Una Healy Takes a Fall for Kids Cyber Safety

first_imgUna Healy has teamed up with Disney to help parents and young people make the internet a safer environment.Together with Disney’s Club Penguin, Una has launched the new ‘It Starts With You’ project. The initiative encourages kids to take the lead in spreading positive behaviour online, while giving their parents the tools to better support them.The Saturdays singer is appearing in an on-air campaign on Disney Channel as Disney’s Alice in Wonderland, falling into the unknown realm of the ‘digital’ world.Una Healy Falling Through CyberspaceHealy understands a mother’s responsibility to protect her children, saying: “I wouldn’t think twice about teaching my child how to cross the road safely, and it shouldn’t be any different when it comes to teaching her to navigate safely in the online world too.“The internet is a place for discovery, learning and making friends, so it’s important that parents empower young people to treat each other with respect online.“Even though my daughter Aoife is only young, one day I know she will want to be logging on and speaking to her friends online, and when that happens I want to make sure she is safe and that I understand the language being used to ensure this.“The internet can be a brilliant thing, which is why we want young people to learn the rules of the road with Club Penguin. It Starts With You!”Parents and young people can visit ClubPenguin.com for more information.last_img read more

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ThriveNorth hosting launch event for Northeast BC Thursday evening

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — ThriveNorth is going to be launching its service in Northeast B.C. on Thursday evening with an event and networking session at Whole Wheat and Honey on Thursday evening.ThriveNorth is an organization that is managed by Futurpreneur Canada, and helps budding young entrepreneurs launch and grow their businesses with mentorship, funding, and resources. Brennan Ecklund and Joanne Norris with ThriveNorth spoke to the Fort St. John and District Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday to present their organization and the opportunities it can offer to young entrepreneurs in the Fort St. John area.The organization offers start-up companies with loans of up to $15,000, and access to up to an additional $30,000 from the Business Development Bank of Canada. Norris explained that the organizations largely helps “Main St.-type” businesses, but that it also provides help to members of the trades that may want to become self-employed. ThriveNorth is hosting a launch event at Whole Wheat and Honey tonight from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Whole Wheat and Honey Cafe. The event is free, though attendees will be asked to register on EventBrite: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/thrivenorth-launch-event-fort-st-john-02222018-tickets-42682496496last_img read more

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Mexico threw Canada under the bus Liberal MP tells Mexican minister

OTTAWA — Canada and Mexico are dealing with lingering hard feelings over last summer’s surprise Mexican trade deal with the United States as their new continental trade pact awaits a final stamp of political approval.Two weeks ago, the head of a visiting delegation of Canadian parliamentarians told the newly installed Mexican foreign minister his country threw Canada “under the bus” last August when it forged a bilateral trade deal with the United States during the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement.A top Mexican trade official tells The Canadian Press that while there may have been a misunderstanding, the U.S. side deal was the work of the previous Mexican government, and Canada and Mexico’s new leaders are moving forward constructively.The side deal between the U.S. and Mexico appeared to blindside the Trudeau government, forcing Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland to abort a three-country trip to Europe.Canada and U.S. negotiators reached an 11th-hour agreement that was signed two months later on Nov. 30 by the country’s three leaders — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, President Donald Trump and former Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto, who was on his last official day in office.The deal must now be ratified by the legislatures of all three countries, but with turmoil in Washington, and a slowly-shuttering political window in Ottawa with a fall federal election on the horizon, that is far from certain.Moreover, Canada and Mexico insist the Trump administration will have to lift its punishing tariffs on their steel and aluminum exports, which the mercurial president imposed under a controversial national security clause in U.S. trade law both countries say was illegal.Canadian and Mexican politicians have been holding a series of regular meetings and exchanges, including a two-day session of parliamentarians in Ottawa this week, and a gathering of the ParlAmericas group, a network of legislators from 35 Western Hemisphere countries, earlier this month.The head of Canadian ParlAmericas chapter, Liberal MP Bob Nault, expressed Canada’s dissatisfaction about last August’s Mexican side deal with the country’s new foreign minister, Marcelo Ebrard, during the organization’s Mexico City meeting earlier this month.“We did say very clearly in our last meeting in Mexico with the foreign affairs minister that we were frustrated with the feeling that Mexico was sort of moving away from the trilateral agreement,” Nault said in an interview.Nault said he was concerned about “the way it unfolded at the end,” and a perception “that Canada got thrown under the bus by Mexico.” He said that represented a break from “what we originally felt was the approach, that is, Mexico and Canada had to be very close to each other to make sure we got a good deal for our countries and make sure the U.S. didn’t overtake us.”The Canadian Press has previously reported, citing anonymous sources, that Freeland gave Mexican negotiators an upbraiding over their bilateral deal during an August meeting in Washington.“I think it’s getting better,” Nault said this week of the relationship. “Overall, we both have the same position: we want the tariffs removed. We want them removed now. We want to move forward with ratification.”Luz Maria de la Mora, Mexico’s deputy trade minister, acknowledged the past Canadian complaints, but she said the two countries are moving forward constructively.“That was part of the negotiation process … right now, it’s over,” de la Mora said in an interview.“The previous administration in Mexico was responsible for doing that. But at the end of the day, it might have been the case that it actually helped the process.”The Mexico-U.S. side deal marked the start of nearly two months of intense talks between Canadian and American negotiators because the Trump administration imposed a Sept. 30 deadline for Canada to sign on to the U.S.-Mexico pact or potentially be cast adrift.De la Mora succeeded Juan Carlos Baker, one of Mexico’s top negotiators, when the new Mexican government of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was sworn in on Dec. 1.Lopez Obrador won the Mexican presidency in July, branding himself a socialist reformer dedicated to ending decades of corruption and improving the plight of Mexican workers. His term didn’t begin until Dec. 1, which left a window for the Pena Nieto government to finish negotiating a trade deal that Lopez Obrador would have to sell to his country’s lawmakers.During the transition, members of Lopez Obrador’s team joined the Mexican negotiators, but de la Mora said they acted as observers, not participants. She said that extended to the Mexican decision to move forward with a bilateral deal with Canada.“We were not involved in that decision at all,” de la Mora said.“If at some point during the negotiations there were misunderstandings or miscommunications, those moments are over.”She cited the fact that half a dozen of her cabinet colleagues visited Ottawa in November before they were sworn in, in order to forge a good working relationship.“It would be very positive that the three countries have this agreement approved this year, really. It would be something that would send a really good signal to the markets.”Mike Blanchfield, The Canadian Press read more

