Next step for NBA is hiring women in positions of power

first_imgIn this Feb. 6, 2016, file photo, San Antonio Spurs assistant coach Becky Hammon, left, talks to Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich, right, on the court during a timeout in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers in San Antonio.  (AP Photo/Darren Abate, File) MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich sees one simple way for both the NBA and women to mark real progress in the league.Hire more women in positions of power.“I think there just has to be more, more of the same,” said Popovich, who during the offseason promoted assistant coach Becky Hammon, moving her one step closer to a head coaching seat. “There are more Beckys out there, they just have to be noticed and given the opportunity by people who are wise enough and courageous enough to do it and not just sit in the old paradigm.”And not just on the bench, but on the business side of the NBA as well.The NBA routinely gets high marks for its diversity efforts and is widely viewed as a leader on social issues. Still, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver believes the league needs to be better, and he made his feelings known in a memo to teams in the wake of the Dallas Mavericks’ embarrassing scandal.Several NBA teams tout statistics about women in their workforce, but beyond a handful — including Lakers controlling owner Jeanie Buss and Pelicans owner Gayle Benson — the next step for the league seems to be more women in positions of power such as CEOs and COOs.Memphis guard Mike Conley said it’s important for basketball, business and society itself to have women in positions of authority.“We welcome it, and we do want to see more of that,” Conley said, “and I think that will help bridge that gray area and all the things that have been happening with the Mavs and situations like that and hopefully it will never occur” again.The NBA earned an A+ for racial hiring practices but a B for its gender hiring practices this summer from The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports . That puts the NBA “significantly above” other professional sports, even as the number of women hired at the team level dropped for a third straight year with the percentage of women in team vice presidents and professional staff dipping as well, according to the report’s author, Richard Lapchick.When the NBA began investigating a report of sexual harassment and improper workplace conduct involving the former team president, the Mavericks did not have one woman at the executive level. Owner Mark Cubanhired former AT&T senior executive Cynthia Marshall as CEO and president in February , promoted four women to executive roles and now has eight women among 18 leadership roles.A memo obtained by The Associated Press last month shows the NBA plans workshops in Atlanta and Los Angeles in mid-November on the diversity and inclusion efforts. The NBA also set up an anonymous tip line after the Mavs’ story broke.NBA teams surveyed by The Associated Press say they’ve already been holding seminars on workplace conduct and putting women in leadership roles.Irina Pavlova represented the Nets on the Board of Governors before leaving last year and was replaced by a woman as president of the company that runs the Nets, Barclays Center and Nassau Coliseum. The Toronto Raptors have Teresa Resch as vice president of basketball operations and player development, and Dr. Lisa Callahan is chief medical officer for both the Knicks and the WNBA’s Liberty.The Miami Heat recently hired Ruth Riley Hunter as its newest television and radio analyst, a move in motion before Silver talked about wanting more women in the NBA.Grizzlies general manager Chris Wallace has seen the number of women in the NBA jump dramatically since he joined the league in 1986 and believes its heading in the right direction. Chantal Hassard has been with the Grizzlies since the franchise was in Vancouver and is entering her third season as VP of team operations and player programs. Memphis also just brought back Nicki Gross as a basketball analyst after she was the D-League’s only woman assistant in 2015 with Iowa.“I think it adds a viewpoint, a skillset that is very beneficial for the teams,” Wallace said.Silver wants teams hiring more women, including jobs with power, so the NBA is going to help. The NBA plans an event at the All-Star break in Charlotte, North Carolina, in February to grow the “pipeline of female talent in basketball operations roles.”Lapchick said hiring more women has to be a combination of efforts by both the NBA and its teams.“Teams saw the results in Dallas with no women in leadership to stop/confront bad behavior, which I believe is not uncommon toward women in the workplace in and out of sport,” Lapchick told the AP. “Adam has the respect to push and I am impressed by the NBA’s actions after the decline in gender grade when the Report Card was published followed by the post investigation in Dallas.”Ethan Casson, CEO of the Minnesota Timberwolves and the WNBA’s Lynx, said it can’t be a quota approach — and believes there are qualified women in the candidate pools. About 40 percent of Minnesota’s full-time employees are women with 35 percent of department heads and above women. He noted how transparent the NBA and its teams have been on this issue.“It’s constantly challenging your organization’s thinking and creating what that environment is, and that’s what makes the diversity inclusion so important,” Casson said. “You’re a better organization when you’re built that way from the ground up.”___AP Basketball Writers Tim Reynolds and Brian Mahoney and AP Sports Writers Dave Campbell, Andrew Seligman, Janie McCauley, Anne M. Peterson, Schuyler Dixon, Pat Graham, Tom Withers, Howard Fendrich, Brett Martel, Kyle Hightower and AP freelance writers Raul Dominguez, Clay Bailey and Ian Harrison contributed to this report.___More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/tag/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more

The Gathering at Red Mountain: Back for another round

first_imgLast year’s impromptu ‘Gathering’ brought together the legendary group of friends who perfected the freeski alpine lifestyle, melding mountaineering with mogul-mania and fashion with free-dog in Verbier in the 1970s and 80s. News of the frenetic blend of skiing, philosophizing and partying that ensued over three days in March 2009 at Red Mountain traveled through the blogosphere and pub counter conversations throughout the West, and the call was made for a repeat performance.The Gatherers must gather again, bigger and better!For 2010, The Gathering takes it to another level as several generations of Powder Magazine’s most coveted lensmen converge to present and describe the true stories behind some of the finest ski photographs ever captured. Hank deVre, Wade McKoy, Scott Markewitz, Christian Pondella, Jordan Manley, and Erik Seo collectively represent the past, present and future of Powder’s photographic excellence. Their work has inspired thousands of skiers across the globe, and has helped each of us understand why we seek out that perfect day. Red Mountain’s heritage as the original ski resort of Western Canada and cult northwest powder mecca makes it the perfect location to bring together the old guard of the ski world with young up-and-coming skiers, photographers and filmmakers of the vibrant Kootenay region. The Gathering is a TMP (The Mountain Project) event and another signal of Red Mountain’s growing reputation as a global crossroads for mountain professionals from North America, Europe, Down Under and Up Yonder.The Gathering is a three-day ski-festival culminating in a big night out of photos, short films and live music in the infamous Miners Hall heritage building (circa 1890). The already classic TGR film ‘Swift, Silent Deep’ will make its Kootenay premiere earlier in the day. The event runs from April 2nd – 4th. Visit the Gathering website   or click through at Red’s website for presenter bios, full schedules, accommodation event specials and to book.last_img read more

