Renovation of Temghar dam to take two years

first_imgPune: The repair work on the Temghar dam, one of the potable water lifelines of Pune, is finally underway, however, renovation of the biggest cracks may not be complete until June. The Maharashtra government has sanctioned ₹98 crore for the repair and renovation of the dam wall. Although authorities have asserted that the basic wall structure is intact, despite the cracks.The 87-meter high dam has a capacity of holding water up to four tmcft. It was built between 1997 and 2001, making it the newest among the city’s four major drinking lifelines — the others being Khadakwasla, Varasgaon and Panshet dams. The repair work was initially due to commence in December last year, but was delayed owing to the municipal, the zilla parishad (ZP) and the panchayat samiti elections.To face delay in monsoonAccording to sources in the State Irrigation Department, the work order was issued last month, with the installation of machinery and the labour in place. The process of final repairs is expected to stretch over a period of nearly two years. The work, however, may face further delay this monsoon.An Irrigation Department official said, “Priority has been given to repair the points where the cracks in the wall-face are the deepest before June, in a bid to ensure that the water, which will get stored during this monsoon, does not seep out.”The water storage has been reduced to facilitate repair work, with a plan being mooted to release the water into the Khadakwasla dam.FIR against 34 peopleLast year, in August, Maharashtra Water Resources Minister Girish Mahajan had acknowledged that the construction of the Temghar dam was indeed faulty and had directed action against the persons responsible.Following this, the Pune Rural Police had lodged a first information report (FIR) against 34 persons for allegedly using inferior quality material during the construction of the dam. The complaint included names of government officials, and directors and board members of two south India-based construction firms, Srinivas Construction and Progressive Construction, who were responsible for the construction of the dam. Both the firms were blacklisted later.City-based Right to Information (RTI) activist Vijay Kumbhar had pegged the water leakage from Temghar to be in excess of 5 crore litres, despite irrigation authorities claiming that not all seepage went waste as water flowed into the Khadakwasla reservoir.last_img read more

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Heavy rains lash Gujarat

first_imgHeavy rains across the state has led to floods with dozens of villages cut off from main towns as roads and railway tracks are submerged in flood waters. In Saurashtra region, more than 500 people stranded in their houses were shifted to safe locations in various places due to water logging on Saturday.”Due to torrential rains, more than 50 villages have been affected in Saurashtra and North Gujarat regions,” a government official said, adding the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) has been pressed into service. “Around 30 villages in the state are still cut off as internal roads are flooded,” the official added. In some villages in Saurashtra, dozens of cattle were swept away in gushing waters or drowned. On Saturday, Saurashtra, North Gujarat and South Gujarat received heavy rains, disrupting normal life in interior villages. According to met department, Gujarat will continue to receive moderate to heavy rains for next few days. The authorities have advised fishermen to not venture into sea for fishing while all coastal district authorities have been alerted to be prepared for flood situation.last_img read more

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5 Things to Consider Before Telecommuting

first_imgTelecommuting seems like the ideal work situation. You can earn an income from the comfort of your home, while avoiding commutes and office politics. Nevertheless, telecommuting is not without its challenges. Before accepting a work-at-home position, here are some things you should consider.1. Do you have the discipline?The first week I worked from home full time, I didn’t do any work. I watched TV, did laundry and played with the kids. Working at home offers flexibility, but if you’re not careful, you’ll whittle away the hours and have nothing to show for it. Successful telecommuters have the discipline to get their behinds in their desk chair and work. A daily schedule and routine helps in forcing yourself to get to work.2. Are potential interruptions managed?Children, pets, neighbors who need you to let the cable guy in, and many other interruptions can get in the way of work. Anticipating and managing potential problems can help. Do you have child care? Did you create a set schedule for work and let everyone know not to interrupt you during those times? Have you added browser apps that prevent you from surfing the net and wasting time?3. Do you have a workspace?While many people started their work-at-home journeys on a kitchen table, it’s not the ideal location. Work is best done in a quiet, designated area. The ideal place is a room with a door that you can use to shut out the world when you’re working and shut out work when you’re not. But if you can’t designate a room, you should have an area that is exclusive for work and is away from household distractions.4. Do you have the tools and equipment to do the job?Not all employers supply everything you need. Many expect you to have a computer and other tools needed to do the job. Your work items should be in your workspace where you can get to and use them easily. At the very least you need a computer that has the speed and oomph to do the work you need to do, high speed Internet access and top-notch anti-virus protection.5. Are you prepared to be alone?One of the biggest challenges to working from home is the isolation. You can’t peek over your cubicle divider to check in with your neighbor or eat lunch with colleagues in the lunch room. Social media can help, as long as you don’t waste time. Or you can work at the local library or java joint. Finally, if possible, consider going into the office occasionally just to check in and connect with your colleagues.Telecommuting can increase your productivity while reducing the amount of time you commute. But it has its own challenges that can get in the way of success. Before accepting a telecommuting position, make sure you’re prepared mentally and physically to work from home.Originally posted on Personal Branding Blog by Leslie Truexlast_img read more

