Commercial ‘artiste’ Sachin Tendulkar Gets Tax Break

first_imgSachin Tendulkar was levied an income tax of Rs 2,08,59,707 on an income of Rs 5,92,31,211 he earned from ESPN Star Sports, Pepsico and Visa in foreign currency during 2001-02 and 2004-05.Sachin Tendulkar, super God of cricket, has formally declared that he is an actor and not a cricketer. The,Sachin Tendulkar was levied an income tax of Rs 2,08,59,707 on an income of Rs 5,92,31,211 he earned from ESPN Star Sports, Pepsico and Visa in foreign currency during 2001-02 and 2004-05.Sachin Tendulkar, super God of cricket, has formally declared that he is an actor and not a cricketer. The excuse: he models for TV advertisements. In order to save tax of around Rs 2 crore on income derived from doing TV commercials, Tendulkar told the Income Tax tribunal that acting, not cricket, is his profession. The tribunal accepted that he is an artist on the grounds that “he has to use his own skills, imagination and creativity in the commercials”.Tendulkar was levied an income tax of Rs 2,08,59,707 on the income of Rs 5,92,31,211 that he earned from ESPN Star Sports, PepsiCo and Visa in foreign currency during 2001-02 and 2004-05. He had challenged the order of the Commissioner of Income Tax-Appeal (CIT-A), to pay up. In an order on May 20, the tribunal ruled that Tendulkar could claim deduction in tax on his income from modelling as he is an artist.Tendulkar had claimed deduction of tax under Section 80RR of the Income Tax Act. The section states that a person can claim tax deduction if he is a playwright, artist, musician, actor or sportsman and the income for which deduction is claimed is derived by him in the exercise of his profession.When the assessing officer asked Tendulkar to explain the nature of his profession, the master blaster submitted that “he is a popular model who acts in various commercials for endorsing products of various companies”. He further stated that the income derived by him from ‘acting’ had been reflected as income from “business and profession” whereas income from playing cricket was reflected as “income from other sources” since he is a non-professional cricketer. Tendulkar explained that the claimed deduction in tax was from the exercise of his profession as an ‘actor’.advertisementThe assessing officer rejected Tendulkar’s claim and looked up the dictionary for the meaning of the term ‘professional’. “It could be correct to say that playing cricket is the source of his livelihood and is therefore his profession,” the officer observed, adding that “if Sachin is not a cricketer, then who is a cricketer?” He noted that Tendulkar had received remuneration for providing a wide variety of services to these companies. The various activities mentioned in the agreement with these companies had nothing to do with his claim of being an actor. Therefore, the officer said, his claim was not justified. Tendulkar has an agreement with these companies for the use of the name, photo, original voice, clothing, footwear, playing product spokesman, personal and media appearances.”It is true that while appearing in ad films Tendulkar would have to dress in a certain way and would have to follow the script suggested by the director. However, that does not make him an actor. In all the advertisements in which he appears, what is highlighted is his personality as a cricketer. It is important to note that the company that wants Tendulkar to endorse its brand uses him because he is Sachin Tendulkar, the cricketing legend,” the officer noted.After his claim was rejected, Tendulkar submitted that he should be considered an ‘artist’ for the purpose of Section 80RR. He submitted that the meaning of ‘artist’ be read along with the several clauses of the endorsement agreements. However, the CIT-A did not buy this argument. He ruled: “Tendulkar is primarily involved in playing cricket and irrespective of whether he is a professional or not, it cannot be disputed that his profession is playing cricket. Tendulkar is not being paid for his activities as an actor or his performance as an artist. The nature and quality of his acting or performance as an artist would never have resulted in the contracts and payments made out to him.”Tendulkar appealed against this ruling to the tribunal. An earlier ruling by the tribunal allowing tax deduction to actor Amitabh Bachchan helped his case. In 2004, the tribunal had ruled that the income derived by Bachchan as a host of TV show Kaun Banega Crorepati (KBC) was liable for deduction of tax under Section 80RR because he used his skills as an artist in the show.Asha Vijayaraghavan, judicial member of the tribunal, and R.K. Panda, accountant member, ruled: “While appearing in advertisements and commercials Tendulkar has to face the lights and camera. As a model he brings to his work a degree of imagination, creativity and skill to arrange elements in a manner that would affect human senses and emotions and to have an aesthetic value. No doubt, being a successful cricketer has added to his brand value as a model. But the fact remains that he has to use his own skills, imagination and creativity. Every sportsman does not possess that degree of talent or skill or creativity to face the lights and camera. The income received by him from modeling and appearing in TV commercials and similar activities can be termed as income derived from the profession of an artist.”advertisementTendulkar had also claimed deduction of Rs 57,969 towards staff welfare expenses that included expenses incurred on tea and snacks provided to his staff, Rs 50,000 each on account of entertainment expenses and telephone expenses and Rs 1,42,824 on account of car expenses. However, the tribunal dismissed these claims saying that the use of telephone, car and food was for him and his family.This is one act where the man who holds almost all the batting records in cricket has outdone himself.last_img read more

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Astonishing comebacks the new norm in the Champions League

