MercedesAMG One Delayed Some 9 Months

Powertrain-tweaks are behind the hold-up.The long-awaited, Formula 1-engined hypercar from Mercedes-AMG, the One, is facing delays of up to nine months following changes that had to be made to the car’s race-bred powertrain. Mercedes-AMG Has No Plans To Build A Project Two Since F1 introduced 1.6-litre V6 hybrid engines at the start of 2014, Mercedes has been a dominant force, winning every drivers’ and constructors’ titles since, and it is looking likely that it will add to both of those tallies this year.Away from the track, the hypercar game currently in full swing. Aston Martin and Red Bull Racing are joining the established players like Koenigsegg and McLaren, and Mercedes thought now would be a good time to put all that F1 pedigree to good use by introducing its first proper in-house supercar since the CLK GTR AMG of the 1990s.However, an F1 engine is strictly an F1 engine for a reason. Rarely do they make it into road cars; the Ferrari F50 being a key example, the upcoming Lanzante 911 being another. Mercedes, as such, has had to undertake a massive re-working of its potent F1 engine to make it workable in the real world, and those adjustments have set the whole project back by quite a bit. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 19, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News More Project One Mercedes-AMG Project One Advances To Prototype Testing In order to fall in line with stringent emissions regulations the One has to rev at 1,200 rpm when sat at idle. An impressive feat? It might not seem like it, but in F1 trim, idle is closer to 5,000 rpm, which is closer to motorway cruising revs for an every day car.“You have leakage in the throttles in Formula One and nobody cares, because it runs at a 5,000 rpm idle,” Mercedes-AMG boss Tobias Moers told Top Gear Magazine. “At a 1,200 rpm idle, you have to meet the emissions regulations. You need a stable, proper idle. If it’s unstable, your emissions are unstable.”The engine’s redline also had to be cut. In F1 the powerplant’s limit is 14,000 rpm (that in itself is ‘low’ compared to some older F1 engines), but in road car trim it’ll be just 11,000 rpm. Power though will be similar to Lewis Hamilton’s F1 car. While exact numbers for the championship winning cars have never been disclosed, it is believed to be around 1,000 bhp, the number of horses that will be packed into the One hypercar.As well as the four-figure horsepower number, 0-124 mph is expected to be handled in in less than six seconds, with the top speed being more than 217 mph.With insane performance like that, and the promise of being able to tell your friends you have ‘an F1 car for the road’, you’d think most future owners of the car would be disappointed to hear of the delay. However, Moers told Top Gear that they’ve actually took the hold-up rather well.“You know what they tell me? ‘Make sure that the car works. Because of what we experienced in the past with hybrid cars, take your time,’” he said; and they have a point. Imagine spending millions on your new toy, only to find out it doesn’t work.So while the owners will have to wait a little longer, so will we, but we can’t wait to see the One when it finally arrives in production trim. AMG: Project One Probably Faster Than Porsche 919 At The ‘Ring read more

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New Flyer Sold 77 Xcelsior CHARGE Electric Buses In California

first_imgVictor Valley is switching to electric buses using Californian incentives and Southern California Edison infrastructure program:“VVTA has partnered with local energy provider Southern California Edison (SCE) on its Charge-Ready Transit Bus Program, which assists in deployment of make-ready electric vehicle charging infrastructure solutions for qualified agencies. The move also provides access to early adoption incentives like the Hybrid and Zero-Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP) provided by the California Air Resources Board (CARB).”“The Victor Valley Transit Authority provides public transit agency in San Bernardino County, delivering over 2.5 million passenger trips per year.”Ron Zirges, Director of Maintenance and Facilities, VVTA said:“Factoring in all unique variables, including steep hills, long distances, extreme weather, and traffic patterns, we are confident that our New Flyer Xcelsior CHARGE buses will lead sustainable transit forward in San Bernardino County. With over 50 years’ experience manufacturing zero-emission buses, New Flyer is an ideal partner to help us achieve 100 percent zero-emission public transit by 2040 – bringing cleaner, quieter, and more sustainable transit solutions to our community.”Wayne Joseph, President, New Flyer of America said:“We are proud to continue building the zero-emission footprint in California, and to support Victor Valley Transit Authority in achieving the 2040 goal while exceeding upcoming federal and state clean air mandates. The evolution to battery-electric transit and supporting infrastructure takes advanced planning and dedication, and we commend VVTA on its commitment to eliminate emissions in pursuit of sustainable transit, a healthier community, and thriving environment in California.” San Diego Orders Six 40-Foot New Flyer Electric Buses Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 7, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News King County Metro Tests EV Buses With More Than 140 Miles Of Range New Flyer Is First With Altoona Tested 60-Foot Articulated Electric Bus Source: Electric Vehicle News 7 New Flyer electric buses for Victor Valley, 77 for CaliforniaVictor Valley Transit Authority (VVTA) in California recently ordered seven 40-foot New Flyer‘s Xcelsior CHARGE electric buses. The agency intends to switch to a 100% electric fleet by 2040.According to New Flyer, company already has sold 77 Xcelsior CHARGE across California (including Coachella Valley, Los Angeles, Oakland, Orange County, and San Diego), which means that nationwide plus Canada it is in three-digit range now.New Flyer newslast_img read more

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Electrek Podcast Tesla Supercharger prices Porsche Taycan coming in a big way

first_imgThis week on the Electrek Podcast, we discuss the most popular news in the world of sustainable transport and energy, including Tesla Supercharger prices, Porsche Taycan coming in a big way, a new electric motorcycle war, and more. more…The post Electrek Podcast: Tesla Supercharger prices, Porsche Taycan coming in a big way, electric motorcycle war, and more appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

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Jaguar IPACE Overview By TEVA In Winter Conditions Video

first_img Jaguar I-PACE Can Charge At 100 kW After Update Jaguar I-PACE is still the closest competitor to TeslaThe Toronto Electric Vehicle Association (TEVA) recently had the opportunity to test drive the Jaguar I-PACE in Canadian winter conditions (-8°C), although it wasn’t another EV range test, but rather a general overview with interesting insights.The I-PACE was considered an excellent electric car, and especially in Canada – after winning the Canadian Utility Vehicle Of The Year 2019 – should cope well on the market.As the Audi e-tron was delayed, the Jaguar I-PACE remains the closest model in the long-range, premium segment to Tesla.Jaguar I-PACE Nissan LEAF & Jaguar I-PACE Receive Canadian Car of the Year Awards Bonus: Short comparison of the Jaguar I-PACE with Tesla Model 3.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Jaguar I-PACE specs:90 kWh batteryRange: 234 miles (376 km) EPA or 480 km (298 miles) WLTP0-100km/h (62 mph) 4.8 seconds / 0-60 mph (sec) 4.5 secondsTop speed mph 200  km/h (124 mph)two permanent magnet electric motors; synchronous – 400 PS (294 kW) total system outputall-wheel drive0-80% DC fast charging in 40 minutes using 100 kW CCS Combo0-100% AC charging using 7 kW 0n-board charger in nearly 13 hours What Does A True Gearhead Think Of The Jaguar I-Pace: Video Reviewcenter_img 46 photos Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 1, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Climate Change Weekly Protecting NYC from rising seas UK promises action melting

first_imgIn the inaugural edition of Climate Change Weekly, we check out:Controversial comments from London’s mayor.England’s environment secretary vows action after a visit from climate activist Greta Thunberg.Talk of a climate-focused debate continues among Democratic presidential candidates.A look at how New York City may deal with rising seas.Melting permafrost is the giant lurking problem that may cost the world trillions and unleash who knows what else.And more… more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8COKnXNH-EThe post Climate Change Weekly: Protecting NYC from rising seas, UK promises action, melting permafrost appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

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Souths scalp keeps British women on roll

first_imgTennis South’s scalp keeps British women on roll Richard Jago at Edgbaston Share on Twitter The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Tue 10 Jun 2008 19.01 EDT Share on Facebook Share via Email The 22-year-old South had the memory of a fine win over the 11th-seeded Francesca Schiavone at Wimbledon in 2006 to bolster her whilst struggling to close the match out. “That helped me quite a bit,” admitted South, who is ranked down at 154 and only came here as a wild card. “There were nerves but I kept looking forward. I wanted to win.” A key was a recovery from love-40 at three-all, when she suddenly served better, though that was the least impressive part of her game. She did, though, attack Bammer spiritedly and switched the direction of her attacks well.Watched by her father, John, a former Fulham footballer, her day was rounded off by the announcement of a Wimbledon wild card which may bring the chance of another notable scalp. However Britain’s No1, Anne Keothavong, went out 6-3, 6-2 to the Ukrainian Kateryna Bondarenko. Mel South raised the possibility of no less than three British players reaching the third round here – only one has ever done so in this tournament’s 26-year history – when she beat Sybille Bammer, the fourth-seeded Austrian, 6-3, 7-5 in the second round of the DFS Classic yesterday.With Katie O’Brien and Naomi Cavaday both playing qualifiers in their second-round matches today, South’s bold and hard-headed display against an opponent who was recently in the world’s top 20 added to a cautious sense of optimism among this country’s leading women. Topics Reuse this content Shares00 Share on LinkedIncenter_img Share on Twitter Share on Messenger Read more Share on WhatsApp Tennis Share via Email First published on Tue 10 Jun 2008 19.01 EDT Share on Facebook Support The Guardian … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Pinterest Since you’re here…last_img read more

