DSME Workers Stage Strike Demanding Pay Increase

first_imgzoom Disgruntled workers of the South Korean shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) staged a four-hour strike on December 12 asking for a pay increase.The workers want a 3.81 percent hike in base salary, according to local media, which reported that only 5 percent of the 5,700 unionized workers joined the protest.The demand is contrary to DSME’s strategy moving forward, which envisages wage freezes and return of 10 pct of wages this year.The move is part of the shipbuilder’s efforts to cut cost as it scrambles to boost financial liquidity.The company has managed to reduce its debt through a major restructuring drive, which included considerable workforce cuts as well.There is no reason for optimism based on the expectations for 2018 either, as DMSE is likely to see a 31 percent drop in sales to KRW 7.86 trillion from KRW 11.37 trillion this year, according to the finance research firm FnGuide.Separately, DSME has dodged a major fine that could have reached up to USD 24.4 million.Namely, the Korean Supreme Court ruled on Monday in favor of DSME in a dispute with the Fair Trade Commission, dating back to 2013, which claimed that the shipbuilder underpaid subcontractors.The ruling paved the way for the shipbuilder to get back about KRW 30 billion (USD 2.7 million) in fines and interest, Yonhap news agency reported.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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HP recalls more laptops for fire and burn hazards

first_img 35 best battery life laptops Pavilion x360 circa May 2016. Josh Miller/CNET The US Product and Safety Commission on Tuesday announced a “battery safety” recall of about 78,500 HP laptops for what the UPSC calls “fire and burn hazards.” HP requested we emphasize that it’s recalling the batteries, not the laptops. Given that most batteries are nonremovable by end users, it amounts to the same thing on your end — you still have to ship your laptop off somewhere. However, it does mean that the company replaces the battery, not the entire laptop, so the distinction matters a lot to them. (Like cars getting recalled for faulty airbags.)HP initiated the recall in January 2018, and expanded it in January 2019, but the news hadn’t widely circulated because of the US government shutdown. The UPSC finally posted the news to its site on Tuesday with the explanation, “NOTE: This recall expansion was previously announced independently on Jan. 17, 2019 by the firm due to US government furlough.” (We spotted it via Tom’s Hardware.)This is part of a continuing series of battery recalls from HP. The Jan. 17 recall was for about 51,000 models, but 41,000 were recalled in June 2016 and 100,000 in January 2017, bringing the total for the past two-and-a-half years to almost a quarter of a million.The recall applies to laptops sold between April 2015 and December 2018. Per HP: Batteries affected by this program may have been shipped with specific HP Probook 64x (G2 and G3), HP ProBook 65x (G2 and G3), HP ProBook 4xx G4 (430, 440, 450, 455, and 470), HP x360 310 G2, HP ENVY M6, HP Pavilion x360, HP 11 notebook computers and HP ZBook (17 G3, 17 G4, and Studio G3) mobile workstations sold worldwide from December 2015 through April 2018. They were also sold as accessories or provided as replacements from December 2015 through December 2018 for the above products, as well as additional products through HP or an authorized HP Service Provider, including certain HP Mobile Thin Client products.  HP also warns, “It is essential to recheck your battery, even if you did so previously and were informed that it was not affected. However if you have already received a replacement battery, you are not affected by this expansion.” If you suspect your laptop qualifies — it doesn’t apply to every model sold within that period — you can download the validation utility from the recall page to check.  Updated 1:30 p.m. ET: Added clarification from HP. See all the best laptops of CES 2019 17:56 Laptops HP Tagscenter_img 2 Comments 37 Photos Now playing: Watch this: Share your voicelast_img read more

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Why could men be more at risk of diabetes

first_imgMen accumulate more iron than women, making them prone to Type 2 diabetes, researchers said. Two-fifth of men as compared to one-fifth of women were at risk.Iron is a micronutrient that is required in the formation of some essential body proteins and enzymes, like haemoglobin, cytochromes and peroxidase. However, it is harmful when stored in excess in the body. It promotes the release of free radicals that damage the secretion capacity of beta cells of pancreas to produce insulin.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIt also decreases insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues and organs involved in glucose metabolism, the study said.The study, led by Alex O Aregbesola from University of Eastern Finland, showed that men have 61 per cent higher prevalence and 46 per cent increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes when compared with women. Excess body iron accumulation is a known risk factor of Type 2 diabetes in hereditary hemochromatosis – a disorder that causes the body to absorb too much iron from the diet. However, the study showed that even mildly elevated body iron contributes to the prevalence and incidence of Type 2 diabetes. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThis excess iron was found to disturb the glucose metabolism in the body. On the other hand, moderate iron stores were found safer than depletion toward iron deficiency.Iron depletion toward deficiency did not offer protection against Type 2 diabetes.The type of association between iron stores and the risk of Type 2 diabetes showed that the risk was lowest on moderate levels, the researchers said.“This study provides a new body of evidence that mildly elevated body iron is an important risk factor of glucose metabolism derangement, which contributes to the increase in the prevalence and incidence of Type 2 diabetes,” Aregbesola said, in the paper published in the journal Annals of Clinical Biochemistry.last_img read more

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