Murky future for freshwater fish in the Amazon floodplains

first_imgAn extreme drought in 2005 decreased many freshwater fish species abundance in areas like Lago Catalão, and many haven’t recovered yet.Drought overturned the ecology of the lake over time – big fish populations declined while little fish boomed.The shift has direct impacts on diets in the region since many local people depend on fish for protein, meaning that climate change is already influencing food reserves here. Life beneath the waters of the Amazon is probably not the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the world’s largest rainforest. All of the bright, primary colors direct your eyes aboveground. But beneath the murky waters of the Amazon swims the highest diversity of freshwater fish on Earth. This stunning diversity may be “out of sight, out of mind” for most, but not for Dr. Kirk Winemiller from Texas A&M AgriLife Research and his Brazilian colleagues. The muddy waters of the Amazon river hold the highest freshwater fish diversity in the world. Amazon floodplains house important fish species but, climate change is increasing the intensity and frequency of floods and droughts in these systems. This could have dramatic effects on fish populations. Photo credit: Rhett ButlerInvestigating long-term data from a floodplain lake near the confluence of the Amazon and Negro rivers, Winemiller and his team found that fish populations drastically changed after a severe drought in 2005. And numbers of many species haven’t recovered since. Such changes are not only ecologically significant: fish are an important source of protein for people residing in these regions, and these life-sustaining fisheries are now imperiled by overfishing and climate change. Climate change is increasing drought intensity and frequency – and this is likely to impact freshwater fish populations in the Amazon and beyond.Changes in biodiversity directly affect “the lives of most organisms living in and around freshwater environments, including humans” said Dr. Cristhiana Röpke, the lead author of the paper from the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia in Manaus, Brazil.Floods and droughtsRiver life in the Amazon is extreme. When precipitation levels are high during the rainy season, Amazonian floodplains fill. But when there is not enough water in the dry season, floodplains can suffer droughts. For large rivers like the Amazon, much of the cycling is dictated by how much rain falls on the headwaters.Kirk Winemiller and his Brazilian colleagues analyzed fish survey data collected from Lago Catalão in Manaus, Brazil. Lago Catalão is a floodplain lake located near the confluence of the Amazon and Negro Rivers. The flood cycle consists of four seasons: rising water, flooding, receding water, and drying. Photo credit: Cristhiana Röpke.Cycling between floods and droughts affects water connectivity and quality, species interactions, and primary production – an important ecological step where primary producer like plants make energy available through photosynthesis.Now, climate change is putting its stamp on this naturally occurring cycle, by shifting rainfall patterns and making these extreme events more frequent and intense. But climatic changes are also affecting headwaters differently. For instance, extreme floods are occurring more often in the headwaters of the Negro river, which is the second largest tributary of the Amazon river. The Madeira river – the largest tributary – has seen more extreme droughts. Many studies have focused on how changes in rainfall may affect forest dynamics in the tropics, but few studies look deeper, into the murky freshwater. Fish out of waterWinemiller and his Brazilian colleagues analyzed data from monthly surveys of freshwater fish conducted in Lago Catalão, a floodplain lake near the confluence of the Amazon and Negro rivers. Between 1999 and 2014, the surveys gathered detailed information about the fish, like species identity, primary food source, and size.With roughly 400 species sampled to date, Lago Catalão represents a large portion of the freshwater fish found in the Amazon floodplains. It is also important for tourism. However, there are minimal conservation efforts in the area, the largest of which are local initiatives for fisheries management. A dried up part of Lago Catalão, a floodplain lake located at the confluence of the Amazon and Negro rivers. Photo credit: Daniele Campos.In 2005, the region suffered a severe drought, during which 70 percent of the floodplain lakes dried up. This is a view of a channel connecting Lago Catalão with the Negro River in October 2005. Photo credit: Sidinéia AmadioThe study shows that rainfall patterns have important direct and indirect effects on lake ecology. Indirectly, droughts may cause shifts in what fish are consuming, causing trickle-down changes throughout the ecosystem. Seasonal water changes determine when the floodplain lake is connected to both rivers. Sometimes it can be completely cut off. In October 2005, an intense drought dried up 70 percent of the floodplain habitats in this region. Lago Catalão was disconnected from the Negro river for about three months.After the drought, fish populations dramatically changed. But not every change occurred immediately. This suggests that intrinsic biological factors – like reproduction, range, and diet – changed as well. Currently, many fish species are less abundant in the floodplain lake than before the drought, including many large fish species that are important for human consumption. The team found hundreds of dead fish near the dried regions of the floodplain lake. Photo credit: Sergio Santorelli.Declines in large fish may be a result of an inability to migrate from river to lake. On the other hand, the study found that small fish that reproduce quicker are now higher in abundance than before the drought. One example is the tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum),a seed and fruit eating giant that weighs up to 88 pounds. Tambaqui is a migratory species that declined after the drought. The year before the drought, the catch per unit efficiency (CPUE) – a measure of abundance for fish – of tambaqui was approximately 0.035. After the drought, this declined to approximately 0.0025 – more than a 90 percent drop from the pre-drought CPUE. Unfortunately, this species is also important to local fish markets and has a high-market value.In contrast, the study found only small changes in the abundance of primary consumers, i.e. fish that rely on only plant material as their food source. However, omnivores and secondary consumers – fish that rely on animals like insects or other fish – markedly declined. Fishing in troubled watersDespite the importance of fish for local consumption, many species with consumer value are overexploited, and are not successfully farmed. “Our study found that some of the most affected fish species were also the ones that were valuable in local fish markets. Therefore, climate change in the Amazon region likely will influence fisheries,” explained Winemiller. As climate change increases the intensity and frequency of droughts, these effects could worsen over time. During droughts, fishermen catch more fish. More droughts may lead to more overexploitation. And this would be on top of the declines already seen in this study. As the research shows, this can greatly affect the lake’s ecology and the resilience of the fish communities as a whole. Each fish species fulfills a different role in the community. They may eat different food, reproduce at different times, and live in different parts of the lake. If a specific role is taken away it may not be filled as quickly – or at all – after extreme events.“Reduced supply of fish would possibly result in starvation and migration of these people to other areas,” said Röpke.In the shallow portions of the floodplain lake, riverine people reside in floating houses. These people rely on freshwater fish as their primary source of protein. Photo credit: Thatyla Beck FaragoShe added that the study highlighted the “need for protection areas in large rivers and floodplains because these areas could work as refuges for fish population preventing collapses and biodiversity loss under a scenario of increased frequency of drought.”Between the number of hooks in the water and prevalent drought conditions, the situation looks murky for Amazonian fish. The need for change is clear, even if the water is not. Citations: Röpke, C.P., Amadio, S., Zuanon, J., Ferreira, E.J.G., de Deus, C.P., Pires, T.H.S., Winemiller, K.O. (2017) Simultaneous abrupt shifts in hydrology and fish assemblage structure in a floodplain lake in the central Amazon. Scientific Reports, 7, 40170.doi: 10.1038/srep40170. Animals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Drought, Environment, Fish, Fishing, Food, Interns, Overfishing, Research, Rivers, Weather Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Maria Salazarlast_img read more