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A Focus On SEC FCPA Individual Actions

first_imgThis previous post provided various facts and figures from 2014 SEC FCPA enforcement.This post focuses on SEC FCPA individual actions historically.Like the DOJ, the SEC frequently speaks in lofty rhetoric concerning its focus on holding individuals accountable under the FCPA. For instance, in connection with the 2012 Garth Peterson enforcement action, the SEC’s Director of Enforcement stated (here) that the case “illustrates the SEC’s commitment to holding individuals accountable for FCPA violations.”Speaking generally, SEC Chairman Mary Jo White has stated that a “core principle of any strong enforcement program is to pursue responsible individuals wherever possible … [and that] is something our enforcement division has always done and will continue to do.”Most recently in November 2014, the SEC’s Director of Enforcement stated as follows.“I always have said that actions against individuals have the largest deterrent impact. Individual accountability is a powerful deterrent because people pay attention and alter their conduct when they personally face potential punishment. And so in the FCPA arena as well as all other areas of our enforcement efforts, we are very focused on attempting to bring cases against individuals.  […] [I]ndividual accountability is critical to FCPA enforcement — and imposing personal consequences on bad actors, including through bars and monetary sanctions, will continue to be a high priority for us.”Since 2000, the SEC has charged 61 individuals with FCPA civil offenses.  The breakdown is as follows.2000 – 0 individuals2001 – 3 individuals2002 – 3 individuals2003 – 4 individuals2004 – 0 individuals2005 – 1 individual2006 – 8 individuals2007 – 7 individuals2008 – 5 individuals2009 – 5 individuals2010 – 7 individuals2011 – 12 individuals2012 – 4 individuals2013 – 0 individuals2014 – 2 individualsAs highlighted by the above statistics, most of the individuals charged – 35 (or  57%) were charged since 2008.  Thus, on one level the SEC is correct when it states that individual prosecutions are a focus of its FCPA enforcement program at least as measured against the historical average given that between 1977 and 1999 the SEC charged 22 individuals with FCPA civil offenses.Yet on another level, a more meaningful level given that there was much less overall enforcement of the FCPA between 1977 and 1999, the SEC’s statements represent hollow rhetoric as demonstrated by the below figures.Of the 35 individuals charged with civil FCPA offenses by the SEC since 2008:7 individuals were in the Siemens case;4 individuals were in the Willbros Group case;4 individuals were in the Alliance One case;3 individuals were in the Maygar Telekom case; and3 individuals were in the Noble Corp. case.In other words, 60% of the individuals charged by the SEC with FCPA civil offenses since 2008 have been in just five cases.Considering that there has been 72 corporate SEC FCPA enforcement actions since 2008, this is a rather remarkable statistic.  Of the 72 corporate SEC FCPA enforcement actions, 60 (or 83%) have not (at least yet) resulted in any SEC charges against company employees.  This figure is thus higher than the 75% figure recently highlighted regarding the DOJ.  This is notable given that the SEC, as a civil law enforcement agency, has a lower burden of proof in an enforcement action.Compare the fact that since 2008 83% of corporate SEC enforcement actions have NOT (at least yet) resulted in any SEC charges against company employees to the following statistic. Between 1977 and 2004, 61% of SEC corporate FCPA enforcement actions RESULTED in related charges against company employees.Like the prior DOJ post on the same topic, although certain historical comparisons of FCPA enforcement lack meaningful value, other comparisons are noteworthy.For instance, while one can question how the SEC held individuals accountable (i.e whether the civil penalties were too lenient) for most of the FCPA’s history, the SEC did frequently hold individuals accountable when a company resolved an FCPA enforcement action.With the exception of last week’s creative SEC enforcement action against PBSJ and Walid Hatoum ,the last SEC FCPA enforcement action against a company employee related to a corporate FCPA enforcement action occurred approximately three years ago in connection with the Noble Corporation matter (see here for the SEC’s enforcement action against Thomas O’Rourke, Mark Jackson and James Ruehlen – current or former employees of Noble Corporation).  Of note from this enforcement action is that when Jackson and Ruehlen put the SEC to its burden of proof, the SEC agreed to settle on the eve of trial in what can only be called a win for the defense.  (See here, here and here for prior posts).  Indeed, as highlighted in this post, the SEC has never prevailed in an FCPA enforcement action when put to its ultimate burden of proof.Once again, like with the DOJ figures, one can ask the “but nobody was charged” question given the gap between corporate SEC FCPA enforcement and related individual enforcement actions.Yet, like with the DOJ figures and as highlighted in this recent post, there is an equally plausible reason why so few individuals have been charged in connection with many corporate SEC FCPA enforcement actions.  The reason has to do with the quality and legitimacy of the corporate enforcement action in the first place.With the SEC, the issue is not so much NPAs or DPAs (although the SEC has used such vehicles three times to resolve an FCPA enforcement action – DPAs with Tenaris in 2011 and PBSJ Corp. in 2015 and a NPA with Ralph Lauren in 2013). Rather, the issue seems to be more the SEC’s neither admit nor deny settlement policy (notwithstanding its minor tweaks in 2013) as well as the SEC’s increased use of administrative actions.For more on the SEC’s neither admit nor deny settlement policy and its impact of SEC enforcement actions, see pgs. 946-955 of my article “The Facade of FCPA Enforcement.”  In the article, I discuss the affidavit of Professor Joseph Grundfest (Stanford Law School and a former SEC Commissioner) in SEC v. Bank of America and how SEC enforcement actions “typically omit mention of valid defenses and of countervailing facts or mitigating circumstances that, if proven at trial, could cause the Commission to lose it case.”  In the article, I also discuss the SEC’s frank admission in the Bank of America case that a settled SEC enforcement action “does not necessarily reflect the triumph of one party’s position over the other.”Indeed, a notable development from 2014 (see here) was the Second Circuit concluding that SEC settlements are not about the truth, but pragmatism.Individuals in an SEC FCPA enforcement, even if only a civil action, and even if frequently allowed to settle on similar neither admit nor deny terms, have their personal reputation at stake and are thus more likely than corporate entities to challenge the SEC and force it satisfy its burden of proof at trial as to all FCPA elements.More recently, the SEC has been keen on resolving corporate FCPA enforcement actions in the absence of any judicial scrutiny.  As highlighted in this 2013 SEC Year in Review post, a notable statistic from 2013 is that 50% of SEC corporate enforcement actions were not subjected to one ounce of judicial scrutiny either because the action was resolved via a NPA or through an administrative order.  In 2014, as highlighted in this prior year in review post, of the 7 corporate enforcement actions from 2014, 6 enforcement actions (86%) were administrative actions.  In other words, there was no judicial scrutiny of 86% of SEC FCPA enforcement actions from 2014.It is interesting to note that the SEC has used administrative actions to resolve 9 corporate enforcement actions since 2013 and in none of these actions have there been related SEC enforcement actions against company employees.In other words, and like in the DOJ context, perhaps the more appropriate question is not “but nobody was charged,” in connection with SEC corporate FCPA enforcement actions, but rather – do SEC corporate FCPA settlements necessarily represent provable FCPA violations?It is also interesting to analyze the 13 instances since 2008 where an SEC corporate FCPA enforcement action resulted in related charges against company employees.   With the exception of Siemens, KBR/Halliburton and Magyar Telekom, the corporate SEC FCPA enforcement actions resulting in related charges against company employees occurred in what can only be described as relatively minor (at least from a settlement amount perspective) corporate enforcement actions.  These actions are:  Faro Technologies, Willbros Group, Nature’s Sunshine Products, United Industrial Corp., Pride Int’l., Noble Corp., Alliance One, Innospec, Watts Water, and PBSJ.[Note – the above data was assembled using the “core” approach as well as the definition of an FCPA enforcement action described in this prior post]last_img read more

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Trump Stands Down on Retaliation Against Iran

first_imgTrump said Iran’s attack on the drone was probably an unintentional “mistake.” According to sources, President Trump had approved military strikes against Iran targeting its radar and missile batteries in retaliation for the attack on the American surveillance drone, but he scratched the mission after the planes were in the air. The White House and Pentagon declined to comment on why the mission was scrubbed, but the rumor is the question of escalating the conflict and drawing in Russia at this moment in time. Meanwhile, according to Iran’s Tasnim news agency, the Commander of the Aerospace Force of the IRGC, Amir Ali Hajizadeh, made a statement that they gave a 10 minute warning to pull back the drone at 3:55 a.m. local time on Thursday before the drone was shot down at 4:05 a.m. Iran’s claims to have wreckage of the Drone does fly in the fact of U.S. claims that it was in international airspace.The Deep State appears to prefer war. John Bolton, national security adviser, has publicly and repeatedly been calling for regime change in Tehran. Nevertheless, Trump has actually maintained a cool head and has declined to say what he will do in response to the incident on Thursday. Trump realizes he was elected to end the policy of wars, not begin them. Bolton keeps arguing to go to war against Iran. It is easy for such people to play with the lives of others. If I were Trump, I would argue to go only if you went along with the troops. Trump said Iran’s attack on the drone was probably an unintentional “mistake.” It is Bolton who is the real problem and I would fire him in the blink of an eye.Meanwhile, private airlines are now diverting flights such as British Airways away from the Strait of Hormuz given the tensions and the concern that Iran could mistakenly shoot down a commercial flight. Categories: Iran Tags: Iran, War Cyclelast_img read more

