Kapil Dev turns 60: Celebrating the man who changed Indian cricket forever

first_imgKapil Dev, one of India’s most successful captains, was born on this day 60 years ago. Kapil Dev was the captain of India’s first world cup-winning team in 1983, when they defeated West Indies in the final at Lord’s.Kapil Dev, one of the greatest all-rounder’s in the history of cricket, made his India debut on October 16 in the year 1978. A 19-year-old Kapil played his first Test match against arch-rivals Pakistan at Faisalabad. Kapil scored just 8 runs and picked up just 1 wicket as India drew the Test match.Kapil went on to represent India in 131 Test matches over a career spanning 16 years, in which time he took a total of 434 wickets at an average of 29.64 along with 23 five-wicket hauls. Kapil went onto to score 5248 runs in Tests, at an average of 31.05, including 8 hundreds and 27 fifties.In one day internationals as well, Kapil Dev amassed 3783 runs from 225 matches at an average of 23.79, including one hundred and 14 half-centuries. He also took a total of 253 wickets at an average of 27.45 and one five-wicket haul.Kapil Dev led India to their first World Cup triumph in England and his 175 against Zimbabwe is regarded as an all-time classic.Former skipper and teammate Sunil Gavaskar at the Agenda Aaj Tak in December 2018 said it was the greatest knock he had ever seen in one-day internationals.”That 175 is the greatest knock in ODI history I have seen as a player and as a commentator… I have never seen a better inning. The situation we were in…We were 17 for 5. It was cold and the ball was moving. It looked like we would be bowled out for 70 or 80..,” Sunil Gavaskar said.advertisementGavaskar also said that Kapil would have fetched the big bucks had he put his name for the Indian Premier League auction.”Kapil did not play any lofted drives till he reached 80. It was amazing to see him those sixes. He would have gone for Rs 25 crore in the IPL today,” Gavaskar said.”I think the bowling revolution was started by Kapil Dev. He showed everyone that pace bowling could survive in pitches in India as well. After him came the likes of Javagal Srinath, Venaktesh Pradesh and Zaheer khan. But it was Kapil Dev who started it all,” Sunil Gavaskar was quoted as saying recently.Kapil Dev, also speaking at Agenda Aaj Tak 2018, promised to follow the lead of Team India captain Virat Kohli down Oxford street shirtless if India win the World Cup in England 2019.”I will run shirtless if India win the World Cup. Just like Kohli said that he will run shirtless if India win, I will too,” Kapil Dev said at Agenda Aaj Tak 2018.”I can do anything for my country,” he said.Also Read | Kapil Dev on the perils of giving too much power to players: They will do what they feel likeAlso Read | Kapil Dev would have gone for Rs 25 crore in IPL auctions: Sunil GavaskarAlso Read | Just like Kohli, I will run shirtless if India win 2019 World Cup: Kapil Devlast_img read more

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6 Steps to Better Email Outreach

first_imgHere are six great, easy steps to improving your email outreach that Anne Holland presented at Marketing Sherpa’s Email Summit:Opt-ins – Make it easy for people to sign up to hear from your nonprofit right on your home page. Don’t make them have to hunt long and hard to find how to sign up, or go to through many steps and pages to do it.Welcome messages – Only half of folks Marketing Sherpa surveyed welcomed new sign-ups within 72 hours. You can stand out just by saying hi and starting a conversation once people do opt-in to hear from you.Transactional emails – People open them at much higher rates than anything else. Of course – they want their receipt or to track their stuff if they’ve bought something. So when you receipt (and I hope, thank) donors, you might consider putting in a bit of nice additional content. I wouldn’t ask for more money right then because donors are tired of that, though.Reputation – from AOL to Earthlink to Yahoo!, providers are sorting spam by the reputation of the organization sending the mail. Even though you’re a nice nonprofit, you might get blocked if you’ve had too many bounces or unsubscribes from your emails. So think about slashing your list so it’s just made up of people who really want to hear from you, and consider being more careful about sharing it with people who might spam your supporters.Design and rendering – Did you know half of all folks 25-54 have images blocked on email by default? Wow. And a high number of folks read all their email in preview panes. MAKE SURE your emails appear right. It turns out when people get an email with a funky layout or blocked images, many think it’s spam. Second, make sure that if your images are blocked, there is something interesting to read so you don’t lose people. Third, put what’s interesting at the top and at the left so people can see it in preview.Landing pages – Sherpa says they give you the best bang for your buck. So don’t just write great emails. If people click through, make sure the place they go is very compelling.last_img read more

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Synching your online & offline marketing