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Untangling Services Microservices Functions

“Functions” are at the other end of the scale. A function is a software component whose outputs are totally dependent on the inputs; nothing internal is stored or used. Output = 2xInput1 + Input2 is an example of a very simple function. Functions are obviously small and generalized, so you can reuse them easily, and because the output is a function of the inputs alone, you can give an input to any copy of a function and get the same result. That makes them fully scalable and resilient. Because serverless computing loads function only when they’re used, these properties are critical to the serverless cloud. On the other hand, they’re not as obviously useful in the data center, where having a component stay resident can offer performance benefits without creating incremental cloud service charges. What Role Will Integrations, APIs Play in the Evolution of UCC? Todd Carothers June 27, 2019 RESTful APIs are bringing a wave of change to the communications industry. Building software from components has three goals, ones we could call the “three Rs.” There’s “reuse,” meaning that common functions can be implemented once and used where needed. There’s “redeployment,” meaning that changes to an application can be rolled out with less disruption, and there’s “repair,” meaning that fixing problems is easier because of availability and performance. As it happens, our three critical terms differ in at least one of these areas. Not All Beers & RosesWhich leaves us with “microservices,” perhaps the most confusing of all our new terms for application components in the cloud age. Google tends to use the term to mean much the same thing as a function, but among developers the term seems to have taken on a different meaning. To them, a microservice is a small component that shares the stateless property of functions, but is like services in that they’re persistent. Functions come and go as they’re used and the use ends, but microservices tend to deploy and stay in place for successive uses. That makes them a kind of waystation between services and functions, and that may be why microservices seem to dominate application planning these days. They’re easy to come to terms with, and they’re useful both in the cloud and in the data center. From One End to the Next“Services,” the original componentization strategy, are still in use today. By convention, a service is a functional component of an application that does some specific business thing. A service-oriented application might have services like “Add Employee,” “Pay Employees,” “Change Employee Information,” and so forth. Business activities, business processes, and business transactions determine the componentization. Obviously, these are all components of a single application (payroll/personnel, in my example), but while they’re smaller than the application overall, they’re not really very small and they’re also not particularly easy to reuse. You can’t fit “Pay Employees” easily into a customer resource management application or into check processing. Leading the Way to a Developer-Focused Future Beth Schultz April 29, 2019 Creating a developer mindset isn’t easy, but it’s an imperative as communications and collaboration technologies become increasingly software-centric. Microservices aren’t all beer and roses, though. Any strategy to break applications into distributable components has its own risks. The most obvious is that separate components mean moving work across a network from one to the other, something that takes significant time and creates risks that loss of connectivity will cause an application failure. Nowhere is that more obvious than in the way we refer to the autonomous components of distributed applications. We have “services,” a term that’s almost a decade old but still in use. We have “microservices,” which surely have to be more than tiny little services; and we have “functions,” or “lambdas,” which are often used in “serverless” cloud computing. But what’s the difference, and why should we care? Vonage Takes Care of Healthcare with New Services, APIs Zeus Kerravala April 16, 2019 Helps healthcare organizations fast-track digital transformation plans If microservices are smaller than services, it follows that there would be more of them, and thus more accumulated network delay and risk. Both are exacerbated if the application isn’t carefully designed. For example, a microservice that’s invoked a dozen times in connection with a single transaction multiplies the delay and risk by a dozen times too. Better to avoid using microservices where that kind of iteration is likely. Take CareComponentization offers benefits both in development and in running applications, but even though it’s been around for decades, we’re still grappling with the downside of those benefits. Services, microservices, and functions are all ways to build agile component-based applications, and the fact that even the terms are confusing to many means that special care is needed to build applications in the era of the cloud.Tags:News & ViewsSoftware architecturecloud eraMicroservicesAPIs & Embedded CommunicationsAnalyst InsightCloud CommunicationsDigital TransformationNews & Views Articles You Might Like untangle_774.jpg Software architecture has come a long way since punched cards and monolithic data centers, and the evolution has spawned terms faster than many organizations can learn them. With the cloud now driving software change, and becoming an almost-universal part of enterprise IT plans, we need to understand how cloud software is structured. That means learning its confusing terminology, a process hampered by the lack of clear and accepted definitions. Functions can also be misused. You pay only for what you run in a serverless cloud application, but that’s most valuable when you use functions for something you don’t run often. If a function is invoked hundreds of times per hour, it will surely cost you more than it would if it remained resident—i.e., became a microservice. Plugging Into the Power of APIs Gary Audin June 07, 2019 Evangelist Roy Kurver shares on the importance of APIs for communications today. Twilio Says, ‘Let’s Keep the Conversation Flowing’ Beth Schultz August 08, 2019 The cloud communications platform company showcases two new APIs aimed at improving conversational engagement for messaging and phone calls. They’re also generally implemented in a specific way. They’re persistent, meaning that they’re presumed to be available all the time, and stateful, meaning that they store information between transactions. The former condition means that they can waste resources in the cloud by being loaded and paid for when not in use, and the latter that you can’t scale performance by creating multiple copies to share the load, because the same information wouldn’t be stored in the copies as in the original. See All in APIs & Embedded Communications » Log in or register to post comments read more

