Saints look to Manitoba to find size up front in recruit BJ Avery

first_img“He is a well-rounded player who has no problem going to the tough areas of the rink to score goals and make plays.”Playing in a small town in Manitoba, Avery feels like Selkirk College will be a good fit for him.“I chose Selkirk College because of the great hockey program and I’ve always wanted to live in BC,” he says. “It’s a great opportunity to get a start on my education and figure out what path I want to go.”During his time in Swan Valley, Avery was popular with his teammates and in the community.“The Stampeders are pleased that Selkirk College had successfully recruited BJ Avery for their upcoming season,” says Stampeders head coach Erik Peterson.“As an organization we wish to thank BJ for his dedication, and wish him success in his education and hockey in the future.”Avery is very appreciative of the opportunity that was given to him in Swan Valley, but is looking forward to his next chapter in British Columbia.“It was a great place where my teammates and I were treated very well,” says Avery. “I’m going to miss the organization and the community.”Avery’s academic goals are to enroll in Selkirk College’s Business Administration Program in the Fall Semester.Avery is the fourth forward to commit to the Saints for the upcoming 2015-2016 season joining Dallas Calvin (Trail BCHL), Troy Maclise (Osoyoos KIJHL) and Marcel Fuchs (Creston KIJHL). The Selkirk College Saints men’s hockey team has bolstered its 2015-2016 roster with the addition of hulking forward BJ Avery who has committed to playing in the upcoming British Columbia Intercollegiate Hockey League (BCIHL) season.Avery is a 6-foot-3, 205-pound forward who recently completed his final season with the Swan Valley Stampeders of the Manitoba Junior Hockey League (MJHL).A strong presence down the middle, the Clearwater, Manitoba native spent three seasons with Swan Valley posting 30 goals and 35 assists in 118 career games at the Junior A level.This past season saw Avery set career highs in goals (18), assists (18), and points (36).“I hope to be a go-to guy on the ice and in the locker room that will help the team in any way possible,” the towering Avery says of joining the three-time defending BCIHL champion Saints.Recruited by former Saints head coach Alex Evin, Avery will bring something the team was missing during the 2014-2015 season.“BJ will bring size and strength to an already skilled, hardworking forward group,” says Evin, who announced last month that he will be taking up assistant coaching duties with the BCHL’s Alberni Valley Bulldogs.last_img read more

Indonesian governor asks president to let timber firms drain peat in his province

first_imgBanner image: A Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus). The ape is listed as Critically Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Article published by mongabayauthor This story was reported in part by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on May 15, 2017. Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Conservation, Corporate Environmental Transgessors, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Economics, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forest Carbon, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Haze, Law Enforcement, Peatlands, Plantations, Pulp And Paper, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Southeast Asia Haze, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wetlands Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. West Kalimantan Governor Cornelis asked President Joko Widodo to let some timber plantation companies drain peatlands, even though Jakarta banned the practice last year.In a letter to the president dated Apr. 25, Cornelis makes an economic argument for allowing the companies to proceed as usual.Cornelis is a member of an international consortium of governors dedicated to fighting climate change; Greenpeace said his request to the president amounted to a “double standard.”His request came just days after Jakarta sanctioned a timber firm in his province for building an illegal canal through the Sungai Putri peat swamp forest. The West Kalimantan governor wants to exempt timber firms in the Indonesian province from a national ban on peatland drainage, drawing the ire of green groups who say such a policy shift could spell the end of one of the Bornean orangutan’s last strongholds, the Sungai Putri rainforest.Governor Cornelis, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, outlined his request in a letter to the president dated Apr. 25 — days after the Ministry of Environment and Forestry sanctioned a plantation firm for building an illegal drainage canal through Sungai Putri.“Companies will lose confidence to invest in the forestry sector,” Cornelis wrote to President Joko Widodo, popularly known as Jokowi. An exemption was needed, he argued, “in order to maintain a conducive and comfortable investment climate.”Jokowi introduced the ban in the wake of the devastating 2015 forest and land fires, which burned an area the size of Vermont and sickened half a million people. The country’s vast peat swamp zones have been widely drained and dried for agriculture, rendering them highly flammable and prone to emitting huge amounts of greenhouse gases. Reports of timber firm PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa (MPK)’s activities in Sungai Putri, one of the last best coastal peat swamp forests on the island of Borneo, began to emerge last year. In March, the environment ministry visited the area; on Apr. 21, it ordered the company to stop operating and close the canal, which then stretched 8.1 kilometers long.Rosa Vivien Ratnawati, a member of the ministry’s law enforcement team, said that if the company did not obey the ministry’s instructions, its permit could be frozen or revoked. The ministry would also consider a lawsuit, she said.The canal dug through the Sungai Putri forest by PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa. Photo courtesy of International Animal Rescue.The governor asks in his letter for every timber plantation firm whose permit precedes Jokowi’s signing last December of a new peat regulation, and that had started operating by then, to be allowed to proceed as usual.Greenpeace forest campaigner Ratri Kusumohartono pointed out that Cornelis is a member of the Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force, an international consortium of governors dedicated to reducing carbon emissions. In 2015 he attended the UN climate summit in Paris.“I think the fact that he’s made that commitment yet wants to open the peat and forest in his province for development is a double standard,” Kusumohartono said.Governor Cornelis, second from left, stands with environmental officials from around the world at the 2016 Oslo Redd Exchange. Photo Ken Opprann courtesy of the Norwegian Agency for Development/Flickr.Cornelis in his letter makes an economic case for the plantations, emphasizing the enormity of both the investments being made and the benefits they will produce for the province.He also says the companies will protect the forest in their concessions from local people who encroach on them.last_img read more