first_imgAstonishing comebacks are becoming the new norm in Europe’s top club competition.The phenomenon truly started two years ago, when Barcelona recovered from a 4-0 loss to Paris Saint-Germain in the first leg of the last 16 by winning the return 6-1. That surpassed the previous best second-leg comeback in Champions League history from 12 years earlier, which saw Deportivo La Coruna fight back from three goals behind to eliminate AC Milan.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsBarcelona has been on the receiving end the past two years, however. If blowing a 4-1 first-leg advantage by then losing 3-0 at Roma in last season’s quarterfinals wasn’t bad enough, Barca lost 4-0 to Liverpool on Tuesday after opening their semifinal with a 3-0 first-leg win.Inspired by its English rival, Tottenham fought back a day later from a 3-0 aggregate deficit against Ajax to score three second-half goals — the last coming in the sixth minute of stoppage time — to advance on away goals . This season, there have been 89 goals in 28 games in the knockout stage — 3.17 a game.Barcelona is now a victim of a phenomenon it might have created. The fearless, attacking style in its stellar 2006-11 era of three European titles has been imitated by many teams since.Attack is now the best form of defense. And look what is happening as a result.LOST ART OF DEFENDINGWhere are those warrior defenders of old, the ones who loved nothing more than backs-to-the-wall efforts?There are exceptions, of course — Giorgio Chiellini of Juventus and Virgil van Dijk of Liverpool. But defending seems to be a lost art of soccer.Full backs are now largely a key outlet in a team’s attack. Many center backs are cultured passers rather than obdurate stoppers — see Aymeric Laporte at Manchester City and Clement Lenglet at Barcelona.How much time do top European teams spend practicing defending? More to the point, why would they when many of their games, domestically and in Europe, are so one-sided given the gulf in finances between soccer’s rich and poor?RULES CHANGESIt’s the law. There are just 17 sections in the Laws of the Game which govern soccer but they can be modified each year. Changes usually help attacking play. Japanese rush to buy Tokyo Olympic tickets on first day MOST READ Ankle injuries which ended the career of the great Netherlands, Ajax and AC Milan forward Marco van Basten at age 28 are cited as inspiring the move to protect creative players in the 1990s. Tackles from behind were punished more quickly and severely. Sliding tackles or with studs raised are now rarer.Constantly adapting the offside law has helped attackers — a trend accelerated by video review, which was introduced in the Champions League round of 16 in February.Offside flags are raised less often, letting play develop, because a goal can be disallowed later. Officials want to avoid wrongly stopping promising attacks which means more goal-scoring chances can be created.Video review has encouraged awarding penalties — in part because slow motion magnifies any incident — and defenders seem more hesitant in the penalty area.It adds up to more goal-scoring chances and confidence to chase down a lead.PRESSING PLAYThe slow, methodical play from defense that seemed key to European success decades ago belongs in a museum.A typically old-school team has not won the Champions League since Inter Milan in 2010.UEFA’s technical analysis of the last season’s Champions League calls the modern way of harassing defenders close to their own goal “the Guardiola effect.”Liverpool coach Juergen Klopp’s “heavy metal” brand also stresses quick recovery of the ball and fast-break attacks. Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss View comments Clearly, this never-say-die spirit is becoming contagious amid a spirit of adventure and chaos swirling through the Champions League.But where has this come from?ATTACK, ATTACK, ATTACKPut simply, more goals are being scored in this Champions League era, increasing the likelihood of a comeback and making teams who are trailing believe all is not lost.In last season’s competition, there were 401 goals at an average of 3.2 per game — rising to 3.6 per game in the knockout stage. It was the highest total since the tournament’s rebrand from the European Cup in 1992.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Defenders make more errors in more dangerous positions, so teams know they can score at a faster rate.UEFA noted last season that “50% of goals were scored as a result of ball-winning in the attacking third.”Those three-goal leads look less secure.NEVER SAY DIEPlayers can believe in the art of the possible. And because comebacks happened before, they can happen again.It is no coincidence that English teams, including Manchester United at Paris Saint-Germain in the round of 16, have completed so many comebacks.British soccer is famed for a fighting spirit demanded by fans who often value passion over technique.English Premier League teams, wealthier than most European rivals, now have a feared blend: imported coaches and players with global soccer smarts operating in their adopted country’s fast, aggressive style.Even Barcelona could not cope with a Liverpool team lacking key players yet roared on by an intimidating Anfield crowd. Anything seemed possible. Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Tottenham players celebrate after scoring their third goal during the Champions League semifinal second leg soccer match between Ajax and Tottenham Hotspur at the Johan Cruyff ArenA in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Wednesday, May 8, 2019. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)Ajax’s disconsolate players collapsed to the ground and pressed their faces into the turf. The night before, Barcelona’s startled players looked at each other in pure disbelief , wondering what exactly had happened.Two Champions League semifinal matches, two three-goal leads squandered.ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles SEA Games hosting troubles anger Dutertelast_img read more

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Boost Your Career: Do What The Popular Kids Did In High School

first_imgThose cheerleaders, class presidents and smiling sports stars were so popular in high school, and they’re more successful in their careers, too.They earn more than the rest of us even 35 years after high school is over, according to new research from the National Bureau of Economic Affairs.Students who moved from the bottom of the popularity ranking up to nearer the top – the 80th percentile – earned a salary 10 percent higher, decades after high school. This held true even when the researchers considered several variables like school quality and adult personalities, according to a Wonkblog post in the Washington Post.The reason their popularity paid off: “Social interactions within the group of classmates provide the bridge to the adult world” as they learned to be socially competent, the researchers wrote.Even if you were the shyest student in your school, you can learn to put on a varsity jacket of confidence when discussing your next pay raise or raising your hand about a promotion. Some of the techniques used in high school can be applied to career development and job search today.Here are four lessons everyone can learn from your high school class officers and popular crowd:1. They were connected. This works well for job-hunters too, especially if your connections are in your field or related fields, said Barbara Herzog, a career coach in Washington, D.C. “If you make connections, you will get better jobs faster on average,” she said. You’ll also learn of new opportunities and become more aware of workplace politics and changes, “thus better at navigating them to your advantage.”2. They were standouts. When I started in high school, I was known as the girl with the odd, different “northern accent” because my family had moved from the Detroit area to Southern Indiana. That different outsider reputation stuck. Others were known for their eagerness to host parties or their kindness and cheerleader cool. They embraced their personalities and uniqueness. They had personal brands before the term was coined, and they cultivated them carefully.3. They practiced, a lot.  Even when they already knew they could pass the ball 40 yards, the best players showed up at every practice determined to get better. They spent time during the summer working on their skills too. So ask yourself: “What are you doing to get better at what you do?” Self-development is hard, “often uncomfortable” and requires deliberate actions, Chicago-area leadership coach Art Petty writes in a blog post.4. They went to all the activities. In high school, the popular kids were at every football game, all the plays and big community events – plus, some of their own clubs and lessons. They were visible and involved.  Likewise, if you want a promotion, step up for some key cross-department committees addressing business priorities, career coach Cheryl Palmer suggests in a Money magazine article. Go to the holiday parties, happy hours and industry mixers – and wear a suit that makes you feel like a winner.Even if you never will be a cheerleader or football star, you can adopt some of their best techniques and be a winner.last_img read more

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5 Tips To Handle A Job Offer On The Spot

first_imgIn this era of instant everything and employers are offering instant job offers, too. They make the offer before the interview is over.If this happens to you: congratulations. You should be flattered, since it means you’ve really impressed the hiring manager. Still, you may want to take a breath and consider the job carefully, said David Janowsky, a partner at WinterWyman, who focuses on accounting and financial jobs. This is especially true if you have a partner to consult or another possible job in which you are a contender.“Because of the timing and urgency of need, we have candidates who get offers on the spot, regularly,” said Janowsky, who works mostly with temporary and contract assignments. About four in 10 of the candidates for contract work get instant offers, during the interview or within hours of it, he estimates, and perhaps 10 percent of those seeking permanent jobs with WinterWyman.Sometimes it makes sense to say yes immediately – especially if you’ve been unemployed for a while and really need the money, or if it’s your first full-time position, and you’re jazzed about the job. For others who want to take some time to consider it, Janowsky has five tips for those instant, on-the-spot offers:1. Express appreciation. Thank the hiring manager for the offer. “Say you’re very excited…” and if it’s true, note that the employer is your top choice. Your enthusiasm is important, so muster it even if you are not clear whether the job is right for you.2. Ask for a little time.  You want to review your notes or talk to your partner or your mom before deciding. “Give yourself a moment to process it and call back” with your answer, he said. This gives you overnight or perhaps 24 hours to consider the job. Don’t wait too long, because the employer may decide to interview others and you could lose the offer.3. Ask for an offer package. The offer letter will spell out the key details of what’s included in the benefits and more. “Get it in writing. It does make it more official and a solid offer,” said Janowsky.4. Explain the other prospect. When you have another job interview scheduled the next day, you may want to mention that, Janowsky said, adding: “you want to be honest and forthright.”  You also want to be fair to yourself and make the right choice. If you mention another company, a smart hiring manager may ask “the next layer of questions” about who the employer is and what the other opportunity is like. You should share enough to be honest and credible.5. Find out about follow-up. Set an expectation that some questions are likely to bubble up, and arrange a time or connection on how those will be handled. This will show that you’re treating the offer seriously, and want to go into it understanding it thoroughly. Also, find out who in HR could answer benefit questions.Sometimes employers will gauge your interest by asking: “If I were to offer you this job now, what would you say?”  Recruiters also will do this. This is something you may want to consider before the interview, and come up with a clear, enthusiastic yet honest answer. Perhaps you’d say something like: “I could very much see myself in this position. It’s a great opportunity. I just need a day or two to weigh everything I’ve heard today, and to discuss it all with my career mentor and my husband.” Then consult and deliberate quickly because instant offers often demand quick responses.last_img read more