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The Ultimate Guide to Getting Better Sleep

first_img 21 Words To Never Include In Your Resume Does your nighttime routine consist of scrolling through your iPhone until you get so tired that you accidentally drop your phone on your face? Yeah, me too.Good health cannot happen without good sleep. And good sleep cannot happen without good sleeping habits. Want to know what’s not a good sleeping habit? You guessed it, technology right before bed.Improving your sleep will improve your productivity, your mood, and your overall health. And there’s another obvious benefit: that relentless fatigue you’ve come to accept as normal will be replaced with energy.But enough talk. If your goal is to get better sleep by tonight, you’ve come to the right place. Here’s how to start building habits that will set you up for a life of good night’s sleep.1. Turn Off Electronic DevicesYour body needs some time to go from “awake” mode to sleep mode. One of the best things to do to help your body get ready for sleep is to turn off electronic devices before you get into bed. The light from devices keeps your brain turned “on” when you want to turn your brain “off.” If an hour before is a bit of a stretch for you, start with 30 minutes prior, or even 15 minutes. Create a designated space to keep your laptop, iPad, and phone overnight—and make sure it’s out of reach from your bed.This can be a really tricky thing for many people. Don’t beat yourself up if you find yourself writing emails from under the covers one night. The goal here is to make a concerted effort to be better, not perfect.2. Create a Nighttime RoutineAsk yourself these questions: What relaxes you? What is something you find soothing? What makes you feel comfortable? These are the kind of things you’re going to look to do before you go to bed. For example, if a warm shower or bath decompresses you from the day, think about making that part of a nighttime ritual. Or if a cup of hot tea is is something that allows you to sit and take a deep breath, that will help you transition to a state of relaxation. A nighttime routine steeped in relaxing activities creates an important transitionary state that will carry you to sleep.3. Don’t Forget the BasicsIs your bed comfortable? We can get buried in all the details surrounding sleep, but let’s not forget the fundamentals, a.k.a., your bed, pillows, blankets, the lighting, the noise. One of the best parts of sleep is sinking into a cloud of comfort. Is your mattress current (it shouldn’t be older than 10 years) and comfortable? If not, consider investing in a new mattress, or even just a mattress topper. Are your sheets and comforter comfortable and warm? If you’re waking up with a stiff neck, change your pillows STAT. The National Sleep Foundation says that your room should be dark and quiet. If you happen to live in a street-facing apartment, an eye mask and earplugs can work wonders.4. Beware of Caffeine!Don’t worry, this article is NOT going to tell you to stop drinking coffee. However, it’s important to monitor your caffeine intake in order to sleep well. A good rule of thumb is to stop your caffeine intake around 2:00 pm.5. Try to Reduce Your StressThis one is easier said than done, of course. But we all know that nothing is worse than feeling totally exhausted while lying in bed wide awake with a brain that refuses to shut off. A couple quick and easy ways to help you de-stress before sleep include reading a book, stretching, breathing, or writing your to-do list for the morning.6. Keep Things ConsistentGood habits are born from repetition. You’re not going to transform your sleep schedule and routine in one night, or one week, or even one month. Introducing, and keeping, good habits takes time. The key here is a commitment to consistency. Try to go to sleep around the same time every night, and try your best not to use your electronic devices in bed. Make an effort to establish a routine. The payout will be worth it. After all, is there anything better than waking up feeling rested and refreshed?Additional Resources to Help You Get Your Ultimate Sleep:National Sleep FoundationSleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School Arianna Huffington’s Sleep Revolution Also on Glassdoor:center_img 7 Companies With Incredible New Officeslast_img read more

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What Constance Wu, Viola Davis & Natalie Portman Taught Me About Equal Pay