DNA analysis reveals a third species of flying squirrel in North America

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Researchers described the new species in a study published in the Journal of Mammalogy in May. Glaucomys oregonensis, or Humboldt’s flying squirrel, can be found all along the Pacific Coast, from southern British Columbia all the way down to the mountains of southern California.It is what’s known as a “cryptic species,” because coastal populations of the squirrel had previously been classified as northern flying squirrels (G. sabrinus) due to their similar appearance.A genetic analysis revealed the coastal populations belong to a distinct species all their own. There are now three species of flying squirrel in North America, and it turns out that the newest member of the family has actually been gliding amongst the treetops of the U.S. West Coast, sometimes right alongside its closest relatives, this whole time.Researchers described the new species in a study published in the Journal of Mammalogy in May. Glaucomys oregonensis, or Humboldt’s flying squirrel, can be found all along the Pacific Coast, from southern British Columbia all the way down to the mountains of southern California. It is what’s known as a “cryptic species,” because coastal populations of the squirrel had previously been classified as northern flying squirrels (G. sabrinus) due to their similar appearance. A genetic analysis revealed the coastal populations belong to a distinct species all their own.“For 200 years we thought we had only had one species of flying squirrel in the Northwest — until we looked at the nuclear genome, in addition to mitochondrial DNA, for the first time,” Jim Kenagy, professor emeritus of biology at the University of Washington (UW) and a study co-author, said in a statement.Kenagy is also curator emeritus of mammals at UW’s Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture. It was the Burke Museum’s collection of specimens that led the study’s lead author, Brian Arbogast, to take a closer look at the flying squirrel genetics. Arbogast is an associate professor of biology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, but was a postdoctoral researcher at UW and the Burke Museum when he first began to suspect that there may be an as-yet unrecognized species of flying squirrel.The Burke Museum’s specimens have been collected since the early 1900s, and Arbogast noticed that, while similar in appearance, the squirrels from the Pacific Coast region were often smaller and darker than populations found east of the Cascades.“I’ve been scratching my head over these squirrels since 1992,” Arbogast told National Geographic. “There was just something weird about those from the West Coast.”Arbogast and team’s DNA analysis ultimately revealed not only that coastal populations of the flying squirrels, from southern British Columbia down through western Washington and Oregon and into California, are members of a distinct species, but also that there is no genetic exchange occurring between those coastal populations of what is now called Humboldt’s flying squirrel and inland populations of the northern flying squirrel even though the two species are known to occur together in some parts of western Washington state and southern British Columbia.Arbogast and team write in the study that “mtDNA data from 185 individuals across North America revealed 2 distinct clades embedded within G. sabrinus: a widespread ‘Continental’ lineage and a more geographically restricted ‘Pacific Coastal’ lineage.”“It was a surprising discovery,” Kenagy said. He and Arbogast are amongst a group of researchers who study small mammal distribution in the western and eastern mountain ranges of the U.S. Northwest. “We were interested in the genetic structure of small mammals throughout the Pacific Northwest, and the fact that in other cases we were aware that two different species had evolved in Eastern and Western Washington.”Humboldt’s flying squirrel becomes the 45th known species of flying squirrel in the world. All three species in North America (including the newly discovered G. oregonensis, G. sabrinus, and the southern flying squirrel, G. volans) are small, nocturnal woodland creatures. They don’t actually fly, of course, but glide between trees, for up to 100 meters, on furred membranes of skin that stretch between their forearms and hind legs. Their gliding ability is remarkable, however, as flying squirrels are capable of making sharp turns in midair by using their tail as a rudder and changing the shape and tautness of their gliding membranes with their limbs.The new species was named in honor of naturalist Alexander von Humboldt.The newly-described Humboldt’s flying squirrel is the third-known species of flying squirrel in North America. Photo by Nick Kerhoulas.CITATIONArbogast, B. S., Schumacher, K. I., Kerhoulas, N. J., Bidlack, A. L., Cook, J. A., & Kenagy, G. J. (2017). Genetic data reveal a cryptic species of New World flying squirrel: Glaucomys oregonensis. Journal of Mammalogy. doi:10.1093/jmammal/gyx055Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, DNA, Environment, Genetics, Mammals, New Species, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, October 11, 2019

