les anciens sont très contents de venir, samedi (avant que le leader du groupe A de N2 n’affronte Sainte-Geneviève, le 4e).Et les nouveaux, cette génération qui s’est qualifiée pour la première fois pour une phase de poules de l’Europa League, la saison passée, qu’en avez-vous pensé ?Hé, mais rappelez-vous, on n’en n’était pas si loin avec Differdange contre Tromsø (NDLR : en 2013). On était seulement à un penalty des poules puisque dans la foulée, l’équipe turque (NDLR : Besiktas) que l’on aurait affrontée avait été éliminée sur tapis vert. Si Philippe Lebresne n’avait pas raté son penalty, on aurait affronté Tottenham notamment. Mais ça, les gens l’ont déjà oublié. Bon, concernant l’équipe du F91 de la saison passée, cela ne s’est pas su, j’ai fait dans la discrétion, mais j’ai envoyé un message de félicitations au président Schumacher. Peut-être que 1% de ce parcours m’est imputable, peut-être que j’ai ouvert des voies dans lesquelles d’autres se sont engouffrés et tant mieux !Vous avez assisté à des rencontres de cette qualification historique ?Non, je n’en ai vu aucun. Le dernier match auquel j’ai assisté au Luxembourg, c’était le match du Progrès contre Oufa alors que Paolo Amodio et Emilio Lobo étaient encore aux commandes. J’aurais aimé venir voir, mais j’ai eu quelques soucis de santé et je les ai encore.Vous avez subi plusieurs interventions. Où en êtes-vous ?Oh vous me connaissez, j’ai toujours été quelqu’un de très positif et j’ai repris du poil de la bête par rapport aux derniers mois. Mais on m’a enlevé une grosse partie du foie. En fait, 65% de mon foie était mort sans que l’on sache vraiment pourquoi. On a fait tout un tas d’examens alors qu’il n’y avait aucun signe de problèmes, pas de douleurs, rien d’alarmant. On ne peut pas m’en retirer plus. Si je descends à moins de 35%, je ne peux plus vivre. Pourtant voilà, il me reste deux nodules cancéreux sur cette partie du foie. Alors voilà, je vais jouer un match que je ne gagnerai pas. Mais on peut le rallonger ce match, essayer de gagner du temps. (Il rit) Finalement, je vais faire ce que je n’ai jamais fait comme coach, essayer de faire traîner, jouer les prolongations, voire, si possible, aller aux tirs au but.Mais quelles sont vos perspectives ?Aucun médecin ne se hasardera à me dire le temps qu’il peut me rester ni même à quel point je peux étirer ce temps. Je sais juste qu’on peut vivre avec des nodules cancéreux. Il faut juste qu’ils ne grossissent pas.On ne vous verra donc pas forcément non plus cet automne pour la deuxième campagne consécutive ?En ce moment, non. Conduire aussi longtemps me fatigue de trop. Même en tant que passager. Mon foie n’élimine plus les toxines comme il le devrait et, des fois, je me retrouve complètement vidé, paralysé. Donc je ne m’éloigne pas trop de la maison. Pourtant, j’aimerais bien voir ça ! Si je n’avais pas ce souci, vous me verriez aux matches.Est-ce pour cela que vous avez refusé la proposition du Fola de reprendre la suite de Jeff Strasser en 2018 ?Non, ma maladie ne s’est déclarée qu’en octobre 2018. Par respect pour les clubs, je ne citerai pas leurs noms mais j’ai reçu trois propositions ces deux dernières années. C’est juste que je n’ai pas souhaité y donner suite. J’ai refusé et pas pour motif de santé.Un dernier mot peut-être sur Dino Toppmöller, qui vous avait succédé au F91, en 2016, et qui maintenant occupe un autre de vos anciens bancs, celui de Virton…Mais il me suit à la trace ! Ah lui, il est jeune ! Il a de l’avenir. J’ai suivi tout leur parcours européen