first_img The Best Places to Work in 2019 You’ve probably heard about the gender pay gap, but do you really know what it means and why it matters? Hopefully, I don’t have to explain why having equal pay matters, but some people might be confused as to what the pay gap is actually referring to.To put it simply, the gender pay gap refers to the difference between a women’s and man’s average full-time earnings. According to Glassdoor research, on average, men still earn an average of 24.1 percent higher base pay than women. Even after adjusting for age, education, years of experience, job title, employer, and location, the U.S. gender pay gap is still about 5.4 percent, or about 94.6 cents per dollar earned by men.Women are consistently reporting unequal pay in all types work environments, from restaurant workers and tech fields, all the way up to the top Hollywood elite. And those actresses who earn less than their dashing male counterparts are not happy about it.After diving into some research of Hollywood’s most outspoken activists seeking equal pay for all, I wanted to share a few insights I learned about the gender pay gap.1. Women earn less, despite having more successful movies.“For some reason, our culture values the idea that men belong in the workforce, and if women are allowed in, then gratitude should be the appropriate response,” explains Constance Wu about the Hollywood gender pay gap.In 2016, out of the top-ten highest-paid actors, only two of them were women.  Now, compare that to the earnings from the top-grossing movies since 2006: a movie with male leads ranked in $81 million, compared to movies with female leads brining in a whooping $126 million.Even though their movies are bigger box-office hits and women put in the same amount of work as their male co-stars, women do not have equal pay and, in fact, are making way less.2. The pay gap in Hollywood is actually shocking.To say a woman makes “way less” is an understatement when you dig deeper and learn just how large the gap is.Take Natalie Portman, for example, who revealed that she earned three times less than Ashton Kutcher when the pair starred together in the 2011 romantic comedy, “No Strings Attached.”Portman is an Oscar-winning actress who, despite her success, still earns less than her male counterparts.“The pay disparity is crazy,” said Portman in a magazine interview with Marie Claire. “Compared to men, in most professions, women make 80 cents to the dollar. In Hollywood, we are making 30 cents to the dollar.”If you remember the Sony hacks, you might also remember the letter Jennifer Lawrence penned when she found out that she made less than her male co-stars in “American Hustle.” While Christian Bale and Bradley Cooper earned 9% of the 2013 film’s total profits, Lawrence only earned 7%.17 Celebrities Reveal Their First Jobs3. Some male actors take pay cuts so their female co-stars can earn the same wage.In Hollywood, no one should have to take a pay cut. These studios and networks can afford to pay women equally. I highly doubt their budget, especially for a hit show like “The Big Bang Theory,” cannot accommodate to pay the female leads in the show the same salary as their male co-stars.In this case, actors Jim Parsons, Johnny Galecki, Kunal Nayyar, Kaley Cuoco and Simon Helber, all reportedly took a $100,000 pay cut (they each earn $1 million an episode) in order to increase the salaries of Mayim Balik and Melissa Raunch, who currently only earn $200,000 an episode. The cut from their co-stars bumped both Balik and Raunch up to $450,000 an episode.While it’s very generous and kind for the male actors and Kaley Cuoco to take pay cuts for their co-workers, it really just makes her and the men look like nice people, and therefore covers up the bigger issue–that these two women should be paid fairly.4. Both on- and off-screen, Black women are paid even less than white womenWomen are paid less than men, but black women are paid even less than white women.Pew Research reports that racial and gender wage gaps still persist in America today, with black women taking a harder hit to their pay than white women.For example, the 2016 study from Pew Research shows that from 1980 to 2015, white women have narrowed the gap in median hourly earnings by 22 cents. In 1980, white women earned an average of 60 cents for every dollar earned by a white man, and in 2015, they earned 82 cents on the dollar.But compare that to the median hourly earnings for black women from 1980 to today and you’ll see that black women only narrowed the gap by 9 cents. In 1980, black women were earning 56 cents on the dollar, compared to earning 65 cents on the dollar to white men today.Demystifying the Gender Pay Gap: Evidence from Glassdoor Salary DataIn an interview with Variety magazine, Chris Rock pointed out that Jennifer Lawrence would have a lot more to complain about if she were a black woman.“Black women have the hardest gig in show business,” Rock says. “You hear Jennifer Lawrence complaining about getting paid less because she’s a woman, but if she was black, she’d really have something to complain about.”Viola Davis famously called Hollywood out for its low pay and lack of opportunities for people of color during her speech at the 2015 Emmy Awards. Davis won the Primetime Emmy Award for “Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series” for her role in ABC’s hit show, “How To Get Away With Murder.”“The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity,” said Davis. “You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there.”If you look back at the top ten highest-paid actors from 2016, it’s important to note that, in addition to there only being two women who made the list, we must also recognize that there were zero black women on the list. Furthermore, on Forbes’ list of the top-ten highest paid women in Hollywood, there were zero black women listed and only two women of color.If you break down the pay that top actresses in Television earn, the gap between white and black women is huge and horrendous.Tracee Ellis Ross earns an estimated $80,00 per episode of the TV show “Black-ish,” whereas, Kaley Cuoco earns  $1 million per episode of “The Big Bang Theory.” Kerry Washington of “Scandal,” and Viola Davis of “How To Get Away With Murder,” both earn about $250,000 per episode of their hit TV shows. Taraji P. Henson earns about $175,000 for her role on “Empire.” Now, compare that to the $750,000 per episode that Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel made for each episode of the “Gilmore Girls” reboot.5. We have a long way to go.To sum it up, the gender wage gap is huge and Hollywood is just one example of how unequal pay is for women compared to men. But, it’s not only about a pay gap between men and women; it’s also about a gap between women of various backgrounds, races and ethnicities. That is unacceptable.If the rate of change in the pay gap continues the way it has been, studies indicate that we won’t achieve equal pay until 2152. And right now, given that so many eyes are always looking at Hollywood, the film and television industry has the chance to show every other industry how to pay women and women of color a fair and equal wage. We will be watching. Also on Glassdoor:center_img 25 Amazing Companies Hiring in All 50 Stateslast_img read more

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Sir Alex: Man Utd players will benefit from preseason tour

first_imgFormer Manchester United boss Sir Alex Ferguson says their preseason tour will benefit Jose Mourinho’s players.United will kick off the summer tour with five games in the United States – two friendlies against Major League Soccer sides LA Galaxy and Real Salt Lake, before International Champions Cup (ICC) meetings with City and the two giant clubs from Spain.After returning from America, the Reds will play further matches in Oslo against Norwegian side Valerenga and in Dublin where Italian club Sampdoria will provide the opposition at the start of August. All of the games will be shown live on MUTV.”The great thing about United is you’ve got to accept the challenge of beating the best,” the former manager told ManUtd.com at the tour launch.”The expectation is always there and the matches we’ll face in the ICC are all big ones. It’s very good for the younger players to come into this type of competition in terms of preparing to be a Manchester United player. The more intense the challenge they can get, the better prepared they will be when facing Manchester City in an important league match or Real Madrid or Barcelona in Europe.”The preparation to play in games as big as that can be started in pre-season tournaments like the ICC, which is fantastic.”last_img read more

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​Kirchhoff set for Sunderland departure

first_imgJan Kirchhoff will leave Sunderland this summer, according to the Shields Gazette.The German’s contract will run out of at the end of June and he will be free to sign at another club on a free transfer.Kirchhoff has received offers from clubs in his homeland, but he hasn’t ruled out a move to another Premier League club.The 26-year old signed for the Black Cats in January 2016 but fell out-of-favour with former boss David Moyes.last_img