first_imgHere is today’s fundraising and marketing tip from Network for Good! You can sign up to receive them via email here.Online fundraising only makes up a portion of your overall marketing plan. It’s not a stand-alone initiative–it’s an integrated part of your communications strategy. Not only is your strategy multi-faceted, but your donors are too! Below, check out our tips for integrating your offline and online tactics to best reach your donors across all channels in your online plan: Offline Mailing Tips: •Ask your donors their preference. No, we’re not talking about pizza toppings or movie genres. Reach out to your donors and find out what communications and donation options they prefer. You may think the majority of your folks are strictly offline (or exclusively online). Don’t assume! Get to know them! •Send a cultivation mailer to your lapsed donors inviting them to visit your website. Direct them to a special page on your site that makes an appeal for why they should make another gift. Learn how to make this landing page compelling. •Use email to boost direct mail response. Remember: Your donors hang out in multiple channels, and you want to give them options. You can email your subscribers telling them to watch the mail, or wait for the call. You can also try following up a special appeal with an email, saying, “We hope you read our recent letter, just click here to make your donation online today. It’s convenient and saves us money.” The first renewal effort might be conducted by email, followed by the usual multi-letter series, and eventually a phone call. •Develop a program to gradually gather the e-mail addresses of direct-mail donors who want to add email to their communications with you. Test asks in the direct mail (P.S., buckslip, reply device, etc.) and track response to find the most effective and least expensive ways to gather e-mail addresses without depressing gift response. •Follow up with email. Email is the fastest and cheapest way to let your donors know what happened after they donated. If your donation appeal made the situation seem urgent, your donors will be left scratching their heads if they don’t hear anything else from you about it. •Create complementary content. Entice donors reading your printed communications to visit your website for “exclusive” content. Not sure what to offer? Maybe you have educational tips (“Download 10 tips for managing your diabetes!”) or other downloads of content people can’t get from a postcard or letter. Tips for Other Channels to Consider: •Events. Having a fundraising walk? Hosting an educational program? Create an email list sign-up sheet to capture in-person email opt-ins. •Marketing collateral. Craft your call to action on your brochures and handouts–and let that action have an online option! If you’re requesting donations, give potential donors the address/directions to donate online if they so choose. Remember: Include your website on everything you print/produce. •Business cards. In a previous article we advised building your email list in a variety of ways, including email opt-in information in your email signature. Next time you order business cards, why not include a small call to action? (Ex: Donate online at… Or, Visit our website to learn more…) •Phone calls. Did you just collect a donation over the phone? Does a donor want some follow up? Try this: After you finish a telemarketing call, tell the donor, “We’d like to send you a receipt to acknowledge your gift. The most efficient way is via e-mail – that way we don’t have to waste paper and postage.” (Thanks to the great Madeline Stanionis for this tip!)last_img read more

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From Beverly Hills to Homeless: What a story

first_imgA while back, through this blog, I met an extraordinary person. Mark Horvath used to be homeless, and now he does all kinds of amazing things, including blogging at Hardly Normal. Now he is onto a new project — documenting via video the stories of people in the situation he once knew all too well. Here is a story you must watch — one day an investment advisor, the next, homeless:Mark from invisible people on Vimeo.Mark not only has an incredible personal story, he also knows how to tell a story. These stark interviews with homeless people are riveting. If you’re an agency helping the homeless, I’d post them on your site and I’d reach out to Mark. If you’re a funder, I’d fund him. If you’re a nonprofit, I’d do as he does. Put a face on the problem — and the solution. Show, don’t tell.last_img read more

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Google’s Search Engine Optimization Starter Guide

first_imgCreate Unique, Accurate Page TitlesPage Titles Make Use of Free Webmaster ToolsGoogle Webmaster Tools Offer Quality Content and ServicesContent, Content and Content! Optimize Your Use of ImagesAlt Attribute for Images Use Heading Tags AppropriatelyHeading Tags Good Practices for Promoting Your WebsiteBlogging, Offline Promotion, Social Media, Blogger Outreach Make Your Site Easier to NavigateNavigation, Sitemaps Write Better Anchor TextAnchor Text Improve the Structure of Your URLsURL Structure The SEO Guide IncludesThe Algorithm Must Take Into Account Make Effective Use of Robots.txtRobots.txt Be Aware of rel=”nofollow” for LinksNofollow Attribute Make Use of the Meta “Description” TagMeta Description Tags Nonprofits often ask us, “What are some simple ways that I can improve my website’s performance in Google?” There are lots of possible answers to this question, and a wealth of search engine optimization information on the web, so much that it can be intimidating for  those unfamiliar with the topic. Google has just create a compact guide (PDF below) that lists some best practices that teams organizations can follow that could improve their sites’ crawlability and indexing.From Google:Our Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Starter Guide covers around a dozen common areas that webmasters might consider optimizing. We felt that these areas (like improving title and description meta tags, URL structure, site navigation, content creation, anchor text, and more) would apply to webmasters of all experience levels and sites of all sizes and types. Throughout the guide, we also worked in many illustrations, pitfalls to avoid, and links to other resources that help expand our explanation of the topics. We plan on updating the guide at regular intervals with new optimization suggestions and to keep the technical advice current.So, the next time we get the question, “I’m new to SEO, how do I improve my site?”, we can say, “Well, here’s a list of best practices that we use inside Google that you might want to check out.”Working backwards from this guide, we can easily develop a list of exactly what Google’s algorithm takes into account.This table below, developed by Josh Nelson a blogger for the Hatcher Group, does just that, linking to appropriate resources. Take Advantage of Web Analytics ServicesGoogle Analyticslast_img read more

