Woman held hostage, sexually assaulted

first_imgPolice arrested a person on Tuesday after a woman accused him of holding her hostage in a building in a central area of Lucknow and sexually assaulting her. The incident allegedly took place in a building in Wazir Hasan Road of Hazratganj. The victim claimed when she protested the sexual assault, she was also beaten up by the accused. The woman was taken to a hospital for medical examination and treatment. Lucknow police said a case has been registered and the accused person arrested.According to the victim, on Monday night as she was out to purchase items for puja from a local market, the accused approached her and offered to give her a lift. But instead of dropping her home, he took her to an empty apartment after allegedly sedating her cold drink and attempted to rape her.”He threatened to murder me after keeping me hostage for seven days. When he got drunk and fell asleep, I managed toescape. He had stolen all my cash and mobile,” the victim told a news channel.She received help from police after dialling 100. The accused is the driver of a junior engineer of the irrigation department.last_img read more

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Aroon Purie’s welcome address at Youth Summit

first_imgWelcome everyone to India Today’s first ever Youth Summit, being held as the first decade of the 21st century ends. It’s 35 years since the first India Today was published. The world and India have changed enormously since. Two-thirds of India is under 35 like most of you sitting in this hall. The numbers are huge. 459 million Indians are between 13 and 35. Of these, 333 million are literate. All of you will, through how you study, work and play, decide the shape of the new India.It’s a world very different from when I was a young man, or I would like to think just younger. Thirty five years ago, when I started India Today, it was a world of shortages and queues. It was a world of one TV channel and two cars. Of ration cards, not credit cards. Of fixed landline phones and immoveable expectations. Of foreign exchange restrictions abroad and red tape at home. Of big government and small corporates. Of Cold War and heated rhetoric. Of no opportunities and even less hope.It was a time when we depended on the US PL 480 for food. Now we produce so much food we don’t know where to store it. It was a time when we relied on America for financial aid. Now they come to our doorstep to sell us armaments and nuclear reactors.Things have been transformed beyond recognition.There is, ofcourse, the Internet and the mobile phone, Infosys and the Indian Idol, Tata Nano and the Tata owned Jaguar-Land Rover, Vijay Mallya and Abhinav Bindra and countless other symbols of changing India. As the government has retreated, private enterprise has grown. As the markets have expanded, the mindsets have changed.advertisementWhat tomorrow will be is what you, the youth, make of it. By 2020, just a decade from now, the average Indian will be 29, compared to 37 in China and the US, 45 in western Europe and 48 in Japan. Or looked at another way.By 2050, the percentage of people above the age of 65 will be 39 per cent in the U.S, 53 per cent in Germany and 67 per cent in Japan. India, by contrast will have only 19 per cent above age 60. Thankfully, people like me would be a minority.This is not just an enormous market, but it also means many new citizens with emerging civic responsibilities, many new voters with changing political sensibilities, many new professionals with ideas they want to implement, and many many new parents with youngsters of their own.But as much as the numbers are a windfall, they are also a challenge in terms of employment, employability and education. The crucial three Es. What sort of education will the emerging youngsters get? What sort of jobs will the educated youngster get, or indeed will they get jobs at all? Just think of this–100 million Indians, the combined labour forces of Britain, France, Italy, and Spain- are projected to be added to our workforce by 2020, which is an incredible 25 per cent of the global workforce.Economists have pointed to a decrease in the rate of employment generation across both rural and urban areas which suggests that the advantages offered by a young labour force are not being fully exploited. Will India’s youth overcome this by learning to experiment with entrepreneurship or by developing skills in emerging industries?We are already the second largest reservoir of skilled labour in the world. We produce two million English-speaking graduates, 15,000 law graduates, 9,000 PhDs, and the existing pool of over two million engineering graduates increases by nearly 300,000 a year. These are terrific numbers but quality is yet to triumph over quantity.Most importantly, what sort of society will you, the youth, want to build? The general election last year highlighted the potential of the 200 million strong youngsters between 18 and 35, with many voting for the first time since 1989 when legislation lowered the voting age to 18.What sort of nation will you ensure? Will you retain its hard-won pluralist character? Will our politics go beyond issues like Ayodhya? Will you be able to dream with imagination and do with innovation? Will you be able to lead and not follow blindly?That is the biggest battle of all. Not so much of jobs and education. But the battle of minds. What sort of minds will lead us into the future? What sort of worldview will you have? Will it be a worldview that can encompass the aspirations of the youngsters of Jammu and Kashmir and the hopes of the tribals of Chhatisgarh? Will it reconcile the ambitions of a globalised youth in the have-it-all metropolises and the have-nothing villages?advertisementThis generation has the ability to, as our inaugural speaker Nandan Nilekani has said, embrace risk in a fearful world. But will it?So much has altered. With the collapse of the old order, old business families have vanished, dynamic new entrepreneurs emerged, professionals have become millionaires, managerial salaries are very respectable and every day new industries and services are cropping up. India today is a land of great opportunity. And the world is your oyster.You can be whatever you want to be. From an aeronautical engineer to someone working for an NGO, from a professional video gamer to a politician, from a coffee taster to a glass blower.There is no one formula for success. It’s evident in our speakers today who will tell us about their Mantras of Success. Our inaugural speaker, Nandan Nilekani, is an accidental entrepreneur who is now a technocrat grappling with the question of India’s identity, another, Sourav Ganguly, is a cricketer who crafted a world beating team out of a band of unheralded, small town youngsters; one, Katrina Kaif, is an actor who came from abroad with little Hindi but lots of determination to make it to the top of the game in Bollywood, and yet another, Viswanathan Anand, who is a World Champion in one of the world’s most competitive games.We are all privileged that we will be listening to them today.As for my mantra for success, I believe, there is no substitute for hardwork and hardwork never killed anybody. Plus be passionate about what you do and believe in yourself. And pray that you are in the right place at the right time and, most important, you know it.As someone once said, we cannot always build a future for the youth but we can build the Youth for the Future. For us, the first ever youth summit will be a learning experience, just as our soon-to-be-10-year-old India Today Conclave has been and the two-year-old India Today Woman Summit have been.This is our attempt to train our ears to listen to your voices. Just as we hope you will listen to the array of stars we have gathered here for you today, the best in politics, in business, in sports and in entertainment. They are our leaders today. We hope you will be theirs, and ours, tomorrow.last_img read more