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Law and Order Minister alerted about Zahran in 2016

However, Ratnayake said the information related to religious extremism propaganda carried out by Zahran Hashim using Facebook. Ratnayake said that he had not received any information related to Zahran Hashim preparing to carry out any suicide attacks or preparing explosives.Former Law and Order Minister Ranjith Madduma Bandara, who appeared before the Parliament Select Committee on the Easter Sunday attacks today, also confirmed that Zahran Hashim was being investigated for religious extremism. Zahran Hashim led the Easter Sunday attacks and was one of the suicide bombers. The Law and Order Minister in 2016 was alerted about National Thowheed Jamaath (NTJ) leader Zahran Hashim.The Minister at the time, Sagala Ratnayake, told the Parliament Select Committee on the Easter Sunday attacks today that the State Intelligence Service (SIS) alerted him about Zahran in November 2016. read more

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US lender OnDeck expanding in Canada as peertopeer lending gains popularity

TORONTO – OnDeck Capital, a U.S.-based online marketplace where small businesses can secure loans, is expanding its offerings in Canada, joining a growing number of technology-oriented lenders that promise to transform the financial services landscape.Experts say Canada has been slow to embrace peer-to-peer lending, a burgeoning industry that provides consumers and small business owners an alternative to the banks by pairing them with institutional investors and wealthy individuals willing to lend them cash.The concept is gaining popularity south of the border, as well as in parts of Europe and in China.“Innovations often take longer to arrive here,” says Andrew Graham, the chief executive of Toronto-based Borrowell, an online platform launched a month ago that allows consumers to borrow money at rates ranging from 5.9 to 18 per cent.In the U.S., two large peer-to-peer lenders made initial public offerings last December: LendingClub, which loans money to consumers, and OnDeck, which serves small businesses.Now, after an initial trial period where it offered small loans — $50,000 or less — to Canadian firms, OnDeck has set its sights on expanding north of the border, joining a handful of homegrown startups including Fundthrough, which lends to small businesses, and Grouplend and Borrowell, serving consumers.OnDeck, which has delivered over $2 billion in loans since 2007, will now be offering loans of up to $150,000 to Canadian companies.“We’re really excited about the Canadian marketplace,” said Rob Young, the company’s senior vice-president of international operations. “It’s our first international foray.”For consumers, peer-to-peer loans are cheaper than typical credit card rates and less cumbersome than borrowing from a bank.“Our algorithms are available 24-7,” says Kevin Sandhu, CEO of Vancouver-based Grouplend. “They don’t take vacation, they don’t take sick days. You can come in the middle of the night, Saturday afternoon, they’re there.”For small businesses, borrowing from marketplace lenders may cost more than going through a bank. However, many small business owners don’t have a choice.Steven Uster, the Toronto-based founder of FundThrough, says small businesses are underserved by Canadian banks.“Loans that are under $250,000 just aren’t profitable for the banks,” said Uster. “It takes a lot more work and a lot more time, and they’d rather do the larger-sized loans.”Because they offer their services exclusively online and don’t have to maintain large, costly branch networks, marketplace lenders like FundThrough have lower operating costs and can turn a profit on smaller loan amounts, said Uster.While lending money to strangers could seem like a risky investment proposition, peer-to-peer lenders say they analyze mountains of data to determine a borrower’s credit worthiness.“There is an immense amount of technology and data available that traditional lenders like banks and credit card companies really don’t take advantage of,” said Sandhu.“At the end of the day, they really rely on things like a three-digit credit score and maybe some simple metrics around employment. We look at hundreds, and in some cases thousands, of data points around all of our users.”A number of banks have expressed concerns about tech companies challenging their business models and eating into their profits. In a recent letter to shareholders, JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon cautioned that “Silicon Valley is coming.”Several Canadian bank CEOs have made similar comments during their annual shareholder meetings over the past few months. TD Bank (TSX:TD) chief executive Bharat Masrani said technology companies, including alternative lenders, are creating heightened competition in the financial services space and enjoy advantages because they are smaller and more nimble.RBC (TSX:RY) CEO Dave McKay said the bank will need to work with financial technology startups in order to thrive in what is becoming an increasingly digital world.Graham says that although it’s a “scary time” for banks, particularly those who fail to adapt quickly enough to technological innovation, there is also ample opportunity for traditional lenders and financial technology startups to collaborate.“We think there’s an opportunity to partner with banks and provide the kinds of products we’re providing to their customers,” said Graham. by Alexandra Posadzki, The Canadian Press Posted Apr 28, 2015 4:00 am MDT Last Updated Apr 28, 2015 at 7:00 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email U.S. lender OnDeck expanding in Canada as peer-to-peer lending gains popularity read more