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​Man Utd cleared of misconduct in Pogba transfer, but Juve…

first_imgManchester United have been informed by FIFA that disciplinary proceedings have not yet been opened over Paul Pogba’s transfer from Juventus, according to Sky Sports.However, the world’s football governing body has confirmed that proceedings have begun for the Serie A giants.Both clubs were notified last month to provide extra information of the world-record transfer.Extracts from a book, Football Leaks: The Dirty Business of Football, claimed that Pogba’s agent, Mino Raiola, was mooted to make £41m from the transfer.A FIFA released by read: “We can confirm that disciplinary proceedings have been opened against Juventus FC. “We cannot confirm further as proceedings are ongoing. “We can confirm that no disciplinary proceedings have been opened against Manchester United.”last_img read more

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Ex-Dutch star Bruggink slams Chelsea over Loftus-Cheek treatment

first_imgFormer Holland international Arnold Bruggink has blasted Chelsea over their youth policy.Bruggink can’t believe the way Chelsea management has treated Ruben Loftus-Cheek.He wrote for Voetbal International: “Loftus-Cheek was only eighteen years old when he made his debut for Chelsea in the Champions League at the end of 2014. “He is now 21 and he had exactly thirty minutes last season in the Premier League. I find it tragic that such a talent for more than two years is treated like that.”Loftus-Cheek is a central midfielder who with every top Dutch club would not be out of place.”last_img read more

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Inter Milan coach Luciano Spalletti: I don’t care about reputations!

first_imgInter Milan coach Luciano Spalletti is ready to get tough with his newly inherited squad.Spalletti won’t tolerate big egos inside the dressing room.“Feel my hands. I have the hands of someone who loves to be in the countryside, tend to plants and feed the animals,” he told the Gazzetta dello Sport.“I have feelings and will try with all my strength to transfer my working method and my convictions to the team. That’s to Inter as a team, not as individuals. Because these players have a lot of quality, but then everyone thinks they’ve done their bit and that doesn’t work as a collective.“Every player feels like they are owed something, whereas they need to worry about giving something. A lot. Anyone who works with me must feel totally convinced.“Those who play here must feel they are Inter, not just a player who is at Inter. Otherwise there’s no point talking about a sense of belonging.“The lads mustn’t think: ‘I am Candreva or Murillo, an Inter player,’ but rather ‘I am Inter!’ You need to always keep in mind the great history of this club.“I will hammer this concept into them in every instant. If they don’t understand what it means to wear the Inter shirt, then we’ll get nowhere.”last_img read more

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Real Madrid president Florentino has warning for Man Utd target James

first_imgReal Madrid president Florentino Perez has warned James Rodriguez they won’t be held to ransom.The Manchester Evening News says Manchester United had been suggested as the 25-year-old’s next club after he struggled to win a regular place in Zinedine Zidane’s La Liga and Champions League double-winning squad last season.But Perez told esRadio: “He is one of the best players in the world, he belongs to Madrid and Madrid players do not leave when they want to or their parents want them to.”We have to match the interests of the players with ours, but mostly those of Madrid.”last_img read more

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Bournemouth skipper Simon Francis: You can’t return to preseason out of shape

first_imgBournemouth skipper Simon Francis says returning for preseason out of shape is no longer an option.At 32 years old, captain Francis is one of the more seasoned members of a squad which finished a club-record ninth in the top flight in 2016-17.Francis told the Daily Echo: “It is very important, especially when you get a little bit older.”I can’t run through a lads’ holiday and then come back and try to run it all off in pre-season, that’s for sure. It’s definitely not those days from 10 years ago.”Times have changed. You can’t do what you want and come back overweight and not in shape. You are only going to slow yourself down and go to the back of the queue.”We work hard in pre-season and anyone who doesn’t come back in shape will get found out.”I have to be honest, all the lads come back in great shape and ready to work hard and why wouldn’t you when another season in the Premier League awaits us?”last_img read more

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Crystal Palace move for Sevilla defender Adil Rami

first_imgCrystal Palace are moving for Sevilla defender Adil Rami.The veteran French defender is ready to leave Sevilla this summer and has attracted an approach from Marseille.However, L’Equipe says Palace are also in contact with Rami’s camp.The Eagles are turning to Rami after finding Liverpool’s £30 million asking price for Mamadou Sakho too rich.Rami, 31, will listen to offers from Palace, OM and Besiktas this week before making up his mind.last_img

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Cash on Delivery? Putting JSY’s Payments in Context