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The totally annoying, often wonderful lack of control you have in the social web

first_imgI’m reading Dave Evans new book, Social Media Marketing in an Hour a Day. It’s excellent. Even though I consider myself somewhat knowledgeable in social media, and even do trainings on the topic, there is so much I’m learning. I highly recommend it, for everyone from beginners to intermediate social media folks. I also recommend Allison Fine’s book (“Momentum”) if you want more of the background on the social web.Here’s a key point Dave makes far more eloquently than I ever have: “You’ve got to give up control in order to gain a presence in the conversations that matter.”What he means is, you can’t control the conversation online. And that conversation REALLY matters. To be a part of it, you have to cede control and listen, then participate. And you have to do so honestly. Because disclosing who you are is key to building trust.I say this all the time, less succinctly, but I’ll admit this is easier said than done. When you experience this lack of control, it is not fun or easy. It’s often irritating. But you have to do as he says, and over time, you’ll appreciate the experience and its value.I’ll give you a personal example. A few days ago, you may have read my post, The Perils of the Pre-Ask. My point was as a marketer, you should always ask directly for something. You should not just talk about yourself or have “awareness” as your goal — you should always be focused on getting someone to act in some way. It got picked up in a few places. Peter Panepento of the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s Prospecting Blog interpreted my post this way: that you should always ask people for money. Then a bunch of people understandably assumed this is what I was saying and that I don’t believe in cultivating relationships or asking for something other than money. This killed me, since I’m constantly telling folks NOT to treat donors like ATM machines. It was painful. It was annoying. I wanted to yell at Peter for starting the whole thing (sorry Peter, I’m your fan, but I’m just being honest and holding myself up as a case study.) But I didn’t. Because that would be wrong. He was taking my premise, riffing on it and generating a conversation, and that’s what blogging is about. Kivi picked up Peter’s pickup, adding her own comments, which made me happier.This is CONVERSATION.So I went onto Peter’s blog, identifying myself clearly, thanking the commenters, agreeing with some of their key points, and explaining the interpretation of my post was not what I was trying to say. (Sadly, I did this a day late because I’m behind on my day job, so that’s not best practice, but better late than never.)I also sent Peter an email personally (because I know him) and said thank you for the post — and clarified my point.Now I’m continuing the conversation here.That’s social media. I’m a participant, just like anyone else. So “all” I can do is to participate.The good news, while that being “just” a participant can feel powerless, it’s quite powerful. Honestly and directly and openly being a participant can have a really good outcome. Beth Kanter recently shared another example of this that I experienced. It’s a good read. Actually, everything Beth writes is good. So read her blog regularly if you don’t already.The moral of the story? Participate, in the good and the bad, openly. It’s powerful stuff. If you listen, you learn. Those folks have much to teach you, and much to share. And while it feels dangerous at times, it’s more dangerous not to participate. As Dave says:“On the social web, your absence is conspicuous. Failing to participate retards the advancement of trust. In fact, it can increase the likelihood of mistrust.”last_img read more

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Diversify Your Fundraising Channels to Build a Financially Healthy Organization

first_imgDownload the free MP3 audio and text transcripts below!Knowing where the money comes from to run your nonprofit is almost as important as understanding how these sources affect the sustainability of your organization. Do you have a firm grasp on your fundraising channels? Would you like to build on this revenue, even during tough economic times?In this presentation, Cindy Adams of GrantStation shares:How and why to assess your existing revenue streamsWays to boost your bottom line by building on what you already haveBest practices to developing a funding planWhere to find a few quick and practical assessment tools to ground your workAbout our speakerCynthia Adams has been a fundraiser for over 35 years. Working directly for nonprofits and as a fundraising consultant, Cindy specializes in building bridges between funders and grantseekers. She strongly believes that successful grantseeking requires a thorough understanding of the funders and sound knowledge of the playing field. Her life’s work has been to level that playing field, creating an opportunity for all nonprofit organizations to access the wealth of grant opportunities across the United States. GrantStation was conceived from this basic philosophy.last_img read more

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8 Benefits of Having a Nonprofit Blog