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Bread price hike reversed by bakery owners

Bakery owners have reversed the recent price increase of a loaf of bread after the price of wheat flour was reduced.The Bakery Owners’ Association said that the price of a loaf of bread will remain as earlier and the recent increase by Rs. 2 will not be carried forward. The decision to reduce the price of a loaf of bread was taken after an increase in the price of wheat flour was reversed.

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Former Minister S B Nawinne extends support to UNP

However today he appeared at a media conference chaired by UNP Presidential candidate Sajith Premadasa and extended support for Premadasa. Nawinne said that he was confident Premadasa will win the election. He said that he left the UNP while maintaining his party membership owing to some concerns he had.However he says he decided to extend support to Premadasa as he is a good leader and someone who should be President of the country. Former Minister S B Nawinne, who had supported President Maithripala Sirisena and former President Mahinda Rajapaksa, today extended support to the United National Party (UNP).Nawinne, a UNP member of Parliament, had supported Rajapaksa during the political crisis last October. read more

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Free event teaches high school students financial literacy

Nearly 300 Grade 10 and 11 students from St. Catharines will get a lesson in money management as Brock University hosts its second Financial Literacy Day Thursday, May 23.For the second year, Brock’s Student Financial Services team is hosting the free event to help the high school students get a better understanding of financial well-being, literacy and knowledge.“Money is a significant stress factor and is one of the main barriers preventing university students from graduating,” said Audrianna Kervoelen, Student Financial Services Officer at Brock. “Financial literacy is not formally taught in high school or post-secondary, yet it is a valuable skill for everyday life.”Kervoelen hopes that participating high school students will gain a better understanding of the financial realities of a post-secondary education and start thinking about university sooner.“Our team frequently deals with students who aren’t aware of all the costs associated with going to university. It’s why we host this event — to reach them before they enrol,” said Kervoelen. “Ultimately, we want them to successfully start and finish their university education and fulfil their future goals.”A series of presentations on topics such as saving, budgeting, money-management and funding university, will take place in the Sean O’Sullivan Theatre from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Lunch and campus tours will follow.Although the event is targeted at high school students, Brock also has services available for current University students and weekly financial literacy drop-in sessions during the Fall and Winter Terms. read more

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Burgundy partnership yields new opportunities for Brock MBA students

Graduate students at Brock University’s Goodman School of Business now have expanded program choices with the launch of a new partnership with France’s Burgundy School of Business.The double/dual degree program allows students to earn two degrees in about the same amount of time and cost as Goodman’s traditional Master of Business Administration (MBA) program.“This partnership offers our students more program options with another world-leading business school that includes the opportunity for a work internship,” says Goodman Dean Andrew Gaudes.Students starting at Goodman will earn an MBA from Brock and a Master of Science (MSc) from Burgundy’s Dijon campus. Students will spend one year at each school and all classes are in English.Students who begin the program in Burgundy will complete a one-year Master in Management (MIM) program, which will provide the foundational business courses, before they enter the second year of Goodman’s MBA program.At Burgundy, Goodman students can specialize in wine management, international business development, corporate finance and investment banking, global marketing and negotiation, arts and cultural management, digital leadership, and data science and organizational behaviour.Stephan Bourcieu, Dean and General Director at the Burgundy School of Business, says he is excited about the new double/dual degree agreement with Goodman, pointing out that both schools are AACSB-accredited.“This strengthens the relationship that Brock and the Burgundy School of Business have had for 18 years in the field of student and faculty exchanges and research.“I look forward to offering Burgundy School of Business students the opportunity to spend one year at Brock University on their MBA, and to welcoming Brock MBA students on a range of MSc degrees at the Burgundy School of Business.”With the addition of the Burgundy MSc in wine management partnership, ranked among the best in the world, Goodman is now able to offer wine education at the undergraduate, graduate and professional development level, says Gaudes.“Being located in the heart of Niagara’s wine country, it’s incumbent upon us to offer the depth of business education in the grape and wine industry that our partnership with Burgundy can provide.“Not only do we have a long-standing relationship with the Burgundy School of Business, but quite literally, our roots in the grape and wine industry come from the Burgundy region,” he says.At the undergraduate level, Goodman students are able to spend the winter semester at the Burgundy School of Business and receive a certificate in Wine Business and Tourism. To fill professional development needs, Goodman also launched a certificate in Wine Business Management this summer.Goodman’s International Exchanges and Partnerships Manager Meredith Heaney says the new double/dual program deepens the School’s relationship with Burgundy, one of its oldest exchange partners.“To build on such a long-term relationship and be able to offer our graduate students access to highly specialized programs is just amazing,” she says.This is Goodman’s third double/dual degree at the graduate level. The school has similar opportunities for undergraduate students at partner schools in Ireland, France and Germany.To learn more about the program, visit: brocku.ca/goodman/programs/mba read more