first_imgConservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Article published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsA rainforest in Mexico is home to a newly discovered antibiotic (Science Alert).Researchers call for a coordinated effort to stamp out cocaine trafficking and deforestation in Central and South America (The Verge).An app shows farmers where they can plant crops without cutting down forest in the West African country of Côte d’Ivoire (Deutsche Welle).Researchers discover two species of wasps in Africa that were previously unknown to science (UPI).The head of a Malaysian state says that damage to the environment and wildlife populations by timber and oil palm plantations is hurting the industries’ reputations (The Star).Tanzania’s president halts further moves to reallocate protected areas to local communities (News Ghana).Major supermarkets in the U.K. reveal that they’ve been selling products from soy grown on recently deforested lands (The Guardian).Scientists argue for a more prominent role for the “blue carbon” found in mangroves and wetlands (CIFOR Forests News).Other newsA scientist has trained ravens to avoid threatened tortoises (The Atlantic).Climate policies are gaining traction in the U.S. (The Atlantic).A new fish species turned up in a well in India (The Hindu BusinessLine).The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three scientists for their role in developing rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (The Washington Post).Poachers are stealing maple trees in U.S. national forests (Travel and Leisure).Wealthy countries get more funding to deal with climate-related risks, according to a new study (The New York Times).A new interactive map reveals “road by road” emissions from automobiles (The New York Times).Birds in North America are losing their habitat to climate change (The New York Times).A researcher rebuts recent claims in the journal Science about trophy hunting’s sustainability (The Ecologist).The challenges of moving rhinos may be worth the benefits to conservation, say the scientists involved (Conde Nast Traveler).The rising popularity of mountain biking in U.S. parks threatens people and wildlife (The New York Times).The United States Environmental Protection Agency overhauls lead testing in water for the first time in decades (The Washington Post).Banner image of a grizzly bear in Alberta by Dwayne Reilander via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Svalbard reindeer rebounding better than hoped after nearly going extinct

first_imgThe wild Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus) seems to be on the path to recovery following near extinction in the early 20th century.Now, some 22,000 Svalbard reindeer are estimated to occur across the islands, a population size that’s about twice as high as a previous estimate based on opportunistic counts from 1968 to 2008, a new study has found.The latest estimates also show that the Svalbard reindeer now occupies its entire historical range across Svalbard; areas from where the reindeer was once wiped out by hunting have the potential to support more animals, the researchers estimate.While Svalbard reindeers are doing better than many of their cousins, the subspecies’ recovery could be under threat from human-induced climate change. Reindeer and caribou populations have been declining dramatically over the past few decades. But one subspecies of reindeer seems to be doing better, a new study has found.The wild Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus), which lives in the harsh archipelago of Svalbard off Norway in the Arctic Ocean, was nearly hunted to extinction in the 19th and early 20th centuries. But its protection in 1925, including a ban on hunting, has helped the reindeer population bounce back, previous estimates suggest.To find out how many Svalbard reindeer live across the archipelago today, Mathilde Le Moullec, who completed her Ph.D. from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology this year, and her colleagues systematically surveyed more than 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) of Svalbard between 2013 and 2016. They mostly walked, sometimes 30 to 40 kilometers (18 to 25 miles) a day, and also used a small boat to reach sites that were difficult to get to on foot.In the end, Le Moullec’s team estimated there were about 22,000 Svalbard reindeer across the islands — a population size double that of a previous estimate based on opportunistic counts from 1968 to 2008, the researchers report.“At a global level, the abundances of the 12 reindeer subspecies found throughout the Arctic today appear to have declined, and the species has been listed as vulnerable (i.e., about 40% decline over the past 10–30 yr) by the International Union for Conservation of Nature,” the researchers write in the paper published in The Journal of Wildlife Management. “Our study is an example of the opposite trend pattern.”Reindeer grazing on an open patch of vegetation surrounded by ice and snow. Image Brage B. Hansen.Svalbard is said to have first been sighted by Dutch navigator Willem Barents in 1596. To rebuild a picture of where the reindeers occurred before the advent of humans after the archipelago’s “discovery” in the 16th century, Le Moullec and her colleagues collected reindeer bones and antlers preserved in the cold Arctic environment, and used radiocarbon dating to estimate how old the remains were. That gave them an idea of which areas of the archipelago supported reindeer populations before they were hunted to near extinction.“I call them my treasures,” Le Moullec said in a statement. “Walking all those kilometres, you get to places you would otherwise never go. So we started finding and collecting these ancient bones.”Bones that were older than the first documented human presence in Svalbard occurred across all sampled regions, the researchers found, giving an indication of the reindeer’s historic distribution. The latest estimates show that the Svalbard reindeer now occupies its entire historical range across Svalbard. And areas where the reindeers were once completely wiped out by hunting have the potential to support more animals, the researchers estimated.“Reindeer have recolonized their ancient grazing areas, based on the information we have from the antlers and bones,” Le Moullec said. “But we still see the effect of hunting from 100 years ago. In the areas where they were extirpated, their numbers still have the potential to increase.”While Svalbard reindeers are doing better than many of their cousins, the subspecies’ recovery could be under threat from human-induced climate change. Average temperatures in Svalbard have increased at a rate of 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) in summer and 2.9 degree Celsius (5.2 degrees Fahrenheit) in winter every 100 years, and glaciers in Svalbard have shrunk by around 7 percent over the past 30 years, the researchers write.It’s taken nearly a century for the subspecies to recover from overharvesting, and the reindeer’s response “may be too slow to track the speed of future climate change,” they add.Svalbard reindeer. Image by Perhols via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.5)Citation:Le Moullec, M., Pedersen, Å. Ø., Stien, A., Rosvold, J., & Hansen, B. B. (2019). A century of conservation: The ongoing recovery of Svalbard reindeer. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 83(8), 1676-1686. doi:10.1002/jwmg.21761 Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Environment, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Research, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Derby lorrain : la pression est sur Nancy face au FC Metz