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LIVE BLOG: Hillary Clinton & Leaders Discuss Pay Equality at Glassdoor Roundtable

first_imgAre you ready to help increase salary transparency? Share your salary on Glassdoor anonymously. #ShareYourPayVideo Replay: Watch the entire Glassdoor Roundtable Discussion and learn more about what can be done to reach pay equality As Glassdoor’s Roundtable Discussion on Pay Equality featuring Hillary Clinton, among other leaders, gets underway in New York City on Equal Pay Day, we’re here live blogging about it! Check out the highlights and follow along in near real-time. Or, come back to this post to check out how the discussion unfolded (all times below are EST):11:20 a.m.: A powerful discussion with an esteemed group of panelists. Don’t let the conversation stop! Thank you for joining us.11:15 a.m.: Paid family leave, affordable childcare – if we are going to move the agenda further then we need to recognize how we support each other as human beings. “We work to live, not live to work.”11:11 a.m.: The gender gap and fair pay is a revelation to young women, there is more parity in salary when you start out. The salary gap increases between men and women the more years you work. “I have lived through this. It is long overdue, but we need to use every tool in our disposal to make this change.” – Hillary Clinton11:07 a.m.: “Women are not taught to negotiate. Cultural shift of knowing how to talk about money and having the data to back it up. We have a culture of sharing that millennials are driving, and that is the future of work. Glassdoor is on the cutting edge of providing the platform for that, and this is the wave of the future.” -Tracy Sturdivant11:05 a.m.: Women don’t negotiate because they may lose in other ways: they aren’t liked as much or they are perceived that they are not a team player.11:03 a.m.: “You achieve pay equality when you are laser focused on performance.” -Dan Henkle11:02 a.m.: “It takes courage to look at your numbers and see that there are salary discrepencies that aren’t explained. It’s hard, but its rewarding, because 6 in 10 people don’t want to work at a company that doesn’t pay fairly.” – Robert Hohman11:00 a.m.: “I am optimistic, but also very focused that we don’t lose the impetus behind this conversation… There are so many people that don’t yet accept that its a problem that needs to be addressed, they see it as explainable but it’s not justifiable.” -Hillary Clinton10:55 a.m.: Partly personal, partly policy. “It’s not about women’s choices, its about employer’s choices.” -Tracy Sturdivant10:50 a.m.: GAP has 100.2% pay equality within the company. Big difference? Senior women around the leadership table.10:50 a.m.: “We as a team have a keen understanding of our platform on women’s equality and we love shouldering that load.” -Megan Rapinoe10:43 a.m.: What is the role of government in fixing this? There are laws that make unequal pay illegal, but the issue is transparency, particularly in the private sector. Our challenge is to demand transparency. In the private sector, Salesforce and GAP are leaders in paying the people the same.10:40 a.m.: Bias, networks and “motherhood penalty” impact the g ender gap. For women of color, the numbers are more challenging – over the course of a lifetime, African-American women would lose $900K and Latina women would lose of $1 million.10:32 a.m.: “Organizations like Glassdoor are important because you promote transparency. This is why we need legislation like The Paycheck Fairness Act so you wont get fired for asking what other people make, to promote an even playing field.”10:28 a.m.: “Glassdoor is focusing on an issue that has universal repercussions….The typical working woman was paid 79% of what a man made. There’s no discount for being a woman.” – Hillary Clinton10:25 a.m.: Robert Hohman, co-founder and CEO of Glassdoor, identifying the reasons why salary transparency is important, and introducing Hillary Clinton.10:20 a.m.: Dawn Lyon, head of corporate affairs for Glassdoor, now introducing the Roundtable discussion.10:05 a.m.: Thank you all for your patience. We will be live shortly.9:40 a.m.: We will be kicking off the Roundtable shortly. Running a few minutes behind, but the room is buzzing with excitement!last_img read more

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VMware CEO: Join an Epic Team, Create Epic Products to Achieve Epic Things