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The Gender Gap: Why Women Negotiate Differently than Men

first_imgRecent news stories have focused on the persistent differential between the salaries paid to men and women for similar work.  Such stories are often accompanied by calls for legislation to remedy the disparities.  While we do not dispute the presence of sexism in corporate and institutional settings, it is important to point out that many women—with some training and encouragement—could do better in negotiating employment agreements.  The wage gap is not just about the careers that women are choosing. It’s about how they are negotiating and that they may be penalized if they do.Right now, graduating college seniors across the country are facing what is likely to be the first important negotiation of their lives – the terms and conditions of their first job. Many will approach this conversation woefully underprepared. The vast majority, either because they are uncomfortable with the notion of negotiating, or unsure of how to proceed, will simply accept the first offer on the table.And especially so for women.Even when men and women had the same majors, there were often gaps in pay, according to a 2012 report, “Graduating to a Pay Gap,” from the American Association of University Women. For example, in the engineering, technology, computer science and social sciences fields, researchers found that women made between 77 percent and 88 percent of what their male colleagues were paid.A colleague recently told us a story that might help illustrate why this happens.  She was an accomplished professional with an MBA from a leading business school.  She was asked by the CEO of a company to make a proposal for a consulting assignment and only had a few hours to respond. So she polled friends on Google Chat to get their advice.  The range of suggested hourly rates was from $150 to $300.  The women were all at the lower end of the range, and the men were at the upper end.Her curiosity was piqued, and so she asked them the basis for their suggestions.  The women were guided by what they thought was “fair.” In contrast, the young men replied, “What’s the most I can ask for and not be perceived as a jerk?”But there is another aspect of the negotiation disparity that women should consider.In a study by Professor Linda Babcock at Carnegie Mellon, men and women asked for raises using identical scripts. People liked the men’s style, but the women were branded as aggressive—unless they gave a smile while they asked, or appeared warm and friendly.What do we do about the facts noted by Professor Babcock? Victoria Budson, executive director of the Women and Public Policy Program at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, notes that if women appear more relational in the discussion, they do better in terms of the results achieved. “They have to signal more relationally than their male counterparts to be heard the same.”Sheila English, an accomplished businesswoman and public administrator, urges women—for the sake of their own comfort in the negotiation—to rely on the same kind of interpersonal skills with which they are most comfortable in the rest of their lives. Rather than trying to enter the negotiation in a “male style”—all business, assertive, and direct from the get-go—spend time working on building a relationship with the hiring representative. In other words, play to your natural inclinations.We have recently been conducting salary negotiation workshops for college students and have proposed that they use Budson’s and English’s advice.  Here’s one recent report from Allison, a graduate student in the health professions from Tufts University School of Medicine:I was worried about negotiating because I’m young and don’t have much experience. I learned that, as a woman, I must go about the negotiation differently. Long story short, I was able to get my employer up $14k!!! Sadly, our world can still be quite sexist. After accepting this sad truth, we can still deal with the hand that we, as women, are dealt. There’s no substitute for being prepared in a job negotiation and for having done your research to know what the market values are for your prospective job.  But for women, there is another step in the negotiation process: Knowing how you may be perceived and taking steps to create a better set-up for the discussion.Farzana Mohamed and Paul Levy are the authors of a new book, How to Negotiate Your First Job.last_img read more

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CEO Spotlight: Leadership Advice from Fidelity’s Abby Johnson

first_imgTo round out National Women’s History Month, we turn the spotlight to Abby Johnson, president and CEO of one of the largest financial services companies in the world: Fidelity Investments.Johnson replaced her father, Edward “Ned” Johnson III, and took over as CEO of Fidelity, which has assets under administration of $5.0 trillion, in 2014. Since then, she has quickly become one of the most highly praised CEOs among Fidelity employees, with an impressive approval rating of 92 percent, on Glassdoor.com. And with employees singing praises of great benefits and work-life balance, it’s not hard to see why.Here are her thoughts and advice on today’s hot leadership topics in the professional world:Unite, Don’t DirectThere’s a fine line between a leader and a manager. For one, a leader inspires employees to follow her lead and pursue her goals. A manager, on the other hand, leads by instruction and directives. This is why Johnson finds one more successful than the other:In my experience, encouraging a team-oriented culture that is focused on uniting employees behind a shared sense of purpose and a common goal is more effective than offering directives. If you and your leadership team are on the same page with this approach, it is much easier to engage employees throughout the firm to meet those collective goals.  Tailor the ExperienceThe first step in achieving gender equality in the workplace is understanding and supporting the fact that men and women work differently. Most importantly, Johnson encourages women to find opportunity in everything:As employers, we need to accept that women and men operate differently in the workplace and set up development and training programs that are designed to target high potential employees in both groups. As women, we need to remind ourselves to have an ‘opt in’ attitude. Career downturns happen to everyone and we must remember to treat them as opportunities to change how we work or try something new. That is what shows our true mettle.Invest in professional developmentWhen it comes to increasing female executive leadership, Johnson reminds employers to create equal and ample opportunities for women to climb the corporate ladder:Companies must invest in their female employees’ leadership and professional development. I’m very proud of the numerous development and mentoring programs that Fidelity has in place to help women excel at our firm and we’re seeing results that are validating this approach.Ending gender pay inequality Unfortunately, gender pay inequality still very much exists. But, as Johnson suggests, there are ways to combat this inequality both inside and outside of the workplace:The issue is complex because there is still no single answer as to why. Fidelity’s interest in this issue goes far beyond our organization; we want to empower women’s financial futures, and that means putting programs, such as our THRIVE seminars, in place to help them understand their finances and investing.Following in your father’s footsteps as the president and CEO of a multinational corporation is no easy feat. But Abby Johnson shows us that through hard work, the right attitude and a great team, it is possible.What are some other pieces of advice for female leaders? Share in the comments below!last_img read more