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 10, 2011June 20, 2017By: Sarah Blake, Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The following originally appeared on Maternal Mortality Daily. It is reposted here with permissionThis post is the second in a series on maternal health in the Seraikela block of Jharkhand, India.Janani Suraksha Yojana, or JSY, is a conditional cash transfer program first instituted by the government of India under the National Rural Health Mission in 2005. A 2010 review published in The Lancet in 2010 characterized JSY as “a conditional cash transfer scheme, to incentivize women to give birth in a health facility,” and “the largest conditional cash transfer scheme in terms of number of beneficiaries” JSY is driven by two important assumptions that are shared by many development practitioners and policy makers around the world:Conditional cash transfers can be effective in reducing poverty and promoting gender equity. As with other national conditional cash transfer programs, the cash that is entailed in JSY is part of an effort to overcome barriers to service use – such as awareness and cost; and to give money directly to poor women who otherwise may have little access or control over cash.Increasing institutional delivery will lead to a decline in maternal and newborn deaths. Therefore, according to the government’s guidelines for JSY, “the scheme’s success is determined by the increase in institutional delivery among poor families.”While the program aims to reach poor women across India, it is not applied the same everywhere and, by design, invests the most in the states where institutional delivery is lowest, including Jharkhand. As one of the focus states for JSY, women in Jharkhand have access to greater amounts of money than in other states, and must fulfill fewer conditions to attain it. This means that, while there are restrictions on age, number of previous children and income level in many states, any woman in Jharkhand who gives birth is entitled to the full incentive if they give birth in a facility, whether public or private and government-accredited; and to a smaller amount (for “nutrition assistance”) if they give birth at home.Among the government officials and health workers we talked to, there seemed to be a broad consensus on the fact that the program is having an effect on what women do. According to one government official, before JSY, “The government institutions were seeing zero deliveries. In four years of JSY implementation, this number jumped to 39 percent.” On a visit to one of the primary health centers, which are staffed by auxiliary nurse midwives, who are trained to perform normal deliveries, a group of ANMs showed us the labor room – which is equipped with three birthing tables, but now, they told us, is often so crowded that laboring women end up using the countertops in that room and the neighboring office instead. However, despite this consensus on the impact of JSY, we came across only one person – a doctor at the main hospital where women from Seraikela are referred for complicated deliveries – who declared “they just come for the money. Without the money, they wouldn’t be here.”While the cash that women are entitled to under JSY is perhaps the most visible component of the program, it may not always be the most important factor in women’s decision-making – or even the most significant payment.Sahiyas are also entitled to a payment of 600Rs (around $13) for each woman they assist. Though the implementation guidelines for JSY require that sahiyas’ work be assessed based on the number of women they accompany to the health center, their payment relies on fulfilling many more conditions – some of which they may complete successfully, but may not persuade women to deliver in public facilities. Sahiyas are responsible for completing duties well beyond the trip to the health center: they are responsible for identifying and registering pregnant women who are eligible for the scheme, and ensuring that they have the documents they need to access funds, preparing a “micro-birth plan” detailing the expected delivery date, place and possible referral institutions, to accompanying women to health facilities and providing follow-up care and arranging immunizations in the weeks after a baby is born. The JSY scheme relies on community health workers, known as Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) throughout India, and known in Jharkhand as sahiyas, who are paid for the assistance they provide to women and babies. The women we asked about the cash incentive told us that they had received 1650 Rs (around $40) in exchange for delivering in the health facility, an amount which includes both the incentive and additional funds to cover transportation costs.The role of the sahiya that is defined in the government’s guidelines seems clearly designed to motivate sahiyas to persuade women to use government health facilities. After all, when this happens, everyone gets paid. And, indeed, the scheme often seems to work this way. In Sini, a village located 20 minutes by car (a mode of transportation not always accessible to the people who live there) from a primary health center, and perhaps an hour and a half from the main hospital, a sahiya named Sudha told us simply, “Everyone goes to the institutions now—not because of the money, but because they are afraid of complications.” As we walked around her village, talking to women who had given birth recently, this seemed to be the case. In fact, as we sat with a group of the village’s women, one introduced a newcomer to the group as a woman who had given birth at home a few years ago – “back before we knew about the risks.” The things we learned in Sini suggested that both the sahiyas and the women they serve are following the script written by the government: the sahiya raises awareness, touched with a little bit of fear, and the women absorb the information, and proceed to delivery in the government facilities. At the end of the day, everyone gets paid, and institutional delivery increases.If our interviews ended there, we would have walked away with an idea that JSY is working according to the guidelines, even if this is slightly different from how it is frequently discussed.In another village, which was located around half an hour from the nearest private hospital, we found a very different story. Sita, who had given birth to her daughter a month earlier, told us that she had originally planned to deliver at home, as she had her son, who is now four. But, after being in labor for more than a day, she started to worry, “If I stay here, if something will happen, then what will I do?” At that point, she called her mother, who arrived in a borrowed car from her own village, half an hour a away, and took her, her husband and sister-in-law to the private hospital, which she had heard was better – and closer – than any public facilities. Her daughter was born a few hours later, with no complications, and the two were discharged the next day. The village’s sahiya, Radha, who was looking on as we interviewed Sita, explained that she had not gone with the family because she had broken her arm – and because there was no room in the car. As she beamed with pride at Sita, “one of the finest ladies in the village,” Radha told us that she had filed the paperwork for Sita’s payment a few days before. Though this meant that Sita’s payment would be late, and, in all likelihood, Radha would not get paid at all, the matter seemed almost an afterthought: the money would come, sure, because Sita was entitled to it. It was not enough to cover the cost of the private hospital, which was 2500Rs, but Sita had saved some money in case she needed to pay for hospital fees, and she now plans to set the money from JSY aside for her daughter.Where JSY – and other cash transfer programs – are often presented along the narrow lines of cash in exchange for a pre-defined healthy behaviour – in this case, institutional delivery in a public facility, in action, things are much more complicated. It is possible that people do not always want to talk about the way that cash influences the choices they make about something so momentous as childbirth, even from the few people we talked to, it seemed pretty clear that their choices, though often health-seeking, did not necessarily conform to the conditions defined by JSY–and were not necessarily strongly motivated by cash. There seemed to be no shortage of knowledge about the risks that go with having a baby, or of the ability for some health institutions to provide some help, whether for a normal delivery or as for Sita, a place to go when things seemed to be going wrong.The more we talked to sahiyas and new mothers, the more questions followed. For a program that is so reliant on community health workers, discussions of JSY rarely address the ways in which different sahiyas may influence women and what factors are influencing them.Does it matter that some sahiyas live in communities where the private facilities have better reputations, even if they are more expensive and there is no financial incentive for the sahiya? Is it possible that the payments sahiyas receive throughout the year ultimately influence women’s choices more than the one payment that the women receive on giving birth?If we follow the government guidelines for assessing sahiyas, it is clear that the sahiyas in Sini are more successful, but if we also consider Sita’s ability to make and act on a plan to seek care in a nearby facility in an emergency, we are left with a different possible definition of success. It might be worth asking how JSY might allow for a broader view of what women want and need. This seems especially important in a community like Seraikela where some health facilities are reasonably accessible, but where private facilities may be too expensive and public facilities are not yet equipped to meet the demands that would come with 100 percent institutional delivery, the current goal of JSY.Note: All names used in this post are pseudonyms.Tata Steel Rural Development Society, the host organization for Kate’s fellowship, provided us with transportation and interpreter services. Many thanks to Shabnam Khaled for her help with translation.Share this:last_img read more