Scientists rediscover ‘lost’ monitor lizard in Papua New Guinea

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Herps, Hunting, Lizards, Predators, Rainforests, Reptiles, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife center_img The only specimen of the monitor lizard Lesson collected on New Ireland never reached its destination in France and was not studied in detail.Since then, it has been believed that the monitor lizards on New Ireland are the common mangrove monitors (Varanus indicus).But the new study confirms that the monitor lizards on New Ireland are a distinct species. On an island in Papua New Guinea, scientists say they have rediscovered a species of monitor lizard thought to be “lost” to science since the 1800s.The medium-sized lizard was first discovered on the island of New Ireland in 1823 by French naturalist René Lesson, who named the species Varanus douarrha. According to Lesson, douarrha was the local word for the monitor lizard in Port Praslin, located at the southern end of New Ireland.The only specimen he collected, however, never reached its destination in France and was not studied in detail. It was likely lost in a shipwreck off the Cape of Good Hope.“Since then, it has been believed that the monitor lizards on New Ireland belong to the common mangrove monitor (Varanus indicus) that occurs widely in northern Australia, New Guinea and surrounding islands,” lead author Valter Weijola, a researcher at the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku, Finland, said in a statement.Island of New Ireland, where the rediscovered species of monitor lizard is found. Photo by Valter Weijola.However, when Weijola collected and examined monitor lizards on New Ireland during field surveys in 2012, he found that the lizards are distinct from the common mangrove monitor and are a separate species. His team’s findings were published in the Australian Journal of Zoology.“New morphological and genetic studies confirmed that the monitor lizards of New Ireland have lived in isolation for a long time and developed into a separate species,” Weijola said.The newly described Varanus douarrha is black with yellow spots, and can grow to about 1.3 meters (~4.3 feet) in length. It is the only large native predator currently known to live on New Ireland, the authors write in the paper.Hunting of monitor lizards is common on New Ireland. But current levels of hunting are not likely to pose a threat to the long-term survival of the species, the researchers add.Varanus douarrha is the largest known animal on the island of New Ireland in Papua New Guinea. Photo by Valter Weijola.Last year, Weijola and his team discovered a new species of monitor lizard on Mussau, another island in Papua New Guinea. The turquoise-tailed lizard, Varanus semotus, is thought to be the only known large-sized predator and scavenger on the island.“Together, these two species have doubled the number of monitor lizard species known to occur in the Bismarck Archipelago [of which New Ireland is a part] and proved that there are more endemic vertebrates on these islands than previously believed,” said Weijola.Varanus douarrha was first discovered in 1823, and the only collected specimen is thought to have been lost in a shipwreck. Photo by Valter Weijola.Citation:Valter Weijola, Fred Kraus, Varpu Vahtera, Christer Lindqvist, Stephen C. Donnellan. Reinstatement of Varanus douarrha Lesson, 1830 as a valid species with comments on the zoogeography of monitor lizards (Squamata:Varanidae) in the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea. Australian Journal of Zoology, 2017; DOI: 10.1071/ZO16038last_img read more

Indigenous lands at risk, as Amazon sellout by Brazil’s Temer continues (commentary)