first_imgBlogs can help your supporters and potential supporters get to know and trust you.As important as branding is in marketing your organization, it is also important to step out from behind your brand, and show your supporters and potential supporters that there are real people, like them, running your organization. In an overly branded world, people are looking for ways to figure out who to trust. The personal, human tone of a blog can help.Blogs facilitate conversations with supporters and potential supporters.In my book, there are two things all blogs must have: a way to subscribe and comments. Now, I know that many organizations have a fear of being overrun with negative comments.Thing is, if you want to build relationships through your blog, you have to have conversations. Think of the comment area of your blog like a cocktail party. There are going to be superficial commenters, sad commenters, funny commenters, deep commenters, thoughtful commenters, commenters you don’t agree with, and once in a while, commenters you need to ask to leave.For now, just worry about getting people to come to your party, not how to throw them out.Blogs can be fun!When choosing who is going to blog for your organization, please don’t assign it to someone who looks at it as another thing to check off of their to-do list. Writing for a blog is a creative and social experience. It involves not only writing posts, but also reading and commenting on other blogs. Again, it’s like going to a party, and no one wants to chat with the person at the party who’d rather not be there ’cause they were forced to attend. Should all nonprofits have a blog?  Nope.Can having a blog benefit your organization? Yup.Below are eight benefits of having a nonprofit blog.Blogs help provide quick, up to the minute news about your organization and cause.If you’ve worked for a nonprofit, you know how painfully long it can take to put together a newsletter. Blog posts, on the other hand, can be written in 15-30 minutes. Not only can you share organizational news as it happens, you can also comment on how breaking news in the world relates to your cause, or organization.Tip: If you’re going to use your blog as a regular communication tool, please allow readers to subscribe by email as well as rss. Many, many people do not know how to subscribe by rss. Use a service like Feedblitz or Feedburner Email to facilitate readers’ subscribing by email.Blogs can help you work faster.Just because you have a blog, doesn’t mean you should stop having an e-newsletter, or print newsletter. In fact, it can help provide content for both. If you’ve been posting on your organization’s blog regularly, you’ll have lots of content to pull from when you sit down to write your newsletter. If you’re writing an e-newsletter, you can point back to the original blog posts, which will also drive traffic back to your organization’s website.Blogs can help you reach more people.It’s been said that people need to see an advertisement seven times before they will buy. Below are eight ways someone might read one of your blog posts more than once:As the original post on your blog.As an excerpt in your e-newsletter, and clicking through to read the rest.As a mention in your Twitter feed, and clicking through to read the rest.As an excerpt on your Facebook feed, and clicking through to read the rest.When someone emails it to them.When someone shares it with them using an AddThis like button on the bottom of the post.When they find it saved by someone on a social bookmarking site like del.icio.us, StumbleUpon or DiggWhen another blogger links to it on their blog. Blogs can increase the search ranking of your website.Search engines like sites that update their content regularly and have lots of incoming links; consequently, they like blogs!For more information about nonprofits, blogs and SEO (Search Engine Optimization) check out Organic Non-Profit SEO, The Nonprofit SEO Guide, Blogs and Search Engine Optimization, and 2009 NTC Preview: Kevin Lee on Search Engine OptimizationBlogs can give you the press you seek.Rather than crossing your fingers that a reporter will cover a story about your work, blogs can help you create your own coverage. For example, Community United Against Violence used a blog to cover the trial of men accused of murdering Gwen Araujo, a woman they killed after they discovered that she was biologically male. CUAV’s blog eventually drew media attention to the trial when the blog was covered by the news.Also, if you are writing about the same topics repeatedly on your blog, when a reporter is searching online for an expert on your issue, your posts may come up at the top of their search results.center_img Source: BlogHer; BlogHer Contributing Editor, Britt Bravo, also blogs at Have Fun * Do Good and is a Big Vision Consultant.last_img read more

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Four essential tweaks to your appeals in a recession

first_imgThe Chronicle of Philanthropy today said the nation’s biggest charities are forecasting a 9 percent decline in giving this year – the biggest drop since the publication started tracking private donations in the early 90s. In an interview with the radio program Marketplace, publisher Stacy Palmer said it’s affecting how nonprofits ask for money:One of the things most nonprofits are very aware of is that some people don’t have jobs and they can’t appeal to them, so they’re focusing on the people who are affluent still and who still have money to give. They’re very careful to not make a pitch to somebody who can’t afford to give.I’m not sure that’s the case for most nonprofits – or if it is, it applies only to major donors, which is one circumstance in which a nonprofit may have intimate knowledge of a donor’s circumstances. Most nonprofits are unlikely to know who among their supporters has a job.In fact, the Chronicle on its website suggests as much (registration required to view article). Apparently most of fundraising is as aggressive as ever:The push to be more aggressive in seeking donations continues. The biggest charities are stepping up their efforts to solicit individuals, trying to explain more clearly why they need money, focusing on donors who have stopped giving, experimenting with new methods of online fund raising, and putting more time and effort into securing planned gifts. Charities are also reorganizing their fund-raising departments, sometimes because they have been forced to lay off employees. They are encouraging fund raisers to share responsibilities and work more closely with people in different departments.Here’s my take: you cannot possibly know the economic circumstances of all your individual donors – though hopefully you’re aware of the status of your biggest donors. And you can’t stop asking for money entirely. So what are you supposed to do? Ask, but with four things in mind:1. Empathy is appropriate. Acknowledge times are hard – for everyone – right now. If a donor can’t give, they’ll appreciate you understand this.2. Show you are tightening your belt. Describe every step your organization has taken to tighten your belt and operate as efficiently as possible this year.3. Demonstrate that all donations count. Because you’re stretching every dollar, make the point that every donation helps more than ever this year – whatever the size of the donation.4. Show impact. Thank your donors profusely for their past help and explain in tangible, vivid terms how their donations have made a big difference. And then do it again and again and again. Donors usually don’t stop giving because they don’t have money. They usually stop giving because of a surfeit of appeals and a shortage of thanks. Show donors that they are making good things happen – and give them credit for every piece of good news you have about your programs.A last point: if you have to reorganize your fundraising department or merge departments because of downsizing – something the Chronicle suggests is prevalent – look at this as an opportunity. It’s a chance to show you’re focused on efficiency and it’s also a great way to get rid of siloes where they should not have existed (ie, between marketing and development). Tough times can hold good lessons. Let them make you a better fundraiser.last_img read more