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Cash Transfers, Institutional Delivery and Quality of Care in India

first_imgPosted on June 29, 2011June 19, 2017By: KG Santhya, Associate, Population Council, New DelhiClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of a series of posts on cash transfers and maternal health. To read other posts in the series, click here. If CCTs are a part of your work or research, we’d love to hear from you. Contact us at clindahl@engenderhealth.org if you are interested in writing a guest post on the topic.Today, in India, nine out of 10 pregnant women receive at least one antenatal check-up; three out of four deliver their babies in a health facility; and three out of five mothers receive a postpartum check-up within 10 days of delivery. Indeed, a remarkable achievement for a country that has struggled for decades – and continues to struggle – to make motherhood safe for its women. A major driver behind this surge is the Janani Suraksha Yojana.It is very heartening to see that millions of women are accessing maternal health services. But, how are they treated at the facility once they arrive for these services? Simply as numbers to be recorded in facility registers or as human beings endowed with the right to health? Have we short-changed quality for the sake of quantity? These were some of the questions that loomed large in our mind when we set out to talk to women who had recently delivered in two districts of the state of Rajasthan, a state where 388 maternal deaths take place for every 100,000 births. We conducted a survey and talked with nearly 5,000 women. The experiences of many suggest that the quality of care is unacceptably poor.Did the introduction of the JSY lead to this unacceptably poor quality of care received by women in our study? To answer this question, we compared the experiences of women who had delivered both before and after the JSY was introduced; their descriptions of experiences at the time of their two deliveries portray a mixed picture.Dhapu, a 24 year old mother of two children living in a town, was very unhappy with the introduction of the JSY; for her, the quality of care has indeed worsened “The condition has worsened; we have to wait for half-an-hour to see the doctor and then, the doctor gives you just five minutes.”Rekha, a 25 year old mother of 2 children living in a village, had diametrically opposite views; for her, the situation has improved remarkably “Of course, there is improvement in the health of mothers as well as that of children. Earlier, people were not so aware (about institutional delivery) and many deliveries in the village used to take place at home, attended only by traditional birth attendants. There used to be problems; for example, there were problems in cutting the umbilical cord, and also some children used to turn blue or die; but now, if they face any problem in the hospital, they can be checked and treated promptly. Earlier, in villages, ladies had to bear pain for many days if a problem occurred during delivery, and some mothers used to die; it doesn’t happen in the hospital as they go for an operation in case labour pain is prolonged. Earlier, we had to go to the hospital on our own and as we didn’t know the doctors, they didn’t take care of us properly; now, as the ASHA accompanies us to the hospital, doctors also talk properly and treat us properly. Before, we had to spend money from our own pockets, now we get Rs.1,400 from the scheme and we can at least pay the conveyance charges and purchase medicines etc. using that money.”For women, like Kamla, a 28 year old mother of four children, the poor quality of care received by them had nothing to do with the introduction of the JSY. It was the reality of their life before the JSY was introduced and continues to be the reality today as well: “Each time, I must have waited for at least half-an-hour to 45 minutes. When the nurse came, she gave me dard badane ka injection [for increasing the pain]. She didn’t check my temperature or pulse. Neither did she do any abdominal or vaginal examination… She pressed my stomach so heavily that I screamed. It was like this for all my four deliveries.”Kamla wasn’t an exception; women like her constituted the majority. Our survey findings documented that the JSY has led to improvements in a few aspects of the quality of maternal health care, but for most aspects, has had no effect on the quality of care, For example, the health care provider did not conduct essential examinations – abdominal examination, vaginal examination, checking temperature and pulse – for about three in four women when they were admitted to the hospital for delivery at both times, that is, before and after the JSY was introduced. Many women were subjected to harmful practices at both times. For example, the health care provider applied strong fundal pressure (pushed hard on the abdomen) on one in three women before they delivered; they gave injection for increasing labour pain (most likely oxytocin, a practice that can sometimes lead to perineal tears, uterine rupture and foetal distress). A few things, however, have improved with the introduction of the JSY. Women, by and large, are discharged from the facility after delivery much later than in the pre-JSY period and are allowed to have the person accompanying them — family member, ASHA for example – to remain with them during delivery.In short, while the JSY has succeeded in bringing women to the health facility and has neither compromised the quality nor improved it, there is a long way to go to make motherhood safe and the quality of maternal health services respectful for women in India. The same vigour that we have shown in getting women to the facility should be demonstrated in ensuring that they receive quality care, including the benefits of evidence-based best practices, once they reach it.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Call for Submissions: New Voices in Global Health at the World Health Summit