first_img 4.2★ DevOps Engineer (TS/SCI) with Security Clearance Vmware Reston, VA 23 hours ago 23h 4.2★ New Jobs at VMware For You 23 hours ago 23h 4.2★ 23 hours ago 23h AWS Solution Architect with Security Clearance VMware, Inc. Reston, VA EUC Sales Specialist – Federal Vmware Arlington, VA Want to work with Pat Gelsinger at VMware? They’re hiring like crazy! Join the #1 CEO in the U.S. today! The word “epic” is often used to describe something historically important, lasting and complex. However, when VMware CEO, Pat Gelsinger uses the adjective, he is also describing his over 24,000 employees and the collective mission they’re working for. Ironically, this is the word that his employees use to describe his leadership as well.It’s no surprise, then, that Gelsinger has received a 99-percent approval rating and has been named the #1 Top CEO in 2019 among U.S. large companies. As a first-time #1 winner, jumping 77 spots from last year, Gelsinger has admittedly overcome a trying year — swooning stock prices, aggressive talent poaching and changing company structure — thanks, in part, to investing in company culture and keeping innovation front of mind.We caught up with the software leader to dig into his big win, how he approaches hiring and recruiting, plus what keeps him 100-percent present with his family.Glassdoor: Congratulations on the Top CEOs win. What does it mean to you to know that your employees have rated you so highly?Pat Gelsinger: Of course I’m honored! Fostering an innovative company culture is paramount to us at VMware, especially now as we enter our next phase of growth. Ours is one of those rare work environments where our people understand they have an opportunity to transform the impossible into the essential. That translates directly to high employee satisfaction. The way our people believe in our mission and how they feel about the company – those are reflections of our culture. That’s incredibly inspiring to me personally, and it validates our spirit of innovation. Our culture is one of possibilities, where everyone is empowered, because together we are shaping the future of business in the digital world. If you think about it: we spend more of our discretionary time with our work families than we do our personal ones; it is important to me that our team enjoys that time we have together.Glassdoor: One of a CEO’s primary responsibilities is to hire amazing leaders. What attributes do you look for in your leaders?Pat Gelsinger: Naturally, we want the best and the brightest, but beyond that, I look for those who are insatiably curious and always eager to expand their horizons. We seek out people who are passionate and aligned with our company culture & values.We put a big focus on attracting talented people who are willing to take on the hardest problems — the ones with a spirit to innovate like crazy and popularize our technologies. You also want leaders who can inspire and motivate, especially during times of transformation and change. This is important because the technology industry is advancing and transforming at an unprecedented pace.It’s critical to have leaders who attract others, people who other great people want to work with. It’s also important to emphasize we expect leaders who share in our passion for building an inclusive culture, as that resonates with our values and it’s also smart business. We know our industry needs to do better, and systemic change starts at the top with our leadership driving accountability. I personally review progress against diversity and inclusion goals with my staff.I wouldn’t have gotten to where I am today without hard work and perseverance to continuously learn and grow. — Pat GelsingerGlassdoor: When you interview candidates, what do you look for? Pat Gelsinger: At VMware, we strive to innovate in everything we do, and we seek candidates who share our passion and excitement for solving the most difficult problems for our customers, and want to drive the future of technology. We look for talent who want to reach their goals in a collaborative, thriving environment with shared values. We have an acronym for these shared values: EPIC2Execution (do it together),Passion (challenge the status quo),Integrity (build trust),Customers (make it possible),and Community (give more).At VMware, EPIC2 defines and guides our culture, and serves as an authentic reflection of what we stand for as individuals and as a community. We hire epic people, to join an epic team, to create epic products and achieve epic things. It’s a fun acronym that defines us well.Glassdoor: When you look back over your past year as CEO, can you share how you have navigated a leadership mistake or challenge? Pat Gelsinger: In the last few years, VMware executed a number of strategic partnerships and acquisitions to accelerate our evolution: from virtualization vendor to strategic provider of the digital foundation that powers the apps, services and experiences that are transforming the world. We drove this evolution against a backdrop of changes to our parent company’s structure, which created some uncertainty around VMware’s ownership and future. This period was accentuated by a swoon in our stock price and aggressive pursuit of our talent by others. Candidly, it was a very challenging period. We successfully navigated that uncertainty by helping our employees stay focused and by continuing to execute on our unique vision – which they did superbly. We also reinforced to partners and customers that it was “business as usual,” which enabled us to remain focused on delivering on VMware’s differentiated innovation. Today, our software portfolio spans compute, cloud, networking & security, and digital workspace. We’re now well positioned to help our customers streamline their journey to become digital businesses, so they can deliver better experiences to their end customers and empower their employees to do their best work.The Best Tech Companies to Work for in 2019Glassdoor: Now for a few fun ones: What is your go-to productivity hack?Pat Gelsinger: I’ve learned over the years that you have to take very disciplined and explicit steps to keep your life in balance. And you have to recognize that there are certain times when things get busy and you wind up out of balance — so you have to take steps to get back into balance next month. Say you have a big project coming up: you better take time to go out on a nice date with your partner, or meet for breakfast with your kids. Knowing that work demands ebb and flow over time, you have to put guardrails up in your life to build in those elements of balance.Something I established with my wife years ago is a points system. I earn points if I leave the office at 5 pm, but points get subtracted if I work until 6:30pm. The net effect is that I’m more productive in my time at the office. It ensures that when I’m home, I’m 100% focused on being at home. Conversely, when I’m at work, I’m 100% focused on my work life.I’m often asked, “What’s the best way to not get behind?” My answer is simple: Don’t let yourself be behind! I’m typically in the office by 6am and I clean out my inbox every morning to get to a single page of emails. I use those precious early-morning hours to review priorities and prepare for my day. Every time I do that, I start out on top of the day, with a handle on what’s coming. And it makes me far more productive throughout the day.Glassdoor: What is your #1 job search tip? Pat Gelsinger: Don’t go it alone. For balance and accountability, I can’t emphasize enough the importance of having a mentor. It’s not easy to keep your own priorities in perspective. Also, look to your mentors to help identify the gaps in your knowledge, and then make an effort to fill them. You need to be prepared for the next role that you want to be in. Understanding where your weaknesses and strengths lie will enable you to do that.Glassdoor: What is your personal motto?Pat Gelsinger: My long-standing personal goal is to work on a piece of technology that touches every human on the planet in every modality of life. I recognize that’s audacious. But as technology touches more and more aspects of our daily lives, as a technologist you can see this personal goal becoming true. It’s happening right before our eyes! 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h Director, Global Compensation Consulting VMware, Inc. Washington, DC 4.2★ Implementation Consultant VMware Inc. Broomfield, COcenter_img Sr Consultant VMware, Inc. Washington, DC 4.2★ Sr Solution Engineer, vSAN/HCI – Enterprise VMware, Inc. Washington, DC 4.2★ Client Executive, Intel Community with Security Clearance VMware, Inc. Reston, VA 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h VMware Consultant with Security Clearance VMware, Inc. Reston, VA 4.2★ 4.2★ 4.2★ View More Jobs 4.2★ 23 hours ago 23h Senior Solution Engineer -SLED VMware, Inc. Washington, DC 23 hours ago 23hlast_img read more

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Man Utd remain in pursuit of Spurs midfielder Eric Dier

first_imgManchester United haven’t dropped their pursuit of Tottenham midfielder Eric Dier.The Daily Star says United still have a chance of landing Dier from Tottenham.Spurs have tried to fend off interest from Old Trafford by placing a hefty £50m price-tag on the England international.But it is said there is a possibility of a move materialising this summer.Dier is Jose Mourinho’s top midfield target, although United are also pursuing Fabinho of Monaco and Chelsea’s Nemanja Matic.last_img read more

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West Brom keeper coach Gould: Foster already a Baggies great

first_imgWest Brom goalkeeping coach Jonathan Gould says Ben Foster deserves icon status at the Hawthorns.Gould reckons the Leamington-born keeper is already one of the club’s greatest glove-men, and he says there’s plenty more to come.“He’s probably one of the great Albion keepers,” said Gould. “I remember watching Tony Godden, I used to like him, John Osborne as well, goodness me.”I was lucky enough to be coached by Pete Latchford – he was a good goalkeeper, and Russell Hoult had some great years at West Brom.“There’s been some good ones but Ben is probably towards the top end of what’s gone through the club.”last_img read more

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Tell a story (and get free training if you’re stuck)

first_imgStories are the most powerful form of expression, and as marketers and writers, we should never make a point without telling a story. When one person tells another person a story, the two people are transported together outside the present moment, to another time and place. They are living an experience together as one person recounts what happened and another imagines it in his or her mind. What better way to communicate our cause?If you doubt the power of a story, think about the last time you gave money to a good cause. I’m willing to bet a free copy of my book that a story was behind your gift.I looked at ten charity websites today and not one had a story or link to a story on the home page. Through direct mail, I get some stories, but they tend to sound like they were written from a fundraising 101 template. Where are our stories?! Where is your story? Get one now.Need inspiration? Order Storytelling as Best Practice if you don’t already have it. Or if you don’t want to spend the $15, sign up for a May 24 free training with its author, Andy Goodman, who is its author and the best guy on storytelling for nonprofits, hands down. (It’s free for the first 125, according to Andy’s site, so hurry.)Once you’ve done this, start writing some stories about what you do, why you do it, and how important it is.A really talented writer I used to work with at CARE is Gwendolyn Driscoll, who is now a journalist. She wrote this article in the Orange County Register.I went to the Saddleback Church website and found its story:When Rick and Kay Warren first arrived in the Saddleback Valley in December of 1979, all they had was what they could fit in the back of a U-haul truck. Fresh out of seminary, the young pastor and his bride dreamed of planting a church that would be “a place where the hurting, the depressed, the confused can find love, acceptance, help, hope, forgiveness and encouragement.” With many good Bible-teaching churches already in Southern California, Pastor Rick turned his attention to those who didn’t attend church regularly. Two weeks after Pastor Rick and Kay arrived in the Saddleback Valley, they began with a small Bible study, meeting with one other family in the Warrens’ small condo.On Easter of 1980, Saddleback Valley Community Church held its very first public service and 205 people, most of whom had never been to church, showed up. That began one of the most exciting journeys of growth that any church has experienced in American history. In more than two decades of ministry in South Orange County, God has continued to expand the church’s influence. Currently, Saddleback Church has more than 200 ministries serving the church and community. One in nine people in the area call Saddleback their church home. How do you tell the story of your organization and its start? Is it this colorful? It is this compelling? I’m not a churchgoer, but I’m taken with this story. Not surprising given the man behind it wrote the Purpose-Driven Life, which sold 16 million copies. He is a storyteller. You can – and should – be one, too.last_img read more