first_imgPromis à la L1 comme au titre de champion de L2, le FC Metz rend visite à son cher voisin nancéien, ce vendredi, pour offrir un succès puissamment symbolique à son peuple. Faute d’avoir validé son maintien, l’ASNL vivra un derby sous pression.Après l’officialisation de la montée à Beauvais et la validation du titre de champion face à Valenciennes, l’agenda du FC Metz, magnifiquement troussé, exclut toute invitation au relâchement. Son charme? Une finale pour les supporters d’abord, ce vendredi soir (20h45), sur le terrain d’un voisin à l’avenir toujours incertain. Puis un combat des chefs à domicile le 17 mai pour finir, en compagnie de Brest, le plus solide suiveur des Grenats cette saison. Difficile de concevoir meilleures conclusions.Le leader, justement, aimerait encore étirer sa série d’invincibilité (16 matches) pour parfaire une saison exceptionnelle et il lui appartient désormais de poser la mirabelle sur le gâteau en offrant à ses fans le scalp de l’éternel rival. Ces derniers se sont d’ailleurs empressés de rappeler aux joueurs l’importance de cette avant-dernière échéance, espérant que des Grenats avertis vaudront bien trois points dans le derby. «C’est l’opportunité d’avoir une saison plus que parfaite», remarque Vincent Hognon. «L’enjeu, pour nous, c’est d’être au niveau de la présence mentale et de l’investissement que nécessite un derby. En lui-même, ce match devrait suffire, mais on est prudent. On a essayé de tout mettre en place comme si on n’était pas monté, comme si on n’était pas champion…»«À Nancy en champion»L’ASNL aimerait connaître ce luxe d’une préparation décontractée, d’observer «des sourires à l’entraînement» et de savoir sa prochaine destination tranchée, mais son insécurité au classement lui interdit. Et ajoute du sel à cette partie qui sent généralement le soufre. Car son calendrier est également formidable d’anticipation avec une possible finale pour le maintien à Béziers vendredi prochain. Toute la tension de ce dernier rendez-vous sera conditionnée par les résultats de la 37e journée.À cet égard, ce derby revêt un caractère plus particulier pour l’entraîneur-adjoint du FC Metz qui doit savourer intérieurement sa petite revanche sur le destin. Évincé par l’ASNL en janvier 2018, Hognon reverra «Nancy en champion» pour reprendre ses propres termes, même s’il a toujours évité de personnaliser le débat. Surtout, l’intéressé a conscience de défier un adversaire plus solide que l’ensemble laminé à l’aller (3-0). «Ce sera un match complètement différent contre un effectif XXL avec six nouveaux joueurs, de bonnes pioches», dit-il. «L’ASNL est quand même 6e sur la phase retour et 3e meilleure attaque…» Tant mieux! Au moins, le défi est à la hauteur d’un champion.Christian Jougleux/RL Partagerlast_img read more