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7 High-Paying Jobs With Salaries That Increase Every Year

first_img 23 hours ago 23h Source: Glassdoor ResearchBy cross-referencing the list below with data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), you can see which jobs are projected to have an increased number of openings over the next seven years.1. Software EngineerAlthough you can debate the difference between the terms software “engineer” and “developer,” I grouped them together for this post. Essentially, as a software engineer, you’ll create and develop software. This career has a variety of entry paths: self-education, a computer science degree, or a coding boot camp.Median annual pay: $86,391Year-over-year pay growth: 3.7 percentJob growth (2014-2024): 17 percent Senior Software Quality Engineer RenPSG Indianapolis, IN 2.8★ Attorney Loeb Law Firm Mandeville, LA Financial Planning Analyst PCTEL Bloomingdale, IL 3.3★ Available Software Engineer Jobs 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h Physical Therapist Milestones Therapeutic Associates McAllen, TX See more HR Manager jobs See more Software Engineer jobs N/A 5.0★ 3.0★ Physical Therapist Smiling Souls Homecare Fairburn, GA Accountant Pier 77 Marine Galveston, TX 23 hours ago 23h Registered Nurse (RN), Procedure Center, Per Diem CHOC Children’s Orange, CA HR Manager Payroll & Compliance Alvogen Norwich, NY Available Registered Nurse Jobs 3.3★ See more Attorney jobs Available Physical Therapist Jobs 4. AccountantFor the number-crunchers among us, accounting can be a solid career choice.Yet, to become an accountant, you’ll need a bachelor’s degree in accounting. Many budding accountants also go on to earn the title of Certified Public Accountant (CPA).Median pay: $55,747Year-over-year pay growth: 3.7 percentJob growth (2014-2024): 11 percentWhile the final three jobs didn’t make it into the “high growth” quadrant, they already have a high median salary. Although the pay’s not growing significantly, the field is – which means more opportunities are available for job placements for you. 23 hours ago 23h See more Financial Analyst jobs See more Registered Nurse jobs 5.0★ N/A 23 hours ago 23h 3.6★ 3.8★ Physical Therapist Career Tree Network Walla Walla, WA Does being a graphic designer sound creatively fulfilling to you? Do you dream about becoming a teacher?Although your ideal job might play into what you’re passionate about, that’s not the only thing you should consider when it comes to your career. If you ever want to pay off your student loans or buy a house, you’ve got to think about the salary attached to your job.You should also consider the following numbers Glassdoor Economic Research analyzed in a recent study of 60 jobs: median base pay and year-over-year pay growth (side note: they didn’t look good for graphic design or teaching, unfortunately).If you’re not sure about your next career move, the following list of jobs with high pay and steadily increasing salaries can help you decide.20 Jobs That Pay Over $100k With The Least Competition7 Jobs with High Pay and Increasing SalariesThe following chart lists the results of the Glassdoor study. You can easily see which jobs pay well and have growing salaries. 23 hours ago 23h N/A 2.5★ 2. Registered NurseWith an aging U.S. population on the rise, nurses and caretakers are more important than ever. Although many nurses eventually obtain their bachelor’s degree (BSN), you only need an associate’s degree to become a registered nurse (RN).Median annual pay: $65,930Year-over-year pay growth: 4 percentJob growth (2014-2024): 16 percent Accountant Ted W. Newton, CPA, Inc. Chico, CA Available Accountant Jobs 3.4★ 23 hours ago 23hcenter_img Available Financial Analyst Jobs Executive Team Leader Human Resources (Assistant Store Manager HR) Target Falls Church, VA 23 hours ago 23h Attorney John R Riddle Associates, LLC Red Bank, NJ Available Attorney Jobs 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h Senior Financial Analyst American Well Boston, MA 23 hours ago 23h Attorney Thomason Justice, PS Pateros, WA Senior Financial Analyst Planning & Forecasting Verizon Basking Ridge, NJ HR Manager IKEA Atlanta, GA Remember, before choosing a career (or switching to a new one), you should take into account your interests and working style, as well as the pay and growth you can expect.By pursuing a career with a high earning potential, you won’t only be able to eat all the avocado toast you want – you’ll also be able to tackle other financial challenges like student loan debt, mortgage payments, and retirement.This article was originally published on Student Loan Hero. 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h N/A 6. Physical TherapistPhysical therapy is a booming field within the healthcare industry. In fact, the American Physical Therapy Association estimates there could be a shortage of up to 26,560 PTs by 2025, unless attrition rates are very low (in which case there will be a surplus).Physical therapists help rehabilitate people who are injured or sick. Though it’s a rewarding career, keep in mind you’ll need to attend school for three years after receiving your bachelor’s.Median pay: $73,502Year-over-year pay growth: 1.8 percentJob growth (2014-2024): 34 percent N/A Senior Software Engineer LifeOmic Salt Lake City, UT 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h 4.6★ Accountant IMT Insurance West Des Moines, IA See more Physical Therapist jobs Flight Controls Software Engineer My Job Tank Santa Clara, CA 5. Financial AnalystFascinated by everything you read on the Student Loan Hero blog? Then perhaps you should pursue a career in the financial industry.Financial analysts, who need a bachelor’s degree, offer investment advice to both individuals and businesses.Median pay: $62,277Year-over-year pay growth: 1.8 percentJob growth (2014-2024): 12 percent 23 hours ago 23h 7. Human Resources ManagerAlthough you won’t land a managerial position when you’re starting out, if this data trend continues, working towards a position as a human resources manager will probably pay off.Just make sure you’re a people person. In this role, you’d oversee everything to do with a company’s employees.Median pay: $67,854Year-over-year pay growth: 1.4 percentJob growth (2014-2024): 9 percent Registered Nurse Mercy Saint Louis, MO Available HR Manager Jobs N/A 23 hours ago 23h 3.9★ Registered Nurse Kindred Healthcare Kansas City, MO 3.3★ 3.3★ See more Accountant jobs N/A 23 hours ago 23h 3. AttorneyThere are more than one million licensed lawyers in the U.S., according to the American Bar Association. And if you’re in search of a big paycheck, you might want to join them.Of course, you’ll have to go to a three-year law program to become a lawyer – so before committing, check out our list of the most affordable law schools.Median annual pay: $98,594 per yearYear-over-year pay growth: 3.6 percentJob growth (2014-2024): 6 percentlast_img read more