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On Day of the Girl, Putting Girls First

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 11, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In honor of International Day of the Girl Child, Ann K. Blanc, Vice President and Director of Poverty, Gender and Youth at the Population Council and Senior Advisor to the Maternal Health Task Force, shared a blog post on the Huffington Post about the “600 million adolescent girls in the developing world.” Ann describes the many challenges that adolescent girls face in the developing world–and what it takes for adolescent girls to serve as catalysts for positive change in their communities.From the post:Adolescent girls in the developing world today face greater disadvantages and more limited opportunities than boys the same age. They may be out of school, away from home, married, or trapped in a cycle of exploitative work and poverty. They experience multiple forms of violence and they are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. They are often difficult to reach and overlooked by social and community-based programs and services.Research has shown that the best way to empower the poorest adolescent girls in the poorest communities — the ones most in need — is to put them in the position to determine the course of their own lives. To do this, we need to improve their health, social safety net, and financial knowledge and status. It will take concerted focus from policymakers, program managers, and champions to ensure that these girls have the tools they need. Today, the world’s first observance of the International Day of the Girl Child, is the perfect time to rededicate ourselves to this goal.This is already happening: yesterday, the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) announced a $20 million commitment to reach the most marginalized adolescent girls at risk of child marriage, continuing its longstanding partnership with the Population Council and other organizations. But this dedication must continue and more groups need to get involved.Read the full post here.Share this:last_img read more

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Universal Children’s Day: Integrating Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 18, 2016January 6, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In 2015, 5.8 million children around the world died before their fifth birthday. An estimated two million of those deaths were stillbirths and 2.6 million were neonatal deaths. Globally, the leading cause of under-five mortality in 2015 was preterm birth, which is often preventable with timely, high quality care. Pregnancy, childbirth and the immediate postpartum period are critical periods, not just for mothers, but for children as well.Recognizing the connections between a mother’s health and that of her baby is essential, not only for addressing maternal and infant mortality and morbidity, but also for contextualizing children’s health. What happens to an infant in the womb, during delivery and throughout the postnatal period can have lasting effects on his or her health. Infants who are born preterm, for example, are at greater risk of developing neurological disorders, intestinal problems, asthma, infections and other complications later in life. Studies in Ethiopia, Tanzania and elsewhere have illustrated the devastating effects of maternal deaths on the health and wellbeing of their children.To mark Universal Children’s Day, here is the Maternal Health Task Force’s list of top ten key papers and reports related to the integration of maternal, newborn and child health:1. The global strategy for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health (2016-2030)Every Woman Every Child | 20152. Continuum of care for maternal, newborn, and child health: From slogan to service deliveryThe Lancet | October 20073. A price too high to bear: The costs of maternal mortality to families and communitiesFamily Care International, International Center for Research on Women, KEMRI/CDC Research and Public Health Collaboration | 20134. Integrating health interventions for women, newborn babies, and children: A framework for actionThe Lancet | September 20085. Barriers and enablers to integrating maternal and child health services to antenatal care in low and middle income countriesBJOG | March 20166. Consequences of maternal mortality on infant and child survival: A 25-year longitudinal analysis in Butajira Ethiopia (1987-2011)Reproductive Health | May 20157. Global, regional, national, and selected subnational levels of stillbirths, neonatal, infant, and under-5 mortality, 1980–2015: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015The Lancet | October 20168. Every newborn: An action plan to end preventable deathsEvery Woman Every Child | June 20149. The WHO application of ICD-10 to deaths during the perinatal period: ICD-PMWorld Health Organization | 201610. Essential interventions, commodities and guidelines for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child healthThe Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health | 2011—Learn more about preterm birth and maternal and newborn health integration.Explore resources from the “Integration of Maternal and Newborn Health Care” technical meeting hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) and Saving Newborn Lives.Check out the MHTF blog series focused on the continuum of care.Share this:last_img read more

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Ajax Ousts APOEL From Europa, 4-0

first_imgAMSTERDAM — Ajax hammered APOEL Nicosia 4-0 on Dec. 10 to advance to the Europa League by finishing third in Group F of the Champions League.Both sides had failed to qualify for the knockout stage of the Champions League before the match at Amsterdam Arena. Barcelona topped the group by beating Paris Saint-Germain 3-1 at Camp Nou.Denmark midfielder Lasse Schone scored either side of halftime, with his first coming from the penalty spot, and Davy Klaassen headed the third after a mazy run by teenage winger Ricardo Kishna in the 53rd.Poland striker Arkadiusz Milik made it 4-0 in the 74th to give Ajax its first Champions League win of the season and hand the Cypriots their second straight 4-0 defeat.“We had trouble breaking them down in the first half,” Schone said. “Luckily we scored just before the break and played out the second half very well.”APOEL defended staunchly in the first half, hoping to score on the break to secure the win it needed to advance to the Europa League.But Schone finally broke the resistance, scoring a penalty with the last touch of the half after Marios Antoniades had brought down Milik. Schone doubled the lead in the 50th, firing home after Milik had a shot blocked.Three minutes later Kishna weaved past APOEL’s crumbling defense and crossed from the left for Klaassen’s header. Milik finally got on the score sheet with his first Champions League goal after a Klaassen pass split the defense again.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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City starlet Diaz ‘dribbles like Messi’

first_imgUEFA Champions League Man City youngster Brahim Diaz ‘dribbles like Messi’, says team-mate Francis Last updated 2 years ago 07:50 14/9/2017 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(1) Brahim Diaz, Manchester City Getty UEFA Champions League Manchester City Feyenoord U19 v Manchester City U19 Feyenoord v Manchester City Feyenoord U19 Manchester City U19 Feyenoord UEFA Youth League Pep Guardiola may not get the chance to sign the Argentina captain for his Premier League side, but he could potentially get the next best thing Manchester City Under-19 attacking midfielder Brahim Diaz has been tipped for greatness by his team-mate Edward Francis, with the former being compared to the likes of Eden Hazard, David Silva and Barcelona icon Lionel Messi.City’s U19’s fought their way to a 2-0 win over Feyenoord’s U19’s on Wednesday evening in a similar match-up to the clubs’ senior squads, and Francis feels that is it only a matter of time before his teenage team-mate takes the football world by storm.City 9/1 Champions League winner Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing “He is a type of player who can win matches for us,” Francis told Goal. “He is strong with his left and right foot, he is definitely a big player for us. If we can keep him fit, he can help us go all the way this year.”In the Premier League we can compare him with Eden Hazard, but he is a bit like Messi in the way he dribbles. It’s good to have a player like him in the team. He is also a bit like David Silva.”Francis on DiazCity’s youngsters were competing the UEFA Youth League, where the groups are identical to that of their senior sides. And, having picked up three points in their first clash, Francis has his eyes on the big prize.“It was a good performance for us, good to get the three points away from home. Obviously it’s tough to play against Feyenoord. At the end of the day only the three points matter.“I definitely think we can win the Youth League. With a result like this, it shows that we can get three points even if we don’t play at our best. I think we’ve got a very good chance to go all the way this year.”last_img read more