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A simple intervention to combat current opioid epidemic

first_imgMay 8 2018Asking emergency department (ED) providers to self-identify their opioid prescribing practices and then providing them with timely, clinically relevant, individualized, and actionable feedback on their actual opioid prescribing data, significantly decreases future opioid prescribing among providers who underestimate their baseline prescribing. That is the finding of a study to be published in the May 2018 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM).Related StoriesScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyDiet and nutrition influence microbiome in colonic mucosaMosquito surveillance in Madagascar reveals new insight into malaria transmissionThe lead author of the study is Sean S. Michael, MD, assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine.The study, by Michael, et al, found that providers who initially underestimated opiate prescription rates had statistically significant decreases in opiate prescribing when compared to providers who were more accurate in initial self-assessment of prescribing rates. The randomized trial exposes important gaps in providers’ self-perceptions of opioid prescribing and demonstrates that a simple, data-driven intervention using query-reveal methodology may decrease future prescribing, particularly among providers who underestimate their own prescribing practices.The findings suggest that current and future interventions in which provider adherence to guidelines is expected, including opioid interventions outside the emergency department and other quality and safety initiatives, should directly address the potential barrier of inaccurate provider self-awareness.Gail D’Onofrio, MD, MS, professor and chair, Yale School of Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine, who is internationally known for her work in developing and testing interventions for department patients with unhealthy alcohol and other drug use, commented:”The results have real world applicability. A simple intervention enhancing safe prescribing is one of several opportunities the emergency physician has to combat the current opioid epidemic.” Source:http://saem.org/last_img read more

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Study Sex hormone levels associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in

first_imgMay 29 2018In an analysis of data collected from more than 2,800 women after menopause, Johns Hopkins researchers report new evidence that a higher proportion of male to female sex hormones was associated with a significant increased relative cardiovascular disease risk.The researchers caution that theirs was an observational study that wasn’t designed or able to show or prove cause and effect. But they say the study, described online May 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, suggests that having a more male-like hormone profile seems to increase the risk of heart disease and strokes in postmenopausal women independent of other risk factors.”A woman’s sex hormone levels and ratios of them isn’t something that physicians regularly check,” says Erin Michos, M.D., M.H.S., associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and member of the Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease. “Because an imbalance in the proportion of testosterone (the main male sex hormone) to estrogen (the main female sex hormone) may affect heart disease risk, physicians may want to think about adding hormone tests to the toolbox of screenable risk factors, like blood pressure or cholesterol, to identify women who may be at higher risk of heart or vascular disease. But this needs further study.”Decades of research have shown that, prior to menopause, women have lower heart disease rates than men, and because estrogen levels drop sharply after menopause, physicians once thought that replacing estrogen would reduce cardiovascular disease risk. That idea was essentially upended when results of a landmark women’s health study reported in 2002 showed that replacement female hormones weren’t necessarily protective and could possibly raise the risk of strokes, blood clots and heart disease.Some experts have suggested that those results may have been skewed or exaggerated by the use of older forms of hormone therapy and the fact that it was given many years after menopause in the trials. Additionally, researchers had not focused on the body’s natural levels and ratios of sex hormones as an index of risk in their own right. The estrogen used in the most common hormone therapy preparation is in a different chemical form than that of the body’s natural premenopausal estrogen, estradiol.For the new study, the researchers looked at data from 2,834 postmenopausal women who had participated in the federally funded Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Participants were an average age of 65 at the start of the study, and 38 percent white, 28 percent African-American, 22 percent Hispanic and 12 percent Chinese-American.Related StoriesCutting around 300 calories a day protects the heart even in svelte adultsRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsAt an initial visit that took place between 2000 and 2002, researchers took blood samples and measured levels of testosterone and estradiol.Over 12 years of follow up, the women had 283 instances of cardiovascular disease, including 171 instances of coronary heart disease and heart attacks, 88 strokes and 103 instances of heart failure as determined by medical records, hospitalizations, telephone interviews and death certificates.Among the postmenopausal women in this study who were all free of cardiovascular disease at the beginning, almost 5 percent developed new cardiovascular disease within 5 years. When the researchers compared testosterone and estradiol levels to instances of heart and cardiovascular diseases, they found, in general, that higher testosterone was associated with increased risk and higher estradiol levels with lower risk. After adjusting the results to account for multiple other heart disease risk factors including age, body mass index, education, diabetes and blood pressure, they looked at the ratio of testosterone to estradiol ¾ essentially dividing the testosterone level by the estradiol measurement. For every standardized unit increase in the ratio of testosterone to estrogen, there was a 19 percent increase in cardiovascular disease risk, a 45 percent increase in coronary heart disease risk and a 31 percent increase in heart failure risk.”Although our study adds to evidence that higher estradiol relative to testosterone may have a protective effect on the cardiovascular system in older women, it is premature to advise them to take hormone therapy to reduce their risk,” says Di Zhao, Ph.D., research associate at Johns Hopkins and the lead author of the published research results. “At this point, doctors may want to step up their advice to women to reduce other known risk factors after menopause,” Zhao says.As to why these hormones may affect risk, Michos says there is ample evidence from other studies in women that testosterone can raise blood pressure and contribute to insulin resistance, which are harmful effects, whereas estrogen relaxes blood vessels and lowers bad cholesterol levels, which tend to be good things for the heart and vascular systems.According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease remains by far the No. 1 killer of women in the United States and accounts for one out of every four deaths. Source:https://www.jhu.edu/https://www.jhu.edu/last_img read more

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Study reveals how giant neurons in the brain may play huge role

first_img Source:https://www.rockefeller.edu/news/23275-giant-neurons-in-the-brain-may-play-similarly-giant-role-in-awareness-and-cognition/ Jul 23 2018There is no shortage of wonders that our central nervous system produces–from thought and language to movement to the five senses. All of those dazzling traits, however, depend on an underappreciated deep brain mechanism that Donald Pfaff, head of the Laboratory of Neurobiology and Behavior at The Rockefeller University, calls generalized arousal, or GA for short. GA is what wakes us up in the morning and keeps us aware and in touch with ourselves and our environment throughout our conscious hours.”It’s so fundamental that we don’t pay attention to it,” says Pfaff, “and yet it’s so important that we should.”Pfaff and his team of researchers certainly do. Now, in a series of experiments involving a particular type of brain cell, they have advanced our understanding of the roots of consciousness. Their work may potentially prove relevant in the study of some psychiatric diseases.The big cells in the black boxThe findings, published this month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shed light on an area of the brainstem that is so little understood the first author of the paper, Inna Tabansky, a research associate in Pfaff’s lab, calls it “the black box.” That term is certainly simpler than its actual name–the nucleus gigantocellularis (NGC), which is part of a structure called the medullary reticular formation.In her work, using mice, Tabansky focused on a subtype of extremely large neurons in the NGC with links to virtually the entire nervous system, including the thalamus, where neurons can activate the entire cerebral cortex. “If you just look at the morphology of NGC neurons, you know they’re important,” Pfaff says. “It’s just a question of what they’re important for. I think they’re essential for the initiation of any behavior.”To discover what role the NGC neurons might play in GA, Tabansky and her colleagues, including Joel Stern, a visiting professor in the Pfaff lab, began by identifying the genes that these neurons express. They used a technique known as “retro-TRAP,” developed in the lab of Rockefeller scientist Jeffrey Friedman.To Tabansky’s surprise, the NGC neurons were found to express the gene for an enzyme, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which produces nitric oxide, which in turn relaxes blood vessels, increasing the flow of oxygenated blood to tissue. (No other neurons in the brain are known to produce eNOS.) They also discovered that the eNOS-expressing NGC neurons are located close to blood vessels.Related StoriesResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustIn Pfaff’s view, the neurons are so critical for the normal functions of the central nervous system that they have evolved the ability to control their own blood supply directly. ‘”We’re pretty sure that if these neurons need more oxygen and glucose, they will release nitric oxide into these nearby blood vessels in order to get it,” he says.The circumstances that would prompt such a response were the subject of further experiments. The scientists found evidence that changes in the environment, such as the introduction of novel scents, activated eNOS in the NGC neurons and produced increased amounts of nitric oxide in mice.”There is some low level of production when the animal is in a familiar setting,” says Tabansky, “which is what you expect as they maintain arousal. But it is vastly increased when the animal is adapting to a new environment.” This activation of the NGC neurons supports the case for their central role in arousal, Tabansky says.From cells to psychiatryGoing forward, Tabansky says she’s interested in exploring if their findings might help fill a gap in the understanding of certain disorders, such as bipolar disorder, suicidality, and ADHD. Some genetic research has implicated a role for the neurons she studied in these diseases, but the mechanism behind this link is not known.”By showing that this gene and its associated pathways have a particular role, at least in the rodent brain, that relates to a fundamental function of the nervous system, is a hint about how this gene can cause psychiatric disease,” she says. “It’s very preliminary, and there is a lot more work to be done, but it potentially opens a new way to study how this gene can alter an individual’s psychology.”last_img read more