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Football Ohio State players ready for homecoming against No 15 TCU

Ohio State sophomore linebacker Baron Browning prepares for the next play during the Rutgers game on Sept. 8. Ohio State beat Rutgers 52-3. Credit: Amal Saeed | Assistant Photo EditorDemetrius Knox said he had the dream of playing football at Ohio State since he was in second grade. Being a Springfield, Ohio, native, the fifth-year offensive guard made that dream a reality, but with the help of a family member encouraging him to put himself in the middle of what many consider as a recruiting hotbed for high-level talent: Texas. “It was sixth-grade and my uncle told my mom that I’d have a better shot at being recruited for football if I moved down there,” Knox said. Since 2012, head coach Urban Meyer has placed a lot of emphasis on recruiting Texas during his tenure, signing 12 players from the state for eight seasons up to the 2019 class, with five-star wide receiver and Austin native Garrett Wilson committing to the Buckeyes in April. For many high school players, Ohio State has a reputation of being a national brand, as the program that groomed players such as running back Ezekiel Elliott and cornerback Marshon Lattimore into not only successful collegiate players, but successful professionals. “When you see that, even being in Texas, it kind of is appealing,” sophomore cornerback Jeffrey Okudah said. “Just want to be one of the next guys in line.”Okudah was one of five players from the 2017 recruiting class from Texas to commit to the Buckeyes, including four-star running back J.K. Dobbins and five-star linebacker Baron Browning, according to the 247Sports composite rankings. For many players from the state of Texas, No. 4 Ohio State’s next opponent, No. 15 TCU, is a big game. Besides the fact that the school is in the state where these players were raised, many were recruited by the Horned Frogs.This game means more than just heading home for Dobbins. He will be facing a TCU team that was the first college to offer him a scholarship when he was a freshman in high school. “It was exciting,” Dobbins said. “It was my first one, so I was high on them, you know. I know the coaches well, you know, so it’s going to be fun to play against them.” Despite schools like Texas trying to take the majority of in-state talent, Knox said TCU is almost always considered by any recruit who lives within the Dallas/Fort Worth area. He said even though the school is private and relatively small, it is considered a state “powerhouse.” For Okudah, playing TCU at AT&T Stadium means facing players he has faced before. While a senior cornerback at South Grand Prairie High School in Grand Prairie, Texas, Okudah faced Shawn Robinson, the quarterback at Desoto High School in Desoto, Texas, and now the sophomore starting quarterback at TCU. Even when facing him in high school, Okudah said he knew Robinson was an offensive weapon. “I think the offense he played in in high school really compares well to the offense he plays in now as far as going a lot of empties, spreading the ball around, get it out quick, taking shots and a lot of read option,” Okudah said.Every Friday night, Okudah said players like Robinson were the norm on every Friday night, and he would face talent on that level on a weekly basis, and even a daily basis in practices. However, Knox said the level of talent, in the Dallas/Fort Worth area especially, matches the spectacle local towns bring to high school football. “It’s a completely different feel down there,” Knox said. “Football, I mean Ohio State is Ohio State, but even high school football down there is big. The whole city shuts down, everything.”With the amount of attention recruits get at the high school level, the goal of many players is to get to AT&T Stadium, the home of the state championship games, an atmosphere Knox considers to be “incredible.” As Ohio State takes the field on Saturday, the same field that many high school players strive to be on in December, hoisting a state title trophy, Knox said watching a team that is known historically as one of the more elite teams in the country gives players the idea that they can be in the same position one day. “For recruits to be able to go down the street to the Cowboys Stadium to watch Ohio State play there in person, it’s huge,” Knox said.As for the Texans on Ohio State’s roster returning to their home state, that part of them never leaves, whether the team is playing in Arlington, Texas, or Ohio Stadium. “You don’t have to worry about getting homesick,” Okudah said. “You kind of feel you have a part of home with you to Ohio.” read more