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Forge Stronger Links Between Search Engine Optimization, Social Media and PR

first_imgArticle provided by PR Newswire’s Nonprofit Toolkit, an educational resource devoted to Non Profit public relations. Visit the Nonprofit Toolkit today and receive a waived annual membership ($195 value) and more than $2,000 in discounts and free services. Follow-up: SocializeUsing these tips can help ensure that your release will feature highly in search engine rankings (and links back to your media room or web site). That same release can now be shared beyond these borders using social media. The inclusion of social media elements in a news release is offered by some newswires, as is search engine optimization. But what makes your news worth sharing?Tags. There are more than 300 social bookmarking sites for Internet users out there, and inclusion comes down to presenting people with readily available tags, such as for digg, technorati or del.icio.us. The key, of course, is well-written news: an interesting perspective, an innovative product or a creative article.Include multimedia elements whenever possible. Engaging photos and videos enhance your message, making it more attractive and worthy of sharing with others. Including these elements also goes a long way toward gaining media coverage, as it increases journalists’ options in the ways that they can cover your news.Provide reliable, refreshed information. Whether you maintain a organizational media room or publish a blog, provide the media with one place to find content that is specific, reliable and useful. Develop a regular readership by providing consistent, interesting, reliably refreshed news and information.Use RSS feeds. Utilizing RSS distribution from your company web site and other online content distributors pushes your news automatically to interested parties. It also means that your site will be constantly spidered by search engines, which will in turn improve its ranking in search results. Visit the Nonprofit Toolkit today and receive a waived annual membership ($195 value) and more than $2,000 in discounts and free services. As communicators, our words are our greatest tools. They determine our success in building relationships and positive brand visibility. Nowhere is this more apparent than on the Internet. Online communication is still growing and developing, giving us more opportunities than ever to connect with our stakeholders. But our audience is becoming increasingly fragmented. News sites, search engines, blogs and web sites all vie for attention, making it much more difficult to control our message.So how do we effectively communicate our message to each segment of these many audiences? What line do we take? In the online space, are we spokespeople, publicists, marketers, or a little bit of each? Two audiences: Consumers and the mediaAs public relations professionals, our main responsibility is to provide positive branding for companies and organizations through media coverage and online visibility. The media remain the most important and wide-reaching platform for spreading our message. What has changed with the Internet is that we now have a chance not only to push the message out, but to pull customers and prospects in as well, creating a cycle of communication that links and feeds on itself.Companies on the cusp of the media revolution are taking Web 2.0 and changing internal processes to make the best use of its tools. In particular, marketing and PR departments are coming together to create better communication strategies to target these two audiences: consumers and the media. Tips and tools for optimizing a news releaseNews releases that are search-engine-optimized can establish an online avenue to draw qualified, interested people to information about your organization. Constructing a marketing- and media-friendly release does, however, require internal coordination and planning in order to best use your resources. Here are some tips:Style guides and key messaging. Maintaining messaging consistency across all levels of an organization is always important, but especially when it comes to ratcheting up your online branding. Search engines use specific words and phrases to categorize news and build a relationship between your organizations news releases and its web site. If your news releases reflect words people are using to find information related to your organization, your release will establish a channel leading interested readers to your web site. Develop style guides with your marketing and product teams to make sure your words are consistent.Choose your keywords carefully. Before you write your news release, determine its theme, a list of keywords to represent that theme, and finally two or three keywords or phrases to focus on. Use keyword research tools to determine how your audience searches for news about your industry. These may also indicate the sort of competition that exists in relation to your chosen words. Your marketing team has probably already conducted this research; synchronizing your efforts will save time and establish a uniform company voice. When crafting your release, though, remember to keep your wording natural, so that readers still connect with your message.Place your keywords up front. Specifically, work them into a short (80-character) headline, and repeat them in your lead paragraph. The inverted pyramid of news release writing lends itself well to search engine optimization. Search engines typically scan the title tag of a page, the headline, and the first paragraph of a release, so be sure to include all important information and relevant keywords at the beginning.Distribute your news online. Most newswires post your news releases directly to search engines and relevant industry web sites as a part of the media distribution your organization receives. Be sure to include links in your release that direct Internet users to your organizations site. Inbound links to your organizations website enhance its ranking on search engines, as search engines count each link to your website as a vote for its significance.Use anchor text. In addition to including your organizations URL in a release, use anchor text (terms that appear as hyperlinks leading to pages on your organizations site). Link important keywords to relevant web pages to create a pathway for your readers (and search engines) to easily find information. This drives trafficto your products, creates links back to your web site, and teaches search engines to associate the hyperlinked words with your organizations web site and news releases. All of these add to your site’s search rankings.Link coverage to your media page. This is when your news release stops being a collection of words and facts and becomes part of a larger, cohesive corporate message. For instance, if your organization has an upcoming product launch, start by researching key industry publications’ editorial calendars and develop a pitching timeline. Communicate in advance with your marketing/website team and make sure that when you receive media coverage, your site reflects that coverage. Make full use of your PR success-don’t keep it locked up in a clip book! Integrated communicationConsumersGiven the scope of online communication options available, it is possible to make it easy for the media to report on a company’s or organizations news while increasing visibility to consumers. But it takes internal cooperation. For communication, following up with information is as important as gaining initial interest.In terms of crossover from PR to marketing, consider how your organization handles online leads. Is your marketing department aware of the traffic that your news releases generate when you distribute them online? Do visitors to the organizations web site land on a page that engages them and invites them to learn more about or interact with the organization?The people who seek out your organizations website after reading the news release are highly qualified prospects. Ensuring that the information they find on the site is appealing is critical to converting these prospects, whether they are potential volunteers, donors, or journalists or bloggers looking for a story.The mediaOrganizations that develop visible, organized, easy-to-navigate and highly informative media rooms on their web sites ensure that members of the media are as well taken care of as the consumers who reach the sites.Yet it would be naïve to think that any member of the media relies solely on an organizations web site or media room for information. A recent study of journalists by Fusion PR found that the majority often consult blogs for information. It is increasingly apparent that we need to meet them in the online space of blogs, search engines and news aggregators as well as in the media room, and through traditional news release distribution.Dee Rambeau, product specialist for PR Newswire’s MediaRoom services and managing partner of The Fuel Team, a provider of web-based solutions for the marketing and PR professionals, says that based on their own analysis, clients who have used MediaRoom have “increased their media audience, improved the loyalty of that audience due to the ‘unsubscribe’ feature, increased the specificity of their media audience by offering ‘categories’ of news, and increased the usability of their MediaRoom content by offering multimedia galleries, podcasts, images and videos.”last_img read more