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America’s Giving Challenge – why to do it and how to do it

first_imgJust a few minutes ago, the Case Foundation, Causes and PARADE kicked off the 2009 America’s Giving Challenge, a 30-day, national online competition that enables people to leverage their online and offline personal networks to build communities (“causes”) that raise money and recruit support for a nonprofit. These causes will compete to win cash awards, funded by the Case Foundation, that will total $170,000. There will be daily and overall awards for the top fundraisers. America’s Giving Challenge will be hosted by Causes through its application on Facebook. In addition, PARADE Publications will help launch the Challenge with cover story about the importance of giving by actor Matt Damon.As a partner of the Case Foundation and Causes, Network for Good (where I work) is the processing donations for the challenge.So I’m biased. But I like these challenges, and I’ll tell you why. In my experience with last year’s challenge and similar efforts at our site Six Degrees, I find they are worth your time because they provide:1. A good reason to experiment with social networking. It’s easier to sell an online experiment internally when there are matching grants and exposure at stake. If you’ve been encountering internal resistance to social networking, this may be something that gets naysayers more interested.2. Something measurable. By nature this kind of campaign is well-defined in scope with clear goals and measures of success. Those all happen to be key components of strong online initiatives.3. A way to harness the power of your supporters. Your biggest fans will enjoy a new way to champion your cause – spreading the word on social networks so you can win matching grants. Put your message in the hands of your best messengers – the people who love your cause and quite naturally enjoy recruiting others to it.4. A strong reason to give. I always say you need to answer four questions to get people to give money: why me? what for? why now? and who says? This kind of campaign answers all four well. You are proving relevance (why me) by putting your appeal in the hands of champions spreading the word among friends and family on Facebook. You’re answering what for and why now with the matching gift — donors dollars can go further if enough people give. This kind of campaign provides a great sense of urgency. And most powerfully, it answers who says — by asking your supporters to ask their friends for help, you gain powerful and persuasive third-party endorsement.So consider doing it – especially if you have staff, volunteers or supporters who are wildly enthusiastic about this kind of thing, which does take energy. From now until November 6 at 3:00 p.m. EST, participants will have the opportunity to compete for daily and overall awards – ranging from $500 to $50,000 – based on the number of donations to their cause using the Causes application on Facebook. Nonprofit organizations and individuals who wish to participate in the Challenge can get involved in one of two ways:1. Champion a cause – Individuals can become “cause champions,” individuals who are passionate about a specific cause and will compete to obtain the most donations for their cause through the Causes application on Facebook.2. Promote, donate or join a cause – all individuals are encouraged to take part in America’s Giving Challenge by joining, promoting and donating to the causes they care about. Facebook membership is not required to donate to a Giving Challenge cause.If you do give it a try, here are some tips:1. The more personal the messaging, the better.2. Donate yourself. It’s not inspiring to see zero donations on a cause when you’re asking others to give.3. Post links everywhere – on your site, blog, email signature, etc.4. Send a link to alll the people you know on Facebook and in your email address book.5. Ask others with a following to help. Go to technorati.com and search for blogs that are focused on your issue. Tell bloggers about your campaign and ask them to post on your efforts. They have a circle of active readers who are likely to care about your cause. Talk to Facebook groups that support your cause. Keep widening your circle of influence by co-opting those with their own followings.6. UPDATE: Don’t forget to focus on the people, not the money. It’s about relationships at the end of the day. More on this from Joe at Causes.More tips and training are here.Finally, here is some parting inspiration from last year’s winner – who proves offline tactics help, too:“Winning America’s Giving Challenge [2008] has energized the staff, the board, and thousands of members and friends of Engineers Without Borders – USA. The Giving Challenge inspired so many people to give – from the student members who handed out flyers in their college towns telling people how to make a donation online to the board members and staff who e-blasted their entire address books – all in just 9 days from when we first read about the Challenge in Parade Magazine.”-Heidi Dormody, Director of Development for EWB-USA, which raised $67,867 from 2,979 unique donors.Good luck!last_img read more

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The one-word secret to great relationships – and great marketing

first_imgAnswer? Gratitude.What if your annual report were a Gratitude Report? What if you told stories about what your supporters did rather than trumpeting what you did?It might look like this. This is a real masterpiece of gratitude. And it inspires generosity.How do you tap your inner generous spirit? Here’s your checklist.1. Give away: Give away everything you can and it will pay off. For example, at Network for Good, we give away free training, free newsletters and free fundraising and marketing tips. Our sales and customer service staff give generously of their time, never rushing someone off the phone. This makes quite a few people love us – and they go on to buy, recommend or evangelize our paid services. Which pays off in the long run. If we tried to nickel and dime nonprofits, they would not feel the same way and we’d have fewer funds in the long run. Keep this approach in mind if you’re a membership or services organization.2. Give thanks. Spend a lot more time thanking donors and reporting on their impact than asking them for more money. Make them feel treasured rather than going after their treasures. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: the number one reason donors quit supporting an organization is how they were treated by the organization. They hate too many appeals, not enough thanks and a lack of information on impact.3. Give credit. It’s not enough to be grateful. Give your donors the credit for everything you do. Don’t say, “with your donation, we did xyz;” say, “you did xyz.” Don’t say “we’re so great,” say “you’re so great.” Tell your donors they are doing good works every day of the week through their support of you. This turns donors into owners of your mission, and you can’t get more powerful than that. Pride Foundation – great job in showing how this is done.last_img read more