first_imgBrazilian president Michel Temer has twice survived National Congress votes to initiate impeachment against him on extensive corruption charges.Temer did so by selling out the environment, particularly the Amazon, to the ruralists who largely control the assembly.Among the concessions made or promised to ruralists are presidential decrees to allow agribusiness to rent indigenous lands, forgiving unpaid environmental fines owed by landowners, and ending any enforcement of restrictions on labor “equivalent to slavery.”This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Brazilian President Michel Temer. Photo by Aluízio Gomes licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic licenseMichel Temer, the vice-president who became president of Brazil in 2016 with the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff, is the subject of an ever-growing array of charges of corruption, “criminal organization” and obstruction of justice.He has now survived two votes in the National Congress on initiation of investigations and proceedings for impeachment, the first on August 2nd and the second on October 25th. Obtaining the necessary votes to block impeachment each time involved astronomical sums in various forms of handouts to selected federal deputies. The cost was not only financial – it was also paid by the environment, especially in Amazonia. The successful defeat of the second impeachment attempt did not end this pattern.Public opinion polls currently indicate that Temer has an approval rating of only 3 percent, an all-time low for any president since polling began in Brazil. This means that getting Temer’s legislative agenda passed requires a continual appeasement of the voting blocks that support him in the congress, especially the “ruralists,” or representatives of large landholders. There are also 25 proposals for impeachment still pending in the Chamber of Deputies, which could be brought to the fore as a means of pressuring Temer for more concessions.Indigenous lands appear to be part of the price in this new phase, as became apparent on November 1st, or one week after the second impeachment vote. Temer’s minister of justice revealed plans to allow agribusiness to rent indigenous lands. This is currently illegal, but the minister stated that the arrangement would be implemented either by means of an executive order (medida provisória) or by supporting a bill to this effect in the National Congress. He suggested that it would then be up to the Supreme Court to strike down the measure if considered illegal.Munduruku cacique Disma Muõ: “The government didn’t inform us. The government always spoke of the good things that would happen. They didn’t tell us about the bad things.” The Munduruku number around 17,000 individuals living in the heart of the Amazon, and are just one of many indigenous groups fighting for their survivial against the ruralists and the policies of Michel Temer. Photo by Mauricio TorresHowever, many illegal actions are simply allowed to happen in practice. Building the Belo Monte Dam without consulting the indigenous people it impacted provides a concrete example: in 2012 a lower-court decision in favor of the indigenous people was appealed to the Supreme Court by the executive branch. The dam proceeded to be built, the reservoir was filled in 2015, and consideration of the case has yet to appear on the Supreme Court’s agenda (see here and here).Temer’s favoring of the ruralist demand to open indigenous lands to “renting” (arrendamento) goes back to the lead-up to the second impeachment vote. On October 3rd, Temer met with ruralist deputies in the presidential palace, and, according to all reports (e.g., here and here), he promised to issue an executive order by October 9th allowing indigenous people to rent out their lands non-Indians. A firestorm of criticism ensued (see here and here). On October 4th, Temer denied he had agreed to issue the executive order. It should be noted that it is a common tactic by politicians in Brazil (and elsewhere) to deny controversial plans that in fact continue unchanged (e.g., see here). This recently occurred with president Temer in the case of reducing protected areas along the BR-163 Highway (see here, here, here, and here).Negotiations between ruralists and the administration on allowing agribusiness to rent Indigenous lands apparently continued after the president’s denial (see here, here and here). The most visible ruralist deputy behind the proposal has been Luiz Carlos Heinze, who is best known for his statement in 2014 that Indians (along with gays, lesbians and descendants of escaped African slaves) represent “everything that is good-for-nothing.” On October 18, 2017 a demonstration against a public hearing convened by the ruralist deputies on the proposal to allow renting indigenous lands turned violent, with some of the indigenous people gathered in front of the Chamber of Deputies building throwing rocks and the police responding with teargas and pepper spray.Indigenous leaders tear-gassed by police in front of Brazil’s National Congress in April 2017. Indigenous communities have seen a surge in violence against them and a loss of land rights since Temer took power in 2016. Photo by Wilson Dias courtesy of Agencia BrasilThe influence of ruralists has been on the rise for several years, but the opportunity presented by the recent series of corruption scandals affecting the president has raised ruralist influence to unprecedented heights. Bribes to the various people included in the “criminal organization” that is alleged to include president Temer totaled US $186 million according to then-General Federal Prosecutor Rodrigo Janot.The environmental costs of obtaining the support of enough Federal Deputies to block the first impeachment proposal on August 2, 2017 were high, but they may have been topped by the cost of surviving the second impeachment vote.A 245-page accusation was submitted to the Supreme Court by Rodrigo Janot just before he retired on September 14, 2017, and the accusation was then forwarded to the National Congress where it would have had to be approved to begin an investigation and trial for impeachment. Emblematic events include the May 18, 2017 capture of Temer’s right-hand-man, Federal Deputy Rodrigo Rocha Loures, with a suitcase containing the equivalent of US $159,000, the amount that had been agreed to be paid weekly for a period of 20 years to buy the silence of former Temer ally Eduardo Cunha, the now jailed former head of the Chamber of Deputies who was expected to turn state’s evidence in Brazil’s ongoing series of corruption probes. Police wiretaps had recorded Loures requesting the bribes in Temer’s name, and the confession of Joesley Batista, CEO of the Brazilian multinational JBS (the world’s largest “animal protein” company), stated that the money was meant for Temer. Then on September 5, 2017 a cache equivalent to US $16.3 million in suitcases and cardboard boxes was found in an apartment “loaned” to Geddel Vieira Lima — perhaps Temer’s closest associate who was Temer’s “minister of government” before being forced to resign in November 2016 in another corruption scandal. JBS confessions again tied the money to Temer and his political party. Geddel Lima’s fingerprints were on some of the suitcases. There was also a recording surreptitiously made in March 2017 by Joesley Batista where Temer voiced approval for payment of bribes by JBS to silence Eduardo Cunha.The vast rainforests of Brazil’s Amazon basin are being put at risk by the anti-environmental, pro-ruralist policies of President Temer. Photo © Fábio Nascimento / GreenpeaceApproximately forty percent of Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies is controlled by ruralists: an estimated 210 of the 513 members of the Chamber, or enough to block an impeachment vote.In the lead-up to the first impeachment vote on August 2nd, Temer granted an amazing series of concessions to the ruralists. In the period leading up to the second impeachment vote, ruralist demands included a pardon of US $10.8 billion in unpaid debts and fines by landowners who have failed to pay required contributions to a government pension fund for their employees. This is in addition to US $5.4 billion that had already been effectively pardoned by converting them to installments known as “refis.” The debt is first generously discounted, and the remaining balance is theoretically to be paid over many years, but in practice the installments are routinely left unpaid after the first couple of payments.On the day the second accusation was submitted to the Congress, the Temer administration released US $21 million in pork-barrel allocations (known as “emendas parlamentares”) to selected deputies and promised an additional US $317 million. These handouts translate into further subtractions from government support for other areas, most importantly the Ministry of Environment. On October 16th (nine days before the second vote) Temer’s minister of labor issued an administrative order (portaria) essentially ending any enforcement of restrictions on labor “equivalent to slavery,” which has long been a ruralist demand. Nine days later the order was temporarily suspended by a supreme-court justice, pending a decision from the full court.Michel Temer meets with his ministers, many of whom like agriculture minister Blairo Maggi, hail from, or have close ties to, Brazil’s elite ruralists. Since this 2016 photo was taken, several ministers have been forced to resign due to corruption charges; both Maggi and Temer are currently under investigation. Photo by José Cruz / Agência BrasilThe ruralist demand to open indigenous areas to renting out of land in “partnerships” between indigenous people and agribusiness represents a direct impact on the forest. Indigenous lands protect more Amazon forest than do the “conservation units” administered by the Ministry of Environment. Opening the way to clearing in these areas would be an unparalleled disaster for the Amazon forest. The plan to open up indigenous lands led Greenpeace-Brazil public policy coordinator Marcio Astrini to describe Temer as Brazil’s “worst president in history for the socio-environmental area.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.President Temer, under threat of serious corruption charges, has sold out the Amazon and indigenous people to the ruralist lobby in Congress. Photo credit: sara y tzunky via Visual hunt / CC BY-NC Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Protests, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Ranching, Saving The Amazon, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Can agroforestry propel climate commitments? Interview with Peter Minang