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New automation software cuts time taken for radiation therapy planning

first_imgAug 2 2018Beating cancer is a race against time. Developing radiation therapy plans — individualized maps that help doctors determine where to blast tumors — can take days. Now, engineering researcher Aaron Babier has developed automation software that aims to cut the time down to mere hours.He and his team at the University of Toronto’s Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, including Justin Boutilier, supervisor Professor Timothy Chan and Professor Andrea McNiven of U of T’s Faculty of Medicine, are looking at radiation therapy design as an intricate — but solvable — optimization problem.Their software uses artificial intelligence (AI) to mine historical radiation therapy data. This information is then applied to an optimization engine to develop treatment plans. The researchers applied this software tool in their study of 217 patients with throat cancer, who also received treatments developed using conventional methods.The therapies generated by Babier’s AI achieved comparable results to patients’ conventionally planned treatments. — and it did so within 20 minutes. The researchers recently published their findings in Medical Physics.”There have been other AI optimization engines that have been developed. The idea behind ours is that it more closely mimics the current clinical best practice,” says Babier.If AI can relieve clinicians of the optimization challenge of developing treatments, more resources are available to improve patient care and outcomes in other ways. Health-care professionals can divert their energy to increasing patient comfort and easing distress.”Right now treatment planners have this big time sink. If we can intelligently burn this time sink, they’ll be able to focus on other aspects of treatment. The idea of having automation and streamlining jobs will help make health-care costs more efficient. I think it’ll really help to ensure high-quality care,” says Babier.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerBabier and his team believe that with further development and validation, health-care professionals can someday use the tool in the clinic. They maintain, however, that while the AI may give treatment planners a brilliant head start in helping patients, it doesn’t make the trained human mind obsolete. Once the software has created a treatment plan, it would still be reviewed and further customized by a radiation physicist, which could take up to a few hours.”It is very much like automating the design process of a custom-made suit,” explains Chan. “The tailor must first construct the suit based on the customer’s measurements, then alter the suit here and there to achieve the best fit. Our tool goes through a similar process to construct the most effective radiation plan for each patient.”Trained doctors, and often specialists, are still necessary to fine-tune treatments at a more granular level and to perform quality checks. These roles still lie firmly outside the domain of machines.For Babier, his research on cancer treatment isn’t just an optimization challenge.”When I was 12 years old, my stepmom passed away from a brain tumor,” Babier shares.”I think it’s something that’s always been at the back of my head. I know what I want to do, and that’s to improve cancer treatment. I have a family connection to it. It adds a human element to the research,” says Babier. Source:http://news.engineering.utoronto.ca/ai-tool-automates-radiation-therapy-planning/last_img read more

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Gene considered as tumor promoter may also halt development of cancer shows

first_img Source:https://www.cnio.es/ Aug 9 2018A gene that has for decades been considered a tumor promoter, the PLK1 gene, can also perform the exact opposite function: halting the development of cancer. This finding was made by researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) and the Germany’s Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), and is being published in the journal Nature Communications. The role of PLK1 as a target for powerful drugs must now be reviewed since, depending on the type of tumor to be treated, it might be useful to inhibit it, or it might not. For the time being, the scientists have discovered that the expression of PLK1 in breast tumors can determine a different prognosis, depending on the tumor sub-type.The PLK1 gene is essential for the division and proliferation of tumor cells. It has been known for years the overexpression of PLK1 is found in a large variety of tumor types, and on occasions this overexpression is associated with poor prognosis (when a gene is overexpressed in the cell, there is an excess of the protein produced by that gene). For that reason, PLK1 has for decades been considered an oncogene, a gene that promotes the development of tumors. Plk1 is also a therapeutic target, since inhibiting its activity induces the death of cell tumors. In fact, there are Plk1 inhibitors already at advanced clinical stages.However, curiously, the oncogenic nature of PLK1 has never been formally demonstrated. In other words, until now, no experiment has been designed to demonstrate that the overexpression of PLK1 does indeed contribute to tumor development.That was the initial aim of researchers from Spain’s National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO – Madrid) and Germany’s Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ – Heidelberg) at the start of this joint research project. To this end, they modified the genome of a mouse so that it was possible to overexpress the PLK1 gene at will in these animals. The first thing they noted was that these animals did not develop any more tumors than the normal mice. They then crossed their mice with others that expressed the oncogenes H-Ras or Her2 in their breast tissue, and hence they developed very aggressive breast tumors. They expected a much greater incidence of cancer, but the result was unexpected: by overexpressing PLK1 together with the oncogenes, the incidence of tumors was reduced drastically.Related Stories3D breast tumor models may improve drug discovery and testingScientists use advanced imaging to track brain tumor ‘turncoats’Novel anticancer agents show promise to control tumor growth in nearly every cancer type”That was when we realized that something important was happening,” explained Guillermo de Cárcer, one of the lead researchers on this study at CNIO. “And in effect we have shown that not only does PLK1 not act as an oncogene, but surprisingly it acts as a tumor suppressor”.Plk1 as an indicator of breast cancer prognosis. Intrigued, the researchers consulted the breast cancer databases, in search of a link between the expression of PLK1 and patient prognosis. And they confirmed that “the expression of Plk1 can result in a very different type of prognosis depending on the tumor sub-type”, said de Cárcer.In Her2 positive tumors, the expression of PLK1 gives a better prognosis; however, in patients with positive tumors for the expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER+), it’s the complete opposite. Not only does this paper describe the novel action of PLK1 as a tumor suppressor, it also identifies the molecular mechanism of how this suppression occurs. “We have seen that the overexpression of PLK1 increases the number of chromosomes in cells, because after they divide, cells cannot correctly segregate their chromosomes”, said Rocío Sotillo, lead researcher with the Molecular Thoracic Oncology Group at DKFZ.The fact that Plk1 acts as a tumor suppressor could call into question therapeutic strategies based on the inhibition of Plk1. However, Marcos Malumbres, head of the Cell Division and Cancer Research Group at CNIO and coordinator of the paper, trusts that the inhibition of Plk1 is still a valid and useful option.”The fact that Plk1 is a tumor suppressor instead of an oncogene does not mean that Plk1 inhibitors will not be effective against cancer”, said Malumbres. “Many essential components in cell proliferation can be used as targets against cancer in spite of not having any oncogenic activity, owing to the addition of cancer cells to specific cell processes such as cell division”.The work of these researchers bestows value on the PLK1 gene as an oncological biomarker: “Understanding when PLK1 acts as an oncogene or as a tumor suppressor, and in which types of tumors this happens, is clinically extremely relevant when it comes to using this gene as a therapeutic biomarker”, stresses Guillermo de Cárcer.last_img read more

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Disease modelers project a rapidly rising toll from Ebola

first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Alessandro Vespignani hopes that his latest work will turn out to be wrong. In July, the physicist from Northeastern University in Boston started modeling how the deadly Ebola virus may spread in West Africa. Extrapolating existing trends, the number of the sick and dying mounts rapidly from the current toll—more than 3000 cases and 1500 deaths—to about 10,000 cases by 24 September, and hundreds of thousands in the months after that. “The numbers are really scary,” he says—although he stresses that the model assumes control efforts aren’t stepped up. “We all hope to see this NOT happening,” Vespigani writes in an e-mail.Vespignani is not the only one trying to predict how the unprecedented outbreak will progress. Last week, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that the number of cases could ultimately exceed 20,000. And scientists across the world are scrambling to create computer models that accurately describe the spread of the deadly virus. Not all of them look quite as bleak as Vespignani’s. But the modelers all agree that current efforts to control the epidemic are not enough to stop the deadly pathogen in its tracks.Computer models “are incredibly helpful” in curbing an outbreak, says infectious disease researcher Jeremy Farrar, who heads the Wellcome Trust research charity in London. They can help agencies such as WHO predict the medical supplies and personnel they will need—and can indicate which interventions will best stem the outbreak. Mathematical epidemiologist Christian Althaus of the University of Bern, who is also building Ebola models, says both WHO and Samaritan’s Purse, a relief organization fighting Ebola, have contacted him to learn about his projections.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) But the modelers are hampered by the paucity of data on the current outbreak and lack of knowledge about how Ebola spreads. Funerals of Ebola victims are known to spread the virus, for example—but how many people are infected that way is not known. “Before this we have never had that much Ebola, so the epidemiology was never well developed,” says Ira Longini, a biostatistician at the University of Florida in Gainesville. “We are caught with our pants down.”To a mathematician, combating any outbreak is at its core a fight to reduce one number: Re, the pathogen’s effective reproductive rate, the number of people that an infected person in turn infects on average. An Re above 1, and the disease spreads. Below 1, an outbreak will stall.Outbreak models typically assume that there are four groups of people: those who are susceptible, those who have been infected but are not contagious yet, those who are sick and can transmit the virus, and those who have recovered. A model, in essence, describes the rates at which people move from one group to the next. From those, Re can be calculated.If the disease keeps spreading as it has, most of the modelers Science talked to say WHO’s estimate will turn out to be conservative. “If the epidemic in Liberia were to continue in this way until the 1st of December, the cumulative number of cases would exceed 100,000,” Althaus predicts. Such long-term forecasts are error-prone, he acknowledges. But other modelers aren’t much more encouraging. Caitlin Rivers of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg expects roughly 1000 new cases in Liberia in the next 2 weeks and a similar number in Sierra Leone.Vespignani has analyzed the likelihood that Ebola will spread to other countries. Using data on millions of air travelers and commuters, as well as mobility patterns based on data from censuses and mobile devices, he has built a model of the world, into which he can introduce Ebola and then run hundreds of thousands of simulations. In general, the chance of further spread beyond West Africa is small, Vespignani says, but the risk grows with the scale of the epidemic. Ghana, the United Kingdom, and the United States are among the countries most likely to have an introduced case, according to the model. (Senegal, which reported its first Ebola case last week, was in his top ten countries, too.)The models are only as good as the data fed to them; up to three-quarters of Ebola cases may go unreported. The modelers are also assuming that key parameters, such as the virus’s incubation time, are the same as in earlier outbreaks. “We might be missing the boat and we have no signal to indicate that,” says Martin Meltzer of the U.S. Centers for Disease Prevention and Control in Atlanta.The biggest uncertainty is how much doctors, nurses, and others can slow the virus. There are many ways of pushing down Re, Farrar says—washing hands, wearing masks, or quarantining people, for example. “But given the complexity of this outbreak and the limited resources, we need to find out what are the two or three things that will most help drive down infections,” Farrar says, and that’s where models can help. For instance, would following up on all the contacts of every case be more effective than following up on the much smaller number who had a certain type of contact with a case, such as sharing a room?Rivers is evaluating interventions, such as increased use of protective equipment or campaigns to isolate infected people. In the most optimistic scenario, every contact of infected people is traced, and transmission in hospitals is reduced by 75%. Even that, while drastically reducing the number of Ebola deaths, did not push Re below one.The challenge varies by country, Althaus says. “In Guinea and Sierra Leone, Re is close to 1 and the outbreak could be stopped if interventions improve a bit.” In Liberia, Re has been near 1.5 the whole time. “That means work is only just beginning there.” But Meltzer says there is no reason to believe the situation is any better in Sierra Leone. “We are not seeing any change in the rate of the accumulation of cases,” he says. As models get better at differentiating what is happening in places, Rivers says, “you might be able to put firelines around certain communities.” But such measures are very controversial. When Liberia last week barricaded off West Point, a sprawling slum with probably more than 100,000 inhabitants, it drew a largely negative response. “Quarantines and curfews tend to instill fear and distrust towards the whole of the outbreak response including health structures,” a representative for Doctors Without Borders told Science. Paul Seabright, a researcher at the Toulouse School of Economics in France who has studied such measures, says they are an incentive for people to keep it secret if they have had contact with a patient. Liberia’s harsh actions are “the last thing this epidemic needs,” he says.People in West Africa will have to alter behaviors, Meltzer says. “We won’t stop this outbreak solely by building hospitals. There will have to be a change in the way the community deals with the disease.” Modeling that is easy enough, Vespignani says. “I can decrease the transmission at funerals by 40% easily in a model. That’s one line of code. But in the field that is really hard.”*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public.last_img read more

