Shawsheen Tech Teacher Joe Williams Named Local Hero Recognized For Leadership Achievement

first_imgBURLINGTON, MA — Chopps American Bar and Grill at the Boston Marriott Burlington has announced the 5th Annual Chopps Champions who have been selected through a community-wide campaign to recognize local heroes who live or work in north suburban towns.Chopps Champions were honored in six categories: Business, Community, Education, First Responder/Military, Healthcare, and Technology. All Champions have demonstrated excellence in their field through leadership, achievement, and volunteerism.Each honoree was given the opportunity to choose a charity to which the hotel donated $1,000 in their name.BUSINESSSonia RollinsSales Manager / Realtor – EXIT Premier Real EstateCharity: Brigo Integrated TheatreCOMMUNITYKorey BarkleyExecutive Director – Womenade, Inc.Charity: Womenade, Inc.EDUCATIONJoe WilliamsCulinary Arts Instructor – Shawsheen Technical High SchoolCharity: Wounded WarriorsFIRST RESPONDER/MILITARYBobby CollitonPresident / Founder – Skate for the 22 FoundationCharity: Skate for the 22 FoundationHEALTHCARESandi MackeyTrauma Program Manager – Lahey Hospital & Medical CenterCharity: Brain Injury Association of MassachusettsTECHNOLOGYSteven RotmanChief People Officer – IpswitchCharity: Wonderfund“We are overjoyed by the response to our 5th Annual Chopps Champions Campaign,” said Philip Bond, General Manager of Boston Marriott Burlington. “Six local heroes have been honored among 28 nominees, each of whom has demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to the community. We, including all of our associates at the hotel, are proud to serve the community and make a $1,000 donation to the local charities chosen by these champions.” About Chopps American Bar and GrillChopps American Bar and Grill is a modern Chophouse serving inspired American cooking including a variety of succulent cuts of all natural beef, fresh local seafood, and regional dishes. Both emulating and redefining the traditional Chophouse, Chopps’ warm and unpretentious setting offers comfort and style. A prominently featured open kitchen gives guests a glimpse behind the scenes, as they enjoy a dining experience filled with great food, drinks, and smart casual service.Chopps lunch and dinner menus are designed to appeal to local residents, neighboring businesses, and hotel guest alike who will come for the delicious food, live entertainment, and bustling bar scene. For reservations call 781-221-6643 or visit choppsamericanbarandgrill.com.Boston Marriott BurlingtonThe Boston Marriott Burlington provides the ideal location for a business or leisure trip to the Greater Boston area. The ENERGY STAR® rated green hotel is just 17 miles from Boston and offers easy access to Lexington and Concord as well as local attractions and institutions such as the Burlington Mall, Hanscom Air Force Base, and Lahey Clinic. Boston Marriott Burlington offers 414 modern guest rooms, 4 suites, Chopps Bar, 14,570 sq ft of newly renovated state-of-the art meeting and event venues, a 9,000 sq ft Celebrate Ballroom and dining at Chopps American Bar and Grill. Hotel features and amenities include indoor and outdoor pools, fitness center, complimentary WI-FI, and shuttle service to local destinations. Boston Marriott Burlington is located at One Burlington Mall Road in Burlington, MA. For more information, please call 781-229-6565 or visit marriottburlington.com. Pyramid Hotel GroupPyramid Hotel Group is a privately held, Boston-based hotel company with over 100 hotels and resorts under hotel management and asset management.  Pyramid Hotel Group, ranked among the largest U.S. hotel management company by independent sources, provides hotel management, asset management, and project management services to a broad array of hotel assets. Pyramid Hotel Group is a franchisee of all major hotel brand companies and an operator of independent four- and five-star hotels and resorts. Additional information is available at pyramidhotelgroup.com.This year’s winners (L to R): Steven Rotman, Technology Winner; Sandi Mackey, Healthcare Winner; Bobby Colliton, First Responder/Military Winner; Chef Stefano Zimei, Executive Chef at Chopps American Bar and Grill, Korey Barkley, Community Winner; Joe Williams, Education Winner; Sonia Rollins, Business Winner.(NOTE: The above press release is from Chopps.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedShawsheen Tech Teacher Wins Community CHOPPS Award For EducationIn “Education”Nominate An Outstanding Wilmington Resident For 2019 Chopps Champions ContestIn “Community”Chopps Champions To Accept Nominations For Local Heroes From March 12 To March 23In “Community”last_img read more

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Research group suggests using guppies to control mosquitoes be abandoned

first_img More information: Rana W. El-Sabaawi et al. Biodiversity and ecosystem risks arising from using guppies to control mosquitoes, Biology Letters (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0590AbstractDeploying mosquito predators such as the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) into bodies of water where mosquitoes breed is a common strategy for limiting the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes. Here, we draw on studies from epidemiology, conservation, ecology and evolution to show that the evidence for the effectiveness of guppies in controlling mosquitoes is weak, that the chances of accidental guppy introduction into local ecosystems are large, and that guppies can easily establish populations and damage these aquatic ecosystems. We highlight several knowledge and implementation gaps, and urge that this approach is either abandoned in favour of more effective strategies or that it is used much more rigorously. Controlling mosquitoes does not need to come at the expense of freshwater biodiversity. As the researchers note, humans have been tossing guppies into lakes, streams and other places where there is standing water to reduce mosquito populations for centuries. Once released, they eat mosquito larvae that lie on the surface, preventing them from growing to maturity and biting people. Most such instances have been in response to outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases—locals have used the practice in the studied regions very recently to slow the spread of the Zika virus, for example. But such a tactic, the researchers contend, is not only unproven, but harmful to other animal species in the same water.Curious about the practice of using guppies to control mosquitoes, the researchers combed multiple studies in the areas of conservation, epidemiology, evolution and ecology—looking for those that included guppies. In so doing, they found scant evidence supporting the notion that using guppies to control mosquitoes actually works. They found much more evidence that suggested that guppies should be classified as an invasive species when introduced outside of its native environment. They found instances of the fish reproducing so rapidly and consuming so much of the local food sources that other animals living in the same water died out. They suggest that the use of guppies to control mosquitos for any purpose be abandoned or that its use be used “much more rigorously.”Not everyone is likely to agree with this assessment, however, as some researchers such as those working for the Malaria Consortium have found that putting guppies in water tanks in tropical areas helps reduce the spread of dengue fever in places like Viet Nam—with such an approach, they claim, there is no chance of the fish invading an established ecosystem. Citation: Research group suggests using guppies to control mosquitoes be abandoned (2016, October 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-10-group-guppies-mosquitoes-abandoned.html © 2016 Phys.org Single wild female Journal information: Biology Letterscenter_img Explore further Male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Image: Wikipedia. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from the U.S., the West Indies, Canada and Brazil has conducted a survey of research efforts looking into the effectiveness and safety of releasing guppies to reduce the number of mosquitoes and report that evidence supporting such use is lacking—they also note that guppies can become an invasive species putting other species at risk. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the team describes their research and why they believe that guppies are not an effective tool for fighting the spread of infectious diseases. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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