Officials launch page to file social distancing complaints about businesses

first_imgWith businesses reopening across Florida and social distance measures still in place, many are wondering how they can report businesses not enforcing executive orders to their customers.Officials have added a page on the My Florida license website where consumers can do just that.The website features a list of executive orders and a breakdown on what each one allows or prohibits.Users are encouraged to read through the orders before filing a complaint and explanation of that complaint.The website asks you to leave your name and email, however, you can always remain anonymous.Click here to visit the website MyFloridalicense.com.last_img read more

Proposed Colombia dam threatens to wipe out endangered plants, disrupt river

first_imgA proposed $800 million dam in northwestern Colombia would provide 352 megawatts of electricity annually.The dam is sited in the Samaná Norte River, which scientists are just starting to survey after being barred due to conflict. A recently discovered, critically endangered species of palm, Aiphanes argos, is highly threatened by the dam. Its discoverer says that flooding caused by dam construction could put the palm at high risk of extinction.Other critics say the dam may also displace local communities and reduce populations of a fish species important to the local economy. A dam expert says reduced water flow from damming the Samaná Norte could release more methane into the atmosphere.A representative from the company charged with construction of the dam says precautions will be taken to mitigate environmental damage. PUERTO GARZA, Colombia – A Colombian conglomerate is moving ahead to build a nearly 400-foot-tall hydroelectric dam along the Samaná Norte River in northwestern Colombia, which threatens to extinguish critically endangered plant species found only in the canyon, and block the path of migrating fish.Shrouded in violent conflict between guerrilla, paramilitaries and the state that displaced local farmers from their land for decades, the Samaná Norte River had been protected from development up until ten years ago, when the violence began to subside.Local ecologists, taking advantage of recent peace in the area, are now exploring the canyon in in search of any rare, native species that may be hidden beside the emerald green waters and within the tropical forests hanging off the canyon’s steep walls.The Samaná Norte River. Photo by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.The $800 million dam would provide 352 megawatts of electricity each year, representing 3 percent of Colombia’s annual electricity use.While the environmental license for hydroelectric project Porvenir II has already been approved by the National Authority of Environmental Licenses (ANLA) and construction is expected to begin at the end of this year, environmental and social leaders continue to fight the dam project, which they say will cause irreparable environmental and social harm.The opponents say endangered plant species that are endemic to this peculiar canyon ecosystem along the Samaná Norte River, situated between Medellin and Bogota, may disappear forever if the dam is built as planned.Endangered palmExpert local botanist Rodrigo Bernal, who is renowned for his work studying palms, has explored Rio Samaná Norte several times, accessing the area from the river to collect plant specimens along the river’s shores.According to Bernal, the Samana Norte River canyon is home to a one-of-a-kind ecosystem that provides habitat for various endemic species.“The canyon is very deep with very steep sides that has favored the development of a exclusive flora,” Bernal said. “It’s difficult for a seed to leave this canyon and start growing anywhere else.”Furthermore, Bernal explained that the canyon is composed of marble with calcium carbonate deposits that dissolves in water, forming a karst environment along the rocky shores full of caves, pools and distinctive-looking cracks.Bernal’s focus is on finding new rheophyte species, which are specialized plants adapted to growing along rocky shores and in rock cracks near fast-moving bodies of water.These plants evolved “to resist the pounding water, holding onto the smallest cracks with their wide roots systems,” Bernal said. “To survive, their leaves are narrow and hydrodynamic.”Last year, Bernal and his team discovered a new endangered species of rheophytic palm, which has only been found in the canyon. The team officially named the new palm Aiphanes argos after the investor group that will ultimately profit from the dam Porvenir II.Fruit and leaves of the endangered A. argos palm. Photo by Saul Hoyos.Aiphanes argos is one of the few rheophytic members of the palm family, and is endemic to a small area in the Samaná Norte River. Bernal said that the A. argos is included on the IUCN Red List as a Critically Endangered species because its population is highly threatened by the damming of the river for the hydroelectric plant. According to A. argos’ IUCN assessment, which Bernal coauthored, the planned dam “puts this species at extreme risk of extinction within a very short period of time.”Mauricio Meza Porvenir II project leader at Celsia, who will be building the dam project, told Mongabay that the company is “obligated to relocate” A. argos and any other endangered plant species found in the canyon.Meza also contends that A. argos is found elsewhere, which he said was “great news…we will be able to relocate them to other areas nearby.”However, Bernal said that of the estimated 600 A. argos individuals identified along the river and surrounding tributaries, 80 to 85 percent would be submerged in the event that the dam is built. That would mean that potentially fewer than 100 A. argos palms would be left in their native habitat following the flooding of the canyon.