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How to Ace Your Next Interview

first_imgInterviews are one of the hardest parts of the job search process. You’re trying to make a great first impression, you’re meeting with complete strangers, you want to do and say the right things, and at the same time, you are trying to evaluate the company to see if it’s a right fit for you.  All of this can be overwhelming.Glassdoor teamed up with career coach and founder/CEO of WorkItDaily.com, J.T. O’Donnell on an eLearning series designed to prepare you to ace your next job interview. Whether you are a seasoned pro, a career transitioner or a recent grad entering the job market, you will benefit from the advice and insights shared in this series. Using real examples, tried-and-tested methods, plus feedback from candidates who have interviewed at companies like Target, Bain & Company, Facebook and more, we are aiming to make you the most informed candidate interviewing for a job that fits your life.One of the takeaways is that interviewers will ask for anecdotes that demonstrate qualities essential for the job you’re interviewing for, so prepare to provide anecdotes for prompts like these:1. Tell me about an accomplishment you are most proud of.Always talk about an accomplishment that displays skills that are required by the job you are interviewing for.2. Tell me about a time you made a mistake.Choose a mistake from the beginning of your career that led to an important lesson being learned and useful experience being gained.3. Tell me how you handled a difficult situation.Make sure not to cast blame on others for and focus on the solution you provided.4. Give a time when you went above and beyond the requirements for a project.First, define what was required of you and then define how you went beyond these requirements.5. Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss.Blaming or bad-mouthing isn’t the right route to take. Focus on how you worked together with your boss to move past the disagreement and reach an understanding.6. What are some of your leadership experiences?Don’t get caught up in just listing every leadership role you’ve ever had — think about the ones where you truly made a difference. The 45 Questions You Should Ask In Every Job Interviewlast_img read more

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The Best Advice for Women Seeking a Better Salary