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Scientists identify new species of penis worm

first_imgLet’s get this out of the way first: The penis worms are a group of marine invertebrates named for their penislike shape. All species of the tubular animals, which can reach lengths of 39 cm, have an extensible mouth called a proboscis that is lined with sharp hooks, teeth, and spines. Some species still exist today, but during the Cambrian period, about 500 million years ago, they were among the most common organisms on the planet, and are preserved en masse in the Burgess Shale—a famous deposit of fossils in the Canadian Rockies. New research, published online today in Palaeontology, suggests that the Priapulida phylum, the group that contains all the penis worms, may have been more diverse than previously realized, and that the differences between species are revealed by their tiny teeth. Using a suite of microscopy techniques, researchers analyzed fossils of penis worm mouth parts and discovered a previously unrecognized penis worm. Dental imprints left behind in the rock show that the most common group of penis worm, Ottoia prolifica, should actually be two separate species. The team has proposed the name O. tricuspida for the newly discovered species to reflect a unique three-pronged tooth that distinguishes it from other penis worms. Because the difference is so subtle, the scientists speculate that many fossils previously characterized as O. prolifica may actually belong to O. tricuspida, suggesting that one of the most widespread and ecologically important animals of the Cambrian era may be more diverse than previously thought.(Credit for linked PDF: M. R. Smith et al., Palaeontology [2015])last_img read more

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NIH directors possible exit plan Back to the lab

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the past 7 years, expects to go back to full-time research for a while if he’s not asked to stay on by President-elect Donald Trump, the physician-geneticist said this week. And he expressed unhappiness with Congress’s plan to freeze NIH spending at current levels well into next year, dubbing it “crap.”Like other presidential appointees, Collins must submit by 7 December a letter of resignation that says he will resign as of 20 January, Collins told Scientific American earlier this week. After that, “I have no idea … my mind is pretty open. … It’s not really up to me.” But he said he expects to continue to run the lab he has had at NIH for 23 years “come what may.” Collins declined to comment to reporters yesterday on whether he has been talking to the Trump transition team, but said that if he were asked to stay on, “I guess I’d have to see if that actually happened and what the conditions were.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe He told ScienceInsider that if he doesn’t remain NIH director, it’s “absolutely possible” that he would go back to full-time research “at least for a while. It’s sort of like a sabbatical.” He said that he has had “no ability to do any negotiation about possible future roles” in the public or private sectors because of federal conflict of interest rules. “So when people say, ‘You must have a plan on what you’re going to do next,’ and I say ‘I don’t,’ they should believe it because I don’t.”Collins’s NIH lab, which studies the genetics of diabetes and aging, now has about 10 members, including four postdocs. Collins says he could conceivably stay on permanently at NIH: “It is a wonderful place and my lab is very well situated.” He added, however, that in anticipation of a possible move, he has not taken any new trainees into his lab for the past couple years.  Collins, 66, previously took a break after stepping down in 2008 as director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, where he led the Human Genome Project. After writing a book about personalized medicine, he became NIH director in August 2009.His predecessor, Elias Zerhouni, also took some time off after resigning shortly before the 2008 presidential election. But Harold Varmus, NIH director in the late 1990s, moved directly from that position to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1999.Collins has been sending a message of reassurance to NIH staff and the research community since Trump’s upset victory on 8 November. He said yesterday that he’s “not really concerned” about the fate of President Obama’s initiatives in precision medicine and brain research. “Congress has been continually positive about medical research, it’s one of their highest priorities, and its not a partisan issue. … That kind of support which has already led to the launch of the Precision Medicine Initiative and the BRAIN [Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies] initiative … gives me great confidence that despite various transitions, this kind of effort is going to continue to be a priority for the United States.”Collins did express concern, however, about the news yesterday that Congress intends to pass a stopgap funding measure keeping NIH’s current budget at the 2016 level until 31 March. The Senate and House of Representatives had been considering 2017 spending bills that would give the $32 billion agency between a $1.25 billion and $2 billion increase next year. A continuing resolution (CR), as it’s called, would be “an extremely unfortunate and painful outcome for biomedical research” because it would force NIH to spend its final 2017 budget in just 6 months. That could make it difficult to spend the money “in the most innovative way,” he told an audience at the Bipartisan Policy Center, a think tank in Washington, D.C.“There’s an acronym here which is: A CR Attenuates Progress. That would be C-R-A-P in case you haven’t figured that out,” Collins said to laughter.last_img read more

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Scientists are learning to predict psychosis years in advance—and possibly prevent it