“If the majority of the plant’s population is destroyed, the species’ survival becomes extremely difficult,” Bernal said. “Any little change or disease would have the potential to extinguish the [Aiphanes argos palm] forever.”Flower of the C. fluviatilis another rheophyte first discovered on the Norte Samana in 2009. Photo by Saul Hoyos.This past month, Bernal returned to the Semaná River, to conduct a more comprehensive survey of rheophytic species.The expedition team, which is called Extreme Botany due to the adrenaline-pumping way it conducts surveys via river rafts, collected 40 different rheophytic specimens. The researchers said they expect 9 or 10 to be new species — although they are still waiting for confirmation from experts in the different plant groups.Bernal explains that these rheophytic species are adapted to grow in “extreme situations” of the Samana Norte River, such as heavy flash flooding, and that reproducing them at different altitudes and in new habitat conditions would not be an easy task.“If the canyon is flooded, there is little guarantee that [the rheophytes] could survive in another ecosystem,” Bernal said. ‘What we do know, however, is that these plants will be the first to drown when the dam is built.”Changing an ecosystem and a way of lifeIn addition to concerns for the endangered plants, critics say the dam would bring significant changes to the ways of life of the many people who live around it.Communities along the shores depend on fishing in the Norte Samana. While there are many species such as catfish and freshwater herring, the bocachico is one of the most prized catches for locals.The bocachico (Prochilodus magdalenae) is endemic to Colombia. Each year they migrate upstream from the Magdalena lowland swamps to fast moving tributary waters high in the Andes Mountains.Many families in the village of Puerto Garza depend on the bocachico. In January, residents celebrate this intrepid fish and its contribution to the local ecosystem and economy with the Fiesta del Bocachico.Bocachico (Prochilodus magdalenae). Photo by Zuluaga-Gómez A. via Wikimedia Commons (CC 2.0).Alfonso Giraldo, a member of the Puerto Garza community who gave a television interview to Teleantioquia, said that the Puerto Garza residents are afraid that the large dam Porvenir II would stop the bocachico from migrating upstream and deprive them of an invaluable means of sustenance.“The fear is that with the dam and the reservoir, the fish will disappear,” Giraldo said. “For many people here, we see it as bad, something irreversible.”Celsia’s Meza said that as part of the environmental license they were granted, the company must monitor the river for wildlife passing through for the first year of construction. Once the dam is built, the company would stock the river above the dam.Dams: clean renewable electricity?Celsia argues that Colombia needs to build Porvenir II in order to meet the country’s growing demand for electricity, which the U.S. Department of Commerce projects will continue to rise at a 4.3 percent annual growth rate over the next 12 years.According to U.S. Department of Commerce, large hydroelectric accounts for 66 percent of Colombia’s electricity generation, while gas and coal plants make up another 29 percent. The remaining 4-5 percent is comprised of small hydro and biomass plants.Meza said that the dam offers an “efficient way to take advantage of natural geography,” and that Colombia’s other forms of electricity generation such as coal and gas “could be more contaminating.”Proposed site of the 400-foot Porvenir II dam on the Norte Samana River. Photo by Taran Volckhausen for MongabayLimnologist and biogeochemist researcher at University of Quebec at Montreal Tonya DelSontro studies the dynamics of the methane in freshwater. DelSontro explained that while it’s true hydroelectric plants are more efficient than coal or gas, they “can’t be placed with wind or solar” as a fully climate-friendly source of electricity generation.DelSontro explained that when a large dam is built and the river is widened into a reservoir, the flow of sediments and carbon downstream is stopped, creating “methane bubbling hotspots.”Methane is a highly potent form of greenhouse gas, which causes the climate to heat up at a much faster rate than its better-known climate change accomplice, carbon dioxide. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, methane will be 86 times more efficient than CO2 at trapping heat over the next 20 years.While all bodies of water leave a limited amount of methane in the atmosphere, DelSontro said “there is a particular fear that large dams in the tropics will be big emitters of methane.”Colombia may already be experiencing the effects of climate change. Earlier this year when torrential rainfall killed at least 328 people and wiped out entire neighborhoods in the southern city of Mocoa, Environment Minister Luis Gilberto Murillo told Reuters that the country “is very vulnerable to phenomena of extreme climate variability and climate change.”The family of San Luis municipality councilman Arnulfo Berrio has lived near the Samana river for at least two generations, with both his father and grandfather supporting the family with fish catch from the river.Berrio said that Porvenir II was not worth the cost of damaging the river and its surrounding ecosystem when there is so much potential for solar or wind generation in other parts of the country. Berrio is also concerned about displacement of families that lived in near the dam site and are just now returning to their land after fleeing civil conflict in the 1980s and 1990s.Instead of a dam, Berrio would like to see the country take a more community-friendly approach by helping to develop ecotourism along the banks of the “beautiful natural jewel” found within the Norte Samana river canyon.“[Celsia] says this project won’t displace people from the their land, but it will,” Berrio said. “The hydroelectric dam isn’t development for the community I represent, but rather a degradation of our natural resources.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Morgan Erickson-Daviscenter_img Climate Change, Dams, Energy, Environment, Fish, Forests, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indigenous Communities, Methane, New Species, Plants, Rainforests, Renewable Energy, Research, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife last_img read more