first_img 3.4★ ICU Registered Nurse Del Sol Medical Center El Paso, TX 3.5★ Registered Nurse (RN) – Charge Nurse – $7,000 Sign On Bonus EmpRes Healthcare Management Gardnerville, NV Service Advisor Prime Motor Group Saco, ME 23 hours ago 23h RN, Registered Nurse – OP Chemotherapy CHRISTUS Health Houston, TX 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h 3.1★ 4.7★ 23 hours ago 23h 23 hours ago 23h N/A 4.8★ 23 hours ago 23h Paramedic* Mecklenburg EMS Agency – Medic Rochester, NY 23 hours ago 23h 2.3★ 23 hours ago 23h View More Jobs Deli Associate F&M Deli & Restaurant Mount Laurel, NJ 23 hours ago 23h Director, Advanced Technology Policy General Motors United States LCPC – Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor Above and Beyond Family Recovery Center Chicago, IL 2.8★ Registered Nurse Supervisor RN Waterbury Gardens Nursing and Rehab Waterbury, CT Hot New Jobs For You 3.0★ Are you receiving compensation that fully reflects your skills, education, experience and ability? If your earnings and your worth aren’t matching up, there are avenues for addressing the situation without damaging your career. Here’s how to ensure you get the raise you deserve.Crunching the NumbersAlthough the Equal Pay Act was passed more than a half-century ago, women are still struggling to earn as much as men in the workplace. According to Glassdoor research, a U.S. woman is paid an average of 75.9 cents for every dollar a man receives. On top of potentially starting at a lower pay rate, taking time off to start a family, for a career sabbatical, to tend to an aging loved one or for other concerns is a more substantial setback to women than men, with the hiccup resulting in reduced wages for women and a lengthier career gap.Awesome Companies With No Gender Pay Gap Hiring NowMoving Up or Moving On?Sometimes, improving your situation hinges on changing employers. Whether you maxed out your growth in the current company, stumble onto a better opportunity or are simply ready for a change of scenery, moving on is sometimes the best course of action. In that case, you should review your career-oriented paperwork, especially your cover letter. Give it a refresher, bearing in mind it’s the ideal avenue for drawing attention to your accomplishments and abilities. You can use a cover letter template to create a stellar document. Think of it as a chance to tell potential employers all the things you wish they knew so you can land your dream job.Positive Image, Positive ImpactIf your intention is to remain with your current employer, seek opportunities to impress people of influence. For instance, you can go out of your way to master more bells and whistles of the software your company uses. Another idea is to learn to use a free, online logo-making tool and use it to design a top-notch logo. As Entrepreneur explains, oftentimes companies spend big bucks on a well-designed logo, but by designing it yourself, you can help your company be a standout and boost your career at the same time. Along those same lines, look for ways to up the company’s social media engagement. Raising company image is key to staying strong, and your superiors are sure to be impressed. It’s a great way to put yourself and your employer in the limelight.Enhance Your EducationWhen it comes to catching the eye of the powers that be, going above and beyond your employer’s expectations can make a big impact. With that in mind, adding to your education is sometimes just the shot in the arm your career needs. You might elect to take distance learning classes if you never completed your degree, or are ready to add a new level to your education. Another idea is to add a fresh certification to show you’re serious about climbing the ladder, or learn a more advanced skill that benefits your company directly.Top Skills to Include on Your ResumePower of PersuasionPerhaps you reached the conclusion that you’re underpaid in your work and are considering discussing the situation with the appropriate party. Whether you’re in the interview process or revisiting terms with your current employer, Forbes points out that negotiating can be a challenge for women. Preparing can bolster your confidence as well as provide you with more bargaining power. Review your skillset, education and abilities, and be ready to talk not only about what you’re doing and your current pay rate, but also other responsibilities you are ready to embrace. Maybe there are duties someone less qualified could take over so you can reach your full potential to do more advanced work. Think outside the box, and be ready to point out where you are underutilized as well as underpaid or underrated.Knowing your income doesn’t reflect your value is a tough challenge, but with a handful of smart strategies, you can get the raise you deserve. Evaluate whether it’s time for a change, and if so, make it happen. Draw attention to your assets in a sharp manner and the right doors will open. Part-time Day Associate Crew Carwash Indianapolis, IN 23 hours ago 23h 2.5★last_img read more

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Donnarumma shock stalls Juventus move for Arsenal keeper Szczesny

first_imgArsenal goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny has seen his move to Juventus stall.Juventus have put their interest in Szczesny on ice in order to chase Gianluigi Donnarumma, says Gazzetta dello Sport.A £14m deal between Juve and Arsenal for Szczesny was thought to have been in the making.But Juve will now look to sign Donnarumma ahead of the Poland international.Donnarumma has told AC Milan he will not sign a new contract and has a number of Europe’s elite clubs tracking him.last_img

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Tottenham great Clive Allen: Defoe inspirational for Kane

first_imgTottenham great Clive Allen has hailed the training ground work of Harry Kane.Kane won the Golden Boot for the second season running in May after scoring 29 goals in 29 starts, taking his tally to 99 in all competitions for the club.Allen says Jermain Defoe was a great example for a young Kane when the Sunderland striker was at the club.”Jermain was then and remains a great example, he wanted to practice, wanted to score goals, he loved that feeling and Harry bought into that at a very young age,” Allen told the club’s official website.”That’s what drives him – goals, goals, goals. He wants to keep improving and long may that continue. Practice makes perfect and that’s what he strives for.”When Harry came in as a 16-year-old he just wanted to work every day, particularly on his goalscoring and finishing and we worked at it.”We had numerous competitions in those days and by hook or by crook I’d make sure I won, but when he started to beat me I knew he was on his way!”His attitude, work-rate…he deserves everything he’s got and that’s one of the biggest compliments I can pay. He was focused and knew what he wanted and went about getting there with hard work.”last_img read more

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What is good: being relentlessly generous

first_imgWhat is good fundraising and what is bad fundraising? What is the difference between good outreach and bad outreach?I think the difference between good and bad has a lot to do with generosity.If you’re focused on fundraising, you’re probably focused on inspiring generosity in other people. But how generous are you? I’ve found in life, in fundraising and in blogging, the more generous I am, the more successful my efforts. Scrooges in terms of sharing information, credit and or time get little.Be a good fundraiser (and person) by:1. BEING GENEROUS WITH OUR THANKS: Thank people before they give, after they give and every chance you get. All of us have many options for spending the precious time we have in our short lives. If someone chooses to spend a few moments on you – by reading your message or taking your call, not just by giving – you should be honored. Thank people for even bothering to pay attention. Be generous in thanking – and in listening. 2. BEING GENEROUS WITH OUR INFORMATION: If you have really useful information, share it first and ask for support after. You could require money and registration to get valuable information from your organization, but increasingly online users will just go elsewhere if you present that barrier. Give it away and people will give. I truly believe this. Just look at public radio. How many listeners would they have if you had to pay to tune in, like cable TV? We give away loads of free trainings and information here at Network for Good — and wouldn’t you know it, a lot of the people who get things for free decide to become paying customers of our other services.3. BEING GENEROUS WITH GIVING CREDIT: Blog reader Zan of the Pride Foundation’s annual report is called the Gratitude Report. What an amazing display of generosity – instead of grandstanding about how great their organization is, they put the spotlight on their supporters. That is generosity at its finest. Give credit freely and lavishly – it feels good and it all comes back to you, really.last_img read more