first_img 8 years Doctors routinely assess a patient’s risk of heart attack, various cancers, and diabetes, often intervening to slow or stop disease before it strikes. But preventing psychiatric conditions, from anxiety to depression to schizophrenia, has received scant attention.The reasons are many. “With all due respect to cardiologists,” the brain “is a very, very complex organ,” says Jacob Vorstman, a Dutch pediatric psychiatrist who relocated this fall to The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. There, he’s setting up a clinic to assess and follow young people genetically at risk of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Though the brain is better understood than it was a generation ago, Vorstman says, how its intricate dance of chemical and electrical signals gives rise to mind and personality remains mysterious.Stigma is also a powerful barrier to prevention. Schizophrenia is marked by episodes of psychosis as well as cognitive and social problems, and it’s deeply feared and often misunderstood, even by many physicians. That makes it ethically dicey, some believe, to label young people at risk when not all of them will develop the disease. “It’s easier to say, ‘I am a patient with asthma,’ than to say, ‘Listen, I have psychotic breaks,’” Vorstman suggests.But change is afoot. In recent years, brain specialists have refined their ability to anticipate who’s at highest risk of psychosis—a defining feature of schizophrenia—identifying subtle signs in some children and more vivid precursors in late adolescence. And increasingly, researchers feel they’d be derelict not to pursue prevention. Tests of preventive measures are up and running, ranging from cognitive therapies to pregnancy supplements for the fetal brain to psychiatric drugs. Last month, a German pharmaceutical company enrolled the first volunteer into what is intended to be a 300-person randomized clinical trial testing an experimental drug to prevent psychosis in those at extremely high risk. It’s believed to be the first time a company has poured millions of dollars into an effort like this one. Possible signs Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Cognitive behavioral therapy*Family psychoeducation and support*Physical exerciseSubstance abuse treatment Rachel Loewy was an undergraduate in 1995 when she answered a flyer seeking students to assist with a research study. A couple of floors up in a psychology department building, Loewy sat, clipboard in hand, interviewing teenagers whose brain health was beginning to falter. Some heard whispers. Others imagined that their teachers could read their minds, or that fellow students stared at them and wished them harm as they walked down the halls.The teenagers had been diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder, a condition that can precede schizophrenia. Among the most debilitating and stigmatized psychiatric diseases, schizophrenia can rob sufferers of their self and their future, often in early adulthood.Although these teens didn’t have schizophrenia, the researchers believed that some would later deteriorate and be diagnosed with the disorder. But when Loewy met them they were lucid and self-aware. And they were frightened that their mind sometimes spun out of control. Risk factors V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE Arcing toward psychosis Scientists are trying to decipher early signs that may indicate risk of psychosis later on,and they are testing ways to reduce that risk. Right now, most signs are very vague andnonspecific, and the vast majority of kids who exhibit them stay healthy. Arcing toward psychosisScientists are trying to decipher early signs that may indicate risk of psychosis later on,and they are testing ways to reduce that risk. Right now, most signs are very vague and nonspecific, and the vast majority of kids who exhibit them stay healthy. Prenatal The quest to untangle schizophrenia’s roots began in earnest in the 1980s. Researchers decided that “we ought to get as close as we possibly can to the onset of the illness,” says Robert Heinssen of the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Maryland. At the time, that was considered the first psychotic break, when an individual cannot distinguish reality from fantasy.But when physicians interviewed patients hospitalized after their initial psychotic episode, they were startled to learn that in many cases, “people began experiencing changes in cognition, behavior, and perception for months or years” before psychosis struck, Heinssen says. “That led to this idea that there’s an emerging risk state that precedes” schizophrenia.Brandon Staglin was 14 years old when he experienced this “emerging risk state” first-hand. Living with his parents and 6-year-old sister in Lafayette, California, a scenic town east of San Francisco, he was a science fiction fan who aspired to explore the galaxy and devoured Isaac Asimov books. “I was a little less social perhaps than some of the other students,” Brandon says now, but nothing that triggered alarms.At the time, his grandfather was near death from leukemia. One night, Brandon began wondering what it would mean for him to be gone. “I was pondering these deep thoughts and fell asleep,” he remembers. “I opened my eyes 5 minutes later and couldn’t tell the difference between whether I was dreaming or awake. It was very scary.”He put on a Bruce Springsteen song he’d always loved. “I didn’t feel any of the emotions it [usually] stirred up in me,” he says. Instead, he felt nothing. “That was even scarier.” Although Brandon didn’t recognize these dissociations as related to psychosis, he knew that something was terribly wrong. He woke his parents, who calmed him down, and he went back to sleep. The episode ended there: The next morning all was normal.”These kids know something is not right,” Loewy says. “They say, ‘I’m hearing things,’ and it freaks them out.”Through her mentor, psychologist Elaine Walker at Emory University in Atlanta, Loewy also met middle-aged adults with severe schizophrenia who struggled to maintain their grip on reality and couldn’t carry on a conversation. She was struck by the disparity between the 15-year-olds and the 50-year-olds, and wondered about the path from early foreboding to serious illness. “Can’t we do something?” she asked herself.More than 20 years later, Loewy is a psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco, and that question has defined her career. With a small group of brain experts worldwide, she is trying to bring prevention to the field of psychiatry—one of the few medical specialties that hasn’t managed to incorporate it. 11 years Brandon Staglin at 12 with his younger sister. Anyone with young children might read this and worry—and that is exactly the challenge those seeking to prevent psychosis confront today. It’s all well and good to decipher biology and study the health records or home movies of children who later develop psychosis. But that leaves out many others who stay healthy. Hearing voices at age 11 indicates a 16-fold increased risk of schizophrenia—but the overwhelming majority of these kids will never develop it.To prevent disease, specialists must be able to pinpoint who is hurtling toward it. An international consortium is studying people with a genetic syndrome called 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, which puts them at about a 25% chance of a psychotic disorder. Researchers hope these patients, many of whom were recruited as children, will offer a clearer window into early cognitive and emotional changes that precede the illness. In another effort, Australia and six European countries are running a 10-site project called PRONIA, which began in 2013. PRONIA is recruiting 1700 people who are at high risk of psychosis, who have early-stage psychosis, or who have early-stage depression, in part to compare the trajectory of the two illnesses. Participants are offered a battery of tests over time, including neuropsychological testing, MRI scans, DNA sequencing, and analysis of blood samples for biomarkers, such as those reflecting stress response. In the United States, a long-running study called the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS) is doing something similar across nine centers.Finding these youngsters isn’t easy. Pediatricians and school counselors may see teenagers whose grades have slipped or who have stopped socializing. But “people aren’t really thinking, ‘This could be a budding psychotic process,’” says Cannon, who spearheaded NAPLS 14 years ago. “It’s only after somebody who’s trained to ask these questions asks them, ‘Are you hearing anything that is unusual, or having some ideas that are bothersome?’ And it’s at that point they tell you, ‘I’ve heard a voice call my name.’”Cannon and his colleagues reach out to schools, hospitals, churches, and other groups. And they handle a high-risk diagnosis sensitively. They don’t lead off with the words psychosis or schizophrenia, but explain that the child is experiencing certain symptoms that may worsen—although they also have a high likelihood of improving.”We grapple with, ‘Can I do harm by saying something so uncertain?’” says Kristen Woodberry, a psychologist at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “And yet, you do harm by not saying anything.” In part that’s because the more quickly a psychotic break is detected and treated with antipsychotics and other therapies, the better the long-term prognosis. Woodberry thinks of a 16-year-old she treated, whose psychiatrist had overlooked emerging psychosis for years because “this was a very bright kid, and a very high-functioning family. … He was writing in his poetry, ‘I think I’m losing my mind,’ and nobody picked up on the fact that he is losing his mind.”Increasingly, projects like NAPLS and PRONIA are clarifying what happens in the months and years before psychosis strikes. One of the big discoveries of NAPLS is that people who progress to psychosis suffer a loss of gray matter in their brain over about a year. Another is that blood markers of inflammation, perhaps driven by a mix of genetics and external risk factors, may both boost risk and predict that gray matter loss.Last fall, Cannon and others in the NAPLS consortium published a risk calculator based on 596 people who were followed for up to 2 years. They found that lower memory and verbal learning scores and a decline in social functioning were strong predictors of a psychotic break, along with severity of precursor symptoms, such as unusual thoughts. The result is a calculator, designed for professionals experienced in identifying those at high risk, which NAPLS has made available online. The researchers believe it can reliably detect up to a 50% risk of psychosis in the next year.When it comes to prevention, “I’m not expecting a miracle,” Sommer says. But “we should start.”Research projects are gearing up, and some begin before birth. At the University of Colorado in Denver, Camille Hoffman, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, launched a randomized trial this summer that aims to test a supplement, choline, in 250 pregnant women to improve brain health and mitigate various diseases in the babies. A pilot trial, published in December 2013 in The American Journal of Psychiatry, suggested that choline supplementation in healthy moms-to-be improved “auditory gating” in their babies, which helps filter out background noise. Poor auditory gating is correlated with later psychosis and other psychiatric illnesses. By 4 years old, the children were also more attentive and interactive. To Hoffman, the improvements make sense: Choline activates a brain receptor that helps with brain “scaffolding”—the fundamental arrangement of neurons during fetal development.But because psychosis rarely manifests before the teens, Hoffman’s trial won’t show whether choline given during pregnancy actually prevents disease. Instead she will rely on markers of behavior, stress hormones, and other measures in early childhood.Sommer is encountering similar challenges. For older children, being bullied is a risk factor for later psychosis, and it’s hard to argue against antibullying programs. But when Sommer proposed a study to test an antibullying program for children hearing voices, her grant application was turned down. “This type of research is very expensive,” she says. “You need to target a lot of children, only a few will go on to develop schizophrenia,” and they must be followed for years.Others are looking at cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help at-risk youth reframe their thinking. Several trials have shown that CBT can reduce the risk of developing psychosis by about 50% in the following year, Heinssen says, though it’s not clear whether treatment prevents or delays disease. Either way, researchers also believe the intervention can ease current symptoms, which makes offering it as a preventive much easier to justify. Various international agencies recommend CBT as treatment for high-risk young people, says Paolo Fusar-Poli, a psychiatrist at King’s College London whose office is in an unmarked building so families will feel more comfortable. Though he embraces CBT, Fusar-Poli acknowledges that its link to disease biology is a black box. “Whether it is effective in changing the neurobiology and course of the disorder” is unknown, he says.The most potent prevention strategy is also the most controversial: psychiatric drugs. Over the years, doctors have tried to head off psychosis with the same antipsychotic drugs used to treat full-blown illness. But the jury is still out on whether these drugs prevent a psychotic break, and they come with many side effects. “We were young and enthusiastic and didn’t realize how difficult it would be,” says Scott Woods, a psychiatrist at Yale who studied an antipsychotic years ago in high-risk individuals.Woods is hopeful again. He’s consulting with Boehringer Ingelheim, a pharmaceutical company headquartered in Germany, where scientists this fall began offering an experimental drug to people at very high risk of psychosis who are eligible based on the severity of their symptoms. The drug is not an antipsychotic, but instead strengthens the signaling of glutamate, a neurotransmitter that’s impaired in people with schizophrenia and those at risk. The company was trying it for cognitive problems in schizophrenia, and expanded into prevention.Last month, at sites across the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada, the first of 300 people signed on to be randomly assigned to the drug or a placebo. Like other prevention trials, Boehringer’s is examining whether its treatment can ease current symptoms, as well as prevent psychosis.When asked about the ethics of offering a drug to people who may never get the disease it’s designed to prevent, Michael Sand, the Boehringer scientist overseeing the clinical trial, acknowledges that psychosis risk prediction is far from perfect. But, he says, we welcome prevention in other diseases, like cancer and heart attacks, even for those whose risk is only modest. To Sand, the stigma and tragedy that mark a schizophrenia diagnosis, and our ability to identify those at substantial risk, make preventing it with safe and effective therapies even more urgent. 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AbuseHead injuriesBeing bullied SUSAN MERRELL/UCSF Family therapyPrevent bullying at school. AbuseBeing bullied Withdrawing sociallyHearing voicesDistorted thoughtsDepressionAnxietySleep disturbancesDifficulty with schoolwork If we knew then what we know now, we would have had much better clarity about what the symptoms we were seeing meant. Psychologist Rachel Loewy has been considering how to prevent psychosis in young people for years.  Here she shows her research coordinator Mayra a new software program that involves cognitive training. Scientists are learning to predict psychosis years in advance—and possibly prevent it Hearing voicesSocial withdrawalPerceptual disturbances Antibullying programsDrug abuse prevention Possible interventions Smoking marijuanaExcess stressAbuse Brandon Staglin, now more than 2 decades into life with schizophrenia, suggests that reducing that stigma may make the disease easier to combat, for example by helping affected teens speak up about their symptoms. Despite two psychotic breaks and several years unable to work, he is now doing well on medication and is happily married, getting a master’s degree in health administration, and assisting with a new California program to build a network of early psychosis treatment centers. Not everyone with schizophrenia is as healthy as he is—but not everyone is as incapacitated as even doctors often imagine.”Brandon is a different great now” than he used to be, his father says. “He’s not a Ph.D. rocket scientist … which is what he wanted to do. But he’s got a great life. It’s just a different life.”A few years after Brandon was diagnosed, his parents formed a nonprofit now called One Mind. One Mind has raised millions of dollars for research on a host of brain illnesses. One of its earliest grants was to Cannon, for psychosis prevention. Choline prenatallyGood prenatal care *Positive results from clinical trials Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Four years later, as a freshman at Dartmouth College, Brandon was hit by an onslaught of symptoms that this time didn’t dissipate on their own. A nightmare that he was embedded inside a tree, with one eye poking out and swiveling around, frightened him for days and left him convinced it carried a spiritual meaning. He heard voices telling him he was “a mixed-up kid.”That summer, he suffered a full-blown psychotic break and was diagnosed with schizophrenia. He was 18 years old.”If we knew then what we know now, we would have had much better clarity about what the symptoms we were seeing meant,” his father, Garen Staglin, says more than 25 years later. “He was such a superbright individual. We attributed his quirkiness and his behaviors to the Albert Einstein effect—he just couldn’t be bothered with day-to-day things.”In 1996, not long after Brandon was diagnosed, a pair of Australian psychiatrists named Alison Yung and Patrick McGorry developed a model for the risk state Brandon experienced. They suggested that young people skate toward psychosis and then away from it, just as Brandon did that night his grandfather was dying. They may withdraw socially, suffer sleep disturbances, or stop doing schoolwork. Later work estimated that 20% to 35% of these people would suffer a psychotic break within 2 years.But why does one person with these early signs develop psychosis and not another? Brain studies have yielded some clues. In healthy kids, “the brain dynamically changes” during adolescence, says Akira Sawa, a psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. In particular, widespread “synaptic pruning”—a sort of scaling down of connectors between neurons—reshapes the brain as a child transitions to adulthood. MRIs of some people with schizophrenia show that parts of their brain are smaller than normal, a feature associated with overactive synaptic pruning in adolescence.Recent genetic research lends credence to this theory. In January 2016, a landmark study in Nature from the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, reported that a set of genes associated with schizophrenia can contribute to synaptic pruning.So far, genetic studies have done more to elucidate biology than to identify people at high risk. Although schizophrenia has a strong inherited component—about 10% of those with an affected parent and 50% with an affected identical twin will be diagnosed—the genetics are “humblingly complex,” says Tyrone Cannon, a psychologist at Yale University with a longstanding interest in prevention. “It’s not just one mechanism, it’s thousands of genes.”The life and habits of an average teenager may amplify risk in those already tilting toward disease. Smoking marijuana, for instance, has been associated with psychotic episodes. Stress modulates hormones that are thought to affect pruning, and stressful events often precede a psychotic break. This was true for Brandon, as he struggled with his first year away at college and a breakup with a girlfriend before descending into psychosis.Researchers who have sifted through medical records of people with schizophrenia from before the disease struck, or medical records of their children, recognize subtle signs even earlier. “We’re looking back using the army records from Israel to see what happens before onset, or birth registries from Scandinavia,” says Iris Sommer, a psychiatrist at the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands. She and others have found what she calls a “huge trajectory” of symptoms arcing toward psychosis. This trajectory begins very young and becomes more pronounced, if vague, as a child grows.Most of these signs are nonspecific and carry only a small increase in risk, and many people who are diagnosed later display none of them. Studies of pregnant women have found that some who suffer serious infection are more likely to have a baby who grows up to develop schizophrenia. In elementary school, children at risk can harbor irrational thoughts, like believing they’re being spied on. They may make involuntary motor movements, or hold their limbs or head in awkward positions. Walker collected home movies of children who developed schizophrenia as adults, along with videos of age- and sex-matched siblings. The children were under 10, but in retrospect, the crystal ball was already clear. “Undergrads,” says Loewy, who was one when she watched the movies, “could reliably tell which one was going to develop schizophrenia.” Garen Staglin By Jennifer Couzin-FrankelNov. 16, 2017 , 12:30 PM THE STAGLIN FAMILY last_img read more