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From Beverly Hills to Homeless: What a story

first_imgA while back, through this blog, I met an extraordinary person. Mark Horvath used to be homeless, and now he does all kinds of amazing things, including blogging at Hardly Normal. Now he is onto a new project — documenting via video the stories of people in the situation he once knew all too well. Here is a story you must watch — one day an investment advisor, the next, homeless:Mark from invisible people on Vimeo.Mark not only has an incredible personal story, he also knows how to tell a story. These stark interviews with homeless people are riveting. If you’re an agency helping the homeless, I’d post them on your site and I’d reach out to Mark. If you’re a funder, I’d fund him. If you’re a nonprofit, I’d do as he does. Put a face on the problem — and the solution. Show, don’t tell.last_img read more

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Google’s Search Engine Optimization Starter Guide

first_imgCreate Unique, Accurate Page TitlesPage Titles Make Use of Free Webmaster ToolsGoogle Webmaster Tools Offer Quality Content and ServicesContent, Content and Content! Optimize Your Use of ImagesAlt Attribute for Images Use Heading Tags AppropriatelyHeading Tags Good Practices for Promoting Your WebsiteBlogging, Offline Promotion, Social Media, Blogger Outreach Make Your Site Easier to NavigateNavigation, Sitemaps Write Better Anchor TextAnchor Text Improve the Structure of Your URLsURL Structure The SEO Guide IncludesThe Algorithm Must Take Into Account Make Effective Use of Robots.txtRobots.txt Be Aware of rel=”nofollow” for LinksNofollow Attribute Make Use of the Meta “Description” TagMeta Description Tags Nonprofits often ask us, “What are some simple ways that I can improve my website’s performance in Google?” There are lots of possible answers to this question, and a wealth of search engine optimization information on the web, so much that it can be intimidating for  those unfamiliar with the topic. Google has just create a compact guide (PDF below) that lists some best practices that teams organizations can follow that could improve their sites’ crawlability and indexing.From Google:Our Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Starter Guide covers around a dozen common areas that webmasters might consider optimizing. We felt that these areas (like improving title and description meta tags, URL structure, site navigation, content creation, anchor text, and more) would apply to webmasters of all experience levels and sites of all sizes and types. Throughout the guide, we also worked in many illustrations, pitfalls to avoid, and links to other resources that help expand our explanation of the topics. We plan on updating the guide at regular intervals with new optimization suggestions and to keep the technical advice current.So, the next time we get the question, “I’m new to SEO, how do I improve my site?”, we can say, “Well, here’s a list of best practices that we use inside Google that you might want to check out.”Working backwards from this guide, we can easily develop a list of exactly what Google’s algorithm takes into account.This table below, developed by Josh Nelson a blogger for the Hatcher Group, does just that, linking to appropriate resources. Take Advantage of Web Analytics ServicesGoogle Analyticslast_img read more

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Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results

first_imgWhile the social web has been a fantastic place for nonprofits to harness the long tail of giving with movements like Twestival and the Case Foundation’s Giving Challenge, high dollar donor cultivation has not been prevalent. The goal of our Community Philanthropy 2.0 survey one month ago was to determine whether there is potential for nonprofits to cultivate significant donors online (defined as someone who gives $1,000 or more), and how that can be accomplished.Tremendous opportunity for nonprofitsWhat we found was a tremendous opportunity for nonprofits to participate as trusted providers of credible information and ultimately cultivate the next generation of major donors through the social web.Between blog posts on Mashable, Social Media Club and the Society of New Communications Research, 426 people responded to our 30-question survey (commissioned by The Columbus Foundation, The Saint Paul Foundation and The San Francisco Foundation). Our analysis of these social media power users revealed the group was younger than the traditional composition of donors one would find in a charity’s database. Forty-seven percent were aged 30-49, 40 percent were under the age of 30, and only 13 percent were 50 or older. Almost two thirds (62 percent) were female. Trust in social media is significant among social media savvy would-be donors. Sixty one percent of those aged 30-49 trust social networks and blogs to provide important information, as is the case with 44 percent of those 50 years or older. Among 30-49 year olds, social media use is also very high with 91 percent of users participating in social networks, 81 percent participating in blogs, and 56 percent participating in message boards. Among those 50 and older, 94 percent participate in social networks, 78 percent participate in blogs, and 60 percent participate in message boards.Group social media preferred over personal efforts Not surprisingly, those 30 and younger were not a high dollar donor generation: Only 4 percent donated $5,000 or greater in 2008, and only 11 percent donated more than $1,000. In the same year, 20 percent of those between the ages of 30-49 gave more than $5,000 and 41 percent gave $1,000 or more, demonstrating potential for higher dollar contributions. Of the social media savvy age 50 and older, 47 percent gave more than $5,000 and 66 percent gave $1,000 or greater. The rest of this analysis focuses on the 30-49 and over 50 age brackets as they represent the greatest opportunity for online cultivation of high dollar donors. The social media savvy stated clearly that email is their preferred method of contact from charitable organizations. Seventy-seven percent of those 50 and older and 71 percent aged 30-49 prefer email. Additionally, 45 percent of 30-49 year olds prefer social networks and 31 percent of those over 50 also use social networks. This indicates a growing market for distribution of information via social networks. Social media power users of both the new 30-49 age brackets and the over 50 bracket have used social media to discuss philanthropy. In fact, 84 percent of the social media savvy aged 30-49 and 55 percent of those older than 50 used conversational media for these purposes. This confirms social media is a potential growth area through which major donors can be cultivated. Of all the forms of social media used by 30-49-year-olds, only social networks and blogs received greater than 40 percent rankings for “trust.” Specifically, 66 percent trust social networks and 50 trust blogs. In the over 50 bracket, 62 percent trust social networks and 42 percent trust blogs.PPerhaps one of the most interesting points that arose from this data was that both social media savvy groups prefer group social media, with the exception of blogs. Whether for personal use or trust in third party sites, blogs represent the second most viable source of information next to social networks (among both the digital rich and the traditional brackets). After blogs, message boards, forums, wikis and review sites were all deemed more credible than videos or podcasts (the terrain of traditional “personal” social media). Social media savvy respondents demonstrate a significant opportunity for foundations to provide social media. Among 30-49 year olds, 81 percent said they would participate if the information was highly credible and of strong quality, and 77 percent said they would participate if it came from a trusted source. Even more telling, a whopping 86 percent of those 50 and older said they would participate if the information was highly credible and of strong quality, and 84 percent would participate if social media came from a trusted source.Privacy was not much of a concern for the 30-49 year olds who said they look for in philanthropic social media:• 81% want information from a highly credible or quality source• 77% from a trusted organization• 59% would like to interact with other donors• 58% want to interact with philanthropic experts• 41% want to lead a public conversation• and 36% would like to lead discussions of their ownThe numbers were very similar among the 50 and older bracket:• 86% want information from a highly credible or quality source• 84% from a trusted organization• 56% would like to interact with other donors• 52% want to interact with philanthropic experts• 38% want to lead a public conversation• and 32% would like to lead discussions of their ownFurther respondents qualified the type of conversations for which they are looking. Those 30-49 wanted conversation about the following:• 80% organizational impact• 74% success stories• 71% learning more about the organizations they are participating with• 70% want information on causes they care about• and 43% want information on financial accountabilityAmong the 50 and older bracket, we see similar types of conversations are wanted:• 86% organizational impact• 80% success stories• 80% learning more about the organizations they are participating with• 78% want information on causes they care about• and 47% want information on financial accountabilityVerifying this opportunity for content sources, 71 percent of 30-49-year-olds directly looked to the charity they support for information, and 63 percent trust referrals from friends. In comparison, 78 percent of those 50 and older directly look to their charities and 72 percent trust friends.In summary, nonprofits and charities have a strong opportunity to engage in meaningful conversations (that may lead to contributions) with the social media savvy (30-49 and >50) – especially those who are uncultivated. Clear indicators reveal types of conversations the social media savvy are seeking, so, the rest is up to you!The full Community Philanthropy 2.0 report will be released later this Spring. In the meantime, join the Community Philanthropy 2.0 group on Facebook to to stay connected around this issue.This post is co-authored by Qui Diaz, Beth Kanter and Geoff Livingston, who are working on a special project, dubbed “Philanthropy 2.0? to provide non-profits the information they need to best serve donors and advocates.last_img read more