first_imgIn the Paris agreement, most developing countries identified agroforestry as a key part of their climate strategy.Nationally Determined Contributions, or NDCs, are the main tool for defining countries’ contributions to the Agreement.The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), just released a policy brief on agroforestry’s central role in governmental efforts to achieve their NDCs.Author Peter A. Minang explains how agroforestry’s contribution to climate goals could be enhanced. The Paris Agreement, reached at COP21 in December 2015, aims to keep global temperature rise this century to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) are the main tool for defining countries’ contributions to the Agreement, and most developing country NDCs identified agroforestry as a key part of their climate strategy.The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) is attending the COP23 climate summit in Bonn, Germany, and just released a policy brief on agroforestry’s central role in governmental efforts to achieve their NDCs. Report coauthor Peter A. Minang took some time to explain how agroforestry’s contribution could be enhanced. Article published by Erik Hoffner Giovanni Ortolani for Mongabay: How is agroforestry represented in current NDC ambitions?Peter Minang: Agroforestry is largely represented as an integral part of climate smart agriculture and landscape restoration. More than 90% of countries cite agriculture as a key part of their NDCs. Moreover, tropical forest countries also cite agroforestry as integral to their strategies for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, as well as for sustainable intensification and ecological agriculture in areas adjacent to forests.Mongabay: What is the emission reduction potential of agroforestry?Peter Minang: Agroforestry currently covers about one billion hectares globally. We estimate that agroforestry is currently holding the equivalent of up to 20 years of emissions from deforestation (i.e. up to 34 petagrams of carbon or Pg C). This is perhaps the highest potential for carbon neutrality within the agricultural sector.Cacao agroforestry system in Sulawesi. Image courtesy World Agroforestry Centre Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Mongabay: How can agroforestry help farmers adapt to the impacts of climate change and greater climate variability?Peter Minang: Increasing ecosystem services, such as generating microclimates in communities, especially settlement areas; increasing water holding capacity; increasing soil carbon; and improved soil fertility and therefore food production, is probably the main opportunity. A combination of these services can make a big difference in high rainfall variability and semi-arid areas. The second major pathway to adaptation is through diversification and stability of incomes that accompanies the introduction of trees on farms. Trees are less affected by rainfall seasonality and therefore able to provide relatively consistent incomes and food sources which in turn makes farmers both less vulnerable and more resilient.Mongabay: What are the main challenges to agroforestry adoption?Peter Minang: Agroforestry is a highly knowledge dependent activity. Knowing the right tree, good quality germplasm and how to manage trees for best results is a major determinant of success. With agroforestry, the waiting period needed before beginning production is longer than that for annual crops which poses a major handicap. Investment requirements, in terms of both cash and time in the early years of planting, are also major challenges. Most farmers, especially those in developing countries, do not have the luxury of disposable income for the typical three-year waiting period. ICRAF and its partners are working to significantly reduce the time required through improved techniques intended to induce fruiting as early as possible. This might help solve a great deal of these challenges.Betel nut palm grove in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett Butler for MongabayMongabay: ICRAF’s recently release Policy Brief says that agroforestry takes on average 3–5 years before delivering benefits. How can financial institutions, governments, or the private sector help farmers during this early phase?Peter Minang: Creative blended finance approaches offer some solutions. The recognition that some public finance might be needed in the early phases to promote agroforestry is important. Such investments can be justified by the fact that agroforestry would help increase productivity and employment, as well as adaptation by people, and resilience in agroecosystems. Furthermore, public investments can de-risk investments in agroforestry at landscape scale, thereby allowing for impact investments or private sector engagement. We are currently experimenting with this kind of public investment approach in Cameroon through our Dryad project, which is showing very interesting early results.Mongabay: What are the knowledge demands of agroforestry, and how can farmers in the tropics know the right trees and crops for their land?Peter Minang: In times like these, when climate change effects are manifesting and affecting the growing niches of various tree species, farmers need to know what species best fit both current and future climatic conditions. To support farmers in this regard, ICRAF is engaging in promoting Rural Resource Centers (RRCs) in collaboration with national and local partners in different countries, including Cameroon and Ethiopia. The RRCs serve as the learning medium for farmers on appropriate technologies. ICRAF is also harnessing digital opportunities by developing apps that extend to a majority of farmers via their mobile phones. Recently ICRAF released the Africa Tree Finder app which helps farmers identify what trees could grow in their locality for a specified purpose. It is currently available in Kenya and Uganda and efforts to cover more countries is ongoing.In France, strip intercropping with trees. Image courtesy of AgForwardMongabay: What is the relationship between land tenure and agroforestry?Peter Minang: Given that agroforestry is a medium to long-term investment, clear land tenure is a requirement for any investment. Beyond land tenure is the need for unambiguous tree rights, that is the right to products and services from trees. Interestingly, in some places trees are also used as a means of securing the rights to land, especially where demonstrated first occupancy secures rights to land in traditional customary rules. Hence agroforestry, once established, can be an indicator of tenure stability compared to other annual crop-based land uses. This has the potential to make agroforestry attractive to investments if sufficiently de-risked.See Mongabay’s whole series on agroforestry here.Banner image: Rubber and coffee grown together in China. Photo by Rhett Butler for Mongabay. Adaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Agroforestry, Climate, Climate Change, climate finance, Conservation Technology, Rainforests AN INTERVIEW WITH PETER MINANGlast_img read more