Cyclisme : Christine Majerus s’impose dans le Grand Prix d’Isbergues en France

first_imgIl s’agit du cinquième succès cette saison de la championne nationale.À six jours des championnats du monde sur route qui se dérouleront à Harrogate dans le Yorkshire, Christine Majerus (32 ans) affiche une très belle forme. La multiple championne nationale avait trouvé ce dimanche un arrangement avec l’équipe luxembourgeoise Andy Schleck – Immo Losch pour pouvoir participer à cette épreuve française classée 1.2, qui constituait une excellente préparation en vue des Mondiaux.Au terme des 134 kilomètres de course, Christine Majerus s’est imposée au sprint devant les Françaises Clara Copponi (FDJ Nouvelle Aquitaine) et Pascale Jeuland (Dolticini), l’Italienne Lara Vieceli (WNT-Rotor) terminant quatrième. Partager Vivement samediUne autre Luxembourgeoise a terminé dans le top 20 puisque Elise Maes a pris, pour sa part, la onzième place, à quelques douze secondes de sa compatriote.Pour en revenir à Christine Majerus qui s’est installée dans le top 10 mondial, elle a multiplié les bonnes performances ces dernières semaines. Après sa huitième place sur le Tour de Norvège, elle s’était adjugée le Boels Ladies Tour puis avait terminé quatrième voici une semaine du Challenge by la Vuelta. Neuvième du championnat d’Europe, combien terminera-t-elle des Mondiaux, samedi en Angleterre après les 150 kilomètres de course?Denis Bastienlast_img read more

[Handball] Batinovic, la pierre angulaire

first_imgAuteur de 13 réalisations samedi soir, le Croate a été l’un des grands artisans de la victoire contre Veseli (27-25) et de la qualification pour les 8e de finale de la compétition.Damir Batinovic n’est pas du genre à s’attarder sur des choses par essence éphémères. Alors, samedi soir, quand un journaliste vint à sa rencontre recueillir les impressions de l’homme du match, l’homme aux 13 réalisations, le Croate se montra quelque peu surpris : «Sur le moment, je ne le savais même pas. Pendant un match, je ne les compte pas. Que ce soit moi ou un autre joueur, c’est pareil. Le plus important reste que l’équipe gagne.»S’attirer les lumières en période clémente revient vite à s’attirer les foudres par gros temps. À ce titre, hier soir, le Croate avait déjà tourné la page de la Challenge Cup pour se tourner vers la prochaine échéance : un quart de finale de Coupe de Luxembourg contre Käerjeng. «C’est un match important pour le club, et ce, face à une équipe contre laquelle on a perdu il y a deux semaines à l’issue d’un très mauvais match de notre part…» De cette revanche, le natif de Metkovic espère en être malgré une douleur au talon du pied droit. «J’ai pris un coup. C’est un peu douloureux mais j’irai voir le kiné ce lundi et on verra. J’espère qu’il n’y a rien de grave car je veux jouer ce match contre Bascharage…» Après deux sorties de route successives à ce stade de la compétition – les deux contre Berchem – une troisième ferait vraiment désordre…Il était en état de grâce!Inutile d’échafauder un scénario catastrophe ou de jouer les volatiles de mauvais augure, le début de saison des Red Boys est pour le moins prometteur. Et cette qualification pour les 8e de finale de Challenge Cup l’illustre parfaitement. Pas tant au vu de la renommée de l’adversaire que de la solid(ar)ité défensive affichée sur l’ensemble des deux rencontres. Impression partagée par John Scheuren, le président de l’institution differdangeoise : «Gagner des matches par des exploits individuels, c’est une chose. Mais en gagner deux grâce au travail défensif, c’en est une autre. Cela reflète l’état d’esprit qui règne dans ce groupe.» Les départs, cet été, de certains éléments ont apaisé le vestiaire. Moins de clans, moins de querelles intestines.Ce nouvel environnement serait, paraît-il, l’une des explications du visage affiché par Damir Batinovic. Arrivé à la demande de Danilo Brestovac, reparti en Macédoine avant même qu’il ne pose ses valises à Differdange, le demi-centre a tout d’abord passé une saison sous les ordres de Jérémy Roussel avant de découvrir Sylvain Brosse. Deux techniciens, deux visions. «Jérémy avait un plan de jeu et il fallait le respecter. Mon rôle était de servir en priorité mes arrières», explique Batinovic avant d’ajouter : «Avec Sylvain, il y a également un plan de jeu, mais chacun dispose d’une certaine liberté de mouvements.» Ce style, plus épanouissant, lui permet de prendre certaines initiatives et de faire montre de sa qualité technique. «Samedi, il était en état de grâce!», lâche Scheuren admiratif de «ses tirs à la hanche en pleine lucarne». «Le tir en appui, c’est mon meilleur tir», confirme le natif de Metkovic passé aussi par Zagreb et Maribor. Sous le maillot du Metalurg (2011-2013), il dispute la Ligue des champions et atteint les quarts de finale sous la direction du légendaire Lino Cervar. Repéré, Batinovic rejoint Cesson-Rennes (2013-2016) puis Tremblay (2016-2018). Quatre saisons passées au sein de l’élite française, pour un total de 231 buts en 97 matches de D1, entrecoupées d’une pige en ProLigue et d’un titre de champion de France de D2.À Differdange, tout comme Mikel Moldrup, Damir Batinovic est professionnel. À 32 ans, le Croate sera en fin de contrat en fin de saison. Que fera-t-il? «Je n’en sais rien. Nous ne sommes même pas encore en décembre. On a le temps de penser à ça», déclare le Croate que Sylvain Brosse résume en trois mots : «Un vrai pro.» Qui pour l’heure permet aux Red Boys d’espérer vivre une belle, voire une folle saison… Charles Michel Partagerlast_img read more