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Slightly Shifted

first_imgPosted on June 27, 2011June 20, 2017By: Yeabsira Mehari, Young Champion of Maternal HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This blog post was contributed by Yeabsira Mehari, one of the fifteen Young Champions of Maternal Health chosen by Ashoka and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth. This is her final post about her experience as a Young Champion, and you can learn more about her, the other Young Champions, and the program here.The field of maternal and child health has grown to encompass more than just the mother and child — it now includes whole villages, communities, and countries. We all agree that women’s rights are also human rights. Access to healthcare is a basic human right and, dare I say, a basic need. Whether the system is broken or whether or not one ever existed is an almost irrelevant question. The questions of what the issues are and how we solve them have been entirely dismissed from my head. The issues are right in front of us and the solutions are plenty. For the past nine months, I haven’t been focused on specific solutions to specific problems, but rather, I have been asking myself “How can we effect systemic change in the maternal health field?”Initially, my aim to take part in ending obstetric fistula was the main push behind all my work. Then I moved to India and started working in a different field than obstetric fistula: HIV/AIDS. Though HIV/AIDS and obstetric fistula don’t have much in common, they do share certain traits that have a massive impact on the women who suffer from these ailments. Aside from the physical effects, HIV/AIDS and obstetric fistula patients suffer from psychosocial damage and face being ostracized by their communities. Education on what the ailment is, how it happens, and why it happens is lacking for both. Most believe both conditions are caused by an evil spirit, or by the woman being deemed unfit for motherhood by a higher power. Sitting through counseling sessions at ASHA, I was amazed to see how many women blamed themselves for bringing such a disease to their family — even though, eight out of ten times, it was actually the father’s infidelities that put them at risk. In a country where the act of sex or even discussing sex is a taboo, working in the field of maternal health is difficult. So it was in India that I learned the importance of knowledge. The force behind my work slightly shifted to … education.During my time at ASHA, I spent time working in various departments. Whether it was learning about new HIV/AIDS antiretroviral regiments, sitting in on counseling sessions, working in the clinic, or reviewing hotline questions and answers, I tried to find ways to connect this work with my own project. My mentor had some great suggestions of ways I could borrow ideas from ASHA and apply them to my work on obstetric fistula. One idea was starting a fistula hotline. So, on a trip back to Ethiopia I spent time researching the viability of the idea. The hotline plan was shot down in an instant. Telecommunications is not privatized in Ethiopia, which makes this process that much harder. There is only one HIV/AIDS hotline and it is the only hotline in Ethiopia. When I asked how long it would be before another number became available, I was told they didn’t know. In time, I realized I would have to scrap most of my ideas. Most are skeptical of transplanting ideas from one setting to another, and I am too, especially because of how it can affect the patient and their communities. However, I was certain some of my ideas would work. The only problem was government interference and the number of hoops one has to go through to get anything done. And so, I learned about the beauties of bureaucracy, one of the (if not the) greatest obstacles when it comes to working on the ground. The force behind my work slightly shifted to … government and public policy.The role of government in civil society became a hot topic of discussion among my peers. India seemed to be facing a similar problem, yet enjoyed certain freedoms Ethiopia did not. For example, in India, a country of over 1.21 billion, government-led health initiatives are working and there is a great amount of freedom for organizations to explore their fields. In Ethiopia, then, how can we create a better government? How do we get the voices of the oppressed heard? Our discussions showed us the different struggles countries go through. We came to realize how difficult of a process it was going to be. This usually left me feeling somewhat frustrated. The frustration was not because we couldn’t find a solution; in fact I was certain that if I devoted my time to public policy and public health efforts, I would succeed to some degree. The frustration was stemming from the fact that I couldn’t dedicate all my time. Starting an organization is more than focusing on my passion. It means time doing the paperwork (lots of paperwork), applying for grants, funding, and so much more. How can I make sure Mimidae can survive long term? The force behind my work slightly shifted again to … sustainability.It takes nine months for a mother to give birth to her child, much the same way the YCMH program has nurtured and given birth to a more defined version of myself — a more certain individual keenly aware of her path. I know my destination. In fact, I see it. As I maneuvered my way through the last nine months, my goal was to figure out the best road to my destination. Along the way, I know I will continue to take some detours. My end goal is to better the field of maternal health with a special focus on ending obstetric fistula. My path to this dream has shifted. It has been an extremely transformative shift. Over the nine months, I’ve come to understand the need for education, the importance of the role of the government, the effects of a changing climate on a country, and how a lack of funding can hold back an organization from implementing successful programs, and I’ve gained a better sense of who I am and what role I play in all of this. I’m itching to hop on a plane and go back to India and continue this process of discovery. However, a question lurks in my head: “Is this the best path to your destination?” Yes, I feel more alive and focused when I’m on the ground, but I shouldn’t be focused solely on my feelings. Reminding myself of this question is helping me stay on track. Which track I’ll be getting on now that I’m back in the United States is the question. Should I prepare for medical school? Should I work for a few years? Should I move to Ethiopia for a while and get my projects going? Should I move back to India and work on my project idea there? Which of these plans will help me reach my destination successfully? The force behind my work has slightly shifted…Note of thanks: I want to thank all the other Young Champions and the Young Champions of Maternal Health team. Thank you for your dedication, love, and support! You have been an inspiration.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Systematic Review: Referral Systems for EmOC

first_imgPosted on July 7, 2011August 17, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)DFID, partnering with IMMPACT and others, recently published, a systematic review that delves into the evidence on transport and referral systems for emergency obstetric care (EmOC). The review covers 14 interventions that address organizational problems, structural issues or a combination of the two. The organizational interventions included creating emergency funds through community groups, educating women and traditional birth attendants, and improving facilities. Structural interventions included establishing maternity waiting homes, improving transportation and enhancing radio communications.After discussing and analyzing the interventions, the authors recommend:while continuing to invest in implementing referral interventions within maternal and newborn health programmes, we urge health planners to ensure that the interventions are rigorously monitored and evaluated, or operations research studies designed with controls and comparisons. Secondly, we believe that our finding of the reduction in stillbirth rates in maternity waiting home interventions needs further exploration through well-conducted studies, as the finding was based on studies with suboptimal study designs subject to biases. Finally, we believe that the type of research most relevant to referral interventions for policy and practice is not based on questions of ‘what works’, but should aim to understand how the interventions work andwhy.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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