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Maternal Health Advocacy Guide for Parliamentarians

first_imgPosted on January 27, 2011November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In order to improve maternal health, medical professionals and NGO workers need to engage with government officials, including elected representatives. Many approaches for parliamentarians and other elected officials are outlined in “Maternal Health: An Advocacy Guide for Parliamentarians,” a recent publication from the Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (AFPPD). The publication:pinpoints the challenges in advocating for and providing adequate maternal health. It highlights the decisive role that parliamentarians can play in addressing these challenges. Its primary purpose is to provide guidance and orientation on how to improve maternal and newborn health. Its primary target audience, parliamentarians and other elected representatives, will find it very useful for advocacy purposes and awareness generation in the area of maternal health.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Senior Management Specialist at FIGO

first_imgPosted on February 3, 2011November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)IMPROVING MATERNAL AND NEWBORN HEALTH IN LOW-RESOURCE COUNTRIES THROUGH STRENGTHENING THE ROLE OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS Senior Management Specialist (International Health Programme)FIGO received a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to lead an initiative to improve Maternal and Newborn Health in low and middle resource countries. The initiative aims to strengthen the leadership, advocacy and organisational capacity of selected FIGO member national professional organisations and is being undertaken initially in eight FIGO member associations in Africa and Asia.In connection with this initiative, FIGO is seeking to recruit a highly qualified London based Senior Management Specialist.The selected individual will assume following responsibilities:To directly support, in-country, the Member Associations’ implementation of specific activities of the project from the agreed work plans.To provide direct support to the Member Association in the documentation of the project and the development of reports of the outputs and the outcomes from implemented activities to FIGO and the M&E consultants.To provide one-to-one coaching, small group training workshops and technical assistance for the participating member associations in the following:Governance: To include the development of strategic plans and implementation, constitution, by-laws, minutes, action plans, implementation strategies and reporting mechanisms.Leadership: Leadership models, committee skills, communication skills, negotiation skills, facilitating skills, conflict resolution skills, gender equality.Management, including project/programme management: Log frames, work plans, roles and responsibilities, appraisal skills, performance management, understanding monitoring & evaluation, filing systems.Financial management: Financial planning, annual budgets, policy manuals, financial probity, external audit, fund raising including membership fees, external grant writing, accessing government support, in-kind contributions, charitable donations, investments.Human Resources: Recruitment procedures, job description, advertisements, pension/benefits, policy manuals, performance reviews, skills enhancement/ training.Communication/IT: Paper and IT based systems for internal and external communication, newsletters, media training, advocacy training.To facilitate the identification of national and regional consultants who may be able to provide technical assistance and discuss these suggestions with the Project Director.The successful candidate will have the following:A relevant university degree, or equivalent qualification or expertise in a health related setting (Master level or above is required)Demonstrated experience in project management, implementation, monitoring and evaluation tools, development of workplans, budgets and proposal writingAbility to train individuals and organizations in the above mentioned skillsPrevious experience in working and coordinating with the UN, NGOs or government agenciesFluency in Portuguese or French would be desirableThe fixed-term full-time position will be based in central London. The appointee will also be required to spend significant periods of time in Africa or AsiaSalary will be by negotiation based on experienceFurther information, together with detailed job descriptions, may be found on the FIGO website at http://www.figo.orgApplications in writing – including a full CV – should be submitted by no later than on Friday, the 11th of February 2011 to:Professor David TaylorFIGO, FIGO HouseSuite 3 – Waterloo Court10 Theed StreetLondon SE1 8STE-mail: figo@figo.orgInternational Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics is a UK Registered charity –(No 1113263; Company No 5498067) and is an equal opportunities employerThis job description is also available for download as a Word documentShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Street Protests Demanding Maternal Health in Uganda

first_imgPosted on June 24, 2011June 19, 2017By: Tim Thomas, Senior Advisor, MHTFClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our Young Champions of Maternal Health program helped the MHTF expand its network of likeminded initiatives around the world, most notably through the community of Ashoka Fellows with whom each Young Champion was paired.One of those pairings has yielded news from Joyce Fertility Support Centre in Uganda, run by Ashoka Fellow Rita Sembuya, an initiative in Uganda that shares the MHTF mandate to eradicate preventive maternal mortality in our lifetimes. Faatimaa Amhadi traveled from Iran to work with Rita during her Young Championship.The Young Champions program has ended, but we continue to hear from Rita and her colleagues, most recently regarding a coaltion they are leading in a campaign to “End Maternal Mortality Now in Uganda.” Following is an excerpt from an email received today from Joyce Fertility and an article from the Ugandan Daily Monitor:This year, Uganda’s Constitutional Court heard a historic petition that could finally help address this crisis. It is Petition Number 16 of 2011—a case that draws on the tragic deaths of two pregnant women in Arua in 2010 and Mityana in 2009. Petition Number 16 of 2011 argues that the Government’s non-provision of essential services for pregnant women and their newborns violates the fundamental obligation of the country to uphold the Constitution to defend, protect and promote the right to health and the right to life.This activity took place on Friday May 27 in Kampala where the petition was heard in the constitutional court. Also in the districts of Arua and Mityana (these are up-country districts) where recent cases of maternal death had just happened. People stormed the streets, marching to show interest in the petition.We are fighting for what we deserve as Ugandans, a decision by Constitutional Court that may force the Government to immediately address the crisis of maternal mortality. In supporting this campaign, we are honoring the lives of those mothers we have lost at the time of giving births and saying, no more maternal deaths.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Weekend Reading

first_imgPosted on September 2, 2011November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This week on the MHTF blog:What to do after 2015?Antenatal and postnatal care as a way to address family planning?New estimates of neonatal mortalityAn update on knowledge translation from ICDDR,BSome reading for the weekendBeing born an African babyBiometric identifiers and poverty reduction in IndiaUsing family planning to help AfghanistanTechnology and innovation in global public healthShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Buzz Meeting: Is There a Maternal Health Movement?