A reflection on COP23: Incremental progress but no industrialized country’s top priority (commentary)

first_imgCOP23 was not without incremental accomplishments. There were many, most boldly a coalition of US cities, states, and businesses pledging to do for climate mitigation what the Trump administration won’t.But where was the incitement to reduce carbon emissions beyond the modest Paris pledges, an absolute necessity if we are to contain temperature rise to 1.5 degree C by 2100, the Paris goal? Where are the billions in promised funding to help the victims of climate impacts adapt and recover their losses and damages?If I’ve learned anything from covering four consecutive climate summits, it’s that Paris was something of an anomaly. Most COPs, like COP23, produce progress around the edges of climate mitigation and promises to talk again next year. Always next year.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. I remember well the vibrancy that December evening in 2015 when word spread on the last day of the 21st UN climate summit that there would be an agreement — the Paris Agreement.After two decades of staring at a known and worsening global crisis of epic proportions, leaders of 196 nations, pushed mercilessly by UN, French, and US negotiators, finally decided to not allow the earth to burn up by 2100. The Eiffel Tower glowed with triumphant messages against a starry Paris sky.For the first time, nations voluntarily agreed to reduce their carbon emissions and slow the rate of deforestation. That moment in Paris felt historic, hopeful, perhaps the most significant agreement among world leaders for the greater good of this earth since World War II.Just two years later, as I stayed late on the last night of the 23rd UN climate summit in Bonn, Germany, I felt no such vibrancy and certainly no such history-making optimism. There was little. COP23 wasn’t designed for major breakthroughs. Everyone conceded that.But why not?COP23, while held in Bonn, Germany, was hosted for the first time by a Pacific island nation, Fiji. Developing and vulnerable nations wanted the logo to be true. The response they received? Maybe next year. Photo by Justin Catanoso.Bad and getting worseOnce again, 2017 promises to be another of the hottest years in the historical record. After three years of stable global greenhouse gas emissions, 2017 will see a spike in emissions to record highs.How many hurricanes the ferocity of Harvey, Irma, and Maria must be experienced in the US alone to stoke a greater sense of urgency? How many climate refugees need to be pushed from sub-Saharan Africa and Syria because of unrelenting drought? How much more Arctic ice needs to melt? How much sea-level rise can be tolerated in low-lying island nations — and Miami Beach, for goodness sake — before COP participants stop delaying greater ambitions prior to 2020, when a stronger Paris Agreement is to take effect?Despite Trump’s climate denial, the U.S. military labels the destabilizing impact of global climate change as the most serious national security threat facing the nation. Not immigration. Not terrorism. Not economic calamity. Climate change.So where’s the incitement, now, to reduce carbon emissions beyond the modest Paris pledges, an absolute necessity if we are to contain temperature rise to 1.5 degree C by 2100, the Paris goal? Where are the billions in promised funding to help the victims of climate impacts adapt and recover their losses and damages?Nowhere yet in sight.COP23 was not without incremental accomplishments. There were many, most boldly a coalition of US cities, states, and businesses pledging to do for climate mitigation what the Trump administration won’t. Would a Hillary Clinton administration have done more? Hard to say. Trump’s low-level State Department staffers pressed the common US goal of greater transparency and accountability in reporting climate action. Mostly, they provided cover for other developed