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Football Ryan Day goes back to assistant role following time in the

Ohio State acting head coach Ryan Day prepares to lead the Buckeyes onto the field prior to the start game against TCU on Sept. 15. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorFor three games, all the focus was on Ryan Day.As acting head coach for the No. 4 team in the country following a three-game suspension to head coach Urban Meyer, Day’s temporary promotion from offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach moved his name to the front of college football headlines.Day said the experience, specifically last Saturday in Arlington, Texas against TCU, is one he will never forget.“Saturday night was a little surreal going through that, what a great atmosphere, it was almost like a bowl atmosphere just being there, so that was, that was one of those experiences we’ll look back on,” Day said. “It goes to show you what this place is and how powerful it is, and how fortunate my family and I are to be here.”After taking over for a three-time national champion, Day went 3-0 in his time at the helm, easily handling the likes of Oregon State and Rutgers, while handing the Buckeyes a statement win over a ranked opponent, defeating then-No. 15 TCU 40-28.The 3-0 record leaves Ohio State at No. 4, one spot higher than where it started, and exactly where Day said he wanted the team after he left: in a great spot for Meyer’s return.Going back to his original position, Day said it will be a bit of a weight off his shoulders.“It’s one less thing to worry about,” Day said. “But, you know, the job of coaching the quarterbacks and working with Kevin and the rest of the guys on the offense is still a major task, it takes a lot of work.”Day goes back to the offense after three weeks as the guy for Ohio State, and he comes back to a terrific situation. Day returns his focus to the quarterback room, where redshirt sophomore Dwayne Haskins has left any doubt of his capabilities.Throwing for more than 300 yards in two of his first three starts and earning 12 total touchdowns with only one interception, Haskins has stepped up and proven himself through the first three games of the season.This week, and against Tulane on Saturday, Day is on his way back to normal. But looking back at his tenure, he said his experience as head coach changed daily.“Every day it was a little different, honestly. I mean early on, it was overwhelming, and then every day it became a little bit more normal,” Day said. “Every day brought on a new challenge and there were certain things I wasn’t ready for, certain things I was ready for and I think every day was an opportunity for me to get an experience in that role.”Regardless of the controversy, what he did or didn’t know or what he did or didn’t do regarding the domestic violence allegations made against a former employee, Meyer is back. But Day more than handled his time as acting head coach, bringing Meyer back to the sideline with an undefeated Ohio State team with a top-10 offense in the nation.Now, Day will go back to being an offensive coordinator, joining Meyer on the sidelines for the rest of the season.He said, of all the moments through the first three weeks of the season, coming out of the tunnel at AT&T Stadium is the one that remains at the top.“Really, of all of the things on Saturday night, the greatest part was coming out of the tunnel that first time, and seeing the Ohio State fans there going crazy, I mean it was like, you had chills all over you, and, I mean, tingling like in your scalp, like just to see those guys going crazy for us,” Day said. “Really cool experience, something I won’t forget.” read more

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Football Urban Meyer gives Ryan Day a blueprint to succeed

Ohio State acting head coach Ryan Day paces the sidelines in the in the third quarter of the game against TCU on Sept. 15. Ohio State won 40-28. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorUrban Meyer thought he was set up in a position to succeed when he took the Ohio State job prior to the 2012 season. Taking over the head coaching job from Luke Fickell, Meyer knew the recruiting job that he and former Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel had done, saying he expected there would be quality players in his program coming in who are even better people. He said that was exactly what he walked into. “It was a little bit discombobulated for a bit and that team came together and had a magical season,” Meyer said. Meyer’s mood as he took the podium as he announced his retirement on Wednesday was one of reminiscence, wearing the exact tie he wore to his first press conference as the head coach at Ohio State seven years prior. As he passed the baton to Ryan Day, his offensive coordinator over the past two seasons, Meyer was not nervous. He was not worried about the state of his program moving forward. He watched as Day, the newly announced 25th head coach in Ohio State history, with seemingly a weight off his shoulders. Day looked forward, talking about the importance of the early signing period at the end of the month and how his team would soon operate. Meyer, sitting to his right with a slight grin on his face, fielded questions as though he was content with where he left the program, the same way he felt when he inherited the Buckeyes seven years ago. “This would be a really tough day if we were a mess. This would be a really, really tough day,” Meyer said. “And personally this would be awful, because this is where we’re all from, where Gene [Smith] and I are both from, and to be able to know that this: We did right or at least we feel like we did right. That makes it that much easier.” That does not mean the decision to leave is any easier for Meyer. He said the one thing he is going to miss most is the players. Not the wins, not the conference titles, not the national championships. The players, building teams that lead to a seven-year span in which the head coach won 82 of 91 total games. “It’s not my tenure, it’s our tenure. And we did it the right way,” Meyer said. “I learned this from Woody Hayes to Earle Bruce, to [John Cooper] and Jim Tressel. And that is you have to be a tough guy to play at Ohio State. You have to be a tough guy.” That blueprint of creating a program that appeals to the “tough guy,” a team that expects excellence, the atmosphere that Meyer inherited and expanded upon remains for Day to take on. But this is something Meyer said he told his coaching staff every day. “No one’s forced you to come here. And average is not acceptable,” Meyer said. “Being excellent in everything is the only acceptable. And that’s hard. That’s a tough challenge. And I look forward to watching Ryan continue that challenge.” Ohio State is different than any other school Meyer has coached at, something he did not believe when athletic director Gene Smith told him when he was interviewing for the job. Smith called the job as Ohio State head coach “complex,” having to juggle the responsibilities of a team that does not lose. Day knows there are many responsibilities that come from being the head coach at Ohio State, maintaining the expectation set by his predecessors. “If you’re a recruit who comes to look at Ohio State, there’s no other place in America that takes care of students, student-athletes, better than Ohio State,” Day said. “Understanding how to manage that, understanding how to manage the staff on a daily basis and what it means to be the head coach here.” This was an expectation Meyer, himself, could not take anymore, citing his health for his departure from the program after the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1. But even though he has one more game left as a head coach, continuing to prepare for No. 9 Washington, Meyer continued to reminisce. “One thing I’ve done for seven years is every time between the third and fourth quarter, when I hear ‘Hang On Sloopy,’ I take my headsets off,” Meyer said. “If we’re playing really well I take it off for a little while, really enjoy it. And if we’re not playing well I give it a quick and then back on.” He said he learned his from Bob Davie, the former head coach at Notre Dame who told Meyer this prior to when he took the head coaching job at Bowling Green: pick a time during each game to remember where you are, enjoy those moments. As the press conference ended, Meyer looked to Day, and with a sigh of relief, said “Wow.” The baton was passed: Day with the future in front of him and Meyer with those moments, those memories to look back on. read more