first_imgPosted on October 4, 2011June 19, 2017By: Janna Oberdorf, Director of Communications and Outreach, Women DeliverClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)I was incredibly lucky and honored to participate in the Maternal Health Task Force Buzz Meeting today with a room full of professional researchers, advocates, and maternal health experts from around the world. The day was interesting, educational, and challenging all at the same time, and I feel like I left with a lot of difficult questions to answer in my own work and to bring back to my organization.One of the biggest and most contentious questions posed during the day’s discussion was: “Is There a Maternal Health Movement?” Jeremy Shiffman, associate professor of Public Administration and Policy at American University, laid out a clear and concise answer from his perspective: No. According to Professor Shiffman, grassroots mobilization and action, an element that he defines as essential and at the core of a “movement,” is missing from the maternal health work and community. Unlike other movements, including HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, or the Arab Spring, the maternal health community is still weak in engaging grassroots-level action, according to Professor Shiffman.I agree that the maternal health community has a long way to go in mobilizing the women and the families on the ground who are truly affected by maternal mortality and morbidities. But, I am perhaps more optimistic than Professor Shiffman. I see the seeds that have been planted – though I know that it will take time, effort, and care to grow those seeds into action. Much of today’s discussion focused on the fact that there has been a “top-down” push for maternal health instead of “bottom-up” – a criticism of global advocacy. What I am hoping for, and what I think we need to work towards, is a sandwiching of advocacy and activism for better health for girls and women around the world. Let’s refocus from top and bottom, and start to focus on a push from both sides.Additionally, much of today’s discussion was around whether we need a maternal health movement? What constitutes a movement and what doesn’t? What would and should a maternal health movement look like? Should it mimic the HIV/AIDS movement or have an identity all its own? How can we encourage a movement in countries where women are disenfranchised, poor, illiterate, and/or marginalized? To me, all of these questions are missing the point.However you want to define a “movement,” and whether you think it’s happening right now or might happen in the future, I feel like we would all agree to a few key points:We need to raise awareness about maternal health and quality of care within communities and to educate the women who are vulnerable to maternal mortality and morbidity to seek proper care.By raising the awareness among women, their families, and their communities, the goal is for them to seek quality care and understand that maternal deaths aren’t normal, aren’t right, and aren’t something everyone should just expect to happen based on the flip of coin.When women and communities understand the components of the continuum of care and a healthy pregnancy and childbirth, and if they don’t receive the care they seek, they should push their governments to action and hold them accountable.To me, this is the point. We need women on the ground to understand maternal health, to seek maternal health services and information, to understand that maternal deaths are not a necessary evil, and to hold their governments accountable when they are denied such services. Call it movement… call it grassroots advocacy… call it activism… call it what you will. The goal is the same. And we need to encourage this type of action.At Women Deliver, we’ve been pushing for a global response to maternal mortality in the form of political will and financial investment in MDG5. And over the last few years, we’ve had some success in getting on the political agenda and in having promises and commitments made to maternal health. But we need to focus on the sandwich – we need women, families, and communities on the ground to push for improved health services for girls and women in their nations while continuing to put pressure on global actors to meet their commitments. It doesn’t matter to me if you call it a movement or if it goes down in the history books as one, but I think we’d all agree that there needs to be a push from both sides to have sustainable progress on issues that affect girls’ and women’s health.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Maternal Health Dialogue Series Report Available

first_imgPosted on December 21, 2011November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Over the past two years, the Woodrow Wilson Center has convened a number of public and private focusing on neglected issues in maternal health and strategies to move the maternal health agenda forward.A synthesis report is now available from the Wilson Center that offers a summary and analysis of the meetings:The 2009–2010 Advancing Dialogue on Maternal Health series worked to address many critical and neglected maternal health topics. During this period, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars’ Global Health Initiative (GHI) co-convened 10 public meetings and 2 private workshops with the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to identify challenges and discuss strategies for advancing the maternal health agenda.This brief captures, analyzes, and synthesizes the strategies and recommendations emerging from the dialogue series that took place with the global maternal health community in Washington, DC, USA, and also with the in-country partner APHRC headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya. The findings and recommendations are organized aroundthree major themes for improving maternal health.Read the full report here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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The MHTF Celebrates International Women’s Day

first_imgIn the ‘tweets’ here, you can learn about the work that organizations are doing to…train the next generation of maternal health professionals,improve the quality of maternal health care in high burden countries,expand access to emerging knowledge and evidence in maternal health,strengthen maternal health leadership and technical capacity, andencourage innovation to improve maternal health globally.We invite you to get involved! Learn more about these exciting efforts to improve maternal health by reading the ‘tweets’ below and clicking on the links shared by the organizations. Posted on March 8, 2012November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Maternal Health Task Force serves as a global platform to bring together the efforts of organizations working to improve the health of women around the world. On International Women’s Day, it is an honor for us to showcase the innovative work and inspiring efforts of some of the organizations working to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity around the world. Help us to recognize their work by ‘retweeting’!Share this: On behalf of families around the world, we recognize the women and men who are working to improve the health of women globally. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Induced Abortion, Pregnancy Loss and Domestic Violence