Study: Vast swaths of lost tropical forest can still be brought back to life

first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Agriculture, Amazon, Amazon Rainforest, Biodiversity, carbon, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecological Restoration, Ecosystem Restoration, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forestry, Forests, Landscape Restoration, Plantations, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Reforestation, Restoration, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests A new study has once again emphasized the importance of restoring degraded tropical forests in the fight against climate change.Using high-resolution satellite imagery, the study identifies more than a million square kilometers (386,000 square miles) of lost tropical rainforest across the Americas, Africa and Southeast Asia as having high potential for restoration.The researchers say there’s no time to waste on reforestation efforts, but caution that the type of reforestation undertaken must be carefully considered.Countries such as China have increased their forest cover through the extensive planting of a single tree species, but studies have shown that monoculture tree plantations are inferior to natural forests when it comes to capturing carbon, hosting wildlife, and providing other ecosystem services. JAKARTA — The loss of tropical rainforests the world over is a major contributor to the global climate crisis. But that loss isn’t irreversible, according to a new study that has identified deforested areas spanning more than twice the size of California that can be brought back to life.The paper, published July 3 in the journal Science Advances, estimates there are more than a million square kilometers (386,000 square miles) of lost tropical rainforest across the Americas, Africa and Southeast Asia with high potential for restoration.“Restoring tropical forests is fundamental to the planet’s health, now and for generations to come,” said lead author Pedro Brancalion, from the University of São Paulo. “For the first time, our study helps governments, investors and others seeking to restore global tropical moist forests to determine precise locations where restoring forests is most viable, enduring and beneficial. Restoring forests is a must do — and it’s doable.”Reforesting these “restoration hotspots” would have the least cost and risk and at the same time bring the most benefits, such as carbon storage and biodiversity conservation, according to the researchers.“We were surprised at the large area of hotspots found across global rainforests, a total of 101 million hectares,” study co-author Robin Chazdon, from the University of Connecticut, told Mongabay. “This area is larger than the combined area of Sweden and Spain. And these areas are found in all continents and across dozens of countries.”The researchers used high-resolution satellite imagery and the latest peer-reviewed studies on four forest benefits — biodiversity, climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, and water security — and three aspects of restoration effort — cost, investment risk, and the likelihood of restored forests surviving into the future — to assess and “score” all tropical lands worldwide in 1-square-kilometer (0.4-square-mile) blocks that retained less than 90 percent of their forest cover.The researchers found that the top six countries with the highest mean score were all in Africa: Rwanda, Uganda, Burundi, Togo, South Sudan and Madagascar. That gives these countries the highest potential for feasibly achieving multiple restoration benefits.Chazdon said they scored highly because while most of them had lost tropical moist forests, they had high potential to recover biodiversity, carbon, and water resources through forest restoration efforts.“We were surprised to find such a concentration of highly ranked countries in a single continent,” she said. “The study really highlights the high potential for successful rainforest restoration outcomes in these African countries.”The five countries with the largest restoration hotspot by area are Brazil, Indonesia, India, Madagascar and Colombia.Another encouraging finding is that the majority of the restoration hotspots — 73 percent — were identified in countries that had committed to restore their rainforests by participating in the Bonn Challenge, a global initiative launched in 2011 that calls for 1.5 million square kilometers (579,000 square miles) of the world’s deforested and degraded land to be restored by 2020, and 3.5 million square kilometers (1.35 million square miles) by 2030.To date, 59 national governments, private associations and companies have made Bonn Challenge commitments to restore 1.7 million square kilometers (658,000 square miles) of forest.“It’s encouraging that so many hotspots are located in countries where restoring forests and landscapes is already a priority,” Brancalion said.Small-scale deforestation in the Colombian Amazon. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.No time to wasteChazdon said these hotspot countries should act quickly to restore their rainforests, given that more than half of the world’s tropical forests have already been lost or seriously damaged, and much of the remaining forest cover is under threat.“We need forests to protect watersheds, to mitigate climate change, and to conserve biodiversity,” she said. “As a result of forest loss and damage we are losing species that need forests, diminishing our water supplies, losing soil and productive land, reducing rainfall, and emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.”Despite various commitments to halt deforestation made by governments and businesses, forest loss remains a widespread problem in tropical countries. The tropics lost around 120,000 square kilometers (46,300 square miles) of tree cover last year, an area the size of Belgium, according to data from the University of Maryland.While this number is down from the previous two years, it’s still well above the 18-year average since data collection began in 2001. The tropics lost around 170,000 square kilometers (65,600 square miles) of forest cover in 2016, and 160,000 square kilometers (61,800 square miles) in 2017.Last year, deforestation in Earth’s biggest rainforest, the Brazilian Amazon, reached the highest level in a decade, spanning an area 134 times the size of Manhattan’s land mass.Things are only expected to get worse under the country’s new president, President Jair Bolsonaro. Since taking office at the start of 2019, the Bolsonaro administration has dismantled environmental protections and institutions by firing or not replacing top environment officials, loosening controls on economic exploitation of the Amazon, and halting the demarcation of indigenous lands.Environmentalists have expressed concern that Bolsonaro’s policies will clear the path for unchecked deforestation, with the rising deforestation rate primed to mark 2019 as one of the worst years for forest loss in recent memory.Thousands of animals call the Congo Basin home, including the critically endangered mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei), which lives only in high-altitude rainforests of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. Photo by John C. Cannon.Monoculture plantations vs. natural forests“If we don’t act now it will be too late, as climate change is already affecting forest functions and the opportunities for restoring and protecting forests will decrease dramatically,” Chazdon said.However, she added that restoration “involves far more than simply planting trees.”“One challenge is to define what reforestation can and should achieve, as it is not always focused on restoring ecosystems, enhancing rural livelihoods, or providing a broad range of ecosystem services,” she said.A broader approach of landscape-scale restoration has multiple benefits, such as reducing species extinctions, mitigating climate change effects, and promoting sustainable livelihoods.On the other hand, reforestation efforts that rely on establishing monoculture tree plantations — one species of tree planted across a wide area — have been shown to provide only limited benefits, and don’t last long enough to make a significant impact.China, for instance, managed to increase its tree cover by 32 percent by 2015 through its ambitious reforestation policies aimed to mitigate floods. But most of these reforestation efforts relied on simply planting one tree species. Critics say this approach doesn’t qualify as restoration, since monoculture plantations are often poor replacements for natural habitat and provide fewer ecological benefits.According to a 2010 study, agroforestry and tree plantations support 35 percent fewer species than primary forests, with many wildlife species only found in mature tropical forests.And even though monoculture tree plantations can be grown quickly, they tend not to survive for long. The longevity of timber plantations, for instance, is heavily dependent on shifting market demand for wood. These plantations can be abandoned if they’re seen as a bad investment and replaced with crops with higher economic value once they’re harvested.“Carbon is being stored in these systems, but many of these trees will not live for very long,” Chazdon said.And even if they do survive for a long time, their climate benefits are still paltry compared to natural forests, which studies have found to be 40 times more effective than plantations for storing carbon.Charlotte Wheeler, a forest researcher at the University of Edinburgh, said monoculture tree plantations couldn’t replace natural forests in mitigating climate change. She called natural forests “the only option that can realistically help mitigate climate change.”One of the major reasons plantations aren’t ideal for carbon storage is that regular harvest and clearing tends to release carbon dioxide every 10 to 20 years. However, natural forests, when left undisturbed, will continue to store the carbon in perpetuity.That said, monoculture tree plantations still have a role to play in reforestation efforts, according to Chazdon. In some places, establishing monoculture tree plantations may be the best option, such as in areas with poor conditions for natural regeneration, she said.“One of the feasibility layers in our study is a measure of the variability associated with biodiversity recovery through natural regeneration,” Chazdon said. “In areas with high variability (high uncertainty), plantations are a better investment and in areas where uncertainty is low, natural regeneration is a lower-cost approach.”Monoculture plantations, like timber plantations, can also contribute to forest conservation by sparing remaining natural forests from being logged or cleared for farming.“To maximize long-term success in reforestation, a variety of approaches are needed and it is important to consider the impact on rural people and involve them in the process,” Chazdon said. “There is a place for monoculture plantations, but they should not replace native ecosystems or be grown in areas that have a high potential for natural regeneration.”Brancalion said the new study could help inform policymakers and advanced forest restoration agendas, from setting targets on the size of restored areas to prioritizing where and how to restore.“With the tools we have developed, countries, companies and other actors who have pledged to restore forests have the precise information they need to roll up their sleeves and dive into the difficult work of bringing our forests back,” he said.“There are no shortcuts when it comes to forest restoration, but there is low-hanging fruit that we need to seize now, before it’s too late.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Banner image: Drained, cleared, and burned peat forest in Indonesian Borneo. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Casillas présent pour la reprise à Porto, deux mois après son infarctus