[Basket] : «On peut jouer beaucoup mieux que ça!»

first_imgEtzella a dominé Bertrange, samedi, grâce à un tir à quelques secondes de la fin de Philippe Gutenkauf. L’arrière nordiste, véritable patron de l’armada ettelbruckoise, se montre très sévère à l’égard de son équipe. Car il sait ce dont elle est capable.Après une entame de championnat compliquée, les choses reviennent petit à petit à la normale pour Etzella. Mais pour Philippe Gutenkauf, sauveur de sa formation contre le Sparta, le tenant de la Coupe et champion en titre doit et peut beaucoup mieux faire. On arrive à la mi-saison et votre bilan est de 6-3. Vous êtes deuxième du championnat. Êtes-vous satisfait?Philippe Gutenkauf : Non, je ne suis pas satisfait. On a perdu contre les Musel, le Racing et Larochette… Normalement, ce sont des matches qu’on doit gagner. Pour le moment, on joue à 50 % du basket qu’on a pratiqué la saison passée. On n’arrive pas à jouer 40 minutes notre basket habituel.Vous êtes bien sévère!Bien sûr. Car je sais qu’on peut jouer beaucoup mieux qu’on ne le fait.À quoi attribuez-vous cette première partie de saison en deçà de vos attentes?Je n’ai pas dit qu’on avait fait une mauvaise première partie de saison mais qu’on devait faire mieux pour remporter le doublé. Les raisons de ce mauvais départ sont dures à donner. Sur certains matches, on parvient à jouer comme l’année dernière. On prend du plaisir, on fait des passes, on met nos tirs, on joue collectif. Et le match suivant, on n’est pas du tout collectif, on se dispute et ça ne marche pas.Si on regarde bien, le seul changement majeur dans l’équipe, c’est au niveau des pros. En perdant Tim Coleman et Billy McNutt, vous avez perdu plus que vous ne le pensiez?En fait oui… Les deux ensemble formaient le meilleur duo de la Total League. Billy avait au moins un double-double à chaque match alors que Tim nous a fait remporter beaucoup de rencontres. Je pense que s’ils étaient restés, on réaliserait sans doute encore une fois le doublé.Mais ils ne sont plus là…Non. Mais avec Dwayne (Brown) et Ike (Banks), je peux dire que nous avons deux joueurs également très forts. Ils se donnent à 100 % à l’entraînement et on voit qu’ils veulent nous aider pour atteindre le même résultat que la saison passée.Ike est arrivé en cours de saison, ça a vraiment changé quelque chose une fois qu’il était là?C’est vrai qu’on a eu pas mal de malchance avec les Américains cette saison. Au début, Trayvonn Wright est arrivé. Un super joueur mais qui s’est malheureusement blessé. Ensuite, on a Malik, qui mesurait 2,09 m et dont on pensait qu’il pourrait nous aider. Mais ce n’était malheureusement pas le cas. Désormais, on a Ike. Et des trois cités, je pense que c’est le meilleur. Je suis persuadé qu’on peut faire quelque chose avec lui.Vous êtes encore en rodage avec lui, encore en train d’apprendre à vous connaître?Oui bien sûr! Ça prend encore du temps, mais le coach et l’équipe font l’effort d’intégrer le mieux possible les deux Américains. C’est vrai que lors de la saison dernière, on a eu la chance que ça se passe très vite avec Tim.Revenons au championnat. Il y a deux semaines, vous restiez sur une grosse défaite à l’Arantia, avec plus de 100 points encaissés. Comment avez-vous vécu la situation?Ce match face à Larochette était terrible. La seule chose positive, c’est que je jouais contre mon meilleur ami, Pit Elcheroth. Mais le match en lui-même, on était nul défensivement, Pit a dominé sous les panneaux. Je ne me rappelle même plus la dernière fois qu’on a encaissé 100 points!C’était il y a deux semaines. La semaine dernière, vous n’aviez pas joué, c’était une bonne chose pour préparer le Sparta?Je pense que les deux semaines nous ont fait du bien. On s’est dit qu’on ne pouvait jouer que mieux sinon la saison allait être très compliquée. Le coach et Nelson nous ont motivés toute la semaine, on s’est bien entraînés et on était donc motivés pour l’emporter au Sparta.Ce que vous avez fait… même si ça n’a pas été facile?On a démarré le match de manière très agressive. On a bien couru, on a mis nos tirs, on a bien joué en défense et trouvé Ike et Dwayne sous les panneaux, bref toutes les missions qu’on se fixe à chaque match. On a pris du plaisir sur le parquet en première mi-temps, c’est ce qui explique l’avance de 18 points à un moment de la partie.Mais par la suite, c’est plus compliqué?Oui. Comme ça a déjà été le cas à plusieurs reprises cette saison, on a commencé à faire montre de moins d’agressivité. On a forcé les tirs, on a oublié le jeu collectif. J’ai le sentiment que parfois, quand on mène de quelques points, on est sûrs de l’emporter. Mais cette saison, ce n’est pas le cas. Il faut toujours être attentif car toutes les équipes doivent et veulent gagner pour jouer les play-offs. Partager J’ai le sentiment que parfois, quand on mène de quelques points, on est trop sûrs del’emporter. Mais cette saison, ce n’est plus le casOn peut dire que vous vous êtes fait peur?Au début, j’étais