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Candidates Forum Focuses On Women Of Color

first_imgNearly half of the very wide field of Democratic presidential candidates was slated to take part in the 2020 election season’s first event taking aim at the most coveted of voting demographics: women of color. So it wasn’t surprising in the least that the proper location for the “She the People Presidential Forum,” taking place Wednesday afternoon, should be a historically Black college.Texas Southern University was hosting eight White House hopefuls at what was being billed as “the first-ever Presidential candidate forum focused on women of color.” The forum was set to begin at 1 p.m. local time or 2 p.m. EDT. 1. #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/Umk0I34tE3— Cate Carrejo (@CampaignCate) April 24, 2019 27. Good morning, Twitter angels. It’s 6AM, pitch black outside, in a few hours this auditorium will be PACKED with America’s most progressive decision makers: women of color. #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/yXH5pF9LO7— She the People (@_shethepeople) April 24, 2019 6. While answering a question on the higher Black maternal mortality rates, @EWarren discusses how regardless of the mother’s income or education, a lot of the issues that arise come down to prejudice.She then discusses her plan on how to address it. #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/in7PJbMfgp— Erick Fernandez (@ErickFernandez) April 24, 2019 29. Small but mighty team of women of color working since 5am today. All hands & hearts on deck the next 24 hours. #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/L9vPaRfooV— Jessica Byrd (@JessicaLBYRD) April 23, 2019 11. Getting Ready for #SheThePeople2020! Here’s the line up! pic.twitter.com/Z1Lc7cGcQR— Rep. Renitta Shannon (@RenittaShannon) April 24, 2019 Headed to Houston to #SheThePeople2020! This is the first Presidential Forum for Women of Color that is for us, by us. Today we make history in Houston, Texas! Join us on livestream at 1:00central on Facebook! #SheThePeople2020 @BlackVotersMtr pic.twitter.com/mf9SYFiDq4— LaTosha Brown (@MsLaToshaBrown) April 24, 2019New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, California Sen. Kamala Harris, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren were all confirmed for the event. They also happen to be some of the most outspoken candidates on topics that resonate deeply with voters of color, such as voter suppression, the racial wealth equality gap and reparations. 3. “When we are talking about justice we are also talking about the massive levels of racial disparity in this county.. White families have 10x the wealth of Black families.” @BernieSanders #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/QjxD3X5BfB— People for Bernie (@People4Bernie) April 24, 2019 We’re on our way to Houston for #SheThePeople2020, the nation’s 1st presidential forum focused on women of color. We will tweet the livestream of my remarks at 1:30pm CT/2:30pm ET. Tune in! pic.twitter.com/6yyY6WTnG3— Julián Castro (@JulianCastro) April 24, 2019“Women of color are the most progressive voters in the country,” Aimee Allison, president of She the People, told Houston Public Media recently. “And we’re interested in a whole wide range of social, economic and racial justice issues, and so we’ll be exploring those with the candidates.” 8. After @JoyAnnReid asked about why she decided to travel to the Mississippi Delta despite it not being a swing state, @EWarren talks about her housing proposal. #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/Uv4VHIvwPL— Erick Fernandez (@ErickFernandez) April 24, 2019 LIVE: 2020 presidential candidates participate in the #SheThePeople2020 forum. https://t.co/izIzuxH20p— MSNBC (@MSNBC) April 24, 2019The anticipation across social media was at a fever pitch ahead of the forum. Scroll down to see some scenes and tweets about the “She the People Presidential Forum” at Texas Southern University. 28. #SheThePeople2020 so excited to be here pic.twitter.com/SeOK3PuigT— yeehaw (@Dhamaris5) April 24, 2019 9. .@KamalaHarris was on at #SheThePeople2020Standing ovation from the women in the room. pic.twitter.com/bCtSATvMEI— chris evans (@notcapnamerica) April 24, 2019 19. Our time now. #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/gazYuiwg3s— Tougher than Nigerian Hair (@tailsOFtheCRYPT) April 24, 2019 17. A question about @IlhanMN and how we talk about WoC and Muslim women who speak truth to power from a resident @TexasSouthern student. #SheThePeople2020 #WeMarchWithIlhan pic.twitter.com/wdKy99bi1H— She the People (@_shethepeople) April 24, 2019 4. In a discussion about raising the minimum wage to $15, @BetoORourke says he wants to go farther, endorses ratification of the #ERA. #ShethePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/0kZwrBRYe0— zachary (@zatchry) April 24, 2019 24. Q: @TulsiGabbard do you support Puerto Rico’s statehood?A: #ShethePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/Drf1sln0e8— Antonio (@AntonioArellano) April 24, 2019 25. You thought we were joking about the dance break #SheThePeople2020 That swag don’t stop just cuz we talking about the issues. Don’t let them play Old Town Road! pic.twitter.com/WR5gOZ1WkK— She the People (@_shethepeople) April 24, 2019 14. Incredible intro by the incomparables @RepSylviaGarcia + @JacksonLeeTX18! here here to Year of… Women of Color (and its only the beginning)!!! #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/QerLlEnjLq— Mayra Mendoza (@peppyMiss) April 24, 2019 13. #SheThePeople2020 Never been in a place like this!! pic.twitter.com/E3CSSxiefy— Charlene Mendoza (@cmm246) April 24, 2019 2. “As POTUS I will appoint Supreme Court justices and nominate justices all across the board who will represent the needs of people of color, of working people, and who are prepared to believe and fight for for justice, not just the people on top” #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/EXcQZE0QHc— People for Bernie (@People4Bernie) April 24, 2019 16. #SheThePeople2020 that’s right, Virginia… pic.twitter.com/qx3rzrfCNP— Dan Martinez (@Dan_Martinez1) April 24, 2019 7. When Bernie just said to the women at #SheThePeople2020 that he was “at the March on Washington with Dr. King” They booed & groan pic.twitter.com/UMLVh0391S— Viktor Tramaine aka The May King (@wondermann5) April 24, 2019 5. As the marijuana industry continues to grow, there are people of color sitting behind bars for doing the exact same thing. It’s time we changed the system. #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/7KotnCqihx— Kamala Harris (@KamalaHarris) April 24, 2019 31. MOOD about a few things today: 1)spending time with & learning alongside @IndivisibleTeam group leaders who are in Houston for #ShethePeople2020 2)gratitude for the subtle yet sweet hospitality in Houston 3)breaking bread together at the iconic & delicious @LucillesFood pic.twitter.com/cpxJLSc0si— Mari Urbina (@TiaMari489) April 24, 2019 21. Texas is turning blue thanks to women of color! #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/BD9LMF9qHm— She the People (@_shethepeople) April 24, 2019 22. Kicking off #SheThePeople2020 with remarks from Congresswomen Sylvia Garcia and Sheila Jackson Lee pic.twitter.com/eLXzwMBDKn— Women’s March (@womensmarch) April 24, 2019 23. Q: @JulianCastro why should women of color choose you as their presidential candidate?A: #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/EYSV0NjqOa— Antonio (@AntonioArellano) April 24, 2019 12. #SheThePeople2020 is the first Presidential Forum that is for us, by us. Today we make history in Houston, Texas and We. Are. Here. For. It. pic.twitter.com/SIRtlmYuA7— Luz Collective (@LuzCollective) April 24, 2019 18. Getting straight to the point: Do you see taxing corporations as a racial justice issue? What’s your commitment to fighting for racial and economic justice? @ConMijente at #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/q9kCQQ48pt— Groundswell Action Fund (@groundswellaxn) April 24, 2019 26. A chant of “Our Votes Matter” breaks out. A standing ovation. Women of color are here. The energy cannot be matched! This is how you drop the mic! #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/hFOHpFWd7H— She the People (@_shethepeople) April 24, 2019 20. #SheThePeople2020 getting started. pic.twitter.com/rerFV7SRtA— Linda Sarsour (@lsarsour) April 24, 2019 10. Me watching Kamala’s standing ovation speech at #SheThePeople2020: pic.twitter.com/P2yBmtN4k5— chris evans (@notcapnamerica) April 24, 2019 We’ve arrived! #ShethePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/0FUntiv0pH— Emma Shapiro-Weiss (@fieldsprout) April 24, 2019As a Democratic voting bloc, Black women were key to helping Hillary Clinton win the popular vote in 2016. However, the party has failed to be forceful on issues that matter to the Black community, such as criminal justice reform, education and health care, according to New Jersey Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, co-chair of the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls.“Black women have long been on the forefront of change and progress in this country. Sadly, we are so often left on the sidelines of critical discussions and policymaking that disparately impacts us and the communities we support,” Coleman told the Post.Candidates in the “She the People Presidential Forum” probably had that in mind when signing on to participate.To watch the “She the People Presidential Forum” live online, viewers can stream the event via She The People’s official Facebook page by clicking here, or you can watch below. 30. SheThePeople2020 is the first Presidential Forum that is for us, by us. Tomorrow we will make history in Houston, Texas! @BlackVotersMtr issl excited to be a partner. #shethepeople2020 @_shethepeople pic.twitter.com/fJ8j6fC2BE— LaTosha Brown (@MsLaToshaBrown) April 23, 2019 15. It’s a packed house #SheThePeople2020 pic.twitter.com/g9hBYL1R0f— Andrea Zuniga (@andiezd) April 24, 2019 32. Squad deep in #Houston for #ShethePeople2020! #ReproJustice pic.twitter.com/ZAHgfqpAKo— La’Tasha D. Mayes (@duxfemfac) April 24, 2019last_img read more