first_imgShare this: Posted on May 3, 2013March 8, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Lancet and the M8 Alliance of Academic Health Centres, Universities and National Academies are now accepting submissions of abstracts for presentation at its upcoming 5th World Health Summit as part of the competitive New Voices for Global Health program. Submissions will be considered through June 19, and authors of selected abstracts will have a chance to present their work at the World Health Summit, which will be held from October 20-22, 2013 in Berlin and published in a special booklet that will be distributed at the World Health Summit  and on The Lancet’s website.From the call for submissions:Issues addressed must be relevant, reflect current challenges, show originality and will spark the interest of conference participants and the readers of The Lancet. Topics of particular interest would be those linked to the summit’s main themes:Global Health and DevelopmentHealth in the (post 2015) Development AgendaUniversal Health CoverageGlobal Nutrition and HealthEvidence to PolicyEvidence for improved Decision-MakingSocial media and global HealthForeign Policy and Global HealthResearch and InnovationNew Approaches to the Control of Infectious DiseasesResearch Capacity Strengthening in Low- and Middle-Income countriesFuture of Research for HealthEducation and LeadershipTransforming Health Professions Education through Collaborative LeadershipGlobal Health EducationInterdisciplinary Strategies for Health CommunicationResearch using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods may be submitted.For more information on submission guidelines, click here. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Michael Clarke in Twitter tirade with Australian journalist: Always played by rules

first_imgFormer captain Michael Clarke has denied Australia culture soured under his watch after a prominent Australian sports journalist linked the Cape Town ball-tampering scandal with cultural failings during his captaincy.Journalist Gerard Whateley said on his programme on local radio station SEN that Australia had become the “most despised team in world cricket… a scourge that is part of Clarke’s legacy.”Clarke, who led the side from 2011-15, defended his record as captain in a lengthy tirade on Twitter.”I played to win, but played by the rules of the game and to a similar level of aggression to the other international teams I played against,” he wrote.Clarke has also branded the journalist a “headline chasing coward” in a rant on social media.Fact 1:”Under my leadership of the Test team, Australia was ranked No. 5 in the world and 18 months later we were No. 1, yet you made no criticism of me or our style of play then”Fact 2:”In the process of getting to number 1, I played to win, but played by the rules of the game and to a similar level of aggression to the other international teams I played against”Fact 3:”My conduct as an honest and ‘by the rules’ captain has never been questioned, sanctioned or fined other than when I stuck up for George Bailey when he was bullied by an opponent.”Fact 4:”My recent interview on Macquarie radio gave my opinion on what the team needs to do and I stand by that. For the avoidance of doubt, I believe the Australian team should play to win and to prioritise being respected rather than liked – it would be great to be both, but if they can only be one, be respected”Fact 5:advertisement”I today have received numerous messages of support for my opinion from respected journalists and seniors within the Australian cricket team”Fact 6:”For Gerard Wheatley to insinuate that I am responsible for the ball-tampering issue makes him nothing more than a headline-chasing coward. Perhaps if he was talented enough or courageous enough to make it onto a cricket pitch he would have a better perspective than from behind a microphone.”Clarke was fined for telling England paceman James Anderson to “get ready for a broken… arm” during a Test in the 2014-15 Ashes series, but has always maintained it was in response to Anderson making a threat at Australia batsman Bailey.@GerardWhateley @1116sen pic.twitter.com/zFMphvGcoj Michael Clarke (@MClarke23) November 28, 2018Clarke renewed his attack on Whateley on radio on Thursday, saying he was “out of line”.”Trying to blame me for cheating in South Africa is a disgrace,” he added.The ball-tampering scandal in March led to long suspensions for former captain Steve Smith, vice captain David Warner and batsman Cameron Bancroft, and triggered reviews into the culture of the men’s team and governing body Cricket Australia.Under Tim Paine, Smith’s replacement as captain of the Test side, Australia has committed to being less aggressive on the field of play, a stance which has drawn derision from Clarke and a number of former players.With the four-Test home series against India looming, Clarke told local radio earlier this week that Australia would not win any matches if they did not play “tough cricket”.Paine, however, said his team would still play “that confident, aggressive style of cricket that Australia wants to play”.”No one has spoken about being liked, certainly by the opposition,” Paine told ESPNcricinfo.”We’ve spoken about wanting to get the Australian public’s trust and make sure that clearly you want the Australian public and cricket fans to like or love the Australian Test team.”(With inputs from Reuters)Also Read | Michael Clarke wants Tim Paine’s team to ‘play tough Australian cricket’ vs IndiaAlso Read | Ricky Ponting wants Aaron Finch to open for Australia in Test series vs IndiaAlso Read | Less verbals but more bouncers from Australia: Ian Chappell warns Virat Kohli’s Indialast_img read more