sûr qu’on allait gagner ce match. Mais dans le dernier quart, quand le Sparta est revenu, j’ai commencé à avoir un peu peur. Maintenant, je savais qu’on avait plus d’expérience qu’eux et qu’avec Jairo, Gilles, Dominique ou Fritz, on a déjà connu une telle situation. Et en tant que champion et vainqueur de la Coupe, on se devait de gérer.Et finalement, c’est vous qui offrez la victoire à Etzella?On a mené pratiquement tout le match, jusqu’à un tir de Pitt Koster qui donnait l’avance d’un point au Sparta. Sur la dernière action, Ike devait normalement faire un écran mais comme il n’y avait plus beaucoup de temps, j’ai décidé d’attaquer et de mettre mon tir. Quand je l’ai rentré, il devait rester environ trois secondes à jouer.Vous inscrivez ce panier après avoir effacé Pitt Koster. Vous n’êtes pas coutumier du fait?Non, c’est seulement la deuxième fois que j’inscris le panier de la victoire. La première fois, c’était lors du dernier match des finales contre le T71 la saison passée.Grâce à ce panier, vous repartez avec la victoire. Que retenez-vous du match, la victoire ou le fait que vous vous êtes fait peur jusqu’au bout?On ne retient que la victoire. Il faut toujours tirer le positif de chaque situation. Donc on retient la victoire et pas le fait qu’on s’est fait peur. C’est toujours bon de gagner, c’est important pour nous. Et notre confiance.Avec ce succès, vous terminez la phase aller avec le bon nombre de matches, mais sans avoir affronté le Basket Esch. Est-ce votre principal adversaire, cette saison?Les Eschois ont remporté tous leurs matches jusqu’à présent. Ils sont vraiment très forts. Je pense que choisir Jackson-Cartwright comme Américain était la meilleure décision pour eux. Avec lui, ils ont un vrai meneur capable de gérer le jeu et qui peut trouver ses coéquipiers.Vous ne regrettez pas de ne pas les avoir encore affrontés?Non, ce n’est pas grave. On va les rencontrer à deux reprises en janvier. Je suppose qu’on sera prêt à ce moment.Êtes-vous surpris de voir que le championnat est aussi serré?Oui. Depuis que je joue en N1, c’est la première fois que ça arrive. Généralement, on peut dire à l’avance qui jouera les play-offs et qui sera en play-downs. Mais cette saison, tout le monde peut battre tout le monde. Ça se voit également au niveau du classement. À mon avis, c’est une belle réclame pour le basket au Luxembourg!C’est seulement la deuxième fois que j’inscris le panier de la victoire.La première fois, c’était lors du dernier match des finales contre le T71, la saison dernièrePour le moment, vous êtes toujours en lice sur les deux tableaux. Au vu du jeu que vous produisez, le doublé vous semble réalisable?Bien sûr, c’est notre but de défendre les deux titres. Pour le moment, on est dans les temps. Je pense que les gens oublient parfois qu’on est les tenants de la Coupe et du championnat même si on a déjà perdu trois fois cette saison.Sur un plan personnel, vous êtes-vous fixé des objectifs?De toujours rester positif. De faire tout ce qui est en mon pouvoir pour aider l’équipe à gagner.Comment jugez-vous votre niveau actuel?Je pense qu’à la fin de la saison passée, j’étais vraiment au top de ma forme. Maintenant, pour le moment, je suis plutôt satisfait de mes prestations. Je sais que je peux faire mieux. Notamment sur le plan défensif, pour le moment, mes adversaires me passent beaucoup trop facilement. Mais je suis convaincu que ça va encore venir.Que manque-t-il à Etzella pour redevenir la fantastique machine à gagner de la saison dernière?Plus de collectif et une meilleure défense!On le sait, à Etzella, il y a beaucoup de très bons joueurs. Également parmi les jeunes. Quel conseil pourriez-vous leur donner alors qu’il est peut-être plus difficile de trouver sa place au Deich que n’importe où en N1?Je leur dis toujours de faire le plus possible. Tous les jeunes font du très bon travail à l’entraînement. Joe (Martins), Sam (Wolter), Eric (Zenners), Alex (Pereira Meireles), Mathis (Wolff) et Yannick (Zimmer) sont des joueurs avec beaucoup de talent. Et je pense que dans peu de temps, ils vont le montrer sur le parquet.Pas évident de se faire une place avec un tel effectif?Oui, c’est dur. Si on regarde notre cadre, c’est compliqué de recevoir du temps de jeu quand tu es jeune. Mais je leur ai toujours dit qu’ils devaient saisir leur chance quand elle se présentait à eux.Vous êtes actuellement deuxième du championnat. L’objectif c’est la première place?L’objectif, c’est de gagner le plus de matches possible.Et ça comprend également la Coupe. Vous avez eu de la chance au tirage pour le moment?C’est bien, pour une fois que c’est le cas! On est en quarts de finale mais on sait qu’on doit quand même aller jouer à Mondorf. On doit aller là-bas et revenir avec la victoire, peu importe la manière. On ne doit surtout pas se dire que ça va être plus facile parce qu’ils sont en deuxième division. On doit les prendre au sérieux et faire de notre mieux!Entretien avec Romain Haaslast_img read more