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United States Government Policy Trends for Global Public Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 3, 2010November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Late last week our friend and colleague Laurie Garrett, Senior Fellow for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations released this response to a request from Capitol Hill staffers. Laurie and her team have gathered and analyzed a great deal of data showing the causes and consequences of reduced US overseas development assistance for global health.  It’s an incisive portrait of a timely debate, which we believe will have significant impact on maternal and neonatal health challenges. The policies and funding that the Obama administration and the US Congress decide to make amid ongoing uncertainties in the global economy are likely to have a domino effect on ODA worldwide.  Let’s all stay tuned and stay engaged in these conversations.Share this:last_img read more

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Try and Fail, but Don’t Fail to Try

first_imgPosted on February 28, 2011June 20, 2017By: Sara Al-Lamki, Young Champion of Maternal HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This blog post was contributed by Sara Al-Lamki, one of the fifteen Young Champions of Maternal Health chosen by Ashoka and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth. She will be blogging about her experience every month, and you can learn more about her, the other Young Champions, and the program here.January has been a busy month. With my project in full swing, it’s hard to believe just 5 months ago I had packed up my life after an intense Master’s course and barely any time to come up for air, and up and moved to a new country, city, culture. If I hadn’t heard an inspiring talk by Dr. Wendy Graham during the Global Maternal Health Conference in August, before our Young Champions placements, where she ended by telling us to learn to ‘fail better’ after every challenging experience, the whole journey would have seemed impossible.Unfortunately, no one could’ve predicted that my placement with YRS would come at a very complicated time in the organization. With problems and challenges of their own, and ones I was powerless to understand let alone contribute to. Still, the eagerness and kindness of my colleagues meant I was never without work, and they were sure to keep involving me in every aspect of the program, making sure there were lessons learned every step of the way. It took over month for Dr. Sari and I to hash out the best project that would benefit the organization at this time, and also benefit me with my interest in maternal health and antenatal care within a predominantly reproductive health centre. The arrival to this did not come easy. Once we figured that my background in research could greatly serve the clinic, it took another month for me to figure out how to develop an effective questionnaire and to make sure that when translating it, the same aims were clear, and the intended information being extracted. They also had to be thorough enough to be able to draw solid conclusions about the maternal health and pregnancy status of these women, but short enough to get a large number of women willing to participate.It all worked out for the best of, course—as do most failures like winding journeys that end in spectacular beauty. I am well into conducting the interviews, with over half the sample already obtained. The interest it has sparked has been astonishing, with women coming to the clinic volunteering to participate. Through it, my language skills have drastically improved and I have met the most inspiring and courageous women through whom I am learning a side of Indonesian women I wouldn’t otherwise have had the opportunity to see. The word of YRS is also spreading to women who may have not heard of it yet, or have not visited, as my interviewers reach the far and wide expanses of the market during hours that the clinic is not operating and, if nothing else, that is a personal achievement. I am eager to draw conclusions from this study, learn what the patterns are and help incorporate this into YRS’s educational and (possibly) health services.I’m very much learning as I go along and things are far from running smoothly, but the challenges are exciting and manageable, especially now that I am settled into life in Bali and my project is up and running and I’m discovering my stride. Learning from my fellow Young Champions also gives me strength. I could not have found a better group of people to share this experience with, even if it’s virtual, and having an amazing conference call with them recently just reminded me how much potential is in the world, and how worth it the journey is. They have also offered they’re very own personal advice whenever I have needed it, and when I was at a loss in those first weeks, Julianne Parker gave me very productive ideas that made everything more manageable.I can look at my journey with a little perspective, and when similar ‘bumps’ occur, I can fail better.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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UNFPA Launches “State of the World’s Midwifery 2014″ Report Today

first_imgPosted on June 3, 2014November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)From UNFPA press releaseDespite a steady drop in maternal and newborn deaths since 1990, hundreds of thousands of women and newborns continue to die each year during pregnancy and childbirth: an estimated 289,000 women and about 3 million newborn babies died in 2013 alone. The vast majority lost their lives due to complications and illnesses that could have been prevented with proper antenatal care and the presence of a skilled midwife during delivery.The State of the World’s Midwifery (SoWMy) 2014 presents findings on midwifery from 73 low and middle-income countries. The report shows the progress and trends since the inaugural 2011 edition and identifies the barriers and challenges to future progress. It focuses on the urgent need to improve the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of midwifery services.You can also find the executive summary in French and Spanish and a fact sheet in Arabic.Join us in the Twitter conversation by following #SOWMy2014Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Join Webinar 28 April | Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Epidemic Holding Back Progress

first_imgShare this: Posted on April 26, 2017April 26, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)While maternal mortality is declining in many parts of the world, underlying conditions affecting maternal health—such as diabetes in pregnancy—are often under-prioritized. Please tune in on 28 April for the first webinar in a three-part series, Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Epidemic Holding Back Progress, hosted by Women Deliver.The series will present the emerging evidence base, highlight promising programs and equip the maternal and newborn health communities with tools to spark greater action for addressing diabetes in pregnancy.In Part 1: Examining the Evidence, learn about the prevention, screening, treatment and management of diabetes in pregnancy to improve the health of women and newborns.REGISTERDetails28 April 2017 | 9:30am EDTSpeakersDr. Ana LangerDirector, Maternal Health Task Force, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public HealthDr. Gojka RoglicMedical Officer, Diabetes Unit, World Health OrganizationDr. Anil KapurChairman of the Board, World Diabetes FoundationDr. Hema DivakarConsultant Obstetrician and Medical Director at Divakars Hospital, Bengaluru, IndiaModeratorDr. France DonnayResources ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: —Stay tuned for updates on the MHTF-PLOS Collection, “Non-Communicable Diseases and Maternal Health Around the Globe.” Infographic: Diabetes in Pregnancy ➔Infographic: FIGO Initiative on Diabetes in Pregnancy ➔Policy Brief: Improve Maternal and Newborn Health and Nutrition ➔Policy Brief: Ensure Access to Comprehensive Health Services ➔last_img read more