nations to block progress on defining pathways to billions in financing adaptation and loss-and-damage funds.Under Obama, the wealthiest nation on earth committed just $3 billion to global climate-related funds and paid only $1 billion before Trump’s election. Last month, the U.S. House approved $36.5 billion in recovery funds to Florida and Texas alone, far less than half of what’s needed. So it’s not likely that Clinton negotiators would have been more forthcoming on finance in Bonn.The world gathers again next December for COP24 in Katowice, Poland. Hard deadlines for the Paris rulebook, increased carbon-reduction pledges and clearer paths to adaptation and loss-and-damage financing are expected. Photo by Justin Catanoso.No one’s top priorityIt doesn’t help that the de facto leader of the free world, German Prime Minister Angela Merkel, can’t form the coalition government she needs to lead her country and the EU. She told delegates at COP23 that Germany — despite its massive investment in wind energy — would not phase out coal by 2030 as promised, nor would it meet its carbon-reduction goals in the Paris agreement.Meanwhile, China is building more solar panels than the rest of the world combined. But it is paying billions in Brazil and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to level carbon-sequestering rainforests for ranching and natural-resource extraction to help feed its population and manufacture the world’s products.Nineteen nations agreed to phase out coal by 2030, including Canada and the UK. But most were already close to doing so, and besides, they represent just three percent of the global coal burned for energy. Meanwhile, 1,600 coal-fired plants are planned or under construction in 62 countries.When I interviewed Anote Tong, the former president of Kiribati, a Pacific island country threatened by sea-level rise, his comment, “How can I tell my grandchildren that they may not have a country in 25 years,” nearly brought me to tears. Tong is at the mercy of G-20 leaders. He pleaded with them to act morally and humanely, not just geopolitically. Is that even possible?If I’ve learned anything from covering four consecutive climate summits, it’s that Paris was something of an anomaly. Most COPs, like COP23, produce progress around the edges of climate mitigation and promises to talk again next year. Always next year.Nearly everyone in Bonn believes that climate change represents an existential threat to human life on earth. But it’s clear that, for political reasons both complex and expedient, taking broad, immediate climate action is not a top priority for any of the world’s largest polluters — China, the US, India, the EU, Japan, Canada, Australia. Not even close.Until it is, another year passes as nature responds ever-more furiously to the lack of progress.Maybe next year, at COP24 in Poland, things will be different. Expectations are certainly different. The rulebook to govern the Paris Agreement must be completed. Nations must report how much more they will reduce carbon emissions. Billions in finance are expected to materialize or at least be identified.Scientists say the window for climate action to curb global warming is still open. Let’s hope so. We are rapidly running out of next years.COP23 flags flying in a stiff breeze on the last day of the 23rd UN Climate Summit in Bon, Germany. Incremental progress was made by the 196 nations in attendance at the two-week conference, which was defined by a decided lack of urgency for bolder action by industrialized countries. Photo by Justin Catanoso.Justin Catanoso is a regular contributor to Mongabay and a professor of journalism at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, USA. Follow him on twitter @jcatanoso. Adaptation To Climate Change, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Greenhouse Gas Emissions Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Roud Léiwen : Leo Barreiro dans le grand monde