[Cyclo-cross] A qui le tour dimanche à Mamer?

first_img Partager Un succès pour le champion national à Belvaux. Trois pour le coureur du LG Alzingen, à Kayl, Dommeldange et Tétange.Pour illustrer ce (presque) parfait partage des rôles, c’est Lex Reichling qui s’est imposé dimanche dernier à Cessange au terme d’un final rempli de suspense, un accrochage ayant fortement retardé Dias dos Santos tandis que Thiltges payait les efforts d’une course où il avait passé le plus clair de son temps à mener l’allure du groupe de tête.Une attaque programmée…Nous en sommes donc là. La situation n’est pas explosive puisque pour le moment, presque tous les leaders de la discipline sont parvenus à s’imposer, ce qui est toujours de nature à faire retomber la pression. Mais à un peu plus d’un mois du sacro-saint championnat national, on commence sérieusement à se jauger.«Dimanche à Mamer, je vais attaquer dès le premier tour et personne ne viendra dans ma roue», a ainsi commenté le champion national à l’issue de l’épreuve de Cessange. Comme s’il avait donc une petite revanche à prendre…Atout aux techniciensLe fait est qu’il s’est imposé lors des deux dernières éditions. Ce parcours de Mamer, très spectaculaire et physique, est sans doute le tracé du circuit luxembourgeois qui convient le mieux à son tempérament et à ses qualités techniques.Il sera forcément le favori numéro un. Mais Scott Thiltges qui évolue cette année à un niveau encore jamais atteint, sera sans doute dur à manœuvrer alors qu’une fine pellicule de neige est attendue.De son côté, Lex Reichling et son grand gabarit sera évidemment un peu gêné dans les innombrables courbes à maîtriser. «Je préfère les circuits plus physiques en effet», rappelle-t-il ainsi.On rappellera également que si Felix Schreiber a disparu brutalement de la tête de course à Cessange, «c’est à cause d’une crevaison».Le coureur du VV Tooltime était apparu dans les premiers tours dans de belles dispositions. «Le parcours de Mamer n’est pas trop dans mes cordes. Il y a trop de virages pour que je puisse m’y exprimer», relève ce coureur puissant.Par contre, sa petite sœur Marie sera la grande favorite de l’épreuves dames…13 h : juniors13 h 01 : masters14 h 15 : débutants14 h 16 : dames15 h 15 : élites et juniorsSkoda Cross Cup (après 4 manches) :Élites : 1. Scott Thiltges 339; 2. Lex Reichling 296; 3. Vincent Dias dos Santos 268…Dames : 1. Marie Schreiber 395; 2. Elise Maes 348; 3. Maïté Barthels 281… Vincent Dias dos Santos cherchera à réussir un triplé sur ce circuit technique et spectaculaire.À chaque week-end sa petite histoire. Son scénario. On ne peut pas dire que depuis le début de la saison, un cross ait ressemblé à un autre. Les positions ne sont pas figées, bien au contraire.Après l’ouverture de la saison remportée par Vincent Dias dos Santos dans le cadre d’un urban cross (Reckange-sur-Mess), les deux premières épreuves officielles ont été favorables à Tristan Parrotta (Brouch et Mersch), actuellement sur le carreau à cause de problèmes persistants de genoux, «et toujours pas résolus», explique-t-il, navré.Vincent Dias dos Santos et Scott Thiltges ont donc pris le relais.last_img read more