la saison passée. Legia, Cluj… ce qu’il a fait, c’est bien. Les poules, c’était plus délicat mais c’est logique. Ils n’ont pas été ridicules. Non vraiment, c’est bien…Entretien avec Julien Mollereau L’ancien coach de la Jeunesse, du F91 et de Differdange, 67 ans, est malade. Célébré samedi avec Sedan, il a entamé un combat qu’il dit perdu d’avance. Mais avec force et courage.Sedan, que vous aviez fait monter en Division 2 il y a près de trente ans, fête ses 100 ans avec un match de gala opposant ses anciens joueurs au F91 que vous dirigiez quand il a franchi son 1er tour de Coupe d’Europe, en 2005. Mais c’est le centenaire du club ou une apologie de votre carrière personnelle ?Michel Leflochmoan : (Il rit) Ah non, mais moi, attendez, je n’y suis pour rien ! Ils ont invité les anciens du club, comme je l’ai appris il y a quelques semaines, et il était juste question que je sois présent. Et puis, un jour, on m’appelle en me disant qu’il y aura un petit clin d’œil à la première équipe du F91 qui a passé un tour de Coupe d’Europe et qui comprenait justement beaucoup d’anciens Sedanais… Moi, je suis juste invité.last_img read more

[BGL Ligue] Le F91 s’enterre à Pétange

first_imgDudelange a encore perdu ! Terrible constat, mais pourtant d’une redoutable logique au vu de sa performance lors de son match en retard contre le Titus Pétange (2-0), mercredi soir.Ce devait être le «vrai début du championnat» du F91, dixit son coach, Bertrand Crasson. C’en sera peut-être un peu, déjà, la fin. Dudelange, quadruple champion en titre, est reparti ce mercredi soir de Pétange avec une nouvelle contre-performance qui porte à cinq le nombre de matches consécutifs sans victoire en Division nationale et qui le met à douze points de la tête de la BGL Ligue. Et au rythme auquel tournent les postulants à l’Europe, ces dernières années, on ne voit pas autant d’outsiders (Progrès, Differdange, Jeunesse, Pétange, Fola…) s’effondrer au point que le F91, aujourd’hui relégable après la remise à l’heure de son programme, effectuer une telle remontada.Dudelange ne méritait pas mieux  Mercredi, à Pétange, le pire est qu’il n’a pas mérité beaucoup mieux que ce qui lui est arrivé. Bettaieb, idéalement servi par Pokar en première intention, a gâché seul devant Palha, très bien sorti, l’un des deux seuls tirs cadrés de la partie pour le F91 (65e), Sinani se heurtant aussi au gardien sur le second (76e). Une faillite offensive puisque c’est tout ce que s’offrira Dudelange, au contraire d’un Pétange à sept occasions franches et qui parviendra à inscrire le seul but de la partie par Mokrani, sur un bon débordement de Teixeira côté gauche (1-0, 21e). Les hommes de Carlos Fangueiro, agressifs juste comme il faut, un poil trop maladroits pour planter un deuxième but qui aurait tué tout suspense, remontent sur le podium, après que Fatou, d’un contre chirurgical, ait ajusté Joubert (2-0, 90+2).Julien Mollereau Pétange – F91 2-0 (1-0)Stade municipal. Belle pelouse. Arbitrage de M. Wilmes, assisté de MM. Becker et Dias Balsa. 425 spectateurs payants.Évolution du score : 1-0 Mokrani (21e), 2-0 Fatou (90+2)Cartons jaunes : Kaboré (17e), Teixeira (41e), Kettenmeyer (68e) à Pétange. Sinani (23e), Morren (63e) au F91.PÉTANGE : Palha – Hamzaoui (82e Schneider), Hauguel, Diouf, Held – Kakoko, Kaboré – Teixeira (66e Kalonji), Kettenmeyer (73e Fatou), Abreu – Mokrani.F91 : Joubert – Bouchouari, Schnell, Garos, Kirch – Morren (66e Klapp), Pokar, Stolz, Bernier – Bettaieb (73e Muratovic), Sinani. center_img Partagerlast_img read more