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Jussie Smolletts Empire Character May Not Return

first_img Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ More By NewsOne Staff The city of Chicago is now suing Smollett for a half a million dollars. Kim Foxx, the Cook County State Attorney, has been attacked by the Chicago Police and is calling for a probe into the 16 felony counts being dropped. She has also said she is receiving death threats.Smollett has maintained his innocence.SEE ALSO:Kamala Harris Leads Senate To Finally Passing Anti-Lynching BillWTH? ‘Black Panther’ Writer Roxane Gay Was Not Invited To The Movie PremiereCan Racial Profiling Be Stopped? A Federal Jury Sides With The Louisiana State Police Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family Chicago Police Department , Hate Crime , Homophobic , Jussie Smollett , MAGA , racist attack center_img Jussie Smollett is still experiencing fallout after being accused of staging a hate crime, even though all charges have been dropped. Now it is being reported that has character on “Empire,” Jamal Lyon, will not return for next season. Nonetheless, Smollett’s contract has been extended.See Also: Complete Timeline Of Jussie Smollett InvestigationFox said in a statement to Entertainment Tonight, “By mutual agreement, the studio has negotiated an extension to Jussie Smollett’s option for season six, but at this time there are no plans for the character of Jamal to return to ‘Empire.’” Twitter Reacts To Sen. Kamala Harris Announcing Her Run For President Smollett’s personal rep told ET, “We’ve been told that Jussie will not be on Empire in the beginning of the season but he appreciates they have extended his contract to keep Jamal’s future open. Most importantly he is grateful to Fox and ‘Empire’ leadership, cast, crew and fans for their unwavering support!”The battle is not over for Smollett. Th Osundairo brothers have filed a lawsuit and complained that Smollett’s Los Angeles-based celebrity attorney Mark Geragos made them “feel unsafe and alienated in their local Chicago community.”Reportedly, sources close to the brothers who go by Abel and Ola claimed they have not been able to land an agent since the Smollett case went public.In addition, their fitness training business was skyrocketing but the lawsuit said “many of their potential clients turned out to be feigning interest in getting in shape and were really looking to get details on Jussie’s case.”Geragos and his co-counsel downplayed the lawsuit.“This so-called lawsuit by the brothers is more of their lawyer driven nonsense, and a desperate attempt for them to stay relevant and further profit from an attack they admit they perpetrated,” they said in a statement released Tuesday.On Jan. 29, while walking to a subway, Smollett claimed two men yelled racial and homophobic slurs at him, investigators told The Hollywood Reporter. They allegedly punched and poured bleach on him while one of the suspects put a rope around his neck. As they fled the scene, Smollett told police they said, “This is MAGA country.” Senate Policy Luncheons last_img read more

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End of US shutdown wont mean return to business as usual for

first_img Once their doors are open, however, there will be a staggering amount of work waiting to be done. And that will require triage, says David Conover, vice president of research at the University of Oregon in Eugene and a former ocean division director at NSF.“The first thing they’ll probably want to do is address what didn’t happen during the shutdown,” he says. At NSF, a $7.6 billion agency with no in-house research operations, that will mean processing routine award transactions that were frozen, resuming conversations with scientists with questions about both current awards as well as upcoming competitions, and rescheduling more than 100 review panels—involving 2000 proposals—that were scrubbed during the shutdown.At other agencies, early tasks could include reopening shuttered websites that provide publicly available data and restarting research projects that paused midstream.Taking such immediate steps should ease some of the anxiety that has built up in the scientific community about the status of their research. The uncertainty was especially painful for those with time-sensitive studies that had been approved by funding agencies, but for which the money had not been made available. Also breathing easier: graduate students and postdocs waiting to be put on federally funded grants awarded to their mentors.But what Conover calls “clearing the decks” is only the first—and in many ways the easiest—step. “What’s going to be more challenging is looking ahead to all the pending actions,” he says. At NSF’s headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia, that list includes making decisions on new awards, scheduling panel meetings to review the next tranche of proposals, and fleshing out plans for new initiatives. All that stopped during the shutdown, he emphasizes, and it can’t simply be turned back on along with the lights.“Nobody has looked at any of that stuff,” he says about the pileup of electronic submissions and other communications with the agency. “And NSF may want to wait a while to see what happens in Congress before they think about rescheduling everything, because they could be shut down again.”To avoid that second shutdown, Congress and Trump must strike a deal on the president’s demand for $5.7 billion for a border wall. That issue triggered the current shutdown, and the Democrats now in control of the U.S. House of Representatives have so far refused to negotiate until shuttered agencies were given funding to continue normal operations. If no deal is reached by 15 February, those agencies will once again run out of money.Nusser hopes NSF and other agencies put “people first” as they resume grantmaking operations. But that will still leave a lot of unfinished business.“I don’t know if we should expect to see very much happen in the next 3 weeks,” she says. Federal employees, she notes, “have been through a pretty difficult situation, and I can imagine they are pretty demoralized.”Research and university groups reacted to today’s developments with guarded optimism. “We are pleased that the White House and Congress reached an agreement to reopen federal agencies and urge all parties to ensure we won’t be right back in this same situation in three weeks,” said Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) in Washington, D.C., in a statement. “Although three weeks of funding is better than no funding at all, the U.S. research enterprise does not operate anywhere close to full strength when agencies are only guaranteed to be open three weeks at a time.”APLU also urged legislators to pass spending bills that would provide previously proposed increases for research agencies, rather than freeze their 2019 budgets at 2018 levels. 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But researchers shouldn’t expect their favorite federal research agency to be back to normal anytime soon.“Scientists will need to be patient,” warns Sarah Nusser, vice president for research at Iowa State University in Ames. “You’re not going to get all your questions answered immediately.”President Donald Trump’s announcement this afternoon that he would accept a 3-week extension of current funding levels for several departments and agencies will allow them to reopen on Monday, and Congress appears ready to act at once. The agencies that conduct or fund research that have been mostly closed since 22 December 2018 include NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Emailcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country AFGE/Flickr (CC BY 2.0) Furloughed federal workers who protested the shutdown earlier this month in Washington, D.C., will be going back to work, for at least 3 weeks.last_img read more

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