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Mens Basketball Young Ohio State team struggles in conference play

Ohio State head coach Chris Holtmann calls out to the Buckeye defense in the first half of the game against Iowa on Feb. 10 in the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignAnalyze, then forget. This is freshman guard Duane Washington’s response to any loss: Look at game tape, analyze what went wrong for him personally and the team as a whole, fix the mistakes and forget; move on to the next game. This was his approach after Ohio State’s three-point loss to Rutgers on Wednesday, hoping this mentality would help the Buckeyes ahead of its Saturday game on the road against Iowa. It didn’t. The same problems persisted: the fouls, the turnovers, the inconsistent offense. This led to Ohio State’s first three-game losing streak in head coach Chris Holtmann’s tenure and the Buckeyes falling out of the Associated Press Top 25 poll for the first time since Week 2. For the second-year head coach, competing solely in Big Ten play is a different animal, facing opponents in games that seem to mean more in the long run, especially for a team without much experience. The Buckeyes had a taste of conference play early in December, earning wins against Minnesota and Illinois. However, with the shift to 2019 and a permanent conference schedule, Ohio State has not found the same success.“I think it begins with an awareness that this is life in a power conference. This is life in league play,” Holtmann said. “You are going to go through some serious bumps and bruises.” Now, as Ohio State moves forward, amid the most serious bumps and bruises Holtmann has ever had to deal with regarding this team, it has to turn to something the Buckeyes do not have much of: leadership. The Buckeyes don’t have the Keita Bates-Diop, the Jae’Sean Tate, playing with a fire to make up for what they considered to be a lost 2016-17 season, ending their collegiate careers with winning 13-of-17 conference games. However, what Holtmann realizes is that Ohio State is remarkably young. Despite players on the roster such as redshirt senior guard Keyshawn Woods and senior guard C.J. Jackson, many of the players Ohio State utilizes the most are either freshmen or sophomores, leaning on sophomore forward Kaleb Wesson as its main offensive contributor and post threat. Holtmann said plainly he often forgets Wesson, the player who averages 16.2 points and 6.9 rebounds per game, is a sophomore.  “Sometimes I forget that we have other guys that are sophomores and freshman,” Holtmann said. “That doesn’t change our expectation and our demands on them, but I do need to, at times, remember that we are asking guys that are relatively young to lead our group.”  Holtmann said Wesson leads in part by his consistency during games, showing that he wants to be a leader vocally, and becomes an example especially for the post players, an area the head coach said is a necessary improvement.But youth is something that sophomore forward Kyle Young prides himself on. “Some people think that a leader is just the older guys like seniors and stuff like that. I think coaches do a good job of kind of making it a point that leaders are guys who step in and teach others and help to make the team better,” Young said. “I think the earlier the better, you know, that we learn these important values will help our team get better.” As of late, youth has hurt Ohio State more than it has helped. In the past three losses, Wesson recorded at least four fouls, leaving the game within the first two minutes of the Iowa game after recording two quick fouls.After only five turnovers in the Buckeyes’ nine-point loss to then-No. 8 Michigan State, Ohio State has recorded double-digit turnovers in each of its past two games, breaking its season high with 21 against the Hawkeyes Saturday. Ohio State also has not had consistency in its rotation, playing all 10 eligible scholarship players in the first half of the Iowa loss, with each player ending the game with more than 10 minutes on the court. Holtmann knows the expectation for this team. It’s the expectation to perform like Ohio State did during the first 13 games of the season. But he understands the players he is utilizing and what their capabilities are. “It’s a balance really between that understanding and yet the urgency of wanting it to happen right now, and I think that the reality is we need to learn quickly,” Holtmann said. “I don’t want our relative newness … to be something that we use as an excuse. I also want to have and understand that we have to, as coaches, be committed to teaching it better, reinforcing it more and making sure that our guys are getting it.” This is not the 2017-18 team. Ohio State does not have Tate or Bates-Diop to create a rallying cry after a loss. But Holtmann believes this team has the potential to be that. It just might take some more time and more leadership by the younger players. “We’ll go as far as our collective leadership takes us,” Holtmann said. “I really believe that.” read more