first_imgStockl et al. write:The results of this study clearly show that physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence is a more important factor in understanding induced abortion and pregnancy loss than women’s age, most socio-economic status variables and number of live born children. The significant association between induced abortion and sexual intimate partner violence, in conjunction with most induced abortions undertaken in Tanzania being illegal and therefore likely to be unsafe, suggests that sexual intimate partner violence may have serious reproductive health implications for women beyond significant psychological distress… The findings suggest that preventing physical and sexual intimate partner violence has potential to improve maternal health and pregnancy outcomes.Share this: This study provides previously unavailable population-level data on induced abortion and pregnancy loss and its association with intimate partner violence among representative samples of Tanzanian women. Its findings have implications for future research and service planning, since few studies and maternal health and family planning services currently consider intimate partner violence as an important contributing factor for pregnancy loss. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 6, 2012August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)A new paper, published this week in BMC Public Health, explores the relationship between pregnancy loss and domestic violence in Tanzania, finding that intimate partner violence may also lead to poorer reproductive health outcomes for women.last_img read more

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Inbound Marketing Tips from Dharmesh Shah

first_imgI spoke at Artez Interactive DC today (#artezDC on Twitter if you want to check out the highlights) and while there, I got to hear Dharmesh Shah talk about his new book, Inbound Marketing. Dharmesh founded HubSpot and Website Grader. He calls himself a hackrepreneur. (Full disclosure, we use HubSpot at Network for Good and I was given a free copy of his book today. I am a fan.)Here’s what he had to say: “You have a moral obligation to say to yourself, what am I great at, and how do I use new tools to be a superpower at inbound marketing.”• We walk around in bubbles, isolating ourselves from marketing messages. We screen calls, don’t open mail, etc. That means the outbound model of marketing – ie, pushing messages out to an audience – gets screened out. Consequently, it’s an increasingly expensive way to get to people.• The better way is to pull in the people who are looking for what you have. You can do that by pulling people in with creativity, not cash.• So how do you get found? You look where people (and you) live – Google, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, foursquare, Yahoo! Answers, etc. Your website is your home base where you ultimately engaged people – it’s your center of gravity that takes the relationship you form at these online outposts and takes it to the next step.• As ye SEO, so shall ye reap. Optimizing your website for search (search engine optimization) is essential. It gets you off of the paid traffic morphine drip. More people, less expensive results. Keep in mind the Google ranking algorithm – f(n): Context + Authority (which is the number of links and the power of those of links). By FAR the most weight given by Google goes to authority, so pursue those links! Get people to link to you! The longer your website is around, the better – so start a website NOW, even if it’s not great. These are keys to getting on the first page of Google results and therefore to SEO. Check how you’re doing using his Website Grader. That shows how you’re doing in all of these areas.• Build a blog following: Even if no one on your team can really write and you don’t write often. (This is the one area I don’t think I agree with him – if you have no time and can’t blog regularly or tell good stories, and you have a horrible blog no one reads, you may be better off using that time to engage with bloggers with a following. But we measure success differently – I’m looking at donor relationships, he’s focused on SEO.) He feels like it pays off because people care and want to hear the stories on your blog, even if they are not frequent and old. He says Google likes it – it helps rankings and drives more visitors and links over time. Experiment with different kinds of content. He’s experimented with audio, video, cartoons and how-to focused on his message, because it’s sometimes surprising what format resonates most. For example, cartoons are their best content – it brings in more people than well-researched articles. He said it also works well to take a stand. A strong point of view works best – not a crafted, protected message. There is usually bigger perceived risk than real risk to breaking out and getting attention by taking a stand.• Create content that is hot: You need to ask yourself, am I getting out things that could actually get spread and go big? You’ll fail if you don’t at least try to do this.• Social media: The value of social currency and capital is huge. That’s why social media is worth our attention – injecting our cause into online social relationships is powerful. • Twitter: Even normal people use Twitter now. His twitter.grader.com tool to measure your relative authority. The basics are: bio in profile (76% don’t bother to do this! Yikes!), have an Avatar, put up your background, etc. Then say meaningful, useful things – which too many people on Twitter don’t. Don’t tweet for tweeting’s sake. That’s how you build reach. Like your email newsletter, it’s one more way to build relationships. He uses TweetDeck to manage Twitter.• Retweeting: He analyzed 100 million tweets to see what gets retweeted. Most retweeting happens at midday. Words matter: the terms please retweet helped. Blog, post, free, social media were other hot terms. If you use self-reverential words (I, me), you are far less likely to get retweeted. • Find the stars: Once you’re engaged in social media, look for high social capital people. For example, on Twitter, find the people who are stars tweeting on your issue. Engage them. You can find those people with his twitter.grader.com tool.• Facebook trick: Cheap market research on Facebook – Go to footer, ads, and pretend you’re placing an ad. When you do that, Facebook tells you how many people on Facebook match your demo profile. Nifty way to do your homework to see if this is where your audience is.• Google Wave: It’s Google, so don’t ignore it. But you’re safe on ignoring it now because it’s so complex and hard. Google Buzz – it’s too early to say, he says.• FourSquare: He’s a fan because it connects your physical presence to your online presence – a useful thing for nonprofit events. It’s a great way to set up virtual locations for events.last_img read more

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