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Leicester City v Burnley: match preview

first_img 18 Westwood Fouls 13 Hendrick Goal attempts 21 Ricardo Pereira 19 Rodriguez 2 Lowton 16 Leicester Off target 9 Burnley 3 Leicester On target 4 Burnley (s 67′) Substitutes 9 Vardy It will be an emotional day at what is Leicester’s last home game before the first anniversary of the helicopter crash at the stadium that claimed the lives of five people, including the club’s chairman Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha. While paying their respect, Burnley will aim to frustrate Leicester, testing their creativity and patience. While trying to work openings, Leicester will also have to be wary of counterattacks, because Sean Dyche’s side have scored in every away gamethis season, losing only once in four on the road. Paul Doyle 11 Albrighton Share on Facebook 20 Hart 5 Tarkowski 20 Choudhury 1 Schmeichel Leicester City 6 Evans 4 Soyuncu 7 Gray 28 Long Possession 8 Tielemans Burnley Reuse this content Match stats Share on LinkedIn (s 65′) Lineups 2 Justin 17 Perez 25 Ndidi Share on Twitter 14 Gibson Leicester Share on Messenger 1 Pope (s 83′) 9 Wood (s 73′) Corners 26 Bardsley 26 Praet 10 Maddison Share on Pinterest Share via Email 9 4 34 66 BUR LEI Saturday 3pmVenue King Power StadiumLast season Leicester 0 Burnley 0Referee Jon MossThis season G6 Y22 R2 4 cards/gameOdds H 11-18 A 6-1 D 3-1LEICESTERSubs from Ward, Jakupovic, Fuchs, Morgan, Albrighton, Praet, Gray, Iheanacho, Amartey, Choudhury, Mendy, BenkovicDoubtful NoneInjured James (calf, unknown)Suspended NoneDiscipline Y9 R0Form WWLWWLLeading scorer Vardy 5BURNLEYSubs from Hart, Legzdins, Peacock-Farrell, Taylor, Brady, Cork, Vydra, Rodriguez, Long, Bardsley, CooneyDoubtful Cork (shoulder), Barnes (groin)Injured Drinkwater (ankle, Nov), Gudmundsson (hamstring, unknown)Suspended NoneDiscipline Y11 R0Form DLDWDWLeading scorer Barnes 4 3 Taylor Read more 27 Vydra 25 Lennon Match previews 3 Chilwell Topics 4 10 23 Pieters 12 Ward (s 79′) 15 Barnes 5 Morgan Burnley news The Fiver: the Guardian’s take on the world of football Substitutes 12 Brady Share on WhatsApp BUR34LEI66% Premier League 11 McNeil 6 Meelast_img read more

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Valverde promises additions at Barcelona

first_imgTransfers Valverde promises additions at Barcelona, but no overhaul Chris Burton 15:17 5/20/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Luis Suarez Philippe Coutinho Sergi Roberto Barcelona Getty Images Transfers Barcelona Barcelona v Real Sociedad Real Sociedad Primera División The Camp Nou giants have collected a domestic double in 2017-18, but they will be back in the market for fresh faces when the transfer window opens Ernesto Valverde will be looking to strengthen his Barcelona side during the summer transfer window, but insists he will not “reshape the whole team”.Those at Camp Nou have secured a domestic double in 2017-18, with Copa del Rey success complementing another La Liga title triumph.They are, however, preparing to part with club icon Andres Iniesta, as he readies himself for a new challenge, while speculation surrounds the respective futures of Ousmane Dembele, Yerry Mina, Samuel Umtiti and Andre Gomes. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Goalkeeper crisis! Walker to the rescue but City sweating on Ederson injury ahead of Liverpool clash Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Sorry, Cristiano! Pjanic is Juventus’ most important player right now Additions will be required as a result, with Barca ready to spend again after breaking their transfer record in the last two windows for Dembele and Philippe Coutinho.Valverde told reporters ahead of a final day showdown with Real Sociedad: “We have to strengthen in some positions, but not reshape the whole team.”I don’t want a huge squad, plus there is also the youth team to consider.”We have won the league and cup with a solid base of players who we trust, we only need small changes.”Barca can be expected to bolster their ranks in midfield, with the departure of club captain Iniesta set to create a sizeable void.Valverde is, however, aware that it would be foolish to try and bring in somebody capable of filling the World Cup winner’s boots.He added: “We aren’t going to fall into the mistake of looking for another Andres.”You quite simply are never going to find one.”There are players with profiles like [Carles] Alena, Denis [Suarez] and Coutinho, these could help us offensively.”last_img read more

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Philanthropy Reconsidered

first_imgDeborah Elizabeth Finn has a great new review of the book, Philanthropy Reconsidered by George McCully. She notes:George explains how our rhetoric (and perhaps therefore our thinking) has shifted, as we’ve moved from the industrial age to the information age in philanthropy. It’s no longer about grand patrons giving away their bounty to the deserving poor – it’s about all of us wanting to make a difference, working together, and investing in the change we want to see in the world.We tend to make use of terms such as “nonprofit” to describe our organizations, thus allowing the U.S. Internal Revenue Service to define not only our sector, but to define the taxonomy by which we understand our missions. In his book, George proposes an alternate taxonomy that he developed in the context of his work with the Catalogue For Philanthropy. He points out the need for terminology not based on postive rather than negative definitions (e.g., “nonprofit” or “nongovernmental”), and a taxonomy that orients us to philanthropy as an integral part of our human mission.I agree with that for sure.It reminds me of what our friends at For Impact like to say: We’re not not-for-profits at heart. We’re for impact. And we need as many people behind that as possible.last_img read more

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