first_img Partager Devant l’étonnement ravi de la presse, le sélectionneur avait expliqué en riant qu’il prenait les joueurs dont il était sûr qu’ils ne se laisseraient pas décontenancer par les questions. Alors forcément, voir Leandro Barreiro relevait de l’apparition divine. Éliminatoires de l’Euro-2020, Groupe B. Ukraine – Luxembourg. Ce lundi, 20h45 Mais quelle mouche a bien pu piquer Luc Holtz ? Lui qui se plaisait à naviguer dans des eaux calmes depuis deux bonnes années en n’invitant dans ses conférences de presse d’avant-match que les grognards les plus aguerris à ce genre de missions (Philipps, Jans, Mutsch…) avait déjà surpris son monde en Lituanie, vendredi, en convoquant Olivier Thill. Excellent en première période à Vilnius contre la Lituanie, étouffé en seconde avec tout le reste de l’équipe, il a même semblé avouer que son match en Bundesliga l’avait fait plus « souffrir » que ceux disputés avec la sélection : « Oui, c’est encore autre chose. Mais je finis quand même cuit ». Le Grand-Duché peut-il piéger l’Ukraine ? Après une tirade de trente secondes du sélectionneur sur le sujet, « Leo » s’est contenté de sourire : « Le coach a tout dit !». Comment va l’équipe ? Là encore, service minimum impeccable (du genre qui plaît à un staff) dans un allemand parfait à l’attention des médias ukrainiens : « L’esprit est bon, on se sent tous bien ». Il dribble aussi bien les journalistes qu’il surgit dans les pieds de ses adversaires. Reste qu’au fil de performances oscillant depuis ses débuts (à Malte, en mars 2018) entre l’encourageant et le prometteur en passant par le “peut mieux faire” (à son âge, logique), l’ancien Erpeldangeois commence déjà à être attendu au tournant. Hormis l’Autriche et le Sénégal, il n’a pour l’heure affronté que des nations de seconde zone du continent et dans des ambiances raisonnablement feutrées. Ce lundi, à la Lviv Arena, il va devoir gérer un entrejeu qui a impressionné contre la Serbie et aussi plus de 30 000 spectateurs. Il a déjà connu avec Mayence, une fois, contre Leverkusen en Bundesliga, avait eu du mal et vu son club s’incliner 1-5. Mais c’était déjà il y a une éternité à l’échelle de son âge : il y a cinq mois. Et il grandit vite, visiblement. Le petit milieu récupérateur, 19 ans et déjà 10 sélections au compteur, va avoir droit à son premier grand baptême du feu dans la Lviv Arena. Dimanche, c’était aussi son dépucelage en conférence de presse. A Lviv, Julien Mollereau Oui sauf que voilà, cet épatant garçon à l’abattage débordant sur la pelouse est d’une intelligence et d’une froideur diaboliques derrière un micro. Sur ce point, Holtz non plus ne s’est pas trompé : c’est une tombe. Pas le genre à vous lâcher une peau de banane avant un match de cette importance. “On se sent tous bien” De l’extérieur, on ne dirait pas. Sa vivacité, sa facilité évidente à couvrir du terrain et à multiplier les courses suscitent de la gourmandise. Le voir lancé dans ce genre de partie face à Malinovskiy et ses petits copains sera presque aussi excitant que le voir gérer sa communication avec les facilités d’un pro. C’est dire.last_img read more