first_imgLe gardien international espagnol Iker Casillas s’est présenté lundi au centre d’entraînement du FC Porto pour la reprise de l’équipe première en vue de la saison 2019-2020, deux mois après avoir subi un infarctus mettant en doute la suite de sa carrière. “Retour au travail. Premier jour”, a écrit le joueur de 38 ans sur son compte Twitter, en légende d’une photo où il apparaît souriant à son arrivée au camp d’entraînement des “Dragons” à Olival. “Pour l’instant il ne peut pas encore s’entraîner, les médecins diront s’il faut attendre un, deux ou trois mois. On verra”, a toutefois déclaré son agent Carlo Cutropia, cité par le quotidien sportif de Porto O Jogo. Vuelta al trabajo. Primer día. @FCPorto pic.twitter.com/7NkmLRTfwz— Iker Casillas (@IkerCasillas) July 1, 2019 L’ancien portier du Real Madrid et de l’équipe d’Espagne a été hospitalisé puis opéré d’urgence le 1er mai, après un infarctus survenu à l’entraînement. Il a quitté l’hôpital cinq jours plus tard en avouant que son avenir professionnel était très incertain. “Je dois me reposer pendant deux semaines ou peut-être deux mois, je ne sais pas. En vérité cela m’est égal. L’important c’est d’être ici. (…) Je ne sais pas comment sera l’avenir”, avait alors déclaré l’emblématique gardien, figure du sport espagnol depuis le triplé historique Euro-Mondial-Euro réussi avec la “Roja” entre 2008 et 2012. Arrivé au FC Porto en 2015, Casillas avait prolongé en mars son contrat d’une saison, jusqu’en 2020, et le président du club du nord du Portugal et le président des Dragons Jorge Pinto da Costa lui avait fait part de sa volonté de le garder jusqu’à ses 40 ans. Partager LQ/AFPlast_img read more