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Apple in talks with BT to expand Apple TV: Report

first_imgLondon, Oct 9 (IANS) Apple is reportedly in touch with British telecom provider BT to expand the reach of its Apple TV.According to a report in The Telegraph on Tuesday, the Cupertino-based iPhone maker is in talks with BT and its mobile offshoot EE to give customers the option to purchase an Apple TV that comes pre-loaded with BT’s pay-TV channel apps.”The telecoms operator would offer the technology to EE broadband customers pre-loaded with apps to deliver BT Sport and channels from other broadcasters,” said the report.Apple already has a similar deal in Switzerland. It has also signed a multi-year agreement with Oprah Winfrey and ordered a pair of children’s shows from the creators of Sesame Street.In 2017, Apple announced that Netflix and Amazon Prime 4K videos would also come to Apple TV.Apple’s TV app now supports live news — a feature announced in September 2017 when company CEO Tim Cook introduced the new Apple TV 4K.–IANSna/inlast_img read more

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Playing to the Magnetic Middle

first_imgPeople are conformists. They do what they think other people are doing. This is the basis of social norms theory and plenty of effective marketing.What does this mean to you if you’re marketing greener behavior?Don’t tell people to save the planet. Show them what their neighbors are doing if you want them to think about their behavior.There’s a great analysis of a study that did just this at NeuroMarketing blog.The study found if people think their neighbors are using less electricity, they lower their usage. If they think they are using more, they may increase their usage.One of the smartest minds on marketing in the world and an expert on social norms theory, Robert Cialdini, calls this phenomenon the magic middle in his new book Yes. If you’re marketing greener behavior, keep this in mind. If you’re marketing anything, keep this in mind. The magnetic middle works for raising money, too.last_img read more

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Guest post: telling stories with moving pictures

first_imgKatya’s commentary: A while back I met Mark Horvath virtually (via this blog and my book, as I recall). Mark, it turns out, was once the person directly responsible for the worldwide distribution of Wheel of Fortune, Jeopardy, Married with Children, 21 Jump Street, plus many other syndicated shows. He also had some rough times and was once homeless. Today, he has drawn on all of his extraordinary background by dedicating his time and energy to filming the stories of homeless people in LA at Invisible People. And, lucky for me, he offers this guest post. Be sure to check out Invisible People when you can. Here’s what Mark has to say about video for nonprofits – and nonprofit marketing. Take it away, Mark. If you want to reach Mark, he’s at Twitter.Telling Stories with Moving Picturesby Mark HorvathThere is no denying the power of moving pictures to tell a story. In fact, you have probably taken in one or more forms of video media already today. Sure, I may be biased, but videos are the most powerful way to transmit emotion. If you can transmit emotion while telling a good story you will no doubt increase response.When I started in commercial television in the early 1990s, I managed logistics for a large syndicator. Although I had also spent time producing music videos and working on a feature film, I really knew nothing about the production end of media. However, this changed pretty quickly when I became the executive producer of a weekly tv show for the Los Angeles Dream Center. As far as religious broadcasts go, this show was very different. Rather than a simple “talking head” the show consisted of three independent “testimony” segments. Not only did this require a great deal of production and editing, but it had to be completed each week by an all-volunteer staff with a budget of zero.The best advice I can give you is what was given to me back then. Someone suggested that I start watching news magazine style shows and take notes. 60 Minutes, 20/20, Dateline, even Behind the Music on VH1. They were the professionals at video storytelling, so the TV set literally became my teacher. I also watched lots of infomercials because they are the very best example of long-form response marketing. Local news gives a good example of how to tell a story fast and how to effectively use b-roll when you don’t have lots of time to edit. Everything you need to know about video production is already right in front of you. And best of all, it’s FREE!That said, I’d like to offer a few tips to help you get more results from short-form media. Long-form is a little different, and since many non-profits are trying to figure out how to produce a video for their webpage or fundraising event we’ll just focus on short-form. Some “pros” who went to school for media may argue with these. But in the last five years, my video productions have broken response records and literally raised millions of dollars for cause campaigns. So without further ado, here are my tips for getting more results from short-form media:Content! Content! Content!: There has always been a battle over content vs. quality. Many old-school shooters just want to make pretty pictures and put the story second. Yes, by all means necessary, work hard to get the very best quality (especially since quality transmits credibility). But remember: the most watched video of our time is Rodney King, which was shot on VHS. Compelling content is by far the most important ingredient of a successful story. Work backwards: What result do you want produced from the video? Do you want people to call, write, stand up, talk, yell, give money – what action do you want taken after they view this video? Figure out what the call to action is and then produce your video backwards knowing the desired end result. Know and target your audience: This should not even have to be started, it’s so obvious. But producing video for a kid is a lot different than producing video for old folks. Like attracts like. If you are trying to reach women, do stories featuring women. ‘Nuff said. Produce for delivery: The graphic treatment on a video that will be seen on a computer directly in front of the viewer is different than a treatment used on for a viewer who is 300 yards away at an outdoor event. Short means short: One of the greatest challenges of producing video is cutting out content. But it’s absolutely necessary, otherwise your finished product ends up too long and boring. Between 3 and 5 minutes is a good rule for both online and live events. Sound bites, not voiceover: Of course, there are times when you just have to add a voiceover. But there will be more emotion in the story if you interview the person and let them tell their own story. This will also save costs. I once heard Larry King say he usually never reads his guest’s book and does not prepare. He simply is interested, which helps him ask the right questions. Here are a few of my Larry King-inspired tips for conducting good interviews: Never give questions in advance: I have found people speak from their heart best the first time. Give them questions in advance you’ll get rehearsed emotionless answers. Be a good listener: You never know what new topic is going to be brought up in an interview. Don’t be afraid to explore. Be flexible. You may even get a better story than your original. Take notes: I don’t write down my questions in advance. As the person speaks I write down things that come to my head that I may want to ask later. Acknowledge and affirm the person: Mirror the emotions you want returned. Never put words in their mouth. Put them in your question: Integrity is extremely important when producing nonprofit videos. I never ask a person to say “something.” But I will paraphrase what I would like them to say in the question I ask. Ask them to repeat your question when answering: I’m not in the video, so if I ask, “How did you get to the shelter?”, and they respond “By bus”, the story is missing. I start off each interview by asking them to repeat my question each time so I’ll get, “I came to the shelter by bus.” Have fun: Be friendly and relaxed. Cameras make people nervous and you may be discussing a touchy subject. Help the interviewee feel comfortable. Location is important only if it has meaning: I would much rather see the emotion on a person’s face then a wide shot revealing some cool location. You can always cut in images (called “b-roll”) to help tell the story. Again, this is not your normal school of thought. Shoot a medium close up and use lots of b-roll. It will save you time, money and will be far more effective! There are times when the location may cause an emotional response for the person being interviewed. If that’s the case, GO THERE! Overshoot – ALWAYS: a good editor/producer will eat b-roll. Always shoot more than what is needed especially if you are on location. Chances are you may never be back, so it is better to have and not need then need and not have. Shoot lots of dumb stuff. Watch Survivor and you’ll often see a lizard crawling up a tree used as an edit point. Be creative. Video tape is cheap, so use it! Have fun: Working at Burger King sucks. You are producing video that might just change the world. Have some fun while doing it. Make it happen: The invisiblepeople.tv concept had been in me for a long time. But I couldn’t make it happen until I figured out how to get the past not having professional video gear and editing equipment. I only had $45, a low-end camera and a laptop. I’m so glad I didn’t allow not having the right gear stop me. Today, MySpace’s Impact Channel is featuring one of the invisiblepeople.tv videos. That is amazing since it is not what the “media industry” would classify as a quality production. It’s just a kid talking about being homeless into a $500 camera. Several thousand people will watch that video today alone simply because I didn’t follow the rules and I made something happen. The last rule, there are no rules! Take a risk, do it different and make something remarkable! Eddie from invisible people on Vimeo.last_img read more

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Diversify Your Fundraising Channels to Build a Financially Healthy Organization

first_imgDownload the free MP3 audio and text transcripts below!Knowing where the money comes from to run your nonprofit is almost as important as understanding how these sources affect the sustainability of your organization. Do you have a firm grasp on your fundraising channels? Would you like to build on this revenue, even during tough economic times?In this presentation, Cindy Adams of GrantStation shares:How and why to assess your existing revenue streamsWays to boost your bottom line by building on what you already haveBest practices to developing a funding planWhere to find a few quick and practical assessment tools to ground your workAbout our speakerCynthia Adams has been a fundraiser for over 35 years. Working directly for nonprofits and as a fundraising consultant, Cindy specializes in building bridges between funders and grantseekers. She strongly believes that successful grantseeking requires a thorough understanding of the funders and sound knowledge of the playing field. Her life’s work has been to level that playing field, creating an opportunity for all nonprofit organizations to access the wealth of grant opportunities across the United States. GrantStation was conceived from this basic philosophy.last_img read more

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Mama: Together for Safe Births in Crises

first_imgPosted on April 21, 2011November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The following post is contributed by the Women’s Refugee Commission (WRC) who launched the Mama project. To read a blog post by Marketing for International Development (M4ID), who worked with the WRC to design the platform, click here. This post was originally posted on the WRC blog and is posted here with permission. One thousand women and girls die every day from pregnancy-related causes—that’s about one every 90 seconds. And the overwhelming majority of the countries with the highest rates of maternal mortality are conflict-affected. Yet, the numerous campaigns and programs working to reduce our staggering global maternal mortality numbers don’t reach the health care providers working in these dangerous and isolated areas. Working in a relative vacuum with little peer interaction, doctors, nurses, midwives and other health care workers in crisis-affected settings face tremendous challenges without the peer support, information, skills-building opportunities and training that they desperately need.Mama: Together for Safe Births in Crises, a new initiative designed by the Women’s Refugee Commission and social media and development company M4ID, will be launched April 21. Mama is designed to improve maternal health care and reduce maternal death and disability in crisis-affected settings specifically by using social networking to open up new channels of communication—to connect frontline providers in disparate areas to one another and to give them access to training and advice from experts.Though in remote locations, these health care providers told the Women’s Refugee Commission that they use SMS text messaging as their main means of communication and use Facebook fairly regularly. The Mama initiative connects the two in a way never before attempted—for example, allowing texts from a member of the Mama community to stream directly to a Facebook page and for responses posted on the Facebook page that receive at least three “thumbs up” to be streamed back to the person who sent the original query. The campaign also includes Mama Mentors, technical experts who visit the virtual community on a monthly basis to share their medical expertise, professional development advice and words of encouragement. Once a member of the Mama community, a health care provider is no longer alone—he or she will receive peer support and guidance in the most convenient manner possible. At the same time, we’re keeping the threshold for their participation low to encourage use and maximize the benefits to the community.The Women’s Refugee Commission feels strongly that it’s time to go beyond policy to focus on finding ways for maternal health care professionals on the ground to work to improve their skills. Social networking and technology provide vast unexplored ways in which to do just that and we’re excited to take this groundbreaking first step.Check out the campaign!Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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