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Football Greg Mattison aims to use defensive depth to his advantage at

Ohio State co-defensive coordinator Greg Mattison speaks to the media on National Signing Day. Credit: Colin Gay | Sports EditorGreg Mattison was very complimentary of the defensive line as soon as he was hired as a co-defensive coordinator at Ohio State. He said it was not hard to see the level of talent the group had, saying he wanted to turn them loose as soon as he saw what they could do. Then he saw the rest of the defense. Without having a position room to call his own, Mattison watched everyone: from co-defensive coordinator Jeff Hafley and the cornerbacks to Al Washington and the linebackers. “When I look at people, I go, ‘Boy, that’s a second-teamer?’” Mattison said. “‘That’s a pretty good second-teamer.’”With the amount of talent at his disposal, Mattison saw a way to utilize tempo, something he has embraced in his 48 years coaching football, encouraging players to go as fast and as hard as they can. Ohio State has the ability to do that because second-and-third team players on the sideline waiting to get their opportunity and play with the same amount of energy and effort when the starter has given his all. “That’s our deal: that we have enough depth and we have enough talent that the next guy steps up, gives you a break,” Mattison said. “It doesn’t mean you did something wrong, it means you can come back and be way, way more healthy and way more vibrant and way more energy, and then the next guy goes back in again.” Ohio State head coach Ryan Day said he had something similar this past season in the wide receiver room. He said when Parris Campbell needed a break, then-redshirt junior K.J. Hill could step up and get reps, when Terry McLaurin needed sidelined, Johnnie Dixon was there to back him up. For Day, that’s the ideal situation for the entire team, calling it a “two-deep and a spare.” With that, he said, no matter the position, it keeps players fresh late in games and late in the season. With the experience Mattison has, Day said this was part of the reason why he wanted him on his defensive coaching staff. “He kind of has that mentor feel, where you look to him for advice, been around a long time, seen a lot of football, a lot of wisdom. I feel like that was important to have. He’s someone that the guys look to with a lot of respect, where he’s been, who he’s coached what he’s done,” Day said. “When he speaks, people listen.”  On the defense, Mattison highlighted the amount of depth on the defensive line and the linebacker positions as ones that could really make this approach come to life. “When you have a really, really good defense, you don’t have a person second-team,” Mattison said. “You have a first-first team and a second-first team. And that’s how it’s going to look.” Mattison has bought into the Ohio State football culture when it comes to tempo. From junior defensive end Chase Young to sophomore defensive end Tyreke Smith, from redshirt junior linebacker Tuf Borland, who was also sidelined with an injury, to sophomore linebacker Teradja Mitchell, Mattison seems to have the pieces to create a defense that has one common goal. “Our thing is to try and keep it simpler and let them play and not make it too simple, but put it in their hands more,” Mattison said. read more

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Grove in darkness after utility pole erupts in flames

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedFire destroys GPL’s pole at SophiaMarch 20, 2019In “latest news”Man escapes unhurt after car slams into utility pole at Zorg Village, EssequiboNovember 14, 2018In “Crime”GPL worker falls off rotten pole, diesJanuary 5, 2017In “Local News” Scores of households in the Grove Housing Scheme, East Bank Demerara is without power after a utility pole erupted in flames around 15:00hrs this afternoon.A Guyana Power and Light Inc. crew is currently at the site working assiduously to replace the utility pole and to restore electricity in the area.The incident occurred at a pole in the  Second Bridge areaResidents recall hearing a loud explosion and upon investigation, saw the pole on fire.The entire wooden post was destroyed, leaving the electrical wires exposed.The pole was situated in close proximity to a house which was threatened by the fire.Prompt response from the Fire Service in Diamond resulted in the fire being doused.The GPL crew also responded in a timely fashion and immediately began works to replace the pole.Power is expected to be restored by 20:30hrs.Residents say the utility pole was prone to giving off electrical sparks over the years and GPL was called in on numerous occasions to address the situation.IInfact, they are calling for a complete assessment and replacement of all the old utility poles in the area. read more

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