La plainte pour viol contre Neymar classée sans suite au Brésil

first_imgLe 30 juillet, la police de Sao Paulo avait indiqué ne pas disposer “d’indices suffisants” pour engager des poursuites.L’attaquant vedette du Paris Saint-Germain est accusé par Najila Trindade Mendes de Sousa, une jeune mannequin brésilienne, de l’avoir violée le 15 mai dans un hôtel parisien.  Neymar se dit innocent et affirme que la relation qu’il a eue avec la jeune femme était consentie. Il dit être “tombé dans un piège” et son père a dénoncé des tentatives d’extorsion.L’attaquant de 27 ans a été interrogé le 13 juin dans un commissariat de police de Sao Paulo. Najila Trindade a été entendue à plusieurs reprises.Le joueur a par ailleurs été entendu par la police une première fois début juin pour avoir diffusé sur les réseaux sociaux une vidéo montrant des conversations et des images intimes avec Najila Trindade, et censée prouver son innocence.Neymar, le footballeur le plus cher de l’Histoire, arrivé de Barcelone au PSG à l’été 2017 pour la somme record de 222 millions d’euros, connaît une année compliquée également sur le plan sportif. Il a raté la Copa América remportée en juillet à domicile par le Brésil à cause d’une blessure et ne cache pas ses envies de départ du Paris SG.AFP Partager Une juge de Sao Paulo a décidé de classer sans suite la plainte pour viol visant Neymar, suivant ainsi les recommandations du parquet, a confirmé vendredi une porte-parole du tribunal de la métropole brésilienne.La magistrate Ana Paula Vieira de Moraes, du tribunal de Sao Paulo chargé des affaires de violence contre les femmes, “a accepté la recommandation du parquet”, émise jeudi pour manque de preuve. Elle a “demandé le classement de l’affaire”, a poursuivi cette porte-parole.“Nous avons décidé de demander le classement sans suite”, avait déclaré, jeudi, la procureure Flávia Merlini lors d’une conférence de presse. “Il est impossible de savoir ce qui s’est passé entre quatre murs. C’est la parole de (Neymar) contre celle de (son accusatrice), et nous ne disposons pas de preuves suffisantes pour une inculpation”, avait-elle poursuivi. “Le classement sans suite n’est pas une absolution”, a-t-elle ajouté, soulignant que l’enquête pouvait être rouverte à tout moment si de nouveaux éléments étaient apportés.last_img read more

Coupe de France : tous unis derrière leur «Titi»

first_imgLa réussite de la SSEP Hombourg-Haut, qui dispute son 8e tour de la Coupe de France contre Auxerre, ce samedi à Sarreguemines (15 h), est aussi celle de son coach, Thierry Steimetz.Un lien fort unit les joueurs de la SSEP Hombourg-Haut à leur entraîneur, Thierry Steimetz. Le 7e tour de la Coupe de France, le 17 novembre contre Forbach (1-0) , l’a démontré à deux reprises. Quand une friction éclatait entre l’ancien Amnévillois et un remplaçant forbachois, tout un groupe est venu prendre la défense de son coach. Et quelques secondes seulement après le coup de sifflet final, les héros du jour scandaient son nom avec leurs supporters. «Il est vraiment aimé», confirme l’arrière-droit Fahdi Redjam. «On sait ce qu’il a vécu. »Amputé d’une jambe en raison d’une tumeur au printemps 2017, Steimetz, passé par le centre de formation du RC Lens et le FC Metz, a mis un terme à sa carrière de joueur par la force des choses. Un peu plus d’un an plus tard, il est devenu l’entraîneur d’Hombourg-Haut, en Régional 3. «J’étais hors circuit, entre guillemets. Le président m’a contacté, je connaissais quelques personnes au club. J’ai pris le temps de la réflexion et je ne regrette pas mon choix», assure le natif de Creutzwald.«C’est un perfectionniste» Si la SSEP a manqué de peu la montée la saison dernière, son début de saison parfait rend hommage au travail effectué par Thierry Steimetz et ses hommes, qui n’ont connu que la victoire pour le moment, en championnat comme en coupe. Et si la bonne humeur prédomine dans ce petit coin de la Moselle, le technicien reste exigeant, à l’image de son coup de gueule passé à la mi-temps d’un match mal maîtrisé à Behren. «Il ne crie pas pour crier mais il arrive à nous remobiliser quand on n’écoute pas ses consignes», raconte le défenseur Khalid Benichou. «Il a un fort caractère, il sait ce qu’il veut et ce qu’il ne veut pas.»«Il est à fond dans ce qu’il fait», confirme Fahdi Redjam. «C’est un perfectionniste», estime pour sa part Hassan M’Barki, séduit par les méthodes d’entraînement prônées par le Lorrain de 36 ans. «Il adore le jeu et c’est plaisant. On sent qu’il était un joueur offensif (il rit).» «Je fais tout pour mettre mes joueurs dans les meilleures conditions», glisse Thierry Steimetz. «S’il y a de la joie dans le vestiaire et du plaisir sur le terrain, ça me suffit. Je ne peux plus jouer mais je le fais par procuration.»«Parfois, à voir son regard, j’ai l’impression que c’est lui qui va aller sur le terrain», plaisante Semir Louadj, qui admet que l’identité de l’entraîneur l’a conforté dans son choix de rejoindre Hombourg-Haut cet été. «Le fait que ce soit lui sur le banc a beaucoup joué. Il amène une certaine stabilité dans le vestiaire et il n’y a aucun favoritisme. J’aurais pu jouer en Allemagne ou plus haut mais je ne regrette pas d’avoir signé ici. »Ils sont plusieurs, dans l’effectif de la SSEP, à tenir le même discours. Ce samedi, en cas d’exploit contre Auxerre au 8e tour de la Coupe de France, il y a fort à parier que les premières pensées des «Spartiates» se tourneront vers leur entraîneur…Angelo Salami (Le Républicain Lorrain)Hombourg-Haut (R3) – Auxerre (L2), ce samedi à Sarreguemines (15 h). Partagerlast_img read more