[Europa League] Les matchs à domicile de Dudelange dès 75 euros

first_imgLe club du F91 de Dudelange annonce ce mercredi les prix des packs “matchs à domicile” qui vont être mis en vente pour les trois rencontres d’Europa League, comptant pour les qualifications.Les prix des packs s’étalent entre 75 euros (tribune populaire) et 150 euros (tribune couverte). Deux packs à 100 euros (tribunes côté et face) sont également disponibles. Nous rappelons les trois affiches :• F91 Diddeleng – Qarabag FK, le 3 octobre à 21h au Stade Josy Barthel• F91 Diddeleng – Sevilla F.C., le 7 novembre à 18h55 au Stade Josy Barthel• F91 Diddeleng – APOEL F.C., le 28 novembre à 21h00 au Stade Josy Barthel Partager Pas sûr d’avoir des tickets individuels…Rappelons que le FC Séville est l’équipe d’Europa League la plus titrée (cinq titres). La direction du club précise que des billets individuels seront vendus le soir même en guichet uniquement si les packs ne sont pas tous écoulés. Et comme le FC Séville va attirer les amateurs de foot, rien ne dit qu’il restera des places à vendre en individuelle pour les trois matchs à domicile.Concernant les rencontres à l’extérieur : le F91 proposera comme l’an dernier des packs “voyage + match”. Mais aucun tarif n’a été communiqué pour le moment.La prévente des abonnements aura lieu au bureau du F91 Dudelange, 23 place de l’Hôtel de Ville ; L-3950 Dudelange, le samedi 14 septembre entre 9h et 12 heures. Les supporters détenteurs d’une Golden Card se verront ouvrir les portes dès le vendredi 13 octobre !LQlast_img read more

Benzema : l’enquête sur la sextape est validée

first_imgLa Cour de cassation a rejeté lundi le pourvoi du footballeur Karim Benzema, qui contestait la loyauté de l’enquête dans l’affaire du chantage à la sextape de Mathieu Valbuena en 2015.La Cour a estimé que les méthodes d’enquête employées dans ce dossier étaient conformes, ouvrant la voie à un éventuel procès en correctionnelle pour l’attaquant du Real Madrid et cinq autres personnes mises en examen.Pour mémoire, l’affaire est la suivante : le joueur Mathieu Valbuena aurait fait l’objet d’un chantage financier, autour de la preuve de l’existence d’une vidéo érotique compromettante le concernant. Les maîtres chanteurs auraient des liens avec Karim Benzema, qui aurait pu jouer un rôle à déterminer dans les mises en contact. Partager AFP / LQlast_img read more

Dey Governor Seeks Collaboration with LNP

first_imgDey Governor Joseph Jakey Brown has told Police Director Chris Massaquoi that his office wants collaboration with the Liberia National Police (LNP) in handling traditional cases to give police the chance to concentrate on other cases that are criminal in nature.In a letter dated February 19, addressed to Director Massaquoi, Governor Brown reminded him that his office wants to work with the LNP to manage people of the Deygbo-Gbaweah Chiefdom in Lower Montserrado County.Traditional cases involve domestic issues such as conflicts in marriages, family relationships, children and women’s issues, lack of cooperation in joint ventures like brushing land and cases where a farmer causes fire to affect other farms and sensitive issues that need the collaboration of elders, who have influence to deal with them in their respective communities.Governor Brown said it does not mean working outside the laws of the land, but to ensure that issues that can be resolved by his office’s intervention are handled with the support of the LNP.“Our priority is to reduce the case load on the LNP file,” Governor Brown said, adding, “We are concerned with other issues in our community, and we are sincerely hopeful that working with the LNP will provide us a chance to be able to encourage our people to recognize that our office works in their interest.”He noted that the LNP Zone 6 Depot in Brewerville, outside Monrovia has worked to reduce the crime rate in surrounding communities and his office has recognized that. “As a resident of Brewerville, it is about time we, the Dey citizens honor one of your police officers for his outstanding leadership role in managing his officers to contribute to the reduction of crime in our community,” Governor Brown stated.“As a Dey Governor, representing my kinsmen,” Governor Brown wrote, “it would be ungrateful not to recognize the incredible work of Police Chief Superintendent Blama B. Yancy.” Officer Yancy is the general commander of Zone 6 Depot.Meanwhile, Governor Brown has completed offices for local representation in Deygbo-Gbaweah Chiefdom of Montserrado County. Areas with local offices are Zorquelewen (Bomi County), Kpekor, Kpor, Weafua and Cheesemanburg (all in Montserrado County).He said each of the local offices is staffed with volunteers and each has six messengers, one chairlady, and one development chairperson.He told the Daily Observer in an interview yesterday that he is encouraging the spirit of volunteerism among his Dey people so that each can work to support the other.Brown was confirmed governor in January this year by the chiefs, elders and citizens of Deygbo/Gbaweah Chiefdom, under Paramount Chief Memeh Dukuly, following the death of former Governor Blama Gaye.Fifty individuals filed a petition that was granted by Paramount Chief Dukuly. They included 29 elders, three town chiefs, four clan chiefs and two youth group representatives.Governor Brown served for five years as director of Cyber Crimes at the Ministry of National Security without a salary. He also served with U.S. forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom, and was honored by the White House for heroic combat duties.He holds a Master’s Degree in Public Administration and a BSc in Political Science from the Strayer University in Washington, DC, USA.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Horse cart operator jailed for stealing motorcycle

first_img…remanded on armed robbery chargesTwenty-year-old Ken Dass on Friday admitted to stealing a motorcycle valued at almost $200,000 when he appeared before Magistrate Sherdel Isaacs-Marcus at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts.The horse cart vendor was slapped with three charges involving two counts of armed robberies and simple larceny. The first charge stated that on June 27, 2019 at Lombard Street, Georgetown, while in the company of another and being armed with a cutlass, he robbed Tracy Greaves of a cellphone worth $18,000.Furthermore, on the said date and location, he robbed Tandy Whitaker of a cellphone, handbag, cash and documents all at a total cost of $104, 500.Dass pleaded not guilty to both charges; however, he admitted that between July 1 and 2, 2019 at Charlestown, Georgetown, he stole one motorcycle, CJ 8934 valued at $180,000, property of Andre Haywood.Prosecutor Adduni Inniss told the Court that the defendant stole the motorcycle from a Primary School’s compound where it was being kept. Dass was later seen riding the stolen bike and was subsequently arrested and charged for the offence.As such, Magistrate Isaacs-Marcus remanded Dass to prison until August 2, 2019 for both armed robbery charges, while she sentenced him to one year imprisonment for the simple larceny.last_img read more

Soldier battles for life following WCB accident

first_imgA Private attached to the Guyana Defence Force is battling for his life at the Georgetown Public Hospital after he was struck down by a motorcyclist during a Joint Services operation at Bath Settlement, West Coast Berbice on Monday evening. As a result of the collision, the motorcyclist also received injured and was admitted a patient at the Fort Wellington Hospital.The injured soldier is Brian Samuels, 22, of Low Land, Hope, East Coast Demerara while the motorcyclist was identified as 65-year-old Ramraj of 5th Street, Alberttown, Georgetown.Reports are ranks of the Joint Services, including the now critical officer, were conducting a road block exercise under “Operation Clean Sweep”, during which the cyclist reportedly breached the cordon and collided with Samuels.As a result of the collision, both men fell to the roadway and sustained injuries.They were picked up and taken to the Fort Wellington Hospital but due to the condition of Samuels, he was transferred to the Georgetown Public Hospital where he is said to be in a critical condition. Police are continuing